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The Lafayette advertiser. [volume] (Vermilionville [i.e. Lafayette], La.) 1865-19??, October 22, 1909, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079068/1909-10-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE ADVERTISER.
alui'shed Semi-Weekly 03 Tumd&)
and Friday by
LoROSEN & ALPhA, Pr.prrd1a.
1ubscription, $1.00 a yr, pay.
able in advance.
Gmter4 as smcmii cla s ug., S. U
lint-sic. at 1 'mne. La= gag.
Am of Cumpm .l N ;fIf.
IFRIDAY. OCeTOI3E1 22, 1909.
SCHOOL TAX CARRIES.
Tuesday the tax for the mainte
nahtic of the public schools carried
by good majoriti,.s in the town of
La f'y,!te an:d thv parish. This was
to hle explected. for the people of this
pa:1i. ha;e in lthe past sholtvn them
s.'lves thoroughly :1 favor of schools,
and :,ow that ftndl wetlre needed to
run teI schools for not less than
('eight n o ths in bt - year. it was -'r
taii1 that th y* wouii respond to the
call.
Some Early Railroading.
'YoatI ; C"'n:naniot.
In the early days of railroading,
sny" Mir. ('har'es Ft'red:ric k Carter in
hIs " t 'ent interestilg volulme, ."' heni
Itailrcuads Were New,' the engineer
nas the autocrat of his train, and
natura)!ly conservative. as autocrats
con'r only are. lHe seldom welcomed
an innovation. even one as simple as
the bell cord, first inventdtl by ('on
ductor Hetnry Ayers in 1842. Previ
ou.,,y there had bhen no means of
(tlo..uiiunication between the enigine
antd the moving train.
Conductor Ayers rigged up a cord
passing through the cars with a stick
tied to the end that hung down in
the engine, and told his engineer that
when he saw that stick jerk up and
down he was to stop. But Jacob Har
nel, who ran that engine, was a slow,
steady, obstinate German, with a
sense of his own dignity, and he con
sidered the jerking stick an intrusive
impertinence.
He quietly cut it loose and tied up
the cord.
The next day he repeated the per
formance.
The third day Ayers told him he
would leave that stick and obey its
signals or he, Ayers, would know the
reason why.
It was again cut loose, and at the
first stop Ayers, with fire in his eye,
. yanked the indignant Harnel from his
engine and, after a tough fight, thor
oughly thrashed him.
The primitive stick was soon re
placed by a bell, and the device was
* complete.
Engineer Isaac Lewis rebelled with
'equal vigor against the first attempt
to run a train by telegraphic orders,
at a time when the telegraph, then
in its infancy, was still so little used
.that messages began formally, "Dear
Sir," and concluded with, "Yours re
*pectfully."
He was running a belated west
nd train one day in 1852 when it
'tred to his superintendent, Chas.
eaberho was on board, to tele
eat a' Turner's, where they had
* beet an express, to know if
. reached the station ahead.
S rot. and he then wrote the first
Jraphic train order issued in this
.hlhtry:
S"To operator at Goshen: Hold east
rd train till further orders. Chas.
Inot, superintendent."
He then wrote another order, which
S, ,J, P. BUQUOR.
Hats L Cleaning
Cleaned E Pressing
and T Repair
Blocked: M ing
Like i Neatly
New. Done.
B'
E
Work y Fall
Y And
Called 0 Winter
For ' Pattern s
And R Now on
Delly- Display.
ered. T
Suits
..3$15 Up
PHONE Pants
. 4.50 Up
239 IIDE-FER-U
J,.IP. BUQUOR.
LARGEST DISPLAY II SOUTHWEST LA.
he handed the conductor, directing the
engineer to go ahead regardless of
the express.
Isaac Lewis merely inquired if they
thought he looked like a fool, and de
clined to budge.
Neither persuasion nor threats
availed, and whýn M1lr. tlin ot at length
ordered him down from his engine
and took his place as engineer, he
went instantly to the last scat of the
rear car and sat there. tensely await
ing the head-on collision which did
not happen.
By repeating his telegraphic orders
and inquiries. Minot ran the train
through to Port Jarvis, and saved two
hours, a result which soon led to the
announcement that all trains on the
Erie road thereafter would move un
der telegriuphic orders.
The engineers. under Lewis' lead.
protested at the "crazy risk,' but they
had to yield.
A National Scandal.
Nansas ('ity Star.
The charges made by Representa
tive Herb)ert Parsons of New York
concerning the deal by which Speaker
Cannon got Democratic help in his
rules fight last March. emphasizes the
point that was repeatedly made at the
time that the speaker's victory was
a national scandal. Parsons isn't
given to wild statements. He is chair
man of the New York Republican
county committee, a close personal
friend of Theodore Roosevelt, and a
man of progressive tendencies, though
not a rules insurgent.
