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The New Orleans bulletin. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1874-1876, February 26, 1876, Image 4

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YEW ORLEANS BULLETIN
Office No. 109 Cira vier Street.
M BAKEB ,
JfcDtïOH AND PBOPBIETOB.
ySOEST DAILY CIRCULATION
IN NEW ORLEANS.
*fcEWORLEANS, FEBRUARY 20, 1876.
iBIg-Oae Dollar per month, or Twelve Dollar*
#ar Tear.
jbeerlption* for the DAILY BULLETIN received
at ear eonater, 109 Grarler street.
I BULLETIN Insert« WANTS and TO BENTS,
ding One Square, for riftj Cents each.
le Order* takes
Indorsed bj the
the Bulletin OUee
PBOPBIETOB.
Wa Dew Orleans Bulletin can be badef the
■Mm agent in Mobile, at the depot, on the
Mini of the B P. M. train.
JOB Promo.—We now poemn facOl B ee to
gafeli ne to execute every deec r iption
•nauaerdaL railroad aad steamboat printing,
tnwyen* briefs, blank« and other legal doon
«enta, on the shortest notice, in the beet
and at the most veaeonable rates. We
«■ gnaxantee full satiafeetfon to those of ear
MmdAs who favor ns with their ordera.
Supplement.—W ith onr regular Sunday
•«Mon will hereafteibe leaned a supplement,
Which will enable us te lay before onr readers
greater amount an« diversity of reading
T« r op Larraas.—The Bfaain will pub
liah hereafter the List of Letters in the Bon
«ay edition.
The Saltan ia troubled with a boil, and he
awean by the sacred aword of Mahomet that
the heada of 1100 women who didn't know
how to make bread-and-milk poultice will
eime eff aa soon as be gets well
$7
We have receiveÀiâhe. first number of the
Atlanta Courier, pi^phed at Atlanta, Qa. It
supersedes the Atlanta Herald, and .judging
from its first issue, promises to be quite a
•nooassful journalistic venture. We welcome
it to onr list of exchanges, and wish it every
"àeern* to me aa though all rich men were
m«de and aet up ia business afore my time,
M the remark of a sad-eyed man, and then,
with a deep sigh, he added: ''There's no nse'n
tryin'.* Nothin's left for a feller nowadays
*oopt to start a monnment fand and be treasu
Mr of it"— Exchange.
The Democratic majority in Texas will ex
mood fifty thousand, which ia a very gratifying
ternit and a good beginning for the Presiden
ts year. The people had rather rongh expe
nance under carpet-baggers and negroes ; but
Mnoe they 'discarded the Radical thieves, the
prosperity of the State has warranted a re
taça to true Republican rule. *
It I» with regret we learn through the
.•learner Trenton of the death of Judge John
I. Morgan, of Opelousas, who was suddenly
oat off by a stroke of paralysis, at the age of
sixty yean. The popularity and pnblio spirit
of Judge Morgan is too well known to need
•ft onr hands any nolioe. He was elected in
1872 to his position, and had earned the best
wishes of his people during the time he oc
cupied the offloe, but on tbe 221 he suc
cumbed to the sudden attaok.
Professor Q. Curio's Binging class have
kindly inviteck us to be present at a musical
matinee to be given by them, with the assist
ance of Messrs. Hayen and Eckert, to-day at
M o'clock, at Grünewald HalL The pro
gramme accompanying the invitation displays
• collection of very enjoyable and meritorious
coleotions, and we notice among the young
ladies who will parpicipate, several who have
already wen high enoomiums from oritioal and
■«miring friends. The affair will doubtless
M one of the most pleasant affairs of the Car
adval season, and we return thanks for the
kind mmembranoe of ns by the class.
The steamer W. J. Poitevent arrived at her
fending on Wednesday jiight, bringing down
• very good load of freight Among other
aitioletf An board was a bale of ootton intended
for the Exposition at the Fair Grounds. It
was raised on tbe plantation of Mrs. 8.
Conch, Caibonn Landing, Black River. Mrs.
Gouoh personally superintends the planting
and cultivation of the cotton grown on her
load, and this bale is offered as a sample.
Bhe in reality raised this cotton herself, and
now pate it on exhibition in the agricultural
department of ihe Exposition.
