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The Fulton County news. [volume] (McConnellsburg, Pa.) 1899-current, October 26, 1899, Image 8

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Additional Local.
GoltliiKh the Tailor.
MUlerVVashinjfMachinosatMallo.v'H.
The pension of Alfred Urown, of
C'k'ar Ultimo, has lnvn Increased from
fourteen to thirty dollars a month.
Irwjn In Bcllintf lamps, jjlaHKwnre
nod china dinner seta at h pec i ill low
rates.
A letter from N. II. Vev states that
Jie upd Ms family are much pleased
with WilkliiHbnrjf, the.lr new home.
Mrs". Peek's health has hern tntch bet
ter since they moved. TJn;re is a great
dctnjuid or ear)eiiters und bricklay
ers, as there urn many houses being
erected this summer mostly good
ones. It is a temperance town no sa
loons. Norwood Sewing Machines for eigh
teen dollars at Irwin's'.
The family of the Kditqr are under
obligatiins to Mrs. W. II. l'aylor of
Ay,r tdwnshlp for a basketful of delic
ious pear.
Paragon and Standard notary Sew
ing Machines at Irwin's. Hest ma
chines made. Sold for .cash or month
ly payments.
Some miscreant or .miscreants, en
tered, the wood house of M. 11. ShalT
ner, Ksq., lat Friday night and ap
propriated a pair of gum boot and
some other HUittU;r articles. Our mid
night operators had better pot g(it too
near the telephone oilier, as the light
ning might strike 'em.
Five gullon oil cans filled with (best
Water While oil for 1.10 at Irwi.
Miss Mary E. Daniels has had her
dwelling in this place greatly .improv
ed by having the rooms over her stoe
plastered, new door hung, and all
neatly pa in tod and papered. A door
jcut tlu'oujjh. connecting the niatn.build
ing with the store part adds much .to
the convenience.
The best buckskin glove in town for
JO cents at Irwin's.
William F. Kplb, of Dry run, who
iins been working at PitUburg for
some time met with a serious accident
on Thursday last. When attempting
,to board a freight tra,in at Braddock,
he fell under the wheels having one
leg taken QtT and being otherwise in
jured. He was removed to the West
Vewj Hospital. The unfortunate man
.was about 22 years of age.
James M. Lake of Thompson town
ship recently purchased a tract of land
lying on Timber IUdge from Andrew
Souders and expects in the near future
to erect on it a good dwelling and oth
(er buildings.
All kinds of stoves at W. II. Nes
bit's. Call, examine them, and get
prices before you- buy.
f 'lei Clsney. of Burnt cabins, is
.erecting a nice dwelling on his farm a
short distance west of 'Burnt Cabins
along the State Road.
The carpenters are just putting the
finishing touches to Assessor W. J.
.Cline's new house on the State Boad
about midway between Fort Littleton
and Burnt Cabins. When entirely fin
ished Mr. and Mrs. C'line will have a
yery comfortable home.
Ladies' coats altered, or anything in
ihe line of tailoring neatly fU! by
Goldsmith The Tailor
Spencer M. Janney, president of tivi
Huntingdon and Broad Top railroad
company since 18!K, died at his home
'in Philadelphia last Friday.
Dr. George II. James, a prominent
physician of Huntingdon county, died
at his home at Grbisonia last Thurs
day morning.
Mrs. Anna Mary Cessna, wife of
Harry Cessna, died at her home in
Everett on the 15th Inst. Mrs. Cessna
was a daughter of the late William
JL'levenger, a well known resident of
Brush Creek valley where Mrs. Cess
na's mother still lives.
Mrs. Ellen Skipper, wife of A. K.
Skipper, of Mapleton, died on the Kith
inst., aged about 57 years. Mrs. Skip
per was the mother of Mrs. James
Keith of Wells Valley.
