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Sugar planter. [volume] (West Baton Rouge [i.e. Port Allen, West Baton Rouge Parish, La.]) 1856-1925, July 05, 1856, Image 1

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SN IES. WEST ]LATON ROUGE, SATURDAY, .JULY 5, 15I. N. 27.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MORNING.
Editor & Proprietor.
1VES1' !miTO N R () uuL'r.
Atlvyrti~l«:; -.\ .: t" nil r. ut 1.": . !in, .tn
TJj'uu«nu to TIii 1., " 't1:r
Jobt Prtntlrng
itch 1lt"t Itrv r \ , I".. 1,. T.\
an te \.N,.I v d ,in ::
.1tatc . 1t . , 1.. l ,t ý.i.
AYER'SI
PILLS.1
FOR ALL THE PURPOSES OF A
F"AMILY PHYSIC.
TrwEt: has lntg existed a public demand for an
cir'. ve puri:itivs pill which c.uiid he relied on as
s':re and vrr.ctvl safe in its operation. Thi hL..s
beein prepartr tFo meet that demand. and an exten
Lii tradl of its irtues has conclusively shown with
,;iat success it accomplishes the pfo.tse designed.
It is cany to make a physical pil; ._t not eiasy to
make the best of all pi'rs-one which should have
1no. of the o!'jctions, but all the advantages, of.
cry ethcr. 'This has been attemtetd here, and
w:ith what smce.Is we would respectfully submit to
tia pubiic dci-jion. It has been unfortunate for
the patient hitherto that almost every purgative
medicine is acrimonious and irritating to the bow
elt. This is not. aMany of them produce so much
gripiln pain and revulsion in the system as to more
than cmil erhtalahice the good to be derived from
them. ihee piils produce no irritation or pain,
tilenss it ar-ee from a previously existing obstruc
tiuu or deratngement in the bowels. Being purely
vegtcLlet, nIo iirm nll arise from their use in any
iualltit v; but it i. better that any medicine should
be taken judi'iitly. M1inete directions for their
ui- in the several diseases to which they are ap
e;:bcin are gielt onl the bm:. Anmnou the corn
rt a·nt- wi'hlt have hoe n speedily cured by them. we
,a n,:tion Lver I' mtplaint. in its varitus forms
f .l:.ult .. Indiiat inn. Languor and Loss of Ap
i, tite. itl-tie-,.c lrrit:bititv. Bilious Headache,
lii.i 's FE\evr, e`eier ::nd Ague. Pain in the Side
rI,1 iT s: i ,hr, in truth, all these are but the con
slu'r.en, of diiav,- l action in the liver. As an
ali:eit thi:ev atiirl prompt and sure relief in Cos
t;lrus, 'ile. (:Colie, Dsetent'r'. Humors. Scrofula
and 111v y. Colids with sloreni. of the body, Licers
.'ttd imtritt of the lltidrl, Irrye',uhities; in short,
arl: and every case ws here a purgative is required.
'they hae e dl-o lroduced untie singularly suc
e-sitit cure; n n heumatisn:. Cot;. ])rps, Grar el,
F'ry.lqnlas, Pltpitatin of the lh .Ir, Pai ,s in the
ta, l, Stomach. and Side. "itey s-ti t;d te freely
tiktin in the estring of the ye;.r, to pnuris the blood
aud prepare the system for the chanige of seasons.
.it occasiona! do-e stimtni.ltc.s the stiomacch and
btrvels into healthy action, and restlres the appe
tite and vigor. T'1ev purify the ,bld, and, by their
stimulant action on the circulaltory system, reno
'ate the strength of the body, and restore the
wasted or diia.sed enerie:s of the whole organism.
IJetllce an ocasoial donse i, advantageous. ev\n
thoutgh itso serious deratneecliut exists: 'let un
necessary dosing ihould niever be c.tried tao far, 1
as every purgative medicine redruces the strength,
h,lttn tiaktte to excse. 'T'.e thousand cases in which
a physic is required cannot be enumcerated here, but
they suggest tthemscel.s to the reasonl of every
LbdVy; and it is cnfidently believed this pill will
answetr a better purpose tltan any thing which has
hitherto hibt at: aiablie to mankind. When their
virtues are once known, the puiliic will no longer I
doubt what remedy to empl(,oy when in need of a
cathartic medicine. Beingc sugar-wrapp.ed, they are
JlcaLsant to take, aIn being purely vegetable, no
aar anrise front their use in any quantity.
For minute directions, see wrapper on the Box.
PREI'AI:ED BY r
DR. JAMES C. AYER,
Practical and AnalyticalChem'ist, r
LOWELL, IASS. t
Price 25 Cents per Box. Five Boxes for $L
AYER'S
CHERRY PECTORAL,
C or the rapid Cure of
COUGHS, COLDS, HOARSENESS,
BRO HCIITIS, WMHOOPING-COUGl,
CROIUP, ASTHMA, AND
CONSTUMPI'TION.