HIis assertion is that a (teal was
consummated at Albany by which
Democratic votes were given to the
speaker in exchange for a pledge that
the Republican legislative leaders
would kill certain bills obnoxious to
Tammany. These bills provided for
better election laws and so would
have jeopardizes the control of New
York city by Mr. Murphy's organiza
tion, which always relies more or less
on crooked elections.
The records sustain the charges to
this extent. That eight Democrats
from New York city bolted the party
caucus and voted with Cannon on the
rules fight; and that the election bills
in question were killed by the co
operation of Republicans and Demo
crats in the New York legislature.
Besides there was a mass of indirect
evidence that is often conclusive to
the persons acquainted with it.
Nobody in Washington at all fa
miliar with.the situation doubted that
there was a deal that defeated the
efforts of Murdock, Madison and the
other insurgents to correct the rules.
It was known, for instance, that the
Tammany representatives were in
constant communication with New
York by long distance terephone. The
Congressional Recoid proved the col
lusion between the speaker and Rep
resentative Fitzgerald, who was se
lected to offer the dummy amend
ments to the rules. Before Fitzgerald
*had announced the purpose for which
he rose, Cannon gave the information
to the house. Later it leaked out that
there had been some sort of a deal
made at Albany for the suppression
No Others.
It is a class to itself. It has no ri
vals. It cures where others merely
relieve. For aches, pains, stiff joints,
cuts, burns, bites, etc-, it is the quick
est and surest remedy ever devised.
We mean Hunt's, Lightning Oil. 50c
and 25c bottles.
----- ----------
of legislation in exchange for the
votes that saved Cannon. Presumably
Parsons has obtained more definite
information on a subject that was a
matter of common gossip at the cap
itol.
In reply the speaker protests tiat
the New York county chairtman h .
grievance. W\hic:h is about all the
defense that the situation admit~ :f.
Cannon is a national di.grac.
D)oesn t it pass undersltni din.g tat
decent Il1t1 u w:ll Ipermit party disip
line and fear of punishml nt to force
them from the suplport without which
his power would crumble?.
For Rent.
One good house-will rent cheap.
Apply to Ulysse Poimboeuf, Clinton
street. Phone 286.
Sign and Guard of Sanity.
A man's life and inHluence is meas
ured by the range of interests to
which he can respond. A store of per
manent and valued interests is both
a sign and guard of sanity.
And She Froze Him with a Stare.
Lady-I wish to be taken standing
in my hat.
Photo Artist-You can be taken sit
ting in it, if you like. I am sure there
is plenty of room.-Illustrated L'its.
How Disperse Hot Air.
A French scientist has perf cted a
means of dispersing fog by hot aIr.
But what we need more than that is
some means of getting rid of hot air.
The First National
A Conservative, yet Progressive Bank,
Which merits your Patronage.
CAPITAL, SURPUS AND PROFITS
$200.000.00
Officers:
N. P. MOSS, President;
J. G. PARKEISON, Vice-President;
S. R. PARKERSON, Cashier;
F. V. MOUTON, Assistant Cashier.
Directors:
N. P. MOSS, F. DEMIANADE.
P. B. ROY, M. BILLEAUD. .T.,
J. A. ROY, JOHN WHITTINGTON:
C. D. CAFFERY, J. G. PARKERSON,
i The Cool Vather
Is a Reminder
that it is time to put up your heaters,
and you will find that the
HOT BLAZE HEATER
is one of the most satisfactory and eco
nomical made. Call and let us show
you the Hot Blaze Heater and tell you
of its good points.
We Sell LILY DARLING and CHARTER OAK STOVES.
Falk Mercantile Co.,. Ltd.
i." . " t .t-. -:-Oo t: +-:·. .-+:.. -
j1ONPY1
BACK
T IlERE'S a lot of money
hT-re and in this vicinity.
Possessors of thatmoney
read this paper; they swear by
it. 'Thev want to l)e shown.
If your goods are right, they
want to buy. This paper
talks to that money at regular
intervals. It's money that
talks back and talks back
strong. Get your share-do
your talking through our ad
v-rtising columns.
(t.,pylright, iJ.J. by W. N. U.,
Has to Be Cited.
"Possibly there is something on
earth that is a surer and quicker cure
for cuts, burns, aches, pains and
bruises than Hunt's Lightning Oil. If
so, I would like to be cited. For twen
ty years I have been unable to find
anything better myself." H. H. Ward,
Rayville, La.
y.
k~e:;>
X ý
.%I~ 1t I( )kVII I) ( ill
"When fH \ i s at the
Jefferson I 'Iht et" ( t _r
if .
~~
~I
~j
ADELAIDE THURSTON, in "Con
trary Mary" at the Jefferson, Oct. 24.
Six Months After Marriage.
After a woman has been married
to a man six months she begins to
feel a romantic interest in the man
she didn't marry.
Many Good--One Best.