The Hon. Carlos Pie, tbe Spanish Consul
aft this port, has become deservedly popular
among the Spanish residents of oar eity, and
the Utter have determined to present him
with* some substantial token of their high
Mgard and esteem for him, both in his official
capacity, and as a friend and associate. A
neatly engraved cud informs ns that on Sun
day. February 27tb, the Spanish residents of
New Orleans will assemble at Grünewald
Hall st 6 o'clock P. M. to present their Con
eul With a "testimonial of their friendship
and esteem." We shall endeavor to be pres
ent to offer onr personal congratulations to
this honored and worthy offioer and gentle
While the President, in the ease of Gen.
Sehenck, adheres stubbornly to his favorite
policy of never removing an officer while
mder fite— a policy attended with disadvan
tages when the fire happens to create a bad
smell—an ngly reminiscence is revived con
cerning the old Memphis El Paso Railroad
swiodle, which Gen. Fremont lobbied
kb rough Congress at a reputed cost of $500,
000 iu gold, besides a large amount of stock
then supposed to be worth baring. The
story connects Gen. Sohsnok with the ini
quitous scheme in a rnamr no less discredit
able than the Emma Mine aoandal, though at
the period referred to he had not reached the
dignity *of Minister to* England, but was
Caairmau of the Committee on Ways and
Means. The Memphis and El Paso job is now
the gubject of a Congressional inquiry, with a
fitir prospect that sotte of the members of the
ffJrty-Foarth Congress -will come in for a
«***•*» ngiog development
of
of
to
to
is
of
of
ply
the
out
be
was
of
the
up
oity
our
QtlAB|jrnNE.
I
:
It fits frequently been our duty to ref ,-r in \
strong language to our annual quarantine
nuisance. Our quarantine Uws were passed
about a quarter of a qentury ago, and while
sanitary knowledge has advanced they have
stood still, and have finally become an almost
unmitigated evil, and a serious hindrance to
the commerce and prosperity of our city and
State. I »
The laws now require that on the establish
ment of çoarMtine all vessels from " infected
ports" »hall be detained at the quarantine
stations fox at least ten days. Last season, in
cases where it was believed safe and proper,
as with the Alexandre steamships and some
others, the law requiring this detention was
disregarded; bot th9 health offioers dis .
the law at their peril in th rocv.:.3, and ti:
relief thus afforded wan bu. trivial compared
with tbe evils resulting Atom the gene. I en
forcement of the law.
On the 22i instant, we published a special
messsgs of the Governor to the Senate, re
commending tbe immediate enactment of
laws snbstitnting the sanitary treatment of
vessels for their imperative time of detention,
and also recommending the redaction and
equalization of the qu irantine fees now
charged at the several quarantine stations of
the State.
Both recommendations are eminently pro
per, end both reforms are imperatively de
manded. It is now eonced'ed that the quaran
tine detention of vessels for a time longer
than the few hour* necessary for their aera
tion, fumigation and disinfection is unneces
sary. The schedule of fees established by
the old law is absurd. A ship of 1005 tons
now pay** $30 ; a schooner twice as large only
$7 50; a steamship of 3000 tons pays $20, an
other steamship of 500 tons pays the same
fee. These charges should be immediately
reduced and equalized.
There are notv before the Senate two short
bills, embracing tbe recommendations of the
Gjvernor's message. They are truly reform
measures, they are not objeoted to, and are
unobjectionable. There are but four working
days of the session left. Cannot our reform
legislators give to this important matter a
little consideration ?
It is not easy tb estimate tbe damage annu
ally done to this port by the present onerous
and absurd quarantine regulations—they
cripple our commerce, they drive trade from
us to other and more sensible cities, they
annoy our shipmasters and shipowners and
agents, and will, if continued in force, greatly
lessen the benefits otherwise obtainable from
the deep water at the mouth of the river.
In tbe name of our crippled aud emasen
lated commerce, in the name of progress and
of oommon sense, we ask the Sanate.to pass
these bills aud send them to the House.
is
MUI*
It the Mississippi was a thousand yards
wide and forty yards in average depth, flow
ing past this city at the rate of four miles an
hour, there would pass by us about two hun
dred millions of cubic yards of water each
hour. If only one-twentieth part of this water
was a muddy solution, the earthy solid sub
stance carried down by onr great river each
hour would be ten millions of cabic yards,
or enough to build an embankment five yards
deep, forty yards wide and fifty thousand
yards long. In twenty-foflr hoars this float
ing real estate wonld be sufficient to cover to
tbe depth of fire yards an area of 1,200,000
superficial yards.
