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The star-independent. [volume] (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1904-1917, February 20, 1915, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
FAIR TO-NIGHT
AND TO-MORROW
Detailed Report. Pace •
RSSW3S." 0 VOL. 77—NO. 67.
PRZEMYSL IS
BOMBARDED
DY RUSSIANS
New Heavy Artillery
Erought Into Play
and Austrians Are
Driven Back.
LATTER SUFFER
HEAVY LOSSES
Berlin Military Expert Says the Rus
sians Are Being Pursued in Threa
Directions and Describes the Fierce
ness of Kecent Battles
Geneva, Via Paris, Feb. 20, 4.45 A.
M.—A dispatch from Cracow says tho
Kuseians haye begun to bombard
Przemysl with now heavy artillery and
that they have driven the Austrians
back aJong the line of Krosno-Jas o-
Gorlico. The Austrians are reported to
have suffered heavy losses in the past
three days at Wysckow, near Bukla
Pass.
Explains Situation in the East
Berlin, Via London, Feb. 20, 10.50
A. M.—Explaining the situation in the
east, Major Moraht, military expert of
the "Tageblatt," points out that re
ports from general headquarters show
the pursuit of tho Russians is procee l
ing in three directions. The northern
most has resulted in the capture of
Taurogen but not without lighting along
the line from Tilsit to Taurogen. The
JJussians, however, soon were forced to
retreat again, Major Moraht says, and
it .appears that no reinforcements have
been sent them from Kovno. He con
tinues:
"There also has been fighting north
west of Grodno, probably against the
fortress Garrison sent ahead against the
Germans. The situation is just as fa
vorable in the district of the Narew
river, near Loinza, where the Germans
are still contending with apparently
fresh Russian troops from the fortress
at Lomza.
"This whole movement is the result
of the Mazurian lake victory. It was
well prepared and splendidly carried
out to cover the right tlank of the for
tified line north of Tarsam."
Major Moraht declares the western
situation shows daily the hopelessness
of the allies' offensive and adds:
"Our procedure there stands in a
certain degree under the pressure of
general conditions. We must, like Gen
eral Lee, abandon for the time our bold
warfare and restrain ourselves to a
Btea«ly holding on."
ANOTHER VESSEL STRIKING
MINE. SINKS IN WAR ZONE
Naskov, Denmark, Feb. 20, Via Lon
don, 1.55 P. M.—The Norwegian
steamer Bjarko struck a mine at 8
o'clock this morning and sank. Her
crew was saved. This is the second dis
aster to Norwegian vessels since the
German blockade took effect. The
Bjarko laden with coal was on her
way from Leith to Nakskov.
The tank steamer Belridge, the first
Norwegian vessel to meet with dis
aster in the war zone after the German
decree went into" effect was torpedoed
yesterday by a submarine near Folke
stone ami was beached badly damaged.
The Bjarko was a small vessel, 128 feet
long and 286 tons gross.
LATE WAR NEWS SIMMY
In an attempt to force the Darda
nelles, tfie gate to Constantinople,
French and British warships began a
bombardment of the Turkish fortifica
tions yesterday, which is being continu
ed to-day. An allied fleet has been at
the entrance of the Dardanelles for sev
eral months and reports from time to
time indicated that damage was done
to some of the Turkish forts. An'official
statement issued in London to-day says
that aeroplanes are co-operating with
the warships in the attacks, which had
"considerable effect."
The present movement evidently is
the most formidable which has been
made in the effort to force a way
through the Dardanelles, beyond which
lies Constantinople.
Another neutral vessel, the second
Norwegian steamer to meet disaster in
the naval war zone established by Qer-
Coatlaucd on Math Pace.
* ■- ■ .. ' .'* .*• ■ \ 1 ' ' ' V" "j[SjFjyJ
•'' ' ' ' * V " • T • '*
si)e mmh ju inn <iii
THE 810 'FRISCO EXPOSITION WHI Y
1 l "\
AMAZING PANORAMA SHOWING A PART OF THE VAST MAIN EXHIBIT PALACES OF THE PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT SAN FRANCISCO.
