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North Branch democrat. [volume] (Tunkhannock, Pa.) 1854-1867, October 03, 1866, Image 2

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©K Democrat.
9ICKLER, Editor.
TUNKHAMfOCK, PA j
Wednesday. Oct. 3, 1866. j
FOR GOVERNOR,
101. HIST!! CIYMEU
OF BERKS.
FOR CONGRESS,
HON. WM. EL WELL,
of Columbia.
FOR REPRESENTATIVES,
JOHN JAUKsON,
of Wyoming, and
C. M. GERE,
of Susquehanna.
NOR SBERIF r,
M. W. DEWITT,
of 'funk. Born.
FOR PROTHONOTART,
E. J. KEENLY,
of Bruin trim,
TOR ASSOCIATE JUDGE,
GORDON PIKE,
of Northmorelaud.
FOR REGISTER AND RECORDER,
O. L. PARRISH,
of Monroe.
FOR TREASURER,
JEREMIAH OSTERHOUT.
of Tuuk. Tu'p.
FOR COMMISSIONER,
G. W. SHERWOOD,
of Falls.
FOR CORONEB,
A. H. BOLLES,
of Meshoppen.
FOR AUDITOR,
JAMES R. ROBINSON,
of Fork*ton.
ELECTION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9th.
IIw we Vote.
By a law passed the last session of the
Legislature, the manner of voting in this
county was materially changed. Voters
should bear in mind that we note vote but
three Tickets.
Ist. One ticket headed ''STATE,'" which
this year contains only the name of the
candidate for Governor.
2d. One ticket headed "JUDICIARY,"
which this year, contains only the name of
the candidate for Associate Judge.
3d. One ticket headed " County" which
must contain the names of ALL COCNTT OF
r.CERs voted for, aho the names of the can
didates for CONGRESS and REPRESEN
TATIVE. No o her title or designation on
the outside of the tickets will be recognized,
and no one will be allowed to vote more
than the three tickets headed as above.—
They must contain the names of all candi
dates voted for. The officers of the elec
tion must deposit these separate tickets in
separate ballot-boxes.
WORK I J WORK ! : WORK I 1 J
T>< rnecrats, national Union men of Wy
oming County ; we make this, our last ap
peal to you before the election.
The time for action is at hand. Re
member thai eternal vigdance is the price
of liberty.
See ihat no man who will vote our tick
et remains al home. You have wily aui
unscrupulous foes to contend with.
Clo*e up the ranks and make a united
and vigorous onset. Your enemies are
desponding, Their leaders in times past,
have left them. They are now led by men
whose motto is "universal suffrage or per
petual disunion." These disunionists, these
blind and fanatical followers of the traitor
Thad. Stephens, are in a minority, in Penn
sylvania to-day, if the true Iriends of the
union will but show .heir strength. None
jure too humble or too weak to aid in the
svork. You have your libetties, and the
perpetuity of a government established by
your fathers, to defend aud maintain.
The union that you, your sons and
brothers fought to restore, is still in peril
still unrestoied. The traitors on one end
of the line have been put down by your
arms. Let the traitors on the other end
of the line be put down by your votes.
Yiu rou'd restore unimpaired, the
constitution of your fathers. You desire a 1
Union of.all the states. You would maintain
the supremacy of the white race.
Shall these glorious ends be attained ?
Shall victory crown your efforts?
With a full poll of the Democratic and
conservative vote, success in such a cau.se
is certain.
Upon you rests the responsibility of se
curing a full vote.
Go to work with willing hearts and a
determination to do everything in vour
power.
You have truth, justice and right upon
your side.
Spare no pains in such a cause.
See your friends and neighbors, talk with
them, convince them, if not already con
vinced of its justice.
See that the sick, the lame, and decrep
id have means to attend the election.
Appoint your best men to guard the polls
from the opening until the close.
See that no illegal or fraudulent votes
are cast.
See that no man who has a right under
the constitution to vote, is deprived ot that
right.
