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Republican news item. [volume] (Laport, Pa.) 1896-19??, January 06, 1898, Image 1

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Republican News Item.
Published Every Friday.
Volume 2.
Business Cards.
SONESTOWN FLAGGING
Company,
g h S:£or^! amboz ' Agents.
SON IvS TOWN
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF DI'SIIORE, PENS A. *
CAPITAL • ■ •».«*
SURPLUS - - SIO,OOO.
I! General Bankinjr Bnsineßf.
F. B. POMH.r>CV. M. D. BWARTS.
Inesident. Cashier.
GALLAGHER'S HOTEL
AND RESTAURANT,
LAPORTE. PA.
F. W. GALLAGHER. Prop.
W'nrm men Is and lunches lit nil hours.
Oysters and game In reason.
„,,r supplied with
"TTPORTE HOTEL.
THOS. W. BEAHEN, Prop.
Mv increased business at the Commercial Hot.'
' iicces'itatcd mine mmmodlons quarters, all.'
luive likewise mnve«l into the large HUH WII
appointed Laurie lintel.
Thiinfong my friends for I««st patronage and rc
S|H.CI tally solicit N continuance of same, I am
Truly \iairs.
TIIOS. W. BEAHEN.
MUNCY VALLEY HOUSE.
B*IWS®AV PROPRIETORS
A Imiei nf established reputation.
Strictly Hist clans in all of its appointments.
Bai wellsitppl.eil with I In- bust of liquors.
CO.vIvIERCIAL HOUSE.
THOi. E. KENNEDV, Prop.
LAPoKTIi PA.
i his I, g nil >e I p|i "i»i' <1 hoase
lea" p I u II h 'SO y at 8 r el >0
HIL .SGROVE HOUSE.
SMITHGALL& SICK.
First-class nccoinmoJut ions.
(Centrally locaieil.
IIILLSGBOVE, PA.
CARROLL HOUSE,
D. tCBEi'E, Proprietor.
DUSIIOUK, PA.
Oae ot .be largest an I best equipped
bu.L-l ia ilit se tio til tn- ~t i'i^.
Tal. iii e b i.»t. it.ies 1.0.i .01 arpor •ay
LtngcS. I'led.
Professional Cards.-
J t J. & F. H. INGHAM,
ATTO HKY--AT" I'AW,
Legil hun s8 iittemled to
in nis iiuil a iju.t.ing comities
LAPORTE. ™
2 B~ KARNS,
Attorney-at-Law,
Prompt and careful uttention giveh to
legal business.
Olfice, over Keeler s Siore,
LAPUUTE, - • - PA.
[T J. MULLEN,
Attorney-at-Law.
LAPORTE, PA.
Office in Court House Building.
P. SHOEMAKER,
Attorney-at Law.
i Office in County Building.
LAPORTE. PA.
Collection?, conveyancing; the settlement o
estate.- and oilier legal LUMlic&s N\ in leeeiM
prompt ulteiit.ou.
A J. BRADLEYT
ATTOK.N&Y AT- I AW,
orfit'K IN I'OUNTV BU Lit IMG
NI.AH CO« UT ItOUBK.
LAP'»KTE, PA
Mtnnl.iv ol eiioli week at Forksville.
Eliery P. Ingham. Harvey K. Weww
|NGHAM & NEWITT,
ATTti BV--A -L W.
OFFICES 7U17 FRANKLIN BLILUING.
L:L.L do. I'Jtli Street Philadelphia,
II iviiu retire I fro II the office of CU ted Stati
Allol'iiei and ASSISTANT I U.ieil .-tale.- Altoruc.l
will eoiitiuue the geiieial pruct.ee of law IN 111
UII.uM .-late.- courts. ami all ihe courts of til
CII> .in I . II nit.l IA I'LTII.I.n Iphia,
HENRY r. DOWNS;
ATT .IIM YMT U«:
OKKIC IN »»» 8..1C BUILDING
CUT HUUSK AH...