In the center of the photograph, which was taken at on elevation of 1500 feet, rises the colossal Tower of Jewels, ±35 feet in height, or as high as the average thirty-fhe story city block. Directly in front
of the tower »* shown the superb Court of the Uuivrrse, one of the most notable features of th<r vast exposition city. 0» the extreme right of the photograph is seen the great circular Palace of Fine Arts, eleven
hundred feet its extreme length, built at a cost of S6OOjDOO.
BRITISH UNO FRENCH FLEETS
BOMBARDING DARDANELLES
FORTS WITH TELLINC EFFECT
London, Feb. 20, 2.50 P. 31.—Tho
British and French fleets, it was offi
cially announced here to-day> bombard
ed the forts of the Dardanelles on Fri
day with considerable effect. The bom
bardment of t'he Dardanelles was re
newed to-day, the announcement added,
with sea planes co-operating.
The text of the official announce
ment issued this afternoon by the Brit
ish Admiralty says:
"Yesterday morning at 8 o'clock a
British fleet of battleships and battle
cruisers, accompanied by flotillas and
aided by a strong French squadron, the
whole under the command of Vice Ad
miral Carden, began an attack upon the
forts at the entrance of the Darda
nelles.
Bombardment at Long Range
"The forts at Cape Helles and Kum
Kale were bombarded with a deliberate,
long range fire. Considerable effect was
produced on two of the forts. Two
others were frequently hit, but being
open earthworks, it was difficult to es
timate the damage. The forts, being
outranged, were unable to reply to our
fire.
"At 2.45 o'clock in the afternoon
a portion of the battleship force was
ordered to close in and engage the
forts at closer range with their sec
ondary armament.
"The forts on both sides of the en
trance then opened fire and were en
gaged at moderate range by the
Vengeance, Cornwallis ( Triumph, Suffren
and Bouvet, supported by the In
flexible ami t(he Agamemon at long
range.
Forts Arrirently Silenced
"The forts on tihe European side
were apparently silenced. The fort on
Continued on Mn<h Page.
WILL USE STEEL MADE HERE
Morton Company to Build War Trucks
From Products of Local Mills
Not only will three hundred motor
; trucks for the Russian government be
constructed in this city by the Morton
Truck & Tractor Company, but the
large quantity of steel to be used in
the machines will also be the product
of local plants. This steed wiM be oib
tained, according to a statement made
I this afternoon by W. S. Morton, man
ager of the Morton plant, from both
the Pennsylvania Steel Company and
the Central Iron and Steel Company.
The Morton Company will put on an
additional force of men when work be
gins on the big order from Russia,
which will probably be early next week.
HARRISBUKG, PA., SATURDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, 1915-12 PAGES.
PJUIftIA-PACIFiC
mmm
Pandemonium Reigns
In San Francisco at
Daybreak, to Wel
come Enterprise
ELECTRIC SPARK
STARTS BIG SHOW
President Wilson Touches Button Late
This Afternoon That Inaugurates
the Big Event Celebrating Comple
tion of the Panama Canal
By Associated Press.
' San Francisco, Feo 20. —The Pana
ma-Pacific International Exposition
opened to-day. At an early hour the
skies. were overcast, but the threats of
showers did not diminish apparently
the city's enthusiasm, which broke
forth at daybreak in a cacophony of
sound the like of which had neVer
tefore been heard in San Francisco.
For on hour, beginrdng at 6.30 o'clock,
sleam whistles, automobile sirens,
church bells, street car gongs and hulj
bub-muking instruments of all kinds
joined in a din. awaking the city and
sending its thousands toward the expo
sition. The day'B program called for
citizens, clubs and various societies and
organizations to assemble at Van Ness
avenue to march to the fair grounds.