Work earnestly from morn till night. If
through your apathy the enemies of the
Union triumph, how bitte-r will be your re
grets, when too late, to avert the evils they
wiil impose upon you and the country.
We say again, a fu'.l vote will secure
certain victory.
I Will every Democrat and conservative
| unionist see that every.possible effort is
i made to secure this most desirable consum
mation ?
Let the freemen of Wyoming an~wsr in
tones that cannot be mistaken on Tuesday
next
ULYSSES MERCUR AND THE NE
GROES.
vs.
The White Men of the Territories-
In the House of Representatives May
loth 1866, ('ending the bill to amend the
organic acts ol the territories of Nebraska,
Colorado, Dakota, Montana, Washington,
Idaho, Aiizona, Utah, and New Mexico,
of which ibis is the ninth section :
Th.it withinthe territories sforesiid there shall be
no denial of the elective franchise to citizens of the
United States because of race or color and nil per
sons shall be equal before the law An-' all acts or
parts of octs, either of CWjrrcss or the legislative
assemblies of the territories iifor< said inconsistent
i \rhh the provisions of this act, are hereby declared
\ null and void "
Mr. LeiJlond moved to strike out this
section which was disagreed to —yeas 36
Democrats and conservatives. Na\s76
Radicals —ot whom ULYSSES MEIICUR
THE PRESENT RADICAL CANDIDATE FOR
CONGRESS IN THIS DISIRICT WAS ONE.
The bill with the ah.>ve section in it was
then passed—yeas, 7U, nil radicals —Mer-
cur being one of tiiein —to najs 43, all
Democrats and conservatives.
SAME VS. TIIE (FHITO MEN OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. —In the House of
Representatives, Janumv 17th 1866. The
•bill extending the right of suffrage in the
District of Columbia the fitst section of
which reads as follows was under final
consult ration:
Be it enacted, JfC Th it troni all laws and parts of
laus | it scribiiiij the qualifications <>f electors for any
office in the District of Columbia the word "white"
le, aid ihe same is heiely. stricken out, and that
' from unit after ibe passage of this act no person shall
] be disqualified from voting at any election held in
I the said District un account of color.
On the final passage of the above oill
which was passed, yea# 1 !6—all ladie.os of
whom ULTSKS MKRCUK WAB ONK— Nays
54 Democrats and conservatives.
SAME VS. WHITS SOLDIERS . — July 27th
and 28lh v. re tlie two last da} >• of the
session. During tlie excitement attend;..it
upon the close of congress,the civil appro
pi iat ion bill was passed, and the bid for
the admission of Nebraska. Page 1172.
Incorporated with the appropriation bill
was the provision for the increased pay of
Congressmen, and for equalization of boun
ties to sohtiers, Mr Mercur voted against
the measure, on its liual passage, and
consequently voted against the bounty for
soldiers ami ajainst the increased pay to
himself. But he received the p<iy he did
not vote tor. The soldier has to stand
back. Though Congress voted him a
bounty, they did not \ote any money to
pay the bounty !
SAME VS. WHITE MEN EVERYWHERE. —
MEKCTR voted for every ruoicol
m axure ot the Hump Congress and oyoiW
ev< rv conservative and c oicdiatory- piop-
osition.
He voted
To vest the functions of legislation in a
Secret Committee of It quisituis.
To pr v. Nt free diaeus>iou.
To insult tlte Repre-ei.tatives of the
people of sovereign States by public dis
courtesies.
To infringe upon the Reserved Right of
Regulating the Suffrage of eacli State.
For additional Negro Soldiers in the
standing army.
For extravagant sell in s of public pluti
di r. Foi grants of Public Lands to t orpo j
rations and Monopolies.
For heavy taxes on articles of necessity
for poor men.
For tlie remission of I'axes to Rich Cor
porations —by allowing them to collect it
from tin- people
-Foran annual tax of over ELEV
EN AIILLIONS of dollars to support the
Negro.
For Test Oaths! !