LAI'OItTR. P v
J. H. CRONIN,
ATT'IRN V AT LAW,
\"TA V PI'BL C.
OFP»« K ON MAI - >T I BKT.
\\
JLPHONSUS WALSH,
APT 'RMBT-AT-L W.
Olßoe in (tank uilding.
T DOSHORB.
sties in the air! (
1 CCi I WATER WORKS, • r
> j|. ELECTRIC LIGHTS, \
S j! .STREET CARS, S
112 %({ | ETC., ETC. „ ' V
sGriat Scott,' /
/ wont the man in the moon be surprised when he sees
112 all th e metropolitan improvements in Dushore. Welf, the V
( Cld Reliable Jewelry <>
S S IGRE IS NOT A CASTLE IN THE AIR. C
2 ifcViii the Earth and is full of good things for you. if you wan J
them. I'i'.iVs lire l ijrht 100. We are constantly iniprovng our wtfcrk shop
anil cut ilo >\ur repairing promptly ami in h workmanlike manner at live j
und let ive Wi-cs. Your patronage is respectively solicited. 112
? | SETTEE BURY, P
C DUSHORE. PA. THE JEWELER. /
IVY, R. Black.-
\—> 1 c
Gr Auatc ( 112 Clark's School of
Un(irtaker,_i and Dealer in,
TTIiVITITIi
A LVUF M.INUFACTC'KSK OF LUMBEK.
FORKSYILLE, X 3 A..
Qncwaking, ! Lumber;
hiBL-ilii, i»r t lie proper find Flouring, moulding, ceiling. Hiding,
i .Metiiß-Jici ol l u■ ■ eimI»•; tut* fiiiet-t 0 „ liund, and made to special order
..-ri-i- iM/niinty, und equipment* mj at, xlidi t tmiice.
FulßSreT' - 1 Specialties:
l.r.l'reil a new and atir.ic | . ' make H specially of t!ie manufac
j V( . H -JiHirf, riicKi rs and other ture to order ol chamber Mii s, Hide board*
11 r , 1 ,■ prii'. ami HU rner ti ide. '""oUCHSe*, extension lab rn and genfriil
\ in limber Hiiii , mattresses!cabinet wink, cant hook Handles, spuil
M , r j , M M at prices to suit lh-! ""'dies, neck xokes turned troni best
nines ■ seaeOlied irmiwood.
I\W tfelvp Hip y POSSIBLE SERVICE,
I l| H NIC IJCoI j n( i Quality of Goods, at the
j Lowe/it Possible Price.
Estimal leerfully on general and special work.
2 R;. BZLJLCKI, Forksville, Pa.
ru.Rogers son.,
[iKSVILLE, PA.
DCk of
oods, Clothing,
Store, Hardware, Etc.,
Having Purchased at Lowest
r\arke t RatWe are Selling
Accordingly,
ALSO A NEW lINE If,
THE CELEBRATED
UP-TO-DATE ....
Stoves
EVERT STOVE GUARANTEED.
"ETERNAL VIGILANCE IS p*E PRICE OF LIBERTY."
LAPORTE, PENNA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 6. 1898.
countyinstitute.
The thirty-second annual teachers' in
stitute of Sullivan county convened at
Dnshore on Monday, Dec. 27, 1897, at l
o'clock p.-m.' "
Superintendent F W. Meylert delivered
a brief address in which he welcomed the
| teaciiers and assured them that the week*
would be one of pleasure and profit. J.
E,Reese Killgore was nominated and elect
ed Secretary, after which Prof. C. M.
Parker, of Binghamton. N. Y., who WHS
in charge of the music during the week,
was introduced. Prof. Parker is possessed
of much good nature, and this with hi><
perfect of music insured us an
ther pleasant year in this
department of institute work.