Forest lire have been raging on
Sideling Hill mountain for several
lays. Large areas both north and
south of the turnpike are being burned
over expending into Wells and Brush
.Creek valleys.
f or almost a vveelc there lias been a
weird stillness in the atmosphere, and
the smoke from the mountain tires has
hung so dense that the light of the sun
has been almost shut out. On Wednes
day the great luminary made his jour
ney across the heavens as a great dull
golden ball, a beautiful sight and one
not oftvn. witnpsd hrrp,
Some one. has figured out. how far a
funnel- has to walk to plant and at
tend forty acre of corn, To plow the
ground with a sixteen inch plow he
walks .';U miles, to harrow it thorough
Jy before plarUing fifty miles more,
and to cultivate (t afterwards, 4MI
piles, making a total of 750 ndlcs
in addition to garnering.
J. II. Tebbs, of Howard, Centre conn
ty, this year took to the Iiellefoute
market and sold 110 bushels of toina
toes and over 25,000 pickles, These
pickles were raised on one-fourth acre
of land and the tomatoes on less than
(Q(e-half (fccj'o.
Send in your items of news when
they are fresh, says an exchange. We
don't like to publish a birth after the
child is weaned, a inirrlage after the
honeymoon Is over, a death after the
widow is married again, nor the notice
of an entertainment after the job work
is done elsewhere and the editor churg
ed for admission.
In the nine months ending September
30 last, a round number total of 2,700
miles were built in the months of July,
August and September, and there are
strong reasons to believe that the build
irg this month will surpass any pre-
All honor to thVjjuly who dares Is
sue invitations to thtK celebration of
her fiftieth birthday. Shtdeserve the
privilege of celebrating theNbundredth
anniversary, V,
A recent embarrassed bride eaused
a flutter of amusement in the congre
gation when she replied to the clergi
man's "Wilt thouV" etc-., with an em
phatic "Yes, thank you, very much."
England Is buying American mules
for use In the prospective war In South
Africa. She Is doubtless doing this
Jn the expectation that they will match
the Boers in their stubborn qualities.
Many who do not believe in compul
sory "higher education,.'' for either
sex, will sympathize with the New
York girl who ran away from the
home of her millionaire adopted fath
er rather than be sent to Vassar Col
lege. The emancipation of women may
have Its drawbacks, after all. A wife
in Cleveland, Ohio, who is being sued
for a divorce, has been ordered by
the Court to pay 4 a week alimony to
her husband pending the decision of
the case and $20 attorney's fees.
It is said to lie the right thing now
to use buckles instead of collar but
tons. As most persons have no desire
to know how it would be to have a
harrow sliding down one's back, it is
likely they will continue to fasten their
collars In the same old way.
The many friends of Ilev. Harry K.
Ash, of New Bloomfield; will regret to
learn that he has been in ill health
for several months. Mr. Ash was lo
cated at Burnt Cabins, and served the
appointments on that charge very ac
ceptably three years, leaving there
two years ago.
An oil derrick nine stories high,
made out of thirty pieces of hewed tim
ber, has been constructed on the Gib
boney lands, at Duncansville, Blair
county. The outfit includes a cable
line 2,000 feet long. The operators will
begin to bore for oil this week, It is
an open secret that the precious fluid
exists there, but whether" the same can
be procured in puying quantities forms
a question which only the present op
erations can determine.
The other night burglars stole !)00
In cash, a gold watch, and some checks
from Mrs. John L. Replogle, of near
Woodbury. Mrs. Replogle kept her
valuables in her bed and did not dis
cover her loss until Monduy of this
week, when she went to the lied to get
some mrfney. The robbery may have
occurred last week. There is no clue
to the robbers.
It is as difficult to understand why a
dog runs on three feet, Instead of four,
as it is to comprehend .why a woman
will wear a skirt cut so long behind
that she must hold it up all the time,
when she might avoid all. the' annoy
ance by making it a little shorter. But
if the dog prefers to trot on three feet,
holding up the other, and women pre
fer to go about grasping their skirts
with grim determination, it is proba
bly their own business, and poor frail
man, who chews tobacco and spits the
juice on the sidewalks ought not to
complain.
Twocarloadsof Wilson College girls
from Chambersburg had a narrow es
cape from death in Carlisle Tuesday of
last week. They had been visiting the
Indiun School, and their cars had been
put on theCumberland Valley railroad
freight track. When the cars were be
ing pushed up by the engine to connect
with the regular train, they collided
with a stock car which had gotten on
the main truck. Conductor Watts, on
tho reur platform, saved himself by
jumping. None of the young ladies
were seriously injured, but a few were
bruised considerably.