We leave it to ouf enterprising young
arithmeticians to caloulate bow long it would
require to raise the level of this city fifteen
feet it all the sediment carried down by the
Mississippi oould be arrested and deposited
within the boundaries of the parish of Or
igans. Or, if they ohoos9, let them oalcalate
the number of acres of land, now unavailable
because overflowed or subject to annual over
flow, which could be raised beyond the possi
bility of overflow by the deposit of the sedi
ment borne by the Mississippi in the
course of a single year if ' it conld be
arrested, separated and diffused. Or let
them consider what the effect would be if the
Father of Waters should cease from the task
of filling up the Gulf of Mexico to the extent
of many square miles of surface and of great
depth each year, and leave hia burden of sedi
ment on strips of land on each bank twenty
miles in width, for the period of five years.
Or let them ealenlate the prodnets of the
20.000 alluvial square miles of most fertile
lands which wonld thus be raised above the
danger of floods.
The time will oome when the earthy bur
den of the turbid Mississippi will be turned
to some good use. The great inventor is yet
to appear who will utilize tbe vast weight of
fertile soil that now goes on its idle errand to
the Gulf. The force to be employed for th is
purpose is the stupendous momentum of the
greatest ourrent that flows from any conti
nent to the sea. There is strength enough in
the mighty river to propel all the engines
new used on earth. The problem to be solved
is to prescribe the method by which the foroj
of the current of the Mississippi can be ap
plied, so as to raise its own waters above the
land, where being held iu tranquil suspension
they will deposit their sediment., and then
flow off to give place to a new flood freighted
with a new deposit.
The power existe in the greatest plenitude
of wealthy abundanoe. The problem is sim
ply to make the force of the mighty current
elevate a small fraction of its volume a few
feet above its natural level. The result of a
successful solution of this problem will be the
arrest, deposit and utilization of the soil now
carried uselessly away to the blue water of
the Gulf.
The great engineer and inventor who finds
out and applies this mighty fluvial power will
be able to do almost anything he pleases. It
was the boast of Michael Angelo Buuuarroti,
that he oonld hang the great Pat al Ca
thedral, the architectural pride of
Rome, in mid-air. A man with genius
of equal baldness and vigor, in oommand of
the titanic power which fl >ws by us perpet*
ually iu silent majesty, would eompel tbe
Mississippi to baild its own levees, to raise
up millions of acres of rich lands, elevate onr
oity above all fear of floods, and even fto aet
our city " npon • hill," joat as the eminent
to
tal
I and enterprising engineer of the jetties has
: declared that he could do with Cairo.
century passes means will be found to make
its floods harmless and its sedimentary depos
it* a source of incalculable wealth.
If Capt. Eads proves to be the pioneer in
this field of invention, he will win jx renown
unsurpassed by that of any discoverer, ex
plorer or inventor of this or any other age.
SALARIES
in \ For two hundred, years the Mississippi has
betn a terror and a tyrant, but before another
There are forly-one officers besides sheriffs
and tax collectors, who receive from the
Treasury of the State, or of this city, salaries
of $5000 or more each, as follows: Governor
$8000, Auditor, Treasurer, Attorney General
..ad Superintendent of Public Education each
Î-5 >00; Chief Justice $7500 by a Radical cou
su ration, and $10,OCO by act of a Radical
Legislature in contempt of tbe constitution;
four Associate Justices $7000 each by the ex
isting constitution and $9500 by law; twenty
one District Judges $5000 each; Mayor $7500,
seven Administrators $6000 each, City Attor
ney $6000, City Surveyor $5000.
There are in this State not less than four
thousand men superior in average ebaraeter,
learning and ability to the present occupants of
the above named offices, whose incomes are less
than $2500 a year. It is jus', as well as
wise, to pay public officials fairly for efficient
aud honest service, but the compensation of
the servants of the people ought to be
measured by the condition of the people, by
their ability to support a costly government,
by the supply of persons possessed of proper
requisites from whom a choice may be made,
and by the incomes which gentlemen of cor
responding capacity usually enjoy from a dili
gent pursuit of their vocations.
As to the Chief and Associate Justices of
the Supreme Court, their salaries being fixed
by the Constitution of the Suite, they can not
be made le'ss.
