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North Branch democrat. [volume] (Tunkhannock, Pa.) 1854-1867, October 03, 1866, Image 1

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SK BIOKT iEH, "Proprietor
NEW SERIES,
A weekly Democratic _
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tic, News, the Arts ' K!:
wad Sciences Ac. Pub- *1 j|
Uhed every Wednes- 1
pay, at Tunkhannock 4
Wyoming County,Pa
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fwitrtss ftfk
IT ft. At W. E LITTLE, ATTORNEYS AT
l\ LAW Office on Tioga street, Tunkhannock. a.
n S. COOPER, PHYSICIAN A SI'RGEON
. Newton Centre. Luaeino County l'a.
/~i Et> S.TUTTON, ATTORNEY" AT LAW
A J Tunkhonnock, Pa. Office a Stark's Brick
•ek, Ttogn Mieet
\I7M. M. PIATT, ATTORNEY AT LAW, O
W fice in Stark's Brick Block Tioga St., Tunk
hannock. Pa.
£ljt SufljUr §ousf.
lIAKHISHU|iG, FKNNA.
The andersigned h.iviqg lately pur.hased the
HOUSE " property, has already com
taenced such alterations and improvements as will
-render this old and popular Jlnusc equal, if not supe
rier, to any Hotel in the City of Harrisbnrg.
A' continuance of Hie public patronage is refpect
fullr (olicited.
J . GEO. J. BOLTON
"WALL'S HOTEL,
LATE AMERICAN HOUSE,
TUN Mil AN NOCK, WYOMING CO., PA.
TIIIS establishment has recently V.ecn refitted an
furnished in the latest style Every attention
will be given to the comfort and convenience of those
wit patronize the House.
T. B. WALL, Owner and Proprietor .
Tunkhannock, Soptcmber 11, 1861.
.NORTH BRANCH HOTEL,
"MESUOPPKN, WYOMING COl NTY, PA
W in. H. COUTH IGIIT, Prop'r
ifT A VING resumed the proprietorship of the above
*£l Hotel, the undersigned will spare no effort to
•iteader the house an agreeable plaec ol sojourn t
wall who may favor it with their custom.
Win. II CORTRIGHT.
Jane, 3rd, 1863
glfiots "fjtotfl,
•TOWA3XTDA, FA.
p. B- BART LET,
I [ Late oft. "BRAHIARD HOUSE, ELMIKA, N.Y.
PROPRIETOR.
-The MEANS HOTEL, i-one of the LARGEST
. and BEST ARRANGED Houses in the country—lt
. ia fitted op in the most modern and improved style,
aed no pains are spared to make it a pleasant and
. agreeable stopping-place for all,
T 3, n2l, ly.
CLARKE, KCENEY ,
MAMCR ACTURE RS ASD WHOLESALE HEALERS IS
'LADIES', MISSES'& GENTS'
silk aitti 'Siissinure flats
ASP JOBBERS IN
; HATS, CAPS, FURS, STRAW GOODS,
;PARAOLS AND UMBRELLAS.
BUFFALO AND FANCY ROBES,
840 BROADWAY,
COKHER OF LaOSARP STREET,
WAW
B. W. CLABK, 1
A. C KEERRT, S
a. lckrrit. 3
M:GILMAN;
DENTIST.
If OILMAN, hog permanently located in Tunk
I* L. hanneck Borough, and respectfully tenderhi
professional services to the citixena of this plaoeand
■arrounding country.
ALL WORK WARRANTED, TO GIVE SATIT
IION.
Office over Tatton's Law Office near the Post
Office
~~ NEW
TAILORING SHOP
The Subscriber bavins had a sixteen years pntc
tieal experience in editing and making clothing-
Boor offers his services in th. ; * '' ne to ' hc c 't' zens o'
NICHOLSON and vicinity
Those wishing to get Fits win A his shop the
pttoa to get them. WUI Jk '
T4-W-6e % J " L - R - s *fT*
i g --
~
HOW THE tVORI) WHITE IS TO BE
GOT OUT OFTHE CONSTITUTION.