Trts remedy has won for itself such notoriety g
from its cures of every variety of pulnsoary disease,
that it is entirely unnecessary to recount the evi
dences of its virtues in any co'mmunity where it t
has been employed. So wide is the field of its use- s'
fulness, and so numerous the cases of its cures, t
that almost every section of the country abounds r,
in persons publicly known, who have been restored d
from alarming and even desperate diseases of the
lungs by its use. When once tried its superiority l
over every other medicire of its kind is too appa
rent to escape observation, and where its virtues are 9
known, the public no longer hesitate what antidote i
to employ for the distressing and dangerous aflfec
tions of the pulmonary organs which are incident c
to our climate. Not only in formidable attacks 1
upon the lungs, but for the milder varieties of t
COLDS, Cov't'Hi, HOARSENaES, &c.; and for CHIL
vSin it is the pleasantest and safest medicine that
can be obtained.
As it has long been in constant use througbeut t
this section, we need not do more than assure tse L
People its quality is kept up to the best thatit ever H
has been, and that the genuine article is sold by
H. T. WADDIL.
WItLLIA BOCtiEL,
J. L. VBILkLT.
,. B. Rou;e Feb. 2t lull ci
An Oration. B.
Ddircred before the TVashington .tssocriatiom of S(
Ltwt':st er on the .lth f J:l I. 11. t h
By James Buchanan, Eaq. t..
Thirty-nine years ago, upon this day, we of
were declared an independent people. At pa
that time the Continental Congress burrt thi
asu:.dcr the chains which bound them to of
Great Britain, and resolved to be free, or ra
perish in the attempt. IUpon that day they w
presented to th, wurd a epectacle tof witimn u1
a;l i, :,-ess which has never been excelled. it
T'i :tke a lr oper estimate of their condluct o
S . ,, t t:.ke it.t view the then sit tation of 1,
tiis ,i.l;1 compared with that of our el:e
n Iv. t): the use side, the arimes of Great 'i
Britain were numerous andt veteran: they
'were le.! by coeItulnanders who hiad rtequirel: C,
Smiilitary reputation in cvery clime; they t n
w,,re ,-p'loit:ed and furnishetd w:th every pi
tnlhn ,nwet ifwar ly a umivti who.e wealth T'I
L.1,. upon l i:l'erel:t me a,' ý-:on:-, p;r'h.;,ed the ti,
s*rs ices of all the crowre! heads in :u"rope. t ,
(n the othier side. our alites were 7,mall and ,
uactuaihted with n:i!ltary d:-<i'1, ,,e: <,'a ,'r
:i,'e s ,is ere de.-titute ,, Itexpelle 1,.,": aid twe ti.
were so Inrtlralv poor that lt"ur ae sitl- ,
dits were not mo re than hail clot.,edi an ou
their winter marci.es over the fr'stv _'roTunl wi
whi.h thev ;et. detending.il ul be. ack,' ;
by the blid th: t flo el ii. theilr naked to
lu even these were not t,,e onv d:!isa a,:- ' cc
ta t. utler which we laIored,. hIlst our ,:i
, enemy inivated uN fr'n, witt,,il.:t the torch tofI vi
discord and of treasn wa lihted ul wtthin. T i
When IndiIpndedence was dtcl:red, tile r[llt!1- ý cr
v t er country had a 1,,,werful par:y thlru .ghcout ti
al thrdde dde State-. and many adacrent inm ith
every other part ot the Union. to
HlE nEC,)TIES VEi:y PA.TIIOTIC.ALY INCLINFD.
DI)readful, therefore. was the res ;osibiii: "
of t!,at I ,'tlnres. IIHt not victor: crowned et.
their banners, their tames wou!d hate b- en
Scursed ,by the peop!e ot this oeun.t!r as the
,prom,'ters of a destructive civil war. whie ,
their blood would have flowed on the scaf- IW
t;fol as a sacrifice to appease the spirit o'
Btinlsli vengeance. lit this aw:fl situation.
r whilst the dark cloud of destruction appeared
ready to burst upon them. they declared tot ""
the world our Independence. T'hey thought
I that.
Ih • One day,. one hour or virtulou li. rte,
Was worth a ahoh-. ot r oity .,f tl, ::: e.'
:e Everlasting honor to their nanmes! The
,I4 gratitude of a free people wil iforever hallow
d their memory.
0 It is not my intention, at this time. to give
r you a narrative cf t.hoe glori,,us events of
e the Revolutionary War. which !,d to the
recognition of our Independence by Great
e Britain and by the world. They have been
the subject of so many orations. ard of suh
i, general interest that they are familiar to every
mind. The present oration shall contain a
short historical sketch of the most prominent
actions of the party now in power in this
d country, and their consequences: and also
Sinquiry corcerning the course which sound
policy dictates that the government bf the
e !nited States should pursue in fi:ture. The
ts imprtance of thosle siubjects. alth.ough not
strictly co:e:ccted with the celleration of this
, day. will. I trust be their apology to every
e mind.
iH TOT'CuEs TIIE DEorr.nArre 1.i';Ui LY.