Dr. Lincoln Hulley, of Bucknell Uni
versity, followed with an address upon
"The Constitution". Dr. Ilulley spoke ol
the Constitution as an outgrowth ol the
difficulties and evils existing between 1781
and 1788. The difficulties on which he
placed particular emphasis were: (1} land
difficulties and boundary disputes;
commercial difficulties, occasioned by a
system of tariff, both state and local- 1
which, owing to its lack of uniformity,!
caused discontent and retaliation from
some of the states; (3) financial difficult
ies; (4) social difficulties; (5) political dif
ficulties. The Doctor then, in a very in
teresting manner, traced the events which
finally culminated in the Federal Conven
tion which formulated the Constitution of
the U. S.
Music by Prof. Parker, "Cow-Bells".
"My Dolly" and "Boating Song", after
which institute adjouried.
MONDAY EVENING.
i . I
| Dr. Hulley entertained the institute in 1
I lie evening with an exceptionally fine'
\ reading from James Whitcomb Riley
j The Doctor said he came before us in
company with a friend whom he :.ad al
ways found congenial and sympathetic, :
and express.d a desire that his hearers
would form the acquaintance of this friend, j
The desire has certainly been realized for i
I no one who heard the reading could fail to
' have a m<tch higher appreciation 'i.r tiv
| ability of James Whitcomb Riley.
TUESDAY MORNING.
- Singing—"Come to the La\e" and
j "Boating Song".
i Dr. Hulley spok" ol the Constitution in j
| the process of its construction in the Fed
i eral Convention, stating that it is com" I
|>osed of compromises hettueen the states. |
and jfiearly every article is a conces- :
sion TOade br the northern states to the |
southern, or v the larger to the smaller, I
and vice veriV
Prof. Park*, followed with a talk on
singing in the public schools, in which he
emphasized the the importance of having ;
children understand what they 6ing. He j
condemned the yelling so often substituted j
for singing. Rec ss.
Singing—"Woodland Elf", "Sing Me
the PHt-a-cake Song".
Dr. Hulley again entertained.the insti- j
tute by a talk on the adoption of the Con
stitution. He insisted that the Constitu- j
tion was adopted by the people and not by |
the states as is generally erroneously be- j
lieved. He called our attention to the |
fact that the question of"State Rights."
which .has so often threatened to rend the
Union asunder, originated in the dillerenc
es of opinion held by the people in differ
ent sections of the country in regard to the
adoption of the Constitution.
TUESDAY AFTERNOON.
Singing—"Boating Song," "OM Mead
ow Bars," and, by special req l Jf Dr.
Hulley, "My Dolly". *
Dr. Francis h. Green.or West Chester
was introduced to the institute. After 1
urging upon the teachers the importance
of taking time to teach literature he took
up the subject of his "Guiding
Principles in Teaching Literature". The
principles which he putin the imperative
mode arft Teach the best; teach a class
ic as a whole; vary the kind of literature;
fn work in literature aim at intensity rath
er tha* extensiveness; allow none toclaim
acquaintance with literature because of
knowing a few dates and titles; cultivate
a love tor the English language; and
keep abreast with the times.
Singing.
"Dr. Hulley then addressed the Institute
upon the "Relation of the Constitution to
United Slates History," after speaking
of Organization of the Government in ac
cord with the requirements of the Consti
tution, the Dr. spoke of the Constitution
as the origin of the difficulties involved#!)
Hamilton's bank, Whiskey Insurrection,
Alien and Sedition laws, Virginia and
Kentucky Resolution, Louisiana purchase,
Burr treason and trial, and many other
difficulties recorded io history.
Singing.
' Dr. Green continued the address deliver
ed earlier in the afternoon and in addi
iou to fhe"Principles in Teaching Liters
' ture" already named, he mentioned : (1}
Get the message, catch the spirit of the
passage ; (2) Bring the boy and girl in
close contact with the author ; (3) Teach
literature is good medicine fo
the mind.
TUESDAY EVENING.