THL RUMP AMENDMENT TO SUPERCEDE A
DIRECT VOTE OF THE PEOPLE.
"The question of negro suffrage does not
and cannot enter into this campaign for
Governor. It is not befote the people in
any shape. The members of the L<-gila
tore to be elected tbis fail cannot act on this
subject. Gen. Geary, as Governor, will
have no tintv to perforin in the premises
during bis first term. The people them
selves must first act before the Governor
can do anything on the subject. Here,then
are t' e facts. Negro stiff, age is not an is
sue in this contest. The iaw forbids the
question being an issue." — Hatrisbury
Ttleyrtph.
The above tissue of falsehoods shows
how anxious the Gearyite* are to avoid the
real issue in the present contest
The question of negro suffrage can and
does enter into this campaign for Govern r,
first, because it can be made an issue at
any time, and second, because it has been
made an issue, by every speaker now oil
the stump fbrtieaiy ; dy everv newspaper
in Geary,s interest in Pennsylvania; by
fully OlK— hall of the Disunion nominating
conventions; by the mixed Brownlow-
Douglass convention now in session in
7\''iladelp!iia ; and by the rump amend
ment to M'C Constitution, which proposes to
grant t'ui! r <dii.T il ' "privileges and immuni
ties" to all men bom in the United States,
without regard to c>>!oi or race.
The members of the L g sD'nre to be—
elected this year can act on the su.'jeet.—
The Constitution was amended in lftS*
and five tears thereafter, (in 1i69,) can be
amended again. The members to be elect
ed this fall will constitute the Legislature
of 18C7. They can pass an amendment -
the parliamentary requirement. The Leg
islature to be elected next year for 1868
can ratify it and call a special election in
January, 1869, to have it ratified by the
people before the assembling of the Leg's-
Dtureof 1869; or they can submit it at a
special or general election in 18158, and call
an extra session on the fii*-t of January, 18-
69, to count the votes, and if adopted add
it to the Cons'itnt'on. Thus State Senators
to be elected ibis full, fot three y ears, can
vote for a negro suffrage amendment in 18
67, and agai.i in 1868. Even if the matter
should no be broached till 1868. the Sena
tors now to be elected would have to ac!
upon th-' preliminary passage. It i> el. ar—
ly evident, theicfore that tlie members
now to be elected can act upon this sub
ject.
Te arc willing to giant that "General
Geary, as Governor, will hav •no duty to
perform in the premises," bee uise there is
no probability whatever of his election.—
Suppose, however, for illustration, that h •
should be elected. His term would o ex
pire till after the 7th ofJmnary, 1870, so
that he could s pprovc such an amendment,
whether preliminary proceedings were Start
ed in 1867 or 1863.
The statement that the "le.yv foibids the
question being an issue," is a very stupid
falsehood . Where is there any law forbid
ding it ? It would be a good thing if there
were a prohibitory law.
It is true that a negro suffrage amend
ment to the Con-titution of Pennsylvania
would have to l>e submitted to a vote of
the people after affirmative action of two
successive Legislature, but such a question
should never he allowed to go so far. Men
favorable to sneh a change in tbe Constitn
tion should not be elected as members and
Senators. Tliev are not trustworthy upon
other questions, if favorably to that. But
there is another point,of graver importance.
It is shis :
The Legislature to he elected this fall
will be called upon to ratify or reject the
amendment to the Federal C n-titiition
proposed by the late Rump Congress. One
of its sections proposes to make citizens of
all persons born in the United States ; t->
prohibit anv State from abridging the priv
ileges and immunities of the citizens thus
created, and to prevent any State front de
priving anv person of lif •. liberty, property
or equal protection of the laws All this is
elearlv intended for the benefit of the blacks
for alt men born in the United States have
ALWAYS enjoved those natural, civil and
political rights, except the negroes. Thw
proposed amendment makes so clear a con
tradistinction between the natural and civil
rightsflife, liberty, property and
and polit eal "privileges and immunities,"*
(tbe privileges of voting, holding offi-e,
Arc.,)that thero can be no reasonab'e doubt
thrown against the belief that it is a well
concocted though covert scheme intend d
to establish and enforce negro suffrage and
equality in all the States without submit -
ting the question to a dirfct vote of the.