John Swope, of Alexandria, Hunt
ingdon county, has killed 10,'t wildcats,
four of this number having been killed
since July. On Monday morning of
last week Mr. Swope brought in three
gray foxes, six' minks, three skunks,
live opossums and one coon. In 1890
the county paid this old trapper $1,300
for scalps of trapped animals. In ad
dition to this he realized a handsome
sum for the hides, which he tans him
self. A boy in one of the country schools
was asked to write an essay. For his
subject he took "The Newspaper," and
here is what he wrote: "I don't know
how the newspaper came into the world.
I don't think God does, for he hasn't
got nothing to say about them, and
'editor' is not in the Bible. I think
the editor is one of the missing links
you hear about, and stayed in the
brush until after the flood and then
came out und wrote the thing up and
has been ever since. I don't think he
ever dies. I never saw a deud 'un and
never heard of one getting licked. Our
paper Is a mighty poor 'un; the editor
goes around without underclothes all
winter, don't wear no socks, and pa
hasn't paid his subscription In live
years."
A Norristown hardware dealer was
neatly fleeced out of W8 by a sharper.
The stranger, under the njime of John
(Jreene., arrived in town early in the
week and visited Walter H. Cooke,
with whom he struck up a negotiation
for a traot of woodland on Sandy Hill.
He said he intended to cut the timber
immediately, and asked Mr. Cooke to
Introduce him to a local hardware
dealer of whom ho wonuld buy axes
and saws for the work. Mr. Cooke did
as requested, but tho stranger waited
until later In the day to make his pur
chases, amounting to $.10. The mer
chant thinking the man was a friend of
Mr. Cooke's and, therefore, all right,
and made no hesitation in accepting
the proffered check of $81, in payment,
and handed the purchaser $18 change.
As the man departed, he said the men
he had employed to fell the timber
would call next morning for the goods.
The merchant is still awaiting for him
to call. The check proved to be worth'
PAID BY UNCLE SAM.
Some of the Odd Eippimpi the Got
eminent Una to llenr.
Every one knows that It costs nlmost
!4K).(K,(Ko a year to run the United
States government In times of peace
and that the department of war nnd
the navy, the Indian and pension bu
reaus absu'.'h the larger part of this
an, ount, but In the course of years a
large number of dependent uinm Un
cle Ham's purse have come Into being
of which the general public knows lit
tle'. Such, for example, are the Interna
tional bureau for the repression of the
African slave trade, located at Brus
sels, a highly laudable Institution, to
the cm-iincs of which our government
contributes $100 a year; the Interna
tional bureau of weights and measures,
also at Brussels, to which $2,270 Is con
tributed, nud the International Geodet
ic association, the expenses of which
our government shares to tho extent
of $1,500 yearly.
As a leading member of a group of
nations specially luterested In humane
and philanthropic work we subscribe
$1125 a year to a lighthouse service on
the coast of Morocco, about $ I.5IHI to
be divided among citizens of other
lands for service rendered to ship
wrecked American seamen, $.VMl a year
toward maintaining a hospital for sail
ors at Panama and $1MI0 for keeping
and feeding American convicts Impris
oned In foreign countries.
Among the unfamiliar purposes In
the home country for which money Is
appropriated from the federal treas
ury Is the maintenance of the Wash
ington monument, costing $11,520 an
nually, and the provision of artificial
limbs for soldiers calling for $547,000
a year. Leslie's Weekly.
DANGER IN CHEAP GLASSES.
A Great Mnnr Ren llnlned hr At
tempt at KoiiBomr.
looking back now to the time when
the Itinerant uack doctor and the
wandering dentist spread misery nnd
destruction over the land, we wonder
nt the Ignorance or carelessness of our
fathers In trusting their teeth or even
their lives to hands so untrustworthy.
A very similar thing Is done today by j
people who buy spectacles or eyeglass- i
es from men who sell them on tne
streets or hnve their eyes fitted by op
ticians who hnve no qualllleatlons for
doing the work.