The lecture "Five Peas in a Pod", the
one advertised upon which Dr. Green'was
o lecture was changed and the audience
listened to what was, by many, pronounc
ed tlie best, upon the subject " Making
It."
WEDNESDAY MORNING.
Singing led by Prof. Parker.
Dr. Martin G. Benedict, occupied the
first period of the session with an addresi
upon "Formation of Habits." The Dr.
laid down and maintained the truth of the
tollowing principles : —(I) The nervous
system is the physical basis of habit; (2)
Physical habits are established by physi
cal actions ; (3) Mental habits are estab-
I lished by mental actions and their corres
| ponding physical actions; (4) All impres
i sions made upon the nervous system are
reasonably if not ab-olutely permanent ,
v 5) Habit once established can only be
changed with the greatest effort if at all.
Singing.
Upon the subject, "Principles in Teach
ing History," Dr. Hulley elaborated - upon
the following suggestions : Use the text
book only as a guide. Gwve, as teachers, ,
special study of the lesson of the day be- ■
fore recitation. Do not use text book in j
class. Encourage independent expression !
'Do not insist upon many dates. Empha
! size only essentials. Develop patriotism.
Teach institutional history. Emphasize
the history of the last century.
After recess singing led by Prof Parker.;
Supt. F.W.Meylert then announced the j
1 members of the Auditing Committee and
ihe Committee on Resolutions. F.J. Wan
| dall, M.D.Sweeney and M. P. Gavitt,
! comprise the former, and J. E. R. Killgore i
and Misses Croniti and Clarke the latter.
!)<• Green, upon How to v Au'hors
! suggested that names, birth-place and en- |
1 vironment, parentage, education and all
general facts connected with their lives, i
i were the most important topics.
As Supt. Meylert was about to adjourn
i the institute a telegram from Prof. Mover j
j and Dr. Stradling of the Summer School
, was received and read. They regretted j
; their inability to be piesent and sent greet-
I iugs and best wishes to tl.e teachers.
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON.
! Singing.
Dr. Hulley, in speaking of the "Rela- i
j tion between Physical Geography and
I History, said that the physical features ol ;
j a country determined the positions of its
| industries, towns and cities, railroads and
| productions, and these in a large measure
| determined History. -Dr. Ilulley conclud
| ed his remarks Vj" insisting that we teach
j the history ol Pennsylvania claiming that
i it contained the esse/itial elements of all
I "•
! history.
I Singing, t
Dr. Benedict continued the subject of
! "The Formation of Habits". He reiterat
ed the principles laid down in the morn
ing, and by a drawing of the nyve cells
showed how habits are formed physiolog
ically. Dr. Benedict has the happylacul
ty of presenting a nitturally dry' Subject in
a very interesting manner anfi should feel
complimeutgij by the intense interest man
ifested. % **
Dr.%Green, following the line of Dr.
Hulley, nested upon the teaching of the
literature of.?ennsylvania. While Penn-;
sylvania has produced, possibly, no stars j
of the first magnitude, she has just cause;
to Le proud of the position her literateurß i
hold in this field.
Dr. Hulley gave us his farewell address |
upon the "History Period". He advised j
short recitations, use of blackboard analy- j
ses and maps and the weaving in of Amer- i
ican literature. The Doctor is an especi-1
ally instructive institute worker. His 1
suggestions are always upon a subj?ct j
which interests every teacher and are not-'
ably practicable. We iegret that he could i
not stay with us throughout the week.
Adjournment.
WEDNESDAY EVENING
The New York Male Quartet provided
the entertainment of Wednesday evening.
The elocutionary and musical parts of the
program were both of the first order. Du
shore has surely been fortunate in secur
ing such an admirable entertainment.
THURSDAY MORNING
Singing.
Dr. Green upon "How to Study an Au
thor" suggests:
1 Have a good knowledge of the life
of the author.
2. Note the kind of composition.
1-50 Per. Year.
Number 34.