people ! This amendment, when once in
corporated into the Federal Constitution
will be binding upon all the States, The
Federal Consti'ntinn ssys it shall he "the
supreme law of the land, and the judges in
every State shall be bound thereby, any
thing in the Constitution or laws of any
State to the contrary notwithstanding
Thus the word "white may be 6trnck from
the Constitution without a legislative
amenndmcnt, and without submitting the
question to the people ! When the Rnmp
amendment shall he p-ssed, the question
| then goes beyond the jurisdiction of our
State Courts, onr Legislature and the peo
ple. Salmon P Cha*e and his Radical,
negro suffrage Court will have exclusive
authority to interpret and determine.
"TO SPEAK HIS THOUGHTS IS EVERY FREEMAN'S RIGHT. " —Thomaa Jefferson.
TUNKHANNOCK, PA., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3, 1866.
the coming election, pledged and sworn
, against tlie issue of negro suff;ago,f or citi
j zensliip,)which is now before the country
in the shape of the Rump amendment. The
Geary Disunionists f< ar to go before the
people upon a DIRECT VOTE to strike out
the word "white," and therefore they are
laboring to elec men who will ratify the
Rump amendment to the Federal Constitu
tion, and thereby override onr State Con
stitution and the will of tbe people. It is
but a modification of he name which the
same school of politicians played successful
ly upon the people of Wisconsin.
Poeple wake up ! White men, if you
want to preserve the ba!lot-b>x pure, and
to bequeath to your children the Same
white man's G vernment which you re
ceived from your ancestors, aron-e and de
feat the tricksters, who, to subserve their
own base pui poses, tell their adherents to
"throw conscience to the devilwho says
that "it is numheis not intelligence we
want and who blasphemously cry—"To
hell with the Constitution F* Now is the
time to strike for your country ! The is.-ue
is clearly before you, and if yon fail to meet
it now, and defeat Disunion ar.d Negroism
the I.lst hope will be gone forever !
GEARY'S PHOTOGRAPH,
During Gurey's Governorship in Kan
sas, the N. Y. Tribune said of liitn :
"Gov. Geary is not a General Jackson.
He is not, on the other hand, a respectable
tyrant, nor yet an imbecile, lie is mere
ly a politician, and the miserable tool of
a miserable faction lie came here not to
make it appear that there was peace; not
to put an end to iniquity, but to cover up
iniquity for a little while, so that the smoke
its burning might not ascend to Heaven
as an evidence against the perpetrators of
all these v'illatnies. Gov. Geary has indis
creetly boast. d that he had a "Presiden
tial candidate to carry on his shoulders."
Under tliis impiession, he had a "Presi
d ntial candidate io carry on his shoul
dir."
I'ioud of this anticipated impprial weight,
the Governor has tint for an instant al
lowed his executive nerve to be unsteaiied
bv groans of an enslaved young empire.
The bleeding ruin of American liberties
lias been scattered at his feet, and not one
man y republican throb ha stirred his
In-art t > the bo'd thorough action lie owes
Kansas All his eff >rts have to holster and
strengthen the P o Slavery party; hence
th.-y remain satisfied with their master; —
wbi eat the sanm time he is loud in his
prote-tions and declarations of impartial—
ty, justice. &r,c. Gov. Geary is either a
very d'gnified man or a very pompons one
perhaps a little of both. He is a pro
found egotist, and talks about what he is
and intends to be, in a somewhat ostenta
tious manner. Gov. Geary is a determin
ed man, without the capacity to determine
on anv systematic course. He has an iron
will witont a purpose, his only aim being
to carry the aforesaid Presidential candi
date safely on his shoulders, and that is
under instructions."
Garey is now indeed the "miserable tool
of a miserable faction." But this time he
lias the negro to carrv on his shoulders.—
Will the people help him to carry the
load ?