2 There 'uas a pow.crfdu FACTION in the
a ,nited States opposed to the a,!qpti,,t rf the Fri
eral Constilut io The individuals of which
t, it was composed were called anUi-federalists.
and were the fnounders of the I,ons ratic party.
SThey gloried insetting themselves in array
e against our present admirable frii of govecrn'
nent. The author.s of this opposirioa war
a cch/fly DI)IfAGOiGUES, who might have
. ris.. to the head of a State faction, but who
d :r:t conscious that their talent SwniC ul ,e
ecli pted. when the luminaries of the Unuite:l
State s would be collected around ti e r:.er
' at Government. To gratify their a:c!,i-i
they wished that this country should conuti:ue
•.divided into a number of petty State sover
Seiguties wit hout any efficient govcrnmen: for
their eountrcl.
i This they desired, although they had t.e
l' example of ancient Greece before their eyes.
t and well knew the clashing interests of the
States and their mutual jealoues, keptalive
byalliancies with different foreign nations.
r would have made this country a perpe'tual
r theater of contention and civil war, until it
t had fled for refuge into the armsof despotism.
e They produced ruin to the State Government
and to the liberties of the people, from the
powers of the federal government. By these
means they succeeded in alarming the fears
of mony good men, and inducing them to be
lieve that government, which is now the pal
ladiumof their safety, would be the instru
ment of their destruction. Notwithstanding
their desperate efforts, the constitution was
adopted, and Washington was elected Presi
dent.
It might have been supposed that these fac
tionaries would have been awed into silence
by his wisdom and virtue. This was not the
case. The opposition which they had given
to the federal government, was now trans
ferred to its administration, At first, indeed,
the voice of calumny dared only to whisper
against Washington and his measures, but ere
long it was heard in thunder.
When the French revolution commenced,
it was hailed by the people of this country,
generally. as the dawn of rational liberty in
Europe. But when, in its progress, it had
become the destruction of religion and morali
ty-when thousands of citizens were daily
sentenced to death and butchered without
trial and without crime-when all the hor
rors of anarchy were poured out upon that
devoted country at home-and when Attilla
like it had become the scourge of God to
foreign nations; the Washingtonian party be
gan to entertain fears of its result. and tholuht
it necessary to stem the torrent of French in
fluence, which was rapidly overdowing our
country. To this duty they we& imperious
ly called, as it was not only in theory one of
the avowed objects of that government to
spread revolutionary principles over the
whole world, but thay had actually attempted
to sow the seeds of rebellion throughout the
United States.
HE ACCUSES THE DEMOCRACY OF LIBELLING
WASHINGTON.
True to their original principles and their
first love, the Democratic party of that dry be
came more thefricnds of the Fr",ch AS THEY
Bil \. Ml '.; 1 l,: Till': I_ N .\ III;S (IF,
SOCIAL O)RIIER. Wlhen the procllination'
of neutrality .a;a isu,'d by \Vahihg, ton-i
that proclarlation which is now almost uni
versIally admitted to have been the salvationi
of ourlpountrv-that proclamation whiiichl im
partiily I,!lied F:Ilgland and France u1pon
the sa.le tooting, and laid openthe commerce
of the world to America, they were so e,
raged that we had not entered into an; alliance
with the French Republic. and wageI .ar
llunder their tbanners. against the huanIlllO race.
SBut n lhieu the treaty of peace with LEnIlaud.
cm(ii:ilily called Jly's treaty was ratified by
W a-shilngt,,n, " ,', .R F:\TS o( r'.L r.,AL .tnl11
w 1! 1. IIi!rFt'; F t f I"r i 'ITE DE t3C )CRATIC r t,:r
Ut'i IN s ii:.al.
IThey ol'eniy charged the Father of his
Ciultr. \witi AN .NrrrE.cr:oN OF tEjTROYINo
I:s ()I' ilC.v:Ii oFFS'PIRING. TIO Sucih a
pitch of ingratitude werb they carried BY
THEliiit IA)l(ILICAL PASSIONS, that
thei. dared publicly, and witho~tthesilt.elst
SIlttillda llll, t' ACClIE HIMI OF LCRETrLtY ZUT.- I
I1.1,; lill> :iANN INTO TIlE TREASUIY I. IKE A
- :... a. I appropriating, without autl),rity
ti :.i:,'v of tile nati:l to his r.wn incdi: idiua
luse. hii it nma!l, whose youth had been worn
Sout ill the 'e plentdid military achievec ents
wh ,II Ich nt!ie our icounlitry idepend iht and
vh "e Ia1 c a'1i experience had been devote..
to ti,,, creation al id onrane*;'lah ,Lithe fIed,'lal
"ovcrnri'.ellt-t- h l:iat la ll he, ia llnever I
it eli llo e farthli ,ig ,re oi tie public lu.nhle
tianl what tid e a elxpended i ti,e public ser
vICe. was Acct <E:s , 1w lEInSG Al E 51a 'ir fi l..t
TO" ' O(F rT : ', 1: I., i! .i:. i'i V. Iillrll': 1ii 1
cruel persecution ri.i ,oble nlind ltet sensiiiy
the etI 'S oI his couliitryimei i ingratitude. In
the bittter es o1f hi -oul he had been abused.
to ni.e his own emphatic language, in " aluch
exa:Ierated and indecent tetras, as could
carcely be applied to a Nero-a notorious
t iieli ter--or ev ,t1 to .a comlillt:ln pick-pocket.