"So many oils and liniments are
advertised it is hard to decide which
to buy- I tried a number before using
Hunt's Lightning Oil. After using it
once, however, I realized I had found
the best there was, and it was useless
to look further. If it fails it's 'all off.'
No other liniment will hit the spot if
Hunt's Lightning Oil fails." C. G.
Young, Okeene, Okla. 25c and 50c
bottles.
MOUNT CARMEL GONVEm1
LAFA YErI'IE. LA.
Boarding and Day School
A full course in French ,t...
...Jighsh. Pupils At every det'ij;
(iOOD SERVICE
is what you always get at
- The -
GOROCN SHAVIIG PARLOR
HOT ANT COLD BATHS
The Latest Styles
IN LADIES'
FALL and WINTER
HATS
You will find in my new stock just
received, and you are specially in
Sited tc call and see them.
Hats Trimmed To Order.
Also a Nice Stock of False Hair.
MISS MARIE CASTEL
Administrator's Sale.
Suttccessi.in of Corinnel I).oiengeaux,
E.:ight,(entjh .Jtldicial l)ist1 it Court. No.
"2; -, luifai tt Patrisli, Louisiana.
I01 \irtier of 0 nil ,rl ,. r of the ll onor
tble Ei'- lh .tlc ltth .ul ih'ial District
,. o it in .l(l for the la':! sh of Lafay
tre. Lo isit ltna, dtell ,pt. 11, 1909,
I ill st II for e'ith it pulllic auction
to the lust andl highest bidder at the
fronlt or of l 11il cour.)llt lhotus-', at La
Iit,.ta. Loui<iana: , betr.we legal sale
louis on
SA.T' Ii)AY. O('TOI.IR t., 1109,
Olh followinig (disr t.il property, to
vii :
()!(e ( l;tai:n trlc't or lot of land
situated in I,:Lf.ayrtt Parishl, ouisi
ti , ,:l" s; r:i g O e 11 h:1lf arpent, to
,othe! r itilh .iil th. h::iiliigs and im
prit)ment]os th t-r-n i, hieotn d norIth by
lIand of Tlheo ile, Trailhia, south by
land of Est'e ('omi(-uimux, east by land
of Louis .\Acele t. and \west by land of
Estteve (oIII(ux: also two cOWS and
two (;lves, on( colt. .liN 1 one lot of
househ)l!d furniture, biing property
beh!onlling to the alhovye ini(ed estate;
said sale beinlg for the purpose of
paying the debts and chbarges of the
said estate.
ALCEE POTIER,
Administrator.
it) ...i ()ARDS
IH. P. BEEI,ER,
"-t, DENTIST.
Office on Lincoln Avenie,
L AFAYETTE. - LOUISIANA.
CIHAS. D. CAFFERT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW sal
O6w on Madison St., Lasf·rsy ELm
LBO ST. CYq,
Attoruev-at-Law.
A. elaimo and eolleetioms gu
prompt attentioa.
WICS -Ia Chaurots' law ea.
JEROME MOUTON,
ATIORNBYIAT-LAW am
NOTARY PUBLIC.
Court House Squire,
LAAvBrTr. - - LOUIUAR&A.
DR. H. c. SAL~eS,
-m-DBENTIST.
Ye oR Buchanan Street,
LAAYEIT. - * . I. lBIANA
". 0. VOORHIBb,
ATTORNBY-AT-LAW nm
NOTARY PUBLIC.
Couy House Square, Lafasett, La.
T. A. McFADDIN,
Justice of the Peosr,
Third Ward.
I. B. BENDEL. DAN DEBAILLON
BENDEL & DEBAILLON,
Fire Insturan.ce Agents,
Representing some of the strongest
Insuranei ('twr! ;:nic, in America
GEO. B. IKINAPP,
'ontractor nul I uildcer.
:stiir ate., l':;ri ;: ri! S ,ccitications
Phorne P. (). Hox 29.
LA FA :' "i'". - LA
Stenography
Bookeekping
TypeWriting
TelegraFhy
All for four dollars
\V hich is an t v'.n:~ ' iif
()ie Dollar lIach. ' In fti ,
(ou will ls get is e li-h.
1i :tehl 'm h It(i , - es. I, n' ;:, ;1 ]n
ship. gifmna-tics. military
drill --and the thfier cthusi.
asIn ot school life at one
of our great State in.ltitu
tions of learninig. rWhy
spend $10N) some-where, or
$200 somewhere else. or
.*300 in some other State
for these things, when
YOUR OWN STATE
iprovides them for yvo
Free! Free! Free!
fAnd, beside that.our reg
ular academic-industrial
course will give you the
foundation for your later
college and professional
courses, whether .ou wish
to become a lawyer, doc
tor, teacher, chemist, me
chanical or electrical en
gineer, or anything else.
¶Send for a Special Circu
lar, Commercial Depart
ment. And for particulars
write to E L. STEPHENS,
Presiden
Southrlt'estern
Louisiana
Industrial
Institute
La foaest. h

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