AN ELF.CTION FUND VOTED BV CON
GRESS. —A good di al of surprise has been
expressed that Congress did not postpone
the vote increasing the pav of its members
until the next session. The extra $2,000
was needed to seenre their re-election.—
Each member has that sum extra to he
devoted to this specific purpose. The
Radical members are thus put in posses
sion of a grand corruption fund amounting
to something over $300,000, taken directly
out of the public treasury, and distributed
ammg its memb-rs nearlv everyone of
whom is to be a candidate for re-p'eetion.
It wa proclaimed beforo the session closed
that congress must be suitn'm r d by the re
elecfion of its present m •mners. It is
now clear that this increase ot pav
was one of the practical measures by which
this result is t<> be brought a out.
FSGT WHITR MKV, recollect that the aho
litio'-.'candidate for Governor JOIIN W.
GKARY, walked in Ihe procession with ne
groes at the Philadelphia convention, sat
on the same platform with tlirm, made
speech s (excuse us he can't do that)
"spoke" from the stand thev did. received
them, welcomed them, applauded % them,
and in everv possible manner, proved that
he believed tlvm lIIS EQU ALS. Do
you think they are your equals ? Tf so
vote for Geary who savs he would "rather
.associate with decent negroes than with
dirty faced, white copperheads."
THE TWO CONVENTIONS. — After review
ing the proceedings of the Philadelphia
convention —the National convention of
the 14th of August and the Radical con
vention which hasjnet closed its proceed
ings, the New York Sun (Rep.) # tersely
sums np as follows :
"Taking the proceedings of the two
conventions together, and banishing all po
litical prejudices, the onlv conclusion to
which * candid ntan can come is thi:
The conservative convention ignored party
fr th" sake of the Union; and that the
ignored the Union for the sake
of party." °
GEARY'S HUMANITY.
In a late number of the Lancaster Intel
liyencer appeared the following article,
| which should be read by every friend of
humanity in the country. JPhen any
| Catholic is asked to vote for the Know-
Nothing Geary, let him remember this
! statement of authentic facts !
BRUTAL TREATMENT OF SISTERS OF CHARITY
BV JOHN W. GEARY.
John IE. Geary, with his narrow intel
' lectaud bigoted nature, we have no doubt
4 •
! made a most acceptable member of that
infamous political organization which pro
! scribed men on account of their birth or
i religious belief. llis hatred ot Catholics
did not end with the short-lived triumph
of the Know-Nothing party. It adhered
to him, and was afterwards displayed in
the most offensive mar.ner possible.
One of the rnovt int. I iirent, wealthy,
and respectable citizens of Frederick, Ma
ryland, sends tip the following statement
of an occurrence, which shows in its true
light and tyranieal characfer of the vain up
start w ho i- the Radical candidate for Gov
ernor ef Pennsplvania. He give the facts
in his own language
To the Editors ot the hilflliyencer.
DEAR SIRS : It occurs to me that jus
tice demands that the rude and brutal
manner in wliieh some Si.-ters of Chanty
were treated by John B'. Geary, should be
known in order tliat tbe Catholic citizens
of Pi nnsylvania may understand the char
acter and the spirit cf the man who ap
peals to them f.-r sipport at the coning
Gubernatorial election. The facts will lie
suffice nt without anv comment, though
you are, of course, at liberty to use them
as vou See fit
lii the full of 1864, under protection of
a pass f.om General Scott, some four or
th e Si.-ters of Charity It ft the St. Joseph'.-
House at Emmitt-burg, on their mission to
nurse tlic sick and wounded soldiers ot
both armies. They had pe mission to vis
't any point along: the line of contest from
Winchester to Richmond, as tin ii" services
might he needed While traveling on
the cars of the Baltimore and Ohio Mail
road, under o<amission from the Com
mander-in-Chief at Washington to go
where they pleased in discharge ot the du
ties of their sacred mission, they were ar
rested at Point of Rocks by Colonel J >hn
W. Geary. In a rude manner they, with
their haggagh, were removed from the car.-
and left among crowds of soldiers a-d
rough camp followers, sitting without
shelter on their trunks by the -oadside. It
was not until after repeated solicitations
that Colonel Geary consented to grant an
interview to the princ pal sister, a lady of
education and refinement, as were her as
sociates. Finallv this military dignitary
gave orders to have her led into Ins august
presence bv a guard.