;.. "_, 11 : I : D x.1 M Y r11 '111}-I;SL artll.E
0i WAoil::N11N.
! What must Ie our opiion of an opposition.
i'llOlse l'ISatolNS wrF.: si t.AK AND . AuI. l,-'
C IN i as to be -ratified in endeavoring to blas
f!t' character and enlbitter the o!i ai e ofi
'a :in.g ,nI A fter thus pj 'ert' n : the
,savior oft iis cou nltry, 110W LAN tiFs 1)H I. D c
,LA 'IC PA.L iLr i .aOE To CALL 111 i1SELVEns His
uI i >u opposition could divert the steady
soul of Washiigtolln from the I urpos('. Hie
had digested a -ysteml of policy whi.ih he
steadily pursued, anlid the etcrumi of faction.
His successor in oilte fur the nOil.t part
walked hisl in footstleps. To ci, t,' e at
peace a nation'l must hte really tor \ir a rIax
irn by which the Fedteral c.u:ilitl-: atIlols
were c i'nstaitly direted. II:ier ti:eir aus
pice:s tieerere, public cred:t "as well es
tablished, is the best lmeans t piuble de
fence.
tire det , o the re, ci!.io)narV woair was
nt funded. and o,i:nlrate taxes n ei : imposed.
is A navy 'was, iilt for the protect,,n of c,-I -
so merce. We considered all natitons equdaly'
1d in war, as enemies, in peace as friendsi; and
be therefore astrict neutratlty towards ail was
be pre-erved. It would be impossible to enu
ot tmeratC every v. ise measure of the "Washing
toniau a:;iauitratinus : suffice it to say, that.
r nig t hewl" cont,iannc.., the presperty of the
I y .L"was . xa.nsiled in the annals of time
The ireall, r ' ,. were almost realized.
Cl:ies ir.-e up as it by magic throughout our
he c1.untry and we alth Uiwed in upon us from
aii nati ia . The wilderness yielded to the
ishand ,, agriculture, and fields loaded with the
rihie.t itets cov\ered those ctbnimy forests
:.e wii:l beast-. but a Jew vtears before had
se, I to roam. Happy, indeed, were those
people, had they but known their own hap
- ;lss. Notwth-tanding their- prosperity.
e :action still continued to rage and to increane.
waH'r THIIEDEM( ,'RACY WOTLD DO FOR iPOWER
lThe posse. t, t' power was t- Crd rf opipo
r' sl,,n about te ,:an u'trer rigirglsse
i Their leaders pretendel to toe:!er soliituli
o f'r the wel'are of the people. Their voices
r- were loud in favor of public economy. an:
,r nainst a nav.y, an arimy and taxes. A -
thuobh France had want nly capture, ai nun:
.e ter of our vessels without :cause had actual
l. demanded tribute of us, and had tihreathen
e ed our country with iin'asion. and swith the
e dreadful fate of Venice, if it were not paid.
s although he had twice refised to recognize our 1
al ministers, who were supplicating for peace,
it they were opposed to raising an army or a
a. navy for our defence.
it After an army had been raised, notwith
ie standing it was commanded by Washington, I
te and destined to act against a foreign enemy, I
rs they loudly expressed their apprehension. I
that it was intended to destioy our republic- l
1- an form of government and substitute morn
' arc', in its stead. The taxes, necessary for
its support, afibrded them a fresh theme of 1
is declamation. By means such as these, they 1
- succeeded so well in their endeavors, that i
they at length became the majority of the
nation, and got its destinies placed in their
e hands. How they have used their power, it
e will be my endeavor to show.
WHAT DEMOCRACY HAD DONE. t
They began with the destruction of the Nary. c
,r It had been supposed by the federal adminis- i
e trations, that a navy was our best defence.- -
From the locality of our country, and from 1
the nature of such a force, they knew that it I
would be peculiary calculated to protect our
shor m foreign invasions, and to make ius
respee d by she nations of the world ; with- r
- out, like a standing army, endangering our 1
liberties. It was aison foreseen by them, f
i that, without a navy, our commerce would i
be exposed, as a rich temptation, to the ava- r
rt ice of all nations; and, in consequence of 1
our weakness, we would be subjected to con- I
o stant insults and injuries upon the ocean, I
- without tha power of resistance. It had, '
t therefore, been their policy, gradually to erect 1
a nary. and they had built a great number of I
r vessels at the time when the first Democratic D
administration came into power.
f At that moment the scene changed. They
s had promised the people an exemption from "
e taxes, and unless they could perform, their
I popularity was in dandger. They did not
a hesitate what course to pursue. THEY 131.s- r
DIATELY SOLD OUR tNATIONAL SHIPS-
THEY DISARMED THE COURTY-LEFT COlM
M1ERCE UNPROTECTED AND INVITED INSULT
AND INJUSTICE FROM ABROAD, THAT THEY n
MIIGIIT NOT BE UNDER TIlE NECESSITY OF q
I NI NtISIl r: A 'TRli' I.I , .; AY. alnd thlreI. y 1IR11;I
a init their pIpllarity at home.