For Military Rule in time of Peace !!
For Negro Equality !!
For Negio Suffrage !!
WHAT ULYSSES VOTED AGAINST
Agaii st State Representation.
Against the Restoration of the Habeas
Cor/ius
Against the President's patriotic vetoes.
Against the Equalization of Bounties to
Soldiers and Sailors.
Against the Constitution.
Against the Union ! 1
In reviewing the official arts of Mr. Con
gressman Mercur, the Bradford Aeyux says; j
XJie honest, thinking, conservative peo
ple of this Congressional District will be
thunderstruck with the course of their rep- ,
resentative. They never intended he sho dij
support Negro Suffrage. They never in
tended to keep the Union divided. They
never intended to scatter with profligate j
hands, lor doubtful ends, the hard earn-d (
n oney of the People. They ask for Re- ' ,
form. They disire retrenchment, THEY j
DEMAND RECONCILIATION. But 1 ]
it must oe" pressed home on the CON
SCIENCE of every honest man who wish- |
e to do the right, and upon the FIDELI- ]
TY of every man who loves country, and
holds fast to the charter of our liberties,
that we ca-not any longer endorse the trai
tor and not share in the treason.
Honest, thinking and intelligent men,
as they review this faithful, authoritative
record, will quietly vote for that plain, sub
stantial unaffected, TKI'E man of the peo
ple. WILLIAM ELWELL.
HIESTE K"C L Y M E R
IN THK
SENATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.
17th April, 1861—Sumter fired on. —
Same day—Joint resolution introduced
into the Senate of Pennsylvania, pledging
the State to maintain inviolate the Con
stitution and the Sovereignty of the I ni
ted States. CLYMER VOTES AYE.—
See Legislative Heron/, p-iye 927.
2d May, 1861—Bill to aid the families ,
ofVolunteeis who enter the service.—
CLYMER SPEAKS AND VOTES POR
IT. See page 961 and 969,
31th May, 1861 —Bill to create a Loan
and Arm the State introduced. CLYMER
speaks for small bonds so as so make a
popular loan. Seepage 1087. CLAMER
speaks for belter muski ts for the soldiers.
Page 1091 IIE VOTES FOR THE
BILL. Page 1092.
9th Mav, 1861—CLYMER introduced
resolutions for procuring flags for Penn
splvania Regiments.— Paae 1046
10th May, 1861—CLYMER moves to j
proceed to the consideration of the resolu j
lions, and they are read and parsed finally, j
Page 1066.
4th July, 1866—The flags procured un
der this resolution received by the State
authorities f.om the troops, and HIES PER
CLYMER not invited to take part.
30th January, 1862 — Resolutions for
expulsion of Jessi eD. Bright from the
Senate of the United States introduced.
CLYMER VOTES AYE, and says "lest
my vote might be misconstrued —not by
our own people, but bv the enemies of
our common friends who battle for a com
mon country —as indicating even in the
slightest degree a desire to shield one who
may be a traitor to the Republic, I vote
ave." Page 144.
17th February, 1862—Thanks to sol
diers and sailors for carrying Roanoke Is
land, Forts Henry and Donelson, and cap
turing Savannah. CLYMER VOTES
AYE Page 258.
23d January 1862—CLYMER speaks
in favor of joint, resolution for paving
Pennsylvania soldiers in service of United
States. Pages% and 90.
Bth Aprii, 1862—REILLY, Democrat,
introduced resolution for Roll of Honor of
five companies who marched from Ilarris
luirg to Washington, on 18tli of'April,lß6l
CLYMER speaks for it, and says: "It is
right and proper that this State should
know the names of those gallant men w ho,
in the darkest hours of our dire necessitv,
garrisoned that ( ap.fai ai d stood there
! rendv to protect it from destruction/'—
Page 874.
September, 1865, Mr. CLYMER vol
unteered as a private in Captain Hunter's
company, and marched into Maryland, un
der < Yd. Knodi-rer.