In vain did site explain fully the char
itable character of her holy mi sion; in
vain did she exhibit the generd unrestrict
ed pqcs given her hv the Oommandei-in—
Phief at Washington, authorizing her to
go, with her associates, wherever their ho
lv miss-'on might call ll em, or wh-revcr
they might he needed to nurse the wound
ed and cnsole the dying; in vain did she
heg to he allowed to proced as several
parlies of Sisters had been allowed to do
unmolested before, over the same route;
in vain did sbe sneak of the crying w-ant s
of the wounded, the sick, ihc dving sol
diers of the Union armv. to relieve and
succor whom was a great part of her mis
s;on: in vain did she assure this petty tyrant
(Geary) that <>hc had nursed the sick and
wounded soldiers of all parties in the Cri
mean war, without molestation or hin
draoce. receiving from Turk and Russian
no le-s courtesy and kindness than she did
fiom Frenchmen arid Englismen : in vain
did she protest with tearful entreaties
against such usage in her native land, after
having traveled on a rimdar mission all
over Europe unmolested, John W. Gea
rv. a bigot bv nature and a pettv tvrant in
bis position, thrust ber and her compan
ions into the cars and sent them baek to
Frederick Pit v. on their wav to the House
of St. Joseph, from which thev came.
The Surgeon-General at Frederick, a
high toned genth man, and a native of
Philadelphia, hearing of the manner in
whiehthe Sisters of Pharitv bad been
itested bv Geary, and fearing the d-Mnagri"g
effect which such brutal conduct, wnu'd
have upon the many thousands of Patho'ic
sol 'iers who were fighting in the front
ranks of the armv. at once dispatched an
orderly to General Ranks at headquarters
near Poolsville, with a letter containing a
a statement of the. conduct rf General
Geaiv. which letter will ho found offic : allv
recorded on the hacks of the Medical Di
rector. The adjutant, after riding all
night, returned to Frederick with an im
perative order, commanding General Gea
rv to esort in neron place safelv on
the southern side of the Pctoraae the said
Sisters of Charity, and to give to them PV
erv assistance to a : d them in the discharge
of their sacred mission of morcv. With
what grace he could after his brutal con
duct, Gearv did escort them beyond the
Potomac, after having endeavored to set
himself up as superior to the Commander
in-f'hief. •
Anv soldier who was under Geary at
Point of Rooks at the time alluded to will
! remember his treatment of these Sisters of
Charity. He will not dare to denv one
word of the ahove statement. If he should
the Medical Director and the Sisters will
testify to the entire truthfulness of what it
Tht tbovt facts have been
furnished in the shape in which they ap
pear, as We have stated, by one of the
wealthiest, most intelligent and honorable
men in the City of Frederick. They show
w hat a mean and miserable bigot John W.
Geary is. We hope our contemporaries
will give the statement awide circulation.
GENERAL GKANT will soon be as bitterly
opposed by the Radicals as the President
himself. Not being able to obtain Ids as
sistance to carry out their treasonable de
signs upon tte country, they will now let
loose their hounds upon his track. -Thus
Jack Hamilton, in a speech recently made
at Cleveland, alternated his usual abuse of
the President with assaults on Congress,
and said, that II Andrew Johnson should
be deposed by a writ of impeachment, and
any military commander, even Grant him
self.should respond to his call o.i the milita
ry .commander would b>* unmade even more
speedily than he had been made. This is
Radical gratitude towards the leader of the
" Boys in Blue."
The Radicals are loud in their
eulogies ot the "Boys in Blue," and aie
constantly talking of the debt of gratitude
which the nation owes them. But when
the Radical Gongress gave a practical il
lustration of the Radical idea of a debt
a of gratitude, they did so by voting
two years'extra pay as folloyvs : For eacli
white solkiet, SSO; lor each neyro soldier,
SBJO. That mode of liquidating a debt ot
gratitude is peculiarly Padical. If the
"Boys in Blue" doubt their sincerity, and
attribute their apparent friendship rather to
hypocrisy than to patriotism, the Radicals
must not blame the soldiers.