"Thank, he to Providence. the del -ioin up
on this subject has var,.shed, awl their ,
I ict n ow appears in its proper liht beiore
- the public. The little remnant oif that iavev
Swhich had been tiridlyI cherisheld by Wash
inrton and his adhere:,ts, but which was le
spi.ed ,by the patriots of the present dayI has
risen triumphant above its eenemies at hor1e,
r and has made the proud mistr ess of thet occeal,
tremble. The peop'e are now cinviucedl
that a navy is their best defei:.-.
1IE \ C'tSES 'rTiE UiEMOtiIIA( OF AT1
TE.MPTING( TO DEIST:OY OURll CO.MMtii:R 'E.
TheDem!)nocratic Admninistlatia; 'ext de
c!ared war against commerce. Th.ey we're
not satistied with deprivinu it of the protec
tion of a navy, but they acted as though iihey
had dete', ci ed uponi its iuihilatin. At a
time %Iwhe lthe nations of Eirutrole were con
s ulse,' b dreadful war,. the (' ited States
beit.g, llTtrIal--a- d xhel, in llc~nl erqlnece
thereof, ail our native pitrod.ucti,,s were in
treat dehard, and t}he rar ~.'yi trade pre
ented to ",:r lmechaul a rich harvest in
ev'ry quttarter , !thI g!b'i. ltiy 0i't u,'' our
"'' ts by ti'tru' , i ccu 'n; Iut.sui'l,', u, i 'j ti s
fly thee Mecans . te strearns of wealth.
which were lI,'wi: into oiv r national tea
sury and iato ct ,ulryi from the thoii. aid
t:, tainl, of commierce. w'.rc suo, enly dried
up. T llu s :i o si, a i'. ri : ai-'u i: ave an in
: intanzeous and a dre adf:t hw to o' r I rs
pertya'. 'che t oice cf ,biIness was no hlnoer
}heaid in our cities. The stil ..es ,f <o "'h
pervaded i cery street. IIie .cI tion anr! ' es
pair .at upon er' 1 main's counte.aInce. The
newspapers of tbe day, instead of beieg filled
with arrivals fronm abroad, aid sales of iner
chaldise: teeneds with bankrupt'ies. And
our ships were laid uip to rot. .as I.scitiat O.y
smrv.rs ..S(F 'TILE WEAK AND WICK
11) 1IOli.CY OF OUR GOVERNMENT.
Who that had witnes-ed these things. can
not observe the hand vo the Corsican desp.t.
hlike that dreadful hand upon the wall of the
Babylonish monarch, writing our distruction.
Who can avoid believing tI.at bonapart was
the source of this policy. and that it was in
tended to operate in uniicon with his conti
nental system. It might perhaps be nnwar
rantab'e to assert that our adminstration
were actually corrupted by France; but that I
their politics were biassed by a warm and
improper partiality for that country, tbere
can be 1;o doubt.
iL A.tUc ,'LWLi:DGES THAT HIS TONGUE
CANNOT i'Oit'tRAY TIHE CU1RUC'TIONS OF
TIit iE D:MiCitACY.
I T.i1E %\ ILL NOT ALLOW ME TO
EN 3MI ERATl ALL TIrE OTHER WILD
ANDI) WICKEDI PRO1.ECTS OF TIlE
)I.lMOCRATI(' ADl MINISTRATION-
! utlie, it to say, that after they had deprived
us of the means of defience by destroying our
navy and thsbandii; our arnmy; after they
had taken away from us the power o0 recre
' atigl, them. by ruim ing, commerce,. the great
-ource tof our ,ational and individual weualth;
i.tter th,.v h.d. lv ref ising the Bank of thit
UnIiteid States a continuation of its charter.
and hbar;a-i :g the financial concerns of the
(;,overniment. and withdrawn the only univer
sa! paper medium of the country from circo
lation : after the people had become tuaccus
- tomed to. and. of course, unwilling to boar
r taxation : and without money in the treasury,
Ithey rashly plunged into a war witha nation
more able to do us inir'ry than amn other
iation in the world. What was the dreadfnl
necessity for this desperate measure ? Was
our contitry invaded No. Were our lib
erties in danger? No. Was it to protect our
little remaining commerce Ifrom 1:he injuries
Ssustained lv the orders in commanld ? No,.
S(',.mrce was not such a flaorite. and the
t merc iints wished for no war on that account.
HIS Ii ,A tiF IDEMOCRATIC DUPLICITY IN
REGARD TO FOGYIn1.
