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The New Orleans bulletin. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1874-1876, February 16, 1876, Image 4

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NEW ORLEANS BULLETIN
* Office No. 109 Ora vier Street.
' PAGE M. BAKEB.
IDITOB AND PBOPBIETOB.
ÂS8EST DAILY CfRCVLATlOH
IN NEW ORLEANS.
SEW ORLEANS, FEBBÜABY 16, 1876.
HIU-Om Dollar per month, or TwoIto Dollar«
per Tear.
mbseriptlos» for the DULY BULLETIN received
at «wr eoanter, 109 Gravier street.
Ike BULLETIN innert» WANTS and TO BENTS,
■et exceeding One Square, Ihr Filly Cent» each.
IOTICE—No Order« taken on the Ballette Offlee
sales« tedoried hy the PBOPBIETOB.
Xlw New Orleana Buluttin can be had ef the
BBW9 agent in Mobile, at the depot, on the
antral of the 2 P. M. train.
/a Pbuttino. —We now poen a ae facilities to
MfM. ns to execute ereij description of
•oamercial, railroad and steamboat printing,
lawyers' briefs, blanks and other legal docu
ments, on the shortest notice, in the best
«*1«, and at the most reasonable rates. We
Will guarantee fall satisfaction to those of onr
Mends who favor ns with their orders.
Supplement. —With our regular Sunday
edition will hereafter be issued a supplement,
which will enable ns to lay before onr readers
greater amount and diversity of reading^
List op Lettubs. —The Bulletin will pub
Bsh hereafter the List of Letters in tbs Sun
*y edition.
" What is the interior of Afrioa principally
used for ?" asked a teacher of a pupiL "For
pnrposes of exploration," was the reply.
Mr. Darwin tells a story, as an example of
the reasoning powers of a monkey that was
seratohed by a pet kitten. At first Jocko
was immensely amazed. B Movering from his
surprise, he set at work to disoover the loca
tion of the claws. After a severe tussle he
got the four feet of the kitten within his
«latches, saw the nails throat from their
gnards, and with the broadest grin of satisfac
tion he proceeded deliberately to bite the
points off of eaoh one.
That ever popular and paissant Prince,
Mourn*, has advised ns by means of a very
neat and elegant card that he and his loyal
Sir Knights will entertain tneir friends at the
Opera House on the evening of February 24,
1876. Of all the potentates in the Roalm of
Joy, none are more beloved than Mom us; his
Knights are all gallant and brave, and form in
procession a oortege conspicuous for its
splendor and evident nobility. We desire to
express onr sincere thanks to his Highness
for the mark of his Ja vor bestowed upon ns,
and to ossäre him that we will be present at
his reoeption, prepared to do him honor.
His Imperial Majesty, R-.x, King of the
Carnival, has, in his royal kindness, deigned
to graciously command onr presence at Expo
sition Palaoe, on Mardi Oras evening, Tues
day, February 29. The royal behest comes to
ns in the shape of an elegantly engraved in
vitation with accompanying oards of admis
sion, bearing the impression of the royal
signet end signed by that faithful servant of
His Majesty, Bathurst, Lird High Chamber
lain. The evening will be given np to
dancing and merry-making, and we are
assured that His Majesty will grsoe the occa
sion by his royal presence, receiving in per
son his snbjects leal and true. We shall obey
with feelings of gratitude, the royal command,
and hasten to do honor to a king we all so
faithfully love, and to whom we yield a wil
ling and prond allegianoe. Long live the
King.
ia
for
to
cal
A Wise Discbimination.— A very worthy
citizen, whose appreciation of the Indiorons
is largely developed, hasaceumnlated a multi
tude of anecdotes illustrative of the bulls and
witticisms of his brother natives of the
Emerald Isle, with which he delights those
enjoying the privilege of being inoluded in
his eirole of friends. That this collection
most be a rioh one, onr readers will doubtless
admit after perusing the following specimen
thereof: A member of the bar being asked
the prioe of his fluids, responded, "fifteen
cents." "It should be very good, then," said
the customer. "We keep only the best,"
was the reply; when the applioant expressed a
wish to be served. A decanter of whisky
being accordingly produced, the customer
filled the glass to the brim, swallowed its con
tents and threw upon the oounter three
nlokels, two of whioh the seller forthwith re
tained. "Why any ehange," said the other,
evidently much puzzled, "did you not say
fifteen eents was your price." "I did," was
the reply, "but I was not then aware of your
being a wholesale operator, and therefore
named the retail price; to charge wholesale
customers as muoh as retail ones have to pay,
would be an imposition."