A surprising number of people buy
their glasses from venders on the
streets. They get glasses for 50 cents
which seem to them Just as good as a
pair they would pay $5 for having
made on an oculist's prescription, and
they think they have saved money.
Classes acquired In all sorts of ways
by Inheritance or exchange from a
friend or even glasses found on the
streets are used to the detriment, even
to the destruction, of the wearer's
sight.
"People seem to think glasses nre
like clothes," snid an old oculist the
other day. "and if they are fairly com
fortable and look well they nsk no
further questions."
Another way In which people dnm
nge their eyes Is through carelessness
In trying to remove dust or cinders
from them. They try themselves, a
friend tries a rub. the nenrcst drug
store nnd the nearest optician nre call
ed on, nil before nn oculist Is consult
ed. The result Is that the eyeball Is
often badly rubbed nnd scraped, and
In many Instances permanent Injury Is
done. New York Evening Post.
One Chili! For Knoh Ilnnr.
Henry I'.loch, a business man of
Brooklyn, eats breakfast nt half past
Rosle. goes to breakfast nt 15 minutes
to Oabrlcl and retires for the night nt
Achilles. Mr. IUoch has 12 children.
1) girls nnd :t boys, lie Is fond of his
family nnd In order that he might al
ways have them In mind had a watch
made with the miniature photograph
of one of the children In the place of
ench of the hours on Its dial. Thus
where the figure 7 would be on an or
dinary watch dial the pretty face of
his daughter Itosle looks out. The face
of the boy Gabriel represents 1 o'clock,
thnt of Freda 2 o'clock nnd so on
n round the dial. At his home Mr.
I'.loch has n large clock, on the dial of
which the figures are represented In
tho same way.
The Deneun nnil the Prayer.
"I didn't like your prayer very much
this morning." said a fault finding dea
con to his minister.
"What was wrong with It?"
"Well. In the first place, -It was too
long, nnd then I thought It contained
two or three expressions that were un
warranted." "I am very sorry it meets with your
disapproval, deacon," the good man re
sponded, "but you must hear in mind
that the prayer was not addressed to
you." Ohio State Journal.
Vulor Trnde,
Bhe shuddered und averted her face.
"To marry for money," she protested,
"Is to sell oneself, and I can't see why
It Isn't .lust as bnd to sell oneself a.i It
Is to sell dry goods or groceries. Trade
Is trade."
She was a candid girl and scorned
the subtle artifices of logic whereby
some are wont to still the voice of eon
science. Detroit Journal.
Am to Fentherlnw -n.
"My experience," snld the reformed
confidence man who had played the
races frequently In his day. "Is that It
Is hnrd to pick the winner, but cum-,
paratlvely easy to pluck him." t'hlcn.
go Tribune.
The Wronir l!u.e.
Minister's Wlfe-Wlike up! There
nre burglars In the house. John.
Minister-Well, what of It? U't them
find out their mistake themselves.
Woman's ,'"rni.
Not Ineluded.
Featherstono I'ome,' Hobble (hand
ing him n quarter), how many fellows
have called on your sister this week?
Hobble Let's see five,
"That doesn't Include me. does It?"
"Oh, no! Sister says you don't
count."- Itrooklyu I.lfe.
What folly to proclaim a love for hu
manity which no one has for the ma
jority of Individuals composing It!
Conservative.
"Slow, hut sure," Is good motto,
but why not be quick and sure?
V'asUlfon Democrat.
X
i
Clothing
X
Our Store Is the Place to Go.
JJ e carry twice the stock of READY-MADE CLOTHING we I
had three months ago, and we are going to sell t
twice as much. Our large stock and low prices will
do it easily. This is not only talk but a business truth
and we can convince all who come. I
t Ae ,iave. more P'ece WOOLENS than you will find in X
I the entire county, and we can make you, WE t
know, the best fitting and the cheapest X
I SUIT,0VERC0ATorPANTAL00NS j
to be fouJ anywhere.
t
Come
li:JLNACE & SOINS. j
& Questions
Just now tho Indies of Mc:nnellhurj unj elsewhere
urc UNklng this question :
Where Is the Place
To get-the most fashion- r
able and the best Hat for r
the least Possible money
We AnWCr n,,,!ir",,;re In McConnellshiirfl, where wc hnve I list
received from the eustern cities u full lino of nil
The Latest Things in
Fashionable
WYillinery.