1, es:.es, if the existence of ti.e or .ers in
council had been its true cause. at.tr their
repeal. our country would have acct p:ed the
ot'ive branch which was oflibred Ly I:. !und.
W \ihat then was the cause! T'he one t: hich
we professed to draw the sword and risk our
all. was to dletermine an abstract question of
the law of nations, concerning which, an
opinion different from that of our adminis
tion. was held by all Europe. To decide
whether a man can expatriate himself or not.
In the decision of this question our adminis
trationlpretended to feel a deep interest.
THE' GREATER PART OF TI-OSE FOR
EIGNERS WHO WOULD BE AFFECTED
BY IT. HAD LONG BEEN THEIR EARN
EST FRIENDS, THEY HAD BEEN ONE
OF THIE GREAT MEANS OF ELEVA
TING THE PRESENT (DEMOCRATIC)
RULING PARTY, AND IT WOULID
IAVE BEEN UNGRATEFULFOR THAT
PARTY TO HAVEABANDONEDTHEM.
11E SAYS FOREIGN INFLUENCE CONTd'OLS
THE ADMINISTRATION.
Superficial observers may suppose this to
have been the real source of the war, but who
ever will carefully and impartially examine
the history of our country, will find its true
origin to have been far different. It took
its rise from the OVERWEENING pARTIALITY
WHICII THE DEuOCRRATIC PARTY have utni
lormly shown for France, and the consequent
hatred which they felt against her great ad
versary, England. To SECURE TlilS FOREIGN
INFLUENCE .HAS BEEN THE LA.iiBO OF T'rEIR
LEADERS FOn MIORE THAN TWENTY YEARS, and
well have they been repaid for their trouble,
tsr it has been one of the principal causes of
introducing end continuing ii power. Im
mediately before the war, THIS FOREIGN
INFLUENGE HAD COMPLETELY EM
BODIED ITSELF WITH EVERY POLIT
ICAL FEELING OF A MAJORITY OF
THE PEOPLE, PARTICULARLY IN THE
WEST, ITS VOICE WAS HEARD SO
LOUD AT THE SEAT OF GOVERN
MENT, that the President was obliged to
yield to its dictates or retire from office
The choice in this alternative was easily
made by a man (Madison) WHO PREFERR
ED HIS PRIVATE INTEREST TO THE
PUBLIC GOOD! We were,therefore,hur
ried into a war entirely unprepared.
TIIE ADMINISTRATION CONQUER A DIS
GRACEFUL PEACE.
What has been its results ? Exactly what
reasonable men expected at its commence
ment. We declared our intention of con
quering Canada; whether for the purpobe of
i- am elx i e tio ihe r ira ted !l.11ie. , or of roltl
l, +l: uI ,tour ,un:uv to, % i, l the docltri ioe 1
ini rl.is..nment, i, mll ateli. l to, the pr'e-nt
a question. I islad roft con t trin i it., we Iha
ie turelves. been Ii ale ill ealy quarter. and
Sthe best blood h l a o ntm r ha r strt roeanwd id
t denice of our " oil. The vl'Y c pT ,l of the
i nit Sltattcs.t e l;fit tete om i eiis 't t y ofwhic
s was reared and cotiseratedl by Vashilutoe.
I, hi een abandoned t l its t te hi jnl ll, l.i
:t:i:.e : -r :ue, D1,iaIi,,R.) who ou"ht ','I
d have shed hris last drol, of bloodv in I.s de
Atclr the (it)emocratic) administration hadt
Sentered luoi tthes oar ilr. i.a dirt tillu h avr
ward with ,I.\N1 t". { " K. dt axin
the people lit, hr i t prt. they baely vhrt-ul
from their duty iha order to tmainthain the pap
ularity, ead adopted the aodious system of!
Y carrying on the vit.,cst by burrowinto money.
SWat herwiere te elititits ol this polic:re DoFes
- not eery man it. tLhe cuntrD v .Ow. was it
Fs ee1 dssgsii ed by tie ru..utiihstration,. that
e the apnited states wou'd.in a short time. have
i becon e bankrupt, had not peace beenI cn
hi clded Thanks oto Heaven, that wre have
has obtained peace. bad aupon odura cemitri is:
ry otherwise the eatilt strctnion, of aroteral
(rovi nmoent d SPPRTDiv stllrY THE SAM
diFEEBLE t A )S tm'ight have su.k loke
the Capitol. into ruins.
IIOW1 THE DEM1,OCRACY EMIIAlIRASSEI) TIHE
('(CNTHY.
This system of antsicpatinii our revenue
r has left a t immense load of debt upon the
c,,:ntry, the payment of which will be a
gerieration. lt upon posterity. This burden
has fallen more heavily upon our country than
any other part of the Union, on account of
our r-'norous and extensive distilleries. The
late ditional dutisress imposed upon whisky
has almost destroyed it, manufacture. In its
conartice ncs it aos rot thanly it as ected the
diar tilirs but it has gived a severe blow
t hilst the distilleries were in active ope
ration, the cattle and grain found a good and
read market at homeilar at. The balance of trade
was generally in our favor. and wealth was 1
rapidly diffusing itselfthroughoutour country.