President Sends Opening Spark
The actual opening of the exposition
gates was signalized by a> series of ar
tillery salutes from the army posts on
San Francisco bay and at noon the pro
gram called for President Wilson to
send an electric spark through the air
from Washington to be received on
the radio antennae swung on the ex
position 's tower of jewels and which
caused the doors of the exhibit palaces
to open and the machinery in machin
ery hall to start.
Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the
Interior, representing President Wilson;
Governor Hiram W. Johnson and C. C.
Moore, president of the exposition,
were the principal speakers of the day.
President Wilson was expected to for
ward a message of congratulation to
the directors to be read to the crowd.
Forty-one foreign nations and 43
States and three Territories of the
Continued «a Saveath Pas*
iiSr
Viewers Are Named by
the Court To-day to
Assess the Damages
and Benefits
FIRST MEETING
TO BE MARCH 15
Report Must Be Submitted to the
Judges by September 27, Next—
Same Board to Pass on Other Front
Street Property
.
The destinies of the residents and
property owners in the " Hardscrab
ble" district—the. river side of Front
street between Herr and Calder streets
—the damages they are to receive and
the benefits that are to be paid to them
as a result of the City's plant to wipe
out their homes for the opening of
Front street, will be determined by a
board 01 viewers appointed this morn
ing by Judge S. J. M. McO&rrell. The
members of the board are Paul G.
Smith, James D. Saltsman and Karl
Steward.
This same board of vie>wors will act
in a similar capacity with regard to
the land on the river side of Front
street, between the south side of Har
ris street and the Vouth side of Ma
clay. Reports in each case, the Court's
order of to-day requires, shall be pre
sented to the judges on or before Sep
temibor 27, next, the opening day of
the September criminal court. The find
ings then will be presented to the
Grand Jury for consideration.
The first meeting of tlhe viewers to
Coatlnord on Ninth Pave.
"PARROT & CO." NEW SERIAL
Another fascinating, mysterious
and delightfully interesting serial
will begin in the Star-Independent
on Monday, "Parrot & C 0.," by
Harold MacGrath, author of "The
Carpet From Bagdad."
The story is a dashing one, a
globe-trotting romance, original and
absorbing from start to finish. There
are many predicaments, exciting
thrills and much genuine amusement.
The first chapter, "East Is East,"
will open the tale in Monday'* Star-
Independent.
Illli
AS COM 111
Dark-Skinned Man of
Mystery Puts Up
Hard Fight Against
Two Bluecoats
POLICE THINK
HE IS INSANE
Stranger Wearing Two Pairs of Trous
ers Utters Mohammedan War Cry
When Resisting Arrest at Third
and Walnut
His hands extended toward the
heavens and uttering the Mohammedan
war cry, "Allaih Akbar," a man of
swarthy complexion who appears to bo
a Turk, created a sensation at Third
and Walnut streets at 8 o'clock this
morning. His actions so frightened a
woman dose to whom he was walking
that she appeaJed for protection to Pa
trolman C. A. Thompson, on fixed post
at the corner.
Thg mysterious man resisted the po
liceman and put up a stiff fight. A
crowd assembled and Patrolman Fehl
eisen ran to Thom[«*>n's assistance. To
gether the bluecoats suMued the man
and called the police patrol. All during
the fight the Turk shouted hdg strange
Mohammedan war crv in a loud voice.
More than a hundred persons were at
tracted by the ravings of the man.
'When in the patrol wagon the pris
oner attempted to divesrt himself of his
clothing, succeeding in tearing off one
pair of trousers before the bluecoats
halteid him. He was wearing two pairs
for warmth.
Attempts at police headquarters to
find out something aibout the captive
proved futile. He, apparently, could
not understand what the desk man was
saying. All the policemen could cateh
of his ramblings in a foreign tongue
was the constant repetition of the
words "Allah Akbar." This trans
lated means "god is great."
It was at first bedieved the man had
ese-aped from the Pennsylvania State
Hospital for the Insane, north of the
city, but no patients answering his de
| scription is missing there. Efforts to
learn his name anid his place of resi
dence were futile, as no interpreter
could understand him. He was sent to
the l>auphin county jail on a "John
Doe" committment to "await develop
ments."