The State would suffer no damage by a uni
form reduction of twenty per cent lrom all
salaries ol public officers.
Iu the theory o£ economy an admitted
axiom forbids the payment of money for what
is not worth the money demanded. The
representatives of the people may -Well apply
this axiom in legislation and demand in all
cases where money is appropriated that the
thing to be bought or tbe service to be ren
dered is worth what they propose to pay. An
inspeotion of tbe appropriation kills of the
last and preceding years, will suggest many
purchases made with the people's money
which, even if honestly made and honestly
paid, woull be known to oome far short of
this rule of eoonomy. When the agents of tne
people undertake to décide for them as to
what they need, means must be considered as
well as wants.
20
A
THE ACQUI TTAL O F BABCOCK.
The telegraph Friday morning informs us
that the jury in the Babccck case has re
turned a verdict of acquittal. We are favored
with the additional information that the re
habilitated Secretary, touched by this mani.
festation of sympathy, tendered his legally
purified hand to each member of the jury in
turn, and warmly thanked them all for the
verdict Gratitude in such a oase is not sur
prising. Babcock would be more or less than
man if he did not feel grateful to the twelve
feliow-oitizen8 who exorcised that unpleasant
vision of Joyce and McDonald in their striped
clothes, which must have disturbed his slum
bers and filled his days with angnish.
Whether or not the jurymen were thrilled
with joy at the contact of a hand which had so
often elapsed that of the President, we may
only oonjecture; but we may be reasonably
sure, that some of them at least, felt honored
by the distinction, and flattered themselves
that they were thus placed en rapport with the
White Honse.
However this may be, we must be just to
the jury. Their verdict was not unexpected.
It was not flagrantly violative of the legiti
mate legal deductions to be drawn from the
testimony. In effect it may be considered
equivalent to a Scotch verdict of "Not
proven," It is hard to see how any different re
sult could have been arrived at after the ob
stacles thrown in the way of the prosecution
by tbe government at Washington. The
crime of conspiracy is difficult- to prove.
Usually it can be established only by the
testimony of co-conspirators. It was on such
testimony that the convictions of Avery, Mc
Donald, Joyce aud McKee were obtained. It
was on such testimony that the conviction of
Babcock was anticipated.
Bat no sooner did the law lay its hands
upon the President's Secretary; no sooner did
it approach tbe portals of the White House,
than the Attorney Gsneral issued a letter of
warning to all who might b9 hereafter dis
posed to confess and to testify, that the usual
customs of the law would not be maintained
in their favor, and that no immunity or even
mitigation of punishment would be accorded
to them.
It is known that this letter was written
under the peremptory order ot the President,
and it is impossible to suppose that the Presi
dent did not intend that it should operate to
the advantage of his friend. In the face of
that order it was impracticable to procure the
testimony necessary to complete the evidence
against Babcock. Whatever moral conviction
may exist that he was connected with the
whisky ring, the legal proof does not seem
to have been sufficiently s rang to warrant the
jury in returning a verdict of "guilty."
Nevertheless, iu spite of his acquittal, the
moral conviction does exist, and'wtll continue
to exist, that Babcock was in partnership with
Joyce and McDonald in the proceeds of the j
"crooked whisky" traffic. His defense was
not the defense of a consciously innocent !
man. Instead of acting according to the j
spirit of his declaration that all the suspi- !
oions telegrams would be explained to Lis en* !
tire exculpation, the* principal badness of j
hia lawyers seetne 1 to be to keep them away
from the jury. Not to explain them, hut to |
suppress them was their persistent effort
Such a defense as that might suffice to ex
clude the evidence necessary to convict, and
tuns assure an acquittal before a jury, bat it
rather tends to a conviction than to on acquit
tal before the foium of public opinion.
And thus Baloook escapes the penitentiary
and returns to the sacred precincts of the
White House. He is saved from what has be
come the unpleasant company of Joyce and
McDonald, and is permitted again to seek the
more than ever congenial society of the
President
Jbiseases of the Eye and Ear,
Dr. C. BEARD, Oecailat*
14_________DAUPHINS STREET-----!,
Orleans Isflrmary.
Office hear* from 1C to 34.
GOV. THOS. A. HENDRICKS
-OF—
INDIANA,
AYILL DELIVER THE
OPENING ADDRESS,
—AT THE—
3 E 3 XPOSIMOKT,
SATUBDAY, FEB. 20,
THREE O'CLOCK
T25 2t
IT. N.