IBut Congress. by imposing a tax upon the
article, more grievous than i was able to
bear. a te pdestroyed the vety ret etue which
the inteded to raise. This instance; among
others of a similar nature. SHOWS HOW
TOTALLY DESTITUTE ARE OUR PRES.
ENT RULE.RS OF \W1.SDU1 AND FORE
SIGHT, even upon subjects immediately re
garding the pecuniary interests of the Gov-
errtnent.
'I'h., .rn n+" t'h only ev ils rnna'rnent
'O These are not the only evils consequent
I) upon that timid a:nd time serving policy. It
E has embarrassed athe governlmeilt -o mulch,
thIat it must be a long time indeed before we
'd can dare again to go to war with any power
ur tid nation, even for the maintainance of our
y dearest rights All these evis would, in a
a- great measure, have been prevented by suffi
at cient independence in the administration, to
h; have inmposed moderate taxes at the com
' mencement of the contest. The credit of
r. the nation would have then continued good,
e and we might have avoided the painful spec
- tacle of seeing the public stock sold ii the
market at an enormous discount, and greedy
s speculators enriching themselves by its pur
r chase at the expense of the toil and sweat of
. the honest yeomnanry of our country.
in Instead of exempting seamen sailingunde
or otn tla from impressment by the war. we,
il have altogethler relinquished that principle:
is because it is a well established truth in the
- law of nations that if war be waged by one
ir country against another, for a specified claim,
s and the treaty which terminated the contest
i. is si!ent upon that object, it is forever aban
ae doned. Thus the Government have at least
. yielded the very point for the maintainance
" ef which they professed to go to war; after
having expended nearly two hundred mil
hions of do lars.
XWe have niot only not obtained by the war
r anything which we were taught to expect,
e but we have lost many valuable privileges.
. All the numerous riahtsand advantagesguar
anteed to ls by Jay'- treaty have been relin
r qui-ied. Nay, we have not only been com
pelled to conclude a treaty which does not
contain one solitary stipulation in our favor
except that there shall be peace; but which
unsettles the boundaries of our country, and
t. leaves to the decision of commissioners,
whether we shall longer retain a part ot our
own territory, which we held in quiet pos
session for more than twenty years.
But notwithstanding our immense national
debt which, if the war had continued, would
soon have resulted in national bankruptcy;
notwithstanding all our property, even the
very necessaries of life, have been taxed
heavily; notwithstanding we have not ob
tained a single object which we had in view
at the commencement of the contest. but have
lost many valuable privileges; notwithstand
ing we have not obtained a single oliect
o which we had in view at the commencement
of the contest, but have lost many valuable
e privileges; notwithstanding our country has
e been invaded in every quarter, and the Capi
r tol of the United States has been laid in ashes
y by a marauding party of the enemy-this has
been ca!led a glorions uar. Glorious it has
it been, in the highest degree to the American
character but disgracrful in the extreme to the
. Administration. When the individual States
a discovered that they were abandoned by the
d general Government, whose duty it was to
protect them the fortitude of their citizens
if arose with their nuisfoltunes. The moment
we were invaded, the genius of freedom in
Q mired their souls. They rushed upon their
enemies with hallowed fury, which the hire
ling soldiers of Britain coild never feel.
F They taught our foe that the soil of freedom
: would always be the grave of its invaders.
TIITE COLNTRY RUINED BY DEMOCRATIC
RULE.
0 But do the administration, who involved
us in the late unnecessary war, derive any
credit, from their exertions? Certainly not.
' They were the spontaneous efforts of the
country, undirected by the government. The
militia who were chiefly engaged in these
glorious conflicts, were often without pay
and without comfortable clothing. The dread
ful situation of the country compelled them
t to abandon their families and the sweets of
domestic life, without any previous warmng,
to detend places which were lelt utterly un
f protected by their proper guardians-places
tI I olt ' ur i i l iel' Eln.ient of the IonttI .t. .\.s . il
ti .: "m ,i he t;l " Spafl in. whI I .r
nout i his kn gdomu t. bt i he was nominal.l.
kht,. iai n II be glory of ros'ui1r hi-s b :nt v
lrnol the arrmies of Frpanie, :s our tiV!.
:ea t take to rtrelf the cm dit of exi.l\ .:: .
our invaders.
W hen we turn our attention to tie rIap',.ii
army. which were peculiarl) under ii. iru-i
tin of the national governmeint. what ,,
didou er?. During the first yea, nf t!i, w:ir;i
that yvear in which it was to hatv c" .i wl '
,li:y;. that year within which ,,r tuit, ,'i
aint harpers were to have floated uIou t:h.
twalls ot quebec. and ail (Ca;ada w e to ;,
h een ours: the year in whrbch that i.r,iiv,.,.
was left inprotected, and the lrces otf ur
Sene:y ;were employed in Europe, it ex!c
riemced nothing but degradation and des:.