We had the pleasure of a call on Tuesday
morning from Miss Tennis a Oisflin, the
sister of Mrs. Victoria 0. Woodhull, whom
cbe accompanies on her lecturing tour. We
eonfess to quite an agreeable surprise in the
personal appearance and very pleasant manner
of this lady. She was dressed in a bine walk
ing sait, with a rather long bat neatly made
cloak of the same color, and wore a jaunty
little hat with quite a ooquettish arranged
feather attached. She is about the medium
height, and rather slightly built; her hair is
quite dark, bat her eyes are a delightful blue,
rivaling in odor the beautiful blue of her
costume, and are exceedingly bright and
sparkling at times, then again they assume a
soft and tender expression, making her look
quite pretty and interesting. If the peculiar
doctrines advocated by herself and her elo
quent sister produce snoh a happy state of
feeling as is depioted on her countenanoe,
and have in store far their believers snob a
fund of personal b auty as has fallen to the
lot cf Mies Ciafiin, we have no doabt that the
knowledge of the fact would cause a grand
rally to the standard upheld by this lady.
Mrs. Woodhull will give her first leoture in
this eity at St. Patrick's Hall, on next Sunday
swening, taking her text from 1 Corinthians,
ID chapter, 16th and 17th verses.
THE EEPOBT 01 THE STATE TBEAB
ÏÏBEB.
each.
Offlee
the
the
to
of
We
onr
of
he
The committee appointed by the Honse to
examine the books of the Auditor and Treas
urer of the State yeetorday, submitted a re
port whioh will be found printed in full in
another column, and which makes some very
startling disclosures of the loose and highly
improper manner in which the funds of the
State have been handled by the pretent State
officials.
We pointed ont, some time since, that there
was no doubt the office of the Treasurer was
ripe for investigation, and henoe the irregu
larities which have been discovered by the
committee have not surprised ns so mach as
the feet that there should have been found
no deficit
The report shows conclusively that the
fonds of the State were tampered with by
the sworn officers of the State in most shame
less disregard of the law and of their oaths of
office. It proves that the Governor and his
legal advisers urged and finally prevailed
upon the Treasurer to divert sacred fonds of
the State for purely partisan pnrposes, and
that for long periods of time the money of
the State was lent ont and used for purposes
never oontemplated by, and in palpable
violation o£ law.
The committee, after exposing the unwar
rantable and fraudulent scheme whereby
Wm. P. Kellogg, Jaoob Hawkins, Henry C.
Dibble, Antoine Dubuclet, and others, caused
a large sum of money to be diverted from its
legitimate use, advise that articles of im
peaehment be drawn against Wm. Pitt Kel
logg, Governor, and Antoine Dnbnolet,
Treasurer. They advise, also, that Henry
0. Dibble, Assistant Attorney General, be
addressed out of office by joint resolution;
that the Attorney General inbtitute criminal
proceedings against Alfred Shaw and J.
H. Oglesby, for violation of the Funding
bill, etc.
The report is lengih^ bat exceedingly
interesting, and we refer onr readers to the
document itself for the fall particulars of the
varions transactions upon whioh the commit
tee base their recommendations.
Those reoommendationa are eminently
proper, and should be acted upon by the
House in every particular except in regard to
the impeachment of the Governor. So far as
that functionary is concerned we are bound
to say, and we say it with profound regret,
that the mantle of the compromise will
effeetnally screen him from this or any simi
lar attsbk. We were not responsible for tbat
compromise. We steadily and persistently
advised against it We pointed oat the very
difficulty that has now arisen, and insisted
that no resolution be passed by the Legisla
ture wbioh could be regarded as condoning
the sins of the Governor. Tb» compromise
was effooted, however, and a joint resolution
wsa passed by the Honse pledging the General
Assembly not to impeach the Governor for any
past rfficial act
We said it was a blander then, we know it
ia a blander now—for now we have indisputa
ble evidence that the Governor had done acts
anterior to the compromise for whioh he was
impeachable, bat for wbieh, in onr view of
the matter, he can not now be tonohed with
out placing the very Honse which sprang into
existence under the compromise in the alti
tude of ignoring a solemn pledge which is
one of the laws of the State, regularly incor
porated in the statutes.