T25 2t
Louis Roeiferer Champagne.
LANDING! AND FOR SALE BY »HE UNDER
. SIGNED:
20 BASKET.« OF 25 AND 30 QUARTS EACH,
20 BASKETS OF 50 AND 60 LINTS EACH,
Of, this Superior Wine, prepared for the Russian,
French and English Markets.
PAUL GELPI & BRO.,
41 Decatur er Old Levee street.
Raisins—Raisin».
2000 Bores LAYER LONDON LAYERS and
finest DKHESAS.
IOOO Hall'. Boxes LAYER LONDON LAYERS
and finest DKHESAS.
IOOO Quarter Boxes LAYER LONDON LAYERS
and finest DEHESAS.
For sale Jby PAUL GELPI A BRO.,
F.5 Ki2do 41 Decatur • r < lid Levee street.
Decorate ,
HERMITAGE wishes to inform his friends and
general public that, with the aid of extia first class
help, lie is now prepared to.furn sh all demands that
may be made on him in the arts of
PAINTING AND DECORATING.
He will make the desired finish to FIREME'.'S
HATS at ONE DOLLAR Each, and use the finest
materials: also CANVAS SIGNS and KRAMES of
eve:y DESIGN and COLOR fsr Louisiana State
Fair and Caruival Week, Cheaper than ran possibly
be done t.y auy other Painter in New Orleans
My mot o—No Monopo'y but Competition Defied.
HERMITAGE, The Painter,
F26 It _ 44 Perdido Street.
CHAMPAGNE l
CHAMPAGNE !
A FRESH LOT JUST LANDING OF THE
CELEBRATED BRAND'
GEO. GOULET & CO.,
RHEIMS.
For sale by all leading wholesale aud retail grocers,
restaurants, etc., and by
PAUL GELPI A BRO,
Sole Agents for the Sonth,
41 Decatur or Old Levee str et.
Sparkling Cognac f
25 CASES QUARTS, PINTS AND HALF PINTS
Cf M. DUROZIER'S CELEBRATED CRKMANT
IMPERIAL or SPARKLING COGNAC, the favor
ite bev.rage of "Bons-Virants" and High Life.
Now landing and for sale by
PAUL GELPI A BRO..
Sole Agents for the South,
41 Decatnr or Old Levee street.
Cognac Brandies ?
—ALL VINTAGES OF—
A.C. MEUKOW'.SCELEBRATED BRANDIES
IN WOOD AND IN GLASS.
For sale in Bond or Duty Paid bv
PAUL GELPl & BP.O,
Sole Agents of tbe South
41 Decatur or Old Ltsvee street.
Fine Wines—Fine w ines.
IOOO Cases Medoc, Chateau Bouliac, St. Julien,
St. Estephe Chateau Giscours, Chateau Ponte, Ca
net, Chareau Larose, Chateau Maigaux. Chateau La
fite Graves. Sauterli s. Hunt S.uternes, Latour
Blanche, Chateau Yquem, Monopole ot the renowned
brand t ruse and F te Freres, Bordeaux The b jitles
of above wines are elegantly put no with patent wire
netting. For sale by PAUL GELPI & BRO.,
41 Decatur or Old Levee street.
_
Notice to the Public.
FAIR» FAIR! FAIR!
8HORTE3T LINE TO THE FAIR GROUNDS.
The ORLEANS RAILROAD COMPANY takes
passengers Lom Clay S atue, on Canal street, to the
central g te of the Exposition Bu Liing« of the Fa r
Grounds, and hence back to th* sta.ting point on
Canal street.
A sufficient number of CARS will always be on
hand for the acrommodatioi of persons wishing to
visit the Exposition. JL HUAED,
F25 15t __ Secretary.
CARNIVAL FLAGS
J. C. MILLER,
1U7.......Foydras Street.......107
(Formerly of CASSIDY t MILLER.)
SAIL NIA IYER
--AND—.
COTTON BUCK AGENT,
r'A rtTVTTtr ATi
Hat on band a large assortment of
FLAGS OF ALT. NATIONS, TENTS. '
TARPAULINS, ETC.
AT LOWEST Fill CMS
J. C. MILLER. 107 Feydrea street.
424 1«
25 DOLLARS.
SAVE
THE WILSON!