Is there an American on the lloor of ,uth
house, who has not blushed for his c'untrnv t
thou:sand times during that disracehl vii;i t
S;,.ii all the general officers. who h.,,l I i .n
been appoinuted for political purPls'er. .. -
trusted with the command at the ,niim:.e.-
1t.:cit of the contest. were disgraceLr : ;:
S1.til other. had foughtthernseie-s hii t, -.t .
;id into notice, all our battles ended ;ito
delt'at.
During the last year of the war. the regu-iar
army. under their commanders. retrieved i t,- r
lost character and performed prodilg is ,,"
valor; but unfortunately on account if the
impotence of the Government. tl, v rt-lught
against such fearful odds that the-y were
hardly able even to defend our northern firon
tier. Indeed. so dreadifl was the situa:ion
of our country for some time previous to the
close of the contest, that the occasional splen
did exploits of our heroes, like the gleams
of lightning in a dark and tenmpestuous night,
onl! added new horrors to the surrounding
gloom" They only served to show us whlat
brilliant exertions out country might have
iuade. had we been coverie;i by men who
were capable of properly ofollecting and di
recting its resources.
But peace has again returned to bless our
shores. Again, Commerce, who has for years
been weeping over the misfcrtunes of our
country, begins to smile. Again we stand
central to all European powers. What then
should be the political conduet in future ?
Precisely to purs.e the political maxinms
adopted by Washington. We ought to culti
vate peace with all nations, by adopting a
strict neutrality not only of conduct but of
sentiment.
sentiment.
We ought to make our neutrality respected
by placing ourselves in anattitude of defence.
We ouht forever to aLandon the wild project
of a philosophic visionary, of letting conuner
ce protect itself. In its protection we oug:t
to increase our navy. We ought never to
e think of embargoes and non-intercourse laws
without abhorrence. We ought to use'every
r honest exertion to turn out of power those
a weak and wicked men who have abandonell
the political path marked out for this countir
0 by Washington, and whose wild and vision
ary theories have been at length tested by
experience and found wanting.
WHAT MUST BE DO\E WITH! FORETCNIMT.
A BOLE ALL WE OUGHT TO DRIVE
FROM OUR SHORES FOREIGN INFLU
ENCE AND CHERISH EX CLU S V E
f AMERICAN FEELINGS. FOREIGNIN
FLUENCE HAS BEEN IN EVERY AGI:
THE CURSE OF REPUBLICS. HER
JAUNDICED EYE SEES ALL THINGS
IN FALSE COLO RS! The thick atmosphere
of preiudices. by which she is foreve rsurround
ed, EXCLUDES FROM HER SIGHT TIHE
LIGHT OF REASON.
Whilst she worships the nation which she
favors for their very crimes, she curses the
enemy of that nation even for their virtues.
In every age she has marched before the
1.,.emies of her country, proclaiming peace
when there was no peace, and lulling its de
fenders into fatal security, whilst the iron
hand of despotism has been aiming a death
blow at their liberties. Already has our in
tant republic felt her withering intluence.
Already has she i:ivolved us in a war which
- had nearly cost us our existence.
LET US. THEN, LEARN WISDOM.
FOM EXPERIENCE. AND FOREVER
BANISH THIS FIEND FROM OUR SO
CIETY. We are separated from the nations
of Europe by an immense ocean. We are
still more disconnected from them bya differ
ent form of government. and by the enjoy
ment of true liberty. Why, then, should we
injure ourselves, by taking part in the ambi
tious contests ot foreign despots and kings i
Should this Washingtonian policy be pur
sued, our country will again rise to its former
agreatness and wealth. Under the blessings
of Providence, we may then calculate on a
long and happy existence as a nation. We
may reasonably hope that our children's chil
dren. to remote generations, may be assembl
ed together upon this auspicious day, blessing
the memories of the men whom heaven en
trusted with the glorious task of making a
great nation free, happy and independent.
A young beauty beheld, one pleasant Sun
day evening. two horses running offat a loco
motive speed, with a light wagon. As they
approached, she was horrified at recognizing
in the occupants of the vehicle two gentlemen
of her acquaintance. "Boys," she screamed
in terror. "jump out--quick-jump out-es
pecialy 'Tonm."
It is needless to say that her sentiments as
to Tom were from that time forth no secret
FILL.oaRE RECEPTION.-New York, June
23.--Ex President Fillnmore,who came pas
senger on the Atlantic, has met with a imost
enthusiastic reception. The St. Nicholas
Hotel, where he stops, is beseiged by large
crowds, anxious to welcome him.
Guns were fired from the landing of the
steamer on Sunday evening until daylight
this morning.
"An will ye be afther telling w t kind,.
ova baste ye call this;' said a newlarrived
Irishman, holding up a wasp between his
thumb and fi ger. - Och murther! Spake
quick jor he's biting me !"
The little inceudiary called tongue it more
venomouS than poisoned arrow, and more kil
ing than a two-edged sword.
Pompey says he once worked for a man
who raised his wages .o high that lie cold
only reach theen once in two years.

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