If the recommendation for impeachment
had been based upon any act subsequent to the
compromise, and if that act was properly one
for which the Governor oonld be impeached,
then we sbonld join in the recommendation
with all onr might, and in spite of the Radical
Senate, whioh it is openly proclaimed is ready
to try and acquit almost instantly, any Radi
cal office-holder subject to impeachment, we
should nrge upon the Honse the most prompt
and vigoroos action.
Thus muoh for the Governor. Ia regard
to the other recommendations, there is no
reason why they should not be acted upon, as
we presnme the committee mast have had
ample testimony upon which to base their
grave charges. The officials against whom
these charges are leveled are not protected by
the compromise. The canning old Radical,
Mr. Wheeler, who manipulated the affair, was
only interested in maintaining the Kellogg
usurpation, and did not care how soon the
snb-officials of the State got into trouble.
Tire report evinces muoh laborious research
and reflects credit upon the gentlemen who,
with rare perseverence and skill, have suc
ceeded in laying bare to the pnblio the
crooked ways by which the Radicals have
managed to maintain their supremacy in this
Slate and to tide over troublous times.
to
of
for
or
an
any
is
GUB POLIO6 AS IT IS
Headers are referred to the ample and most
interesting report of the House committee
raised to investigate the affairs of the metro
politan polioe, of whioh the Hod. George W.
Dupre, of Orleans, is chairman. It is the re
sult of long and diligent investigation. The
facts elieited are not methodized and collated,
but they are given as they were received. It
is well that they are thus placed on reeord,
so that every citizen may know, if he cared
to inquire, what sort of a polioe we pay for at
a very high figure.
The plenary power conferred by State en
aotments on the Board of Metropolitan Police
Commissioners was such as to enable them,
had they been so minded, to close np ail the
haunts of vice, all scenes of dissipation, all
alluring gateways to debauchery and all the
purlieus or moral corruption within the
boundaries of the city and metropolitan po
lice distriot
There was no limit fixed to the number of
policemen whom they might employ, nor to
the wages which they might offer. They
had the power to pay for men of the righ.
kind, and the power to remove the dishonest,
the inefficient, the cowardly, the dissipated,
the vioious, the inebriate and the unfaithful.
Since the inauguration the ot S ate police for
the city and vicinity times have been hard,
and regiments of good men of solid charac
ter and reliable qualities oonld have been
found end mustered into servioe at any
time. Never before in the history
of this or other oities has there been so nota
ble an opportunity to employ ample power
to
in
and ample means to suppress vice, to protect
property, to promote order, to enforce law, to
overawe ruffianism, to guard sacred rights, to
preserve peace, and to guarantee the lives of
the people against violenoe. The police of
this eity, acting honestly, ander honest and
judicious management, might have been a
very powerful ally of the law and might have
made of New Orleans a model of order and
decorum. The power, the means and the
material for oreating the finest, truest and most
serviceable police in the world were not
wanting.
What might have been is now only a theme
of regretful fancy. What has been instead is,
and has long been, a painful reality, full of
the suggestions of humiliation and sorrow.
Oar tax-ridden eity has paid roundly for a
police which has been ander the control of
usurping State officers. New Orleans has
been compelled to pay for the support of a
body of men, nominally a city police, which
has been in reality nothing else than a body
guard for Radioal officials.
We can not now find room to recapitulate
the salient facts developed in this interesting
report It will be read by many thousands
with intense interest, and all will concur with
the committee in the ardent wish " that the
metropolitan police and its present odious
board shall be abolished forever."
WELL-TIMED WABNIHG AND COUN
SEL.
Respecting the brief, pertinent, eloquent
and comprehensive address of the Democratic
Conservative State Central Committee, we
have no remarks to make. The document
speaks for itself, and wherever it may be read
it wiil have its intended effect It is a con
densed summary of the financial and political
condition of the State, resulting from Radioal
misrule and usurpation. It is a signal to the
people to rally in earnest, vigorous and eon
tinned action for the redemption of the State,
and it is likewise a warning and admonition
to all true citizens as to the pnrposes of our
adversaries, the means upon which they rely
and the potent aid which they depend upon
from the leaders of the Radical party of the
North.
The address eomes in good time to
strengthen and reassure the friends of reform
and the toilers for the redemption of the
State who are now waging war against usurpa
tion in onr General Assembly.
will
tbat
any
it
of
is
as
SHAM LEGISLATION.