Best in the World r
WARRANTED 5 YEARS (
No Inst ructions required to use It»
m Suitable for Family Use and
Manufacturing. It will aew fron»
tissue paper to harness leather.
, t5T Machines made especially
for BRAIDING, RUFFLING.
BINDING, mid a variety of ape*
dallies in manufacturina.
BICES Bill I« SUIT TOE TIMES,
Either for Cash or Installment -
Payments or Credit* ,
ACENTS WANTED.
Send for illustrated catalogue of styles aad
prices. Address,
Wilson Sewing Machine Co«
iSq Canal Street, New Orleans, La,
!
Southern S ates Agricultural
* -. • —AX'D—
INEUSTRIAL EXPOSITION.
•peclal Notice.
The entry B oks will close THIS EVENING, at
6 o'clock positively, when the office of the General
Superintendent wi.l lie transferred to the EA.R
GROUNDS.
• SAMT. MUI.LTN,
F25 General Superintendent
G runewtild's Pianos
ABE U SURPASSED.
Th y are of FIRST -CL ASS MAKERS,
REASONABLE IN PRICE.
And are sold on EASY TERMS.
Don't sprnd vnnr money on trashy Pi »nos w en
you can get a STeINVVAY, KN.aBS or PLEYEL
Piano, sud which will 'ast von fry yea-s and always
give satisfaction. My stock is the LARGEST in the
city, and you will do well to call on me before making
arrangements elsewht re.
LOUIS GRÜNEWALD,
Grünewald Hall,
tri Baronne street near Canal.
F20 SnWeSa
Mechanic »•' and Agricultural Pair
Association of Louisiana .
«fecial notice.
The Stockholder* ef this Associât on are hereby
notified to call npon tbe Secretary, at the office of tbe
Association, Mechanics' lustitute, and procure
SEW STOCKHOLDERS* TICKETS
DOR ft §76.
None other will be recognized at the gate* during
the SOUTHERN STATES AGRICULTURAL and
INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION.
F20 fit t. N. MARKS, President
VILLE
FERTILIZERS,
MANUFACTURED BY THE
Chemical
»LOOP FERTILTZîNÔ
WORKS,
Offlrl t 37 Worth Peters StreM, htiwtrn
Bienville an« Customhouse Street*.
FERTILIZER N«. t,
FOR SUGAR CANE.
FERTILIZER ffa. 2,
FOR COTTON.
FERTILIZER FOR
Orange anil Fruit Trees.
FERTILIZER«.
For Sugar Cane.........................|60 001
For Cotton........... 45 00
For Orange and Fru t Trees............ 60 00
Pure Super Phosphate................. 65 00
Pure Ground Bones..................... 45 00
Per ton—in sacks of 200 pounds.
Chemical* Always on Haad s
NITRATE OF POTASH.
NITRATE OF SODA.
MURIATE OF POTASn.
LAND PLASTER.
SULPHURIC ACID.
SYLPH ATE OF AMMONIA.
Fertilize s compounded on ordifs for all
crops. Tliis branch a specialty.
OFFICE :
37 North Peters Street«
Between Customhouse and Bienvill .
F6
* New Goods for Spring Trade,
—AT—
36*. NtJwacAtiig'a.
40 Camp «freer.
NEW AND ELEGANT DESIGNS OF
WALL PAPER and WINDOW KIIADËS.
PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.
F20 lm2dp
of
a
to
I
at
en
the
tbe
Also
Notice to Delinquents.
QFFrCE STATE TAX COLLECTOR, V
First Distrkt 169 Giaviei st.. Up Stairs. >
New Or,cans. Fen. 19, 1876. V
The ten dar s' notice having e«pired. and unpaid
LICENSES and « API l A L TA X for th* year ls7ti
suits will be iostiiu ed against all deiinqnen»*, and
their places of business ch-srd, ACCOivDING TO
LAW, if not p ,id at once. By pr nipt attention to
this notice, costs and anno once will be obviated.
1*20 10t X. C. FOLGER. Collector.
The Attention of Pijxno Buyer »
And others is cal'ed to
The. new scale CH1CK
EK1NG UPRIGHT the
fiiost perfect, b rt toned and
(•est finished piniig ever of- !
ferod for sde in'his lity.
Also, the elegant DUN
HAM. too low priced
HALÉ, and the popular
PLEYEL Pianos, widen are
fur sale at uniiNuallv 1 w
Di icos for c»sh or on month
ly payments.