You are respectfully invited to call soon and see
our new goods.
A. J. IRWIN
McConnellsburg.
y y y r yy t YY.YYYYV vYYvyYYY
ri1
SPECIAL
WAGONS and
BUGGIES.
T. J. COMERER
has on hand from his summer
stock a few good
Millburn Wagons,
Buggies and Surreys
which will goat special prices.
Give him a call before they
are all gone.
STOVES!
1 respectfully announce to tho
general public that since moving
into my new room I havo repleu.
ished my stock and have now on
handn a complete line of Cooking.
Heating and Oil Stoves, Ranges,
Htovo Repairs of all kinds, Stove
Hoards, Stovo Pipe, the celebrat
pd Climax Stove I'olisli, IronKet.
ties, Oil Cloth Rugs, Tinwaro
from the cheaiest tu the best,
Anti-Rusting Tjnwaro which I
guarantee not to rust for two
years, and will wear for eight
years. Every piece is guaranteed
to mo not to rnpt WU(i j wm guar
antee it to you, Jf jt rusts bring
it bade and I will give you anoth
er pjeoe. In Fancy Goods I Jiavo
a large assortment. Butchering
Supplies such as Lard Presses,
Meat Cutters, Butcher Knives
and Hog Scrapers. Also a full
lino oi School Supplies which I
will sell during Court week at tho
lowest possiblo prices. Yxu will
And mo in my now room opposite
Patterson's store where I will bo
glad to have you call and examine
my stock.
A. Stoneu.
MEN'S
AMI
BOY'S
- 0
Answered.
k CO.,
TVYy VY yVyVYyIyy YV!wi 6
S3
t9
S3
PRICES
tV
tvi
cv
10
&3
as
OA
uo
a
as
&
STOVES!
JOHNSTONS COLUAAlNd
K. JOHNSTO
VERY INTERESTS
BARGAIIN
To Start the Fall Season.
Boots for fall. A specially
tine whole stock kip $2.7 o
Light weight calf dress
boot $2,75
The famous "conductor"
boot $2,00
The "Mohawk" boot '$,1 GO
A nice light split boot
at
$1,4?)
140 Foirs of Large Cotton Dl
XIJLUJJL KJ VAUL VI. AmW J V Kf
CLOTHING;
Notice !
Fine All-wool Tricot, long, dark
Oxford Mix., Jound Sack Suit,
Single-breasted, Satin Pipe.
Facings, Well Made and
Trimmed. Fully Worth
$8.50.
Our Price for the Suit 4.50.
BLACK COTTON CLAY WORSTED
warranted fast black. If you
traveled the country over you
wouldn't find the equal of this
value, for it is worth 4.00.
Our price $2.90.
A special drive in an
All-wool Black. CLAY WORSTED.
Extra fine trimming, French fac
ing, elegantly tailored, and will
suit the most particular man.
Our special price is only 10.00.
A pretty child's suit, 75 cents.
Men's underwear, 25 cents.
Ladies' soft fleece lined heavy underwear, 25 C'
Children's union suits soft fleece lined, per suit, 2
Ladies' beautiful skirts all pf
A woman's heavy shoe s
Heavy school sliot
misses, 13-2,
Children's heavy
shoes, 9-12,
An odd lot (19 pui
ladies Uexible line kid
worth 3,00 at
Icets ot 49 cents.
SEE OUR SUPERB L
OF
Ladies' Wrl
IN OUR
Fall Openf
Prices
to suit E
Every L"-
r-fc ,31.
Buyer ! h
if
t
I
r
Ui,
III I ill nil llll IIHUn r
fth.
A good suit for a boy, ?rm
all
utl
ffo,
h tii
?Ier
Par t
fe"i JpT ijcpiv
"f tvf ,,s'"
- it
1 i . B, O
1 X . -gt
Ml h
11

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