The police believe that some of the
man's friends will become anxious
about him and make inquiries in his
behalf. The police are under the im
pression that the man is insane.
BOY.B, CALLS FIRE ENGINES;
SCARED WHEN THEY COME
Brooms Extinguish Small Blaze in
Grass, While Apparatus Makes Long
Run From Center of City—Gas
Causes Fire Scare at Night
A very much frightened boy was
Theodore Levan, 8 years old, son of
William F. Ij»van, of Garfield street,
| when he saw the district fire apparatus
responding to an alarm he had sent in
from box No. 73, Twenty-first and Der
ry streets, at 10.30 o'clock this morn
ing. He had sent in the alarm at the
request of an older person who feared
a fire on the short grass in a field at.
Twenty-third and Perry streets would
reach a row of houses back from Dorry
street.
The firemen, when they arrived, sev
eral companies having made the run all
the way from the central business dis
trict oif the city, could find no fire near
the box but on inquiry they learnetill
that a small boy had run ma-dly out
Derry street and pulled the hook. Fire
Chief Kindler, speeding up his machine,
found both the boy and where the firo
Continued on \luth Poire.
ATHLETE, TIED BY SOPHS,
RESCUED BY CLASSMATES
"Mike" Palm, Dickinson College Foot
ball Star, Comes Here For Class
Dinner Despite His Having Been
Bound to Hotel Bed By Rivals
"Mike" Palm, football hero and
leader of the Freshmen class of Dick
inson College, Carlisle, banqueted with
his classmates in the Metropolitan
Hotel here, last night, but only after a
sensational escapade in which he elud
ed a band of sophomores who, as his
captors, had bound him hand and foot
to the lege of a bed in a Carlisle hotel
in an effort to prevent him attending
the social function.
On Thursday night eight Sophs or
dered Palm from his bed in a donna-
Contlnued on Mnth Pn«e.
HOLD CLERGY FOR RANSOM
Half Million Dollars Demanded of
Catholics in Mexico City
By Associated Press.
Washington, Feb. 20.—A1l the na
tive Roman Catholic clergy in Mexico
City are being held for half a million
dollars ransom, official advices from
diplomatists in the Mexican capital re
ceived here to-day say, and ihe only
priests exempted are those of foreign
nationality, who have been ordered to
leave the country.
POSTSCRIPT
PRICE, ONE CENT.
SAT BOTTLES OR
RORD riOVE THE
ICED FOR IIW
Witnesses Give This as
A rgument for License
For • Paxtonia Inh,
"Dry" For a Year
NO RULINGS MADE
BY NOON TO-DAY
Court at That Time Had Heard Nine
of the Eleven Remonstrances—
Lenkerville Bottler Withdraws His
Application for a Renewal
Whiskey, beer and wine bottles and
beer cases, strewn for several milea
along the Linglestown road outside of
Harrisburg were referred to by witness
es testifying in liquor license court this
morning as indicating to them the
necessity for the relicensing of the
Paxtonia Inn, a hotel which went
"dry" a year ago. Harry F. Eckinger,
new owner of the place, is now apply
ing for a license. John M. Wix, former
proprietor, last year withdrew his ap
plication for a license when a remon
strance was filed against it.
Two of the eleven cases in which
remonstrances have been filed remained
unheard at noon to-day and the court
as yet had given no intimation as to
what disposition it will mako of tha
162 license applications which are not
Continued on Seventh Pace.
LAWYER DIES IN FIRE
Arouses Others But Is Then Trapped
By Flames and Smoke
By Associated Press.
Philadelphia, Feb. 20.—One man
was suffocated and three others wore
injured during a fire that partly de
stroyed the home of Dr. Nathan Blum
berg here early to-day. The man who
lost his life, Louis Silverman, a lawyor,
discovered the fire and aroused the
other inmates. He then returned to his
room and was trapped by flames and
smoke.
A four-month-old child of Dr. Blum
berg was dropped from a window into
the arms of a policeman and was uniu-

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