Will the day ever come when the members
of our Legislature will meet like men of busi
ness, at once begin to transact the bnsinees of
the State and persevere in that business, from
day to day and from week to week, until by
common consent they conclude that there is
nothing more to be done? Legislation is
nothing more nor less than business which
men do best when they go about it with the
honest spirit of hard and steady work. It is
an abuse of the trust and confidence of con
stituents, an abase of the money of the
people, ''an abase of public patience, an
abuse of popular favor, an abuse of the privi
leges of representative government, and a se
rious perversion of most important functions,
to ohange a legislative body into an arena
of wordy debates. It is almost a desecra
tion to turn the hall of legislation, which
ought to bo held sacred as the temple of lib
erty, law and justice, icto a theater for
political debates. The State pays for
work and not for talk; it pays members to
labor for the promotion of the good of
the people and not for working for per
sonal ends; it pays them for so working as to
show their true strength and industry in
doing g od for the Commonwealth, and not
for showing their adroitness in splitting
logioal hairs, their skill in rounding periods
or their prowess in parliamentary tactics.
The people desire and pay their Senators and
Bepresentatives to constitute an economical
Legislature Instead of a costly debating club.
With due allowance for average vanity
and eagerness to win reputation and power,
an intelligent stranger would be astonished
and ashamed to see and hear what is done
and said daily iu the rotuudi, parlors,
drawing-rooms and chambers of the St. Louis
Hotel.
Perhaps this perversion of legislative fane
tions is one of the incurable consequences of
party politics. In all onr American bodies
forming the law-making part of government
there is always to be heard mach debate on
topics which have little or no bearing upon
any proper business, and there is always much
done, the motive and cue of which are far re
moved from any regard for the public good.
There are members whose monomania
is for talking, and who are never
satisfied otherwise. There are many others
whose minds ran exclusively npon
scheming and intrigne. There are as many
more whose absorbing passion is to win high
positions and to retain them. There are
others who care for little else bat money.
There are some who try in good faith to do
their duty and to make to their constituents a
good report of their work, and this they do
under the obstacles and delays caused by
those who seek their own good rattier than
the good of the Commonwealth.
We may impute much of this grievous
abase of legislative functions to the conspicu
ously evil example of onr Federal Congress.
A Card.
I would respet t r ully call th<- attention of the Musi
cal Public, and those who int. nd purchasing Pianos,
to call at my extensile war.-rooms at
GRÜNEWALD HALL,
to inspect my immense stock of first-class
PUNOS
before purchasing elsewhere.
GET ALWAYS THE BEST
hy all means; it will be found to le the cheapest.
Why expend y onr mone in w r hless i rashy Pianos
which are only Rise to sei', and not to la«t If you
want a 1 iano. buy only a good one—the différence is
not great, and yon have a treasure for lifetime
IBB NEW UPRIGHT STUN WAY PIANO
stands alone, proud and unapproa.hable by any other
m- ke, ana is the
GRANDEST CREATION
that modern science in Piano building has modneed.
Dr. Franz Liszt, Rubinstein, Pr f. Elwart (of the
Conservator of Mu ic Paris), and almost every nota
bility anto g greatest living artists, unanimously
pronounce the etoinway
THE MOST PERFECT PIANO OF THE WORLD.
Yon are cordially invited to inspect the largest
stock ever exhibited in this city, and «an rest assured
that my moderate charge« and liberal terms will be
to
to
the
to
found h ghly sstisfactory^bj^you.
GRÜNEWALD,
14, 16, 16, 20 and 22 Baronne street,
Fel3 Sn W„ &Sa Near Canal.
and
glad
call.
to
to
of
of
a
the
not
is,
of
a
of
a
C.
...DAUPHINS STREET
Offina ham fron 10 to 34.
A Cara.
TO THE PUBLIC.
New Orleans, F. b. 9, 1876.
The undersigned was struck with paralysis in bis
left side on the 23d May, 1863, and lost h s speech fi r
about a month, and the free use of his limbs ever
since. In Novi mber, 1874; I bad a second attac
which d.p'ived me of the use of my right hand and
leg, so as to constantly use a can. and at the seme
time verv nervous. In December, 875, I rec ived
the third attack, which oonflned me to the hous -, be
ing complete y h lpliss, untit I obtained the services
and t eatnent of Mis. JAKE ARMSTRONG, who
resides at 553}j Dryades street. Strange t > say, 1er
treatment up to this dite has so far relieved me that
I have no further use for my cane, and has a so dis
(eleda.l ne:vousness from my lodv, and I most
happ-to recomment 1er to any other person that
may be afflicted with the same complaiot. She as
sures me that I will entirely recover my strength in
a few months by f. Rowing her adviee, whi h I hon
estly believe. Z. FOLEY,
F15 2t 9 Carondelet street.