John W. FORNEY, the big gun of the
Geary-Disunion party, gives up the con
test in despair. He has been traveling
through the diferent sections of th • Stat<-
making speeches for General Geary, but he
lias seen the hand writing on the wall, and
knows that no earthly power can preient
Hon. Hiester Clymer from being the m-xi
Governor of Pennsylvania. Laucuster (I J u.)
Intelliyencer,
In addition to the above, we arc inform
ed by one of Mr. Forney's confidential ad
visers, that he is, also, in utter dsp a i r at
the slimness of his chances for United State-
Senators. He can only count seven votes
in the Rad cal caiisus—two in Bucks, and
three in Berks, and two is Montgomery
provided his party carries the election in
those districts !
IN BOSTON. PARSON BROWVLOW SAID :
1 am on a political expedition, fitted out
at Philadelphia,onr main object being to
icipe out tbe moccasin tracks of Andrew
Jobnson, Win. 11. Seward, and the other
untamed and unmitigated copperheads who
are creeping and sliming along in lluir
wake.
The "untamed aid unmitigated copper
heads" who composed the party of tbe
President were General Grant, Gsuera'
Mead.*, Admiral Farragut, and other brave
men of the army and navy, and these are
the men against whom the political "Tore!
and-Turpentine" expedition was fitted out
at Philadelphia.
The New York Herald thus ridicule
the attempt of the Radical leaders to blar
ney adopted eitizens.bv going to their me. ;t
--ii g< and pretending fti-t.d-hip for them :
These old Know Nothings and Pur
tanical fanat cs /hink they can come "the
rich Irish brogue" over our Irish fellow
citizens The idea ot th-se negro worsliip
i: g politicians of the Puritan New Eng
land sclioo 5 , pretending to have any love
for liishmen is supremely farcical. This
only shows to what humbug and deception
the Jacolrn faction will resort in their des
perate effoits to save their party.
THADEUS STEVENS I I NEGRO
EQUALITY J ! !
BLACK. BLUK. BLACK.
Thad Stevens, Aleck Mc CI lire and John
Williamson made speeches on Tuesday
night, S ptetnher 4ili in Bedford, and each
one spoke for NEGRO SUFFRAGE and
NEGRO EQUALITY. Old Thad said
the "NEGRO IS THE ISSUE, GER
MANS, IRISMEN. AND
WERE ALL EQUAL SO LONG AS I
LIVE I WILL MAINTAIN TIIIS DOC
TRINE."
McClure said he would never agree to the
restoration of the Union UNTIL THE
SOUTHERN PEOPLE PUT THEIR
NEGROES UPON A PERFECT EQUA
LITY WITH THEM I,ELVES. William
son said. " A NEGRO HAS AS MUCH
RIGHT TO VOTE AS AN IRISHMAN,
AND MORE." Now is the doctrine
of the Radica's. Republicans cannot deny
this. We can prove it by a hundred wit
nesses. In the name of heaven, can any
decent man endorse it ?
Tlie Radical Disunior.ists are crow
ing considerably over a new advocate of
their sinking cause in the pet son of B*--
ofthe New York H mid, ° . ne
. . . . „ kiows
enough to porke* *" ,i
the lovo' u- * " J tH-gotton money
thieves mav offer him, hut at the
same time he tells them some very unpalat
able ruths. The Hemld estimates that the
conservatives in the present campaign, will
gain fifty Congressmen, and gives them fig
urea as proof. Their new eoovert must
hate little faith, verily ?
TBRMs t a,oo pan awnt3U
''such as may be based upon an uncondi
tional surrender their hostility and are
turn to their just, allegiance to the Constitu
tion and laws of the United Stales."
The iei>elslnve returned to "their just
allegiance to the Constitution and iaws of
the United States," and President Johnson
as his 44 highest duty." is now endeavoring
to maintain, against the present Northern
Disunionists as he did against Southern se
cessionists," the integrity of the Union and
the paramount authority of the Constitu
titution and laws." JFhere then, is the
treason ?