Sole Agent for the Celebrated EiTEY.
MASON & HAMLIN'S ORGANS.
SECOND HAND PIANOS and ORGANS from
Twouty Dollars upwards.
Pianos and Organs TUNED and REPAIRED by
by the best workmen.
PHILIP WEELETN.
ja23 Odp 78 80. 82 and 90 B tronne street^
Southern States Agricultural anil'
Industrial Exposition.
Notice to Cxhibltnr»«
Office of the General Superintendent, )
No. 80 Can p Street. >
New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1876. y
The Entry Books for Exhibitors will be opened at
this office on MONDAY, January 10. .
All applications for entries must be made upon the
printed forms of applicatijn, which will be furnished
at this office.
The Ground* and Buildings Will be open for the
reception of article* for exhibition from February 1
until February 25, 1876, aud exhibitors are requested
to make early appl cation, aud entry, in order that
everything may be in position c.n the opening day
The Entry Books will lie closed on FRIDAY
EVENING, February 25. 1876, at 6 o clock, and no
entries will he allowed after that time. THIS RULE
IS IMPERATIVE:
Catalogues and general information furnished to
applicants ut this office.
n y order of the Executive Committee.
jaPtf SAML. MULLEN. Penh Supft
H. P. BUCKLEY,
..................Camp Street......... .........S'
HAS FOR SALE AT LOWEST PRICES.
WALTJÎAJR STEM.WIiVDFRS,.
-ALSO
Other American, English and Swiss WATCHES
in all Stj les, for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Always oa hand, a full assortment of SILVEB
WAhE and JEWELRY. .
WATCHES carefully repaired! DIAMONDS ta
rn- un ted. <512 tf 2dp
The Purest Wines in the World !
KELLEY'S ISLAND PORT WINE.
SWEET CAT AAVBA.
DRY CATAWBA,* *
_ ISLAND QUEEN CHASlFAGNfci'
Superior to any other. For sale by all grace! s.
•I1RBPSHIUE A «9.«
No. 15 Peter* street. 1
Sole Southern Agents Kellev's Island WiaoComnan*
d-5 _._ ^
BEAU THIS THROUGH '
THEN BEAD IT AGAIN? I
V ^
V
%
k
IN ALL grades, sizes, styles AXI>
PRICES, FROM 912 TO ftMIT.
The following WATCHES are all PATENT
LEVERS in HUNTING CASES, STRONG an#
DURABLE, FULLY GUARANTEED and fa>
SUPERIOR to any imported Watch at like price :
No. 1. NICKEL CASE........................$12 00
X«. 2. solid silver cask ................15 on
No. 3. SOLL! SILVER STEM WINDER..... 25 0»
No. 4. 14 KARAT SOLID GOLD CASK...... 55 0»
No. 5 . 18 karat solid gold case......70 0»
No 6. 14 KARAT GOLD STEM WINDER.. 75 00
No. 7. 18 KARAT GUI D STEM WINDER..100 0»
No. 8. LADIES GOLD WATCH..............45 OO
No. 9 . ladies gold siem winder .....05 on
I will «end any of the above liy Exp eee, C. O. D-,
or by Mail, reaLtored, at my risk on receipt of price.
Money can be »ent «afely by Fust Office Older, ia
RegiRt- red Letter, or by Draft.
Addre-s A. M. HILL. Jeweler,
86 St. Charles street, corner Commercial Place.
_ n7 3m ajp FrSaSu_
Southern Shoe Manufactory 0
NEW ORLEAN8, July 24, 187Î,
Genri emen af New Orlenne and LoMtelana*
1 am starting a Southern Sl)*e Factory I only ash
of yon geatlemen. fos your patronage. I guatantee
that I will give you better satisfaction in ray line than
any eetablishmenAn this city—cheaper and ofa better
materhü. Gentlemen, you all knew that there are
a grf at many laborer* and mechanic* in this Stete
who have no work nor any food for theix wives *Bd
children. If we will start onr own factories and pat
ronise each other we could easily get along with onr
factories of all deecription*. Our money is all giver*
to the North and West, which i* million* of dollar*.
I have been established in the Shoe Manufactory for
the last twenty-five years, and call the attention of
Ihe community in general.
Your* respectfully,
' JOHN HANSEN,
35 Cana streak

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