$1 Briefs a Specialty. $1
One Dollar per Page. Large Octavo.
COMPETITION DEFIED!
— BY —
.(.a a CLARK & HOFELINE, - «. *
I I J Gravier Street, I I )
Wear Camp. ■■■
Compound Pulmonic Paste,
AN INVALUABLE PREPARATION FOR
COUGHS,
CATARRH,
BRONCHITIS,
CONSUMPTION,
And all inflammation of the LUNGS.
Prepared only and for sale by
'FREDRICKSON & HARTE,
139 CANAL STREET.
F13 2dp3
Southern States Agricultural and
Industrial Exposition.
OFFICE OF THE GEN'L SUPERINTENDENT, ;
No. 89 Camp street.
New Orleans, February 12, 1876, \
Special Notices to Exhibitors of
Machinery.
The new roadway is now completed, and Exhibit
ors of Machinery can place their entries in position
at once.
All heavy loaded wagons will en' er at the Savage
St'eet Gate.
No goods will be received at the Fair Grounds
until entries have been completed at the City Office,
No. 80 Camp street. SAM'L MULLEN,
F13 10t __General Superintendent.
Southern States Agricultural and
Industrial Exposition.
OFFICE OF THE GEN'L SUPERINTENDENT, ;
N o. 80 Camp street, 1
New Orleans, February 12,1676. ]
Special Notice to Exhibitors.
On and after MONDAY, February 14, the General
Superintendant will be at tho Fair Grounds each
day, from 10 A. M. to 2 P. M., tor the puipose of
locating exhibitors' space.
All applications for space must be made at the of
fice, No. 80 Camp street, corner Natchez, where
printed forms of application may be procured and
diagrams of the fielilings can ho seen.
Exhibit re must arrange their counters, shelving,
tables and decorations at cnce, in order that every
thing may be in readiness on tie opening day.
SAMUEL MULLEN,
F13 10t General Superintendent.
Southern States Agricultural and
Industrial Exposition.
Notice to Exhibitor*.
Office of the General Superintendent.
No. M» Camp Street.
New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1876.
The Entry Rooks for Exhibitors will be opened at
this office on MONDAY, January 10.
All applications for entries must be made upon the
printed forms of application, which wiil be furnished
at this office:
The Grounds and Buildings will be open for the
reception of articles for exhibition from February 1
until February 25, 1876, and exhibitors are requested
to make early appl cation, and entry, in order that
everything may be in position on tho opening day
The Entry Books will be closed on FRIDAY
EVENING, February 25, 1876, at 6 o'clock, and no
entries will te allowed after that time. THIS RULE
IS IMPERATIVE.
Catalogues and general information furnished te
applicants at this office.
By order of the Executive Committee.
Îa9 tf SA ML. MÜLLEN, Genl.
Supt
TO THE PUBLIC.
NEW OR! E.VNS PACIFIC RAILROAD.
The Citizens' Committee appointed at the mass
meeting held at St. Pari-iuk's Hall, January 27, in the
interest cf the NEW ORLEANS PACIFIC RAIL
WAY COMPANY, have recommended the follow
ing well known, active, energetic and highly re- I
spectable gentlemen as solicitors to the capital ;
stock of the company. The public aie hereby in- |
formed that the districts as designated will he can
vassed by the gentlemen whose names are ap
pended
The eastern End western boundaries are from river
to s«amp:
1. South side of Canal street and north side of I'oy
dras, inclusive, Col. Ch. R. Hailey, F. Camerden,
Esq. .
2. South side of Poydras to north side of Calliope,
inclusive, W. Wallace Esq., H. W. Fowler. Esq.
3. South side of Calliope to north side of Jackson
street, inclusive, P. R. Byrue, Esq., B. B. Hotchkiss
Eiq.
4. South side of Jackson to upper line of Carroll
ton, inclusive, John McNulty, Esq., A. Gallaird, Esq.
5. North side of Canal street to south side of St.
Louis, inclusive, J. P. Roux, Esq., A. Dnpre, Esq.