Furthen than this. In July, 1861, Con
gress passed the following resolution :
" Resolved , That this war is not "Waged
on our partjin any spirit of oppression or
for any purpose of conquest, or for interfor
ing with THEKIOHTS OR ESTABXJSHEC INSTI-
Turioxs of these States but to DEFENiJ
and MAINTAIN the SUPREMACY of
the C ONSITTL riON, and to preserve
the Union with ALL THE DIGNITY and
RIGHTS of the several States UNIM
PAIRED."
President Johnson (then Senator) intra
duced this resolution. Has he ever denied
or repudiated it in word or act? Did
the Republican convention £af Baltic
ra ire, which nominated hiin, ask him to
repudiate it? By no means. Andrew
Johnson was taken as the Republican can
didate with that resolution as his pole star
and lliough the demagogues, who followed
him to gather the spoils of office and the
wreck of war, have thrown away the chart
President JohnsoN continues to steer the
■ hip of State by that fixed point in the
Northern political heavens. Is that trea
son.
But wi ois this Geary ? A fPhig—A
I'oitage Railroad Democrat—a Know
Nothing— a J.m Lane Freesoiler, by bit
own confession—a Democrat without pre
fix or affix*' —and now a negro suffrage
Disunionist, working againsL ''the iutcg"
rity of the I nion and the paramount su
premacy of the Constitution and laws of
the United States."
Voters, who is the traitor?
The lTsunionists accuse Johnson,
Cowan, Doolittle, and the thousands of
Un : on men who are .-upporting the Union
policy, of treason to their party. Will
they please say what that party is ? In
1854 th-re was a Know Nothing party
which, after a brief existence in a chrysalis
state, came out of its shell and called itself
the "Republican party" B'-forc it got
I out perfectly drv it ealled itself the M . Peo
pie's partybut soon afterwards changed
j that for the "American Republican pa ty.**
Soon after, this prefix was dropped and an
other substituted, making it the "Demo
cratic Republican party." The war came,,
and off went the old skin and out came Iho
animal as the "Union Party."
Since then its adherents have been pleased
to stvle themselves variously as "Union
leaguers,'* " oyalist," "f/tiioiiiests." "war
democrats," "patriots," " radicals," Arc. —
Now they call their organization the " Un
ion Republican party," or ** Radical tuyty,.
as suits the company. To which of those
various stages of existence have the per
sons alluded to become traitors.
GEN. BCTLKR. who, we believe, intend*
to stump Pennsylvania for Gen. Gearv, in
dicated his preference for negro suffrage,
last week, in this emphatic manner :
"Had the negro been armed, the result
would have been far different. We armed
him with the musket when he was fit to
! use it ; shall we not arm. him with the ballet?
There is apr judice against the negro on
| the question of labor. When the labor
! saving machinery was introduced into Eng
! land, the laboring classes rose and destroy
ed it, because they thought it wou'd take
away the work that brought them bread.
"Suppose we were only looking for ex
pediency. The Stvtes must come back.—
We want a loyal constituency in those
States. Where will thev come from ?
a "'Sitter of self -protection, as a matter of
economy, the negro must have a vote
As *oon as the Radicals get the,
power they 1 "whit,-"-
from the Constitution of Pennsylvania.—
Let the- honest tax payers remember this
i at thi "|>wllofr-box.
C
VOL. 6 NO. 9.
WHO IS THE TRAITOR
John W. Geary said at Huntingdon, the
other day, in a two mfnnU. speech, that
"He would not prove a traitor because
Andrew Johnson did "
To whom or to what lias Andrew John
son proved a traitor? Not to the Union
for he is doing all in his poser to restore
t, in all its integrity. Not to the party
which nominated and elected him in 1864,
for the platform upon which he was made
Vice Pr> sident, says—
" That it is. the highest duty of every
American citizens to maintoin against all
thqir enemies, the integrity •/ the Union
and the paramount authority of the Consti
tution and /kwj of the United Stntes:"
and th it there shall be no terms of peace
offered except—

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