3. Seek to know the history of the Be
• lection under consideration. *
4. Note the influence of the selection.
) ft. Observe the plan or plot. * ;
J 6. Dftcoverand describe main char
i iciers figuring,
i - 7. Comment on its diction.
8 Encourage a love for the Anglo-Sax
on element.
Winging..
I)r. Benedict followed
i upon '•Attention 1 ' in which he claimed
. tha: attention was a Slate of the mind not
. a faculty; that we assist the mind in com
: ing to a state of attention by the muscles
of the body. By several practical illustra
tions he showed that attention was in
part a muscular process. lie distinguish- -
m1 also between outward and inward at
tention, and voluntary, non voluntary and
expectant attention.
Prof. Parker continued his talk of Tues
day upon "Singing". He spoke of several
talacies that are accepted by the average
teachers of music, and by practical appli
cation proved the truth of his assertions.
No talk should be remembered and
profited by more than the one Dr. Green
delivered upon "Guiding Principles in
Teaching Language". After speaking in
unmistakable terms of his disapproval of
early introduction of technical Grammar,
and urging upon us a more careful con
sideration of that study of language which
Sives to the boy and the girl a control of
English in speech, he proceeded with a
most eloquent plea for some radical re
| forms along this line.
THURSDAY AFTERNOON
Singing.
I Dr. Green concluded his address of the
| morning upon the subject "Language".
He named twelve fundamental principles
, and closed his remarks with an earnest
j plea to the directors, urging upon them
i the importance ot furnishing supplement
ary reading matter for their schools, '
speaking of the great good done by good
literature in shaping the characters of
! children.
| Singing.
This being the afternoon set aside lor
■ addresses to the Directors' Association a
; >toodly number were present to hear the
j "Address to Directors" delivered by Dr.
Benedict. He said that the responsibility
, for the education of our boys and girls
j rested upon parents, direc ors and teaeh
i ers. That the problems of education were
I financial and intelectual. He explained
j why the State appropriation is sometimes
1 received so long after due. He discussed
| the basis upon which the money isappor
| tioned under the new appropriation bill,
i and urged upon the directors the necessi
ty for economical expenditure of money
I and of employinga high grade of teachers.
Singing.
Supt. H. S. Putnam of Bradford county,
and Supt. Becht of Lycoming county were
introduced and delivered short addresses.
Dr. Green then gave a farewell talk in
which he spoke of the meaning of the in
stitute to the true teachers.
THURSDAY EVENING
I~ - i
The excellent address delivered by Dr.
J.'T. Rothrock of the University of Penn
sylvania, upon the subject, "Beautiful
Pennsylvania," illustrated with ste.eopti
con views, impressed all who were privi
leged to hear it with a higher appreciation
of our beloved Keystone State and tho
the importance of perpetuating its forestry
interests.
FRIDAY MORNING
Singing,
Dr. Benedict, in concluding his address
| upon "Attention", stated that nothing ex
; ists for the mind unless the mind is atten
tive. In securing attention he suggested:
| that we cultivate an interest in the child's
! mind; that we use original methods; that
J we use objects; that we cultivate, on the
! part of the pupil, curiosity and expectant
| attention. He illustrated his remarks by
| showing the advertisements ot several pro
i irressive firms which had applied the prin
I ciples lor which he contended. Ilecess.
j GENERAL BUSINESS.
I The Auditing Committee presented its
| reporV, after which Supt. Meylert announc
ed thai the local institutes in the eastern,
western and southern districts will be held
as follows: Muncv Valley, Jan. 29; Hills
grove, Feb. 12; Dushore, Feb. 26.
The committee on resolutions then sub
mitted the following report;
Whereas, This the thirty-second annual
institute of the teachers of Sullivan county
has proven the most interesting and in
structive and, therefore, the best ever held
in the educational history of the county,
be it
Resolved. That we, the teachers, extend
to our Superintendent, Prof. F. W. Mey
lert, our thankftil appreciation of the in-.
Continued on Fag* Firs-

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