6. North si.le of St. Louis street to south side of
Espl made, inclusive, J. G. Sanchez, Esq., A. Kilshaw,
Esq.
7. North side of Esplanade street to lower line of
citv, inclusive, Jno. Pasloy, Esq., Samuel Powers,
Esq.
The above named gentlemen are fti'ly authorized
to obtain subscriptions to the capital stork cf the
NEW ORLEANS PACIFC RAILWAY COM
PANY. E. B. WHEELOCK, President.
Febnarv5. 1876. F6 10t
notice.
OFFICE STATE TAX COLLECTOR, f
Fibst District (160 Gravier st, up staust. C
New Orleans, Jan. 28, 1876. )
Public notice is hereby given to th6 Tax-payers ot
the First District of New Ot leans, that I am ready
to issue Slate Licenses for the year 1876, and to re
ceive all Taxes for the years 1875. 1674 and 1673. Th.»
office will be open from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.
N. C. FOLGER,
{ a29 lm Sta'e Tax Collector. First District
John H. Carter
having become connected with the house of Messrs.
BRIGGS, PAYNE A CO., Wholesale Grocers, 17
and 19 Peters and 15 and 17 Fulton street, will be
glad to have his city and country friends give him a
call. ja7 tf
FIRE INSURANCE.
IMPERIAL AND NORTHERN
Insurance Companies of London.
IMPERIAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY I THE NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY
OF LONDON,
Established 1803. I Established 183A
TOTAL AS-ETS RE PRESENTED ........................................ ..... 000,000.
The above Companies have combined to transact, EXCLUSIVELY,
A PXRB INSURANCE 33USINBSa
IN THE UNITED STATES.
E. W. CROWELL, Esq., formerly manager of the Imperial at New York, having retlredR »-ALU
BER, E'q. t 40 Pine street, New York, assumes the mauagemot tot the business by appointment irom tun
London Offices, from January 1, 1876 the companies issuing a joint policy. — - -
This will undoobtedlv hi the STRONGEST FIRE INSURANCE 1'OLICY made in the United WMtefc
Adjustment in case i f Loss will be prompt and liberal, and payment made according to tne custom be
the N»w Orleans Board ot Insnrers. __ . „ . - — ____
ja20 P. R. FEET., Agent. »3 Cnrendelet Btrnet.
SAVE
25 DOLLARS.
THE WILSON !.
Best in the World I
WARRANTED 5 YEARS!
No instructions required to noe It*
Suitable for Family Cw oud
Blanii fart Bring. It will «fWUJJ
tissue super to harness leather.
BT Machines mode especially
for BRAIDING, KU.FFXj NG,
BINDING, und a variety of spe
cialties in manufacturing.
PRICES MADE TO SUIT TM f IH&
Either for Cash or Installment -
Payments or Créait, , .
ACENT8 WANTED.^
Send for illustrated catalogue of styles and
prices. Address, ^
Wilson Sewing Machine CoJ
x8o Canal Street, New Orleans. La.
VILLE
FERTILIZERS,
MANUFACTURED BY THE
Clieiuical
BLOOD FERTILIZING
WORKS,
Office : 37 North Peters Street, between
Bienville and Custoinhon te Streets.
3
FERTILIZER No. 1,
FOR SUGAR CANE.
FERTILIZER No. 2,
FOR COTTON.
FERTILIZER FOR
Orange and Fruit Trees.
FERTILIZERS.
For Sugar Cane.........................$60 00
For Cotton.............................. 45 00
For Orange and Fru t Trees............ 60 00
Pure Super Phosphate................. 65 00
Pure Gronnd Bones..................... 45 00
Per ton—in sacks of 100 pounds.
Chemical« Always an Ilnnd :
I *•
;
| *
NITRATE OF POTASH.
NITRATE OF SODA.
MURIATE OF POTASH.
LAND PLASTER.
SULPHURIC ACID.
SULPHATE OF AMMONIA.
Fertilize s compounded on orders for all
crops. This branch a specialty.
OFFICE :
37 North Peters Street,
Between Customhouse and Btenvill
F6
The Attention of Piano Buyers
And others i« called tc
The new scale CHICK
ERING UPRIGHT, the
most perfect, b st toned and
beet finished piano ever of
fered for sale inthis rity.
TV
elegant
tne low priced
DUN
Also, the
HAM.
HALE, and the popular
PLEYEL Pianos, wliicn are
fur sale at unusually low
nt ices for c*sh or on month
ly payments.
Also.
Sole Agent f«r the Celebrated E8TEY.
MASON A HAMLIN'S ORGANS.
SECOND HAND PIANOS and ORGANS from
Twenty Dollars upwards.
Pianos and Organs TUNED and REPAIRED by
hy the best workmen.
ja23 2dp
PHILIP WERLEIN,
78. 80. 82 and 90 Baronne street
The Purest Wines in the World !
KELLEY'S ISLAND PORT WINE,
SWEET CATAWBA,
DRY CATAWBA,
ISLAND QUEEN CHAMPAGNE
Superior to any other. For sale by all grecers.
SHROPSHIRE A CO,,
No. 15 Peters street
Sole Southern Agents Kelley 'e Island WixeCompan
dJ5
of
a
to
I
the
tho
CHAMPAGNE!
CHAMPAGNE !
Golden. Fleece.
HENRY GOULET, Reims.
The Mob l Exquisite Wine Imported*
For Sale hy
RAREäHIDE dc MAES,
jal6 lm 2dp
17 Tchoupitonlas street.
H. P. BUCKLEY,
8
8..................Camp Street...........
HAS FOR SALE AT LOWEST PRICES,
WALTHAM STEM-WINDERS,
O.lier American, English and Swiss WATCHES
in all Styles, for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Always on hand, a full assortment of SILVER
WARE and JEWELRY.
WATCHES carefully repaired. DIAMONDS ra
in unted. dl2 tf 2dp
King of the Carnival.
SPECI4L NOTICE.
WAR DEPARTMENT, CARNTVAL PALACE, »
New Okleaxs, Jen. 22, 1876. $
All persons having business with the Government
of His Majesty, the King of the C.trt ival, may ad
tiro s comm anicati ins to Lock Box 8-1, Postoffice.
WARWICK,
ja23 1m Earl MarsbaL
Kotice.
DEPARTMENT OF FIN4NCE—CITY HALL, t
New Okleaxs, J:.n. 11,1876. J
CITY LICENSES for the year 1876 are new dto,
and will be issued from this office, nntil Febrotry 29,
1876, after which costs will accrue.
I PILSBURY,
jalt tF29 Admi strator of Finance.
A. M. HILL,
Manufacturer and realer in All Kinds of
GOLD PENS,
HOLDERS, PEN AND PENCIL CASES,
TOOTHPICKS, ETC.,
Presents the following REDUCED PRICE LIST
and solicits City and Country Orders :
No. 6
No. 5
No. 4.
*2 25
$2 00 .
*1 75.
No. 3. No. 2. No. 1.
$1 50. «1 25. 81.
No. 1 Ladies' Pen in Desk-Hoider ...'.......(1 25
1 -- Pearl-Holder and Box...
No. 3 School Pen in Desk-Holder.'.'........."1 1 75
No. 4 Pen in Pocket-Holdtr...... 2 5#
- ..................... 3.00
£°- * _ with Pencil....... 3 59
No. 1 Pen in Solid Gold Penc 1 Case........... 8 50
No. 4 .. __ ........... 12 00
No. 10 Pen in Fine Holder and Box (largest
Peu m ide)............................. 6 00
Pearl and Gold Magic Pencils ................. 5 00
Ivory 3 a«
Rubber " 111 ! ! " " I [ " ] I " 3 50
I will «-nd any of the above ar ic'es by mail, regis
tered at my risk, ou rece pt of price. Money he
sent safely by mail, registered.
. Gold Peas Repointed, 73«,
Address, A. M. HTT.T. .
86 St. Charles »treet.
Corner Commercial Place.
n!3TuWeTh
Southern Shoe Manufactory.
NEW ORLEANS, July 24,1875.
Gentlemen of New Orleans and L*sl«laaai 1
I am starting a Southern Shee Factory Ionlyaok
of you geatlemen. for your patronage. I guatantoa
that I will give you better satisfaction in my line
any establishment in this city-cheaper and of a N rt t w
material. Gentlemen, you all know that then am
a great many laborer» and mechanics in this
who have no work nor any food for their wives and
children. If we will start onr own factories and pal.
ronize each other we could easily get along with onr
factories of aU descriptions. Our money is aU givsn
to the North and West, which is millisnz of dollars.
I have been established in the Shoe Manufactory te
the last twenty-five years, and call the attention at
tho community in g «tarai.
Yours respectfully,
JOHN H>N8EN,
35 Cana street

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