11th February, 1863 Amendments to
the Constitution, allowing soldiers to vote.
CLYMER VOTES AYE. Page 167.
sth January, 1864—Senate met a tie
between Democrats Republicans.—
J'ennev, the Speaker, refused to leave the
oha.' r —the law and Constitution required
him to drt so. The Democrats regarded
this as revolutionary and resisted it, and
refused to proeee. Ito business until Pen
ney would resign, ami a Speaker be elect
ed.
i 9th March, 1864— Penney resigned, a
Speaker was elected, anu the Senate pro
ceeded to husiness. Bet wee.? s'h of Jan
uary and 9th of Match, the Republicans
attempted to force the D m >crats to legis
late. This was resisted, and tl e\ voted
agnint prnceedina to consider everything
that was brought up. and invariably gave
as their reasons for so doing, that the Sen
ate was not organized. 1 *age 3.
Mr. Johnson moved to proceed to the
consideration of the Amendments to the
Constitution allowing soldiers to vote. —
This motion was defeated by a tie vote. —
CLYMER VOTING N AY. Reason giv
en, the Senate was not organiz d.
Mr. Johnson moved To PROCEED TO THE
CONSIDERATION of the Amendments to the
Constitution allowing soldiers to vote.—
This morion was defeated by a tie vote.
CLYMER VOTING NAY. Reason giv
en. the S nate was not organ*zd.
9th March, 1864—The tie was unlock
ed bv the election of Mr. St. Clair, a new
Senator. The Republicans took np the
Constitutional amendment and passed it l
hefo-e Speaker Penney resigned. CLY- !
MER did not vote on its passage because j
the Senate was not vet organized. Penney !
then resigned end was re-elect d Speaker ; !
Mr. CLYMER then, at onee asked leave '■
to record his VOTE IN FAVOR of the Amend
ment to the Constitution allowing soldiers
to vote. The Republicans refused to al
low it Page 341.
30th March, 1864—Resolution introduc
ed asking Congress to pav tile private sol- i
dier in coin or i's equivalent PAGE 536. !
CLYMER speaks in its favor.'and says, "it j
is strange that those w' o profess so much 1
love for the soldier should here to-dav re- 1
sist a proposition so fair and just. Ful
some praise yon can give it is in roar line,
but when the soldier asks for the means
wherewith to supply his wife and little ones
with the bare necessaries of life, you turn
your backs npon hiin, and brand as disloy
al every man who advocates his claims. If
it be disloval to stand by, guard, protect
and defend the poor and humble against
the rich and powerful, to be in favor of the !
soldier rather than of the shoddy contrac- 1
tor. then lam disloyal." PAGE 538.
'29 th April, 1864—Thanks to Meade fori
Gettysburg, and testimonial to Reynolds !
introduced. CLYMER VOTES AYE |
PAGE 933
15th March, 1865—8i1l for the main
tenance and education of destitute orphan
children of deceased soldiers and sailors
up for consideration. CLYMER speaks
Appendix, page 62. Votes for it, appendix,
page 65.
At all times and in all places HIESTER
CLYMEN is admitted to be a pure and
honest man.
FOURTEEN REASONS FOR ABAN
DONING THE RADICALS,
BT AN UNCONDITIONAL UNION MAN.
From the Patriot and Union.
FELLOW COUNTRYMEN : The writer of
these lines has been an earnest, he might
almost confess, a FIERCE Union man all
through the war. He was three years and
a half in the military service of the coun
try, and can establish a claim to VERY IM
PORTANT services rendered, and repeated
exposure of life in the Union cause He
never held, and never expects to hold, a
civil office, and has never been an active
partisan. lie was zealous and active in
putting down the rebellion. But now that
the war is over, rebtdlion crushed, slavery
dead, and all danger of a revival of the fol
ly of secession forever gone, he feels that he
has some right to plead for PEACE, for RES
TOKATION, for ECONOMY of public expendi
ture, for a return of confidence and good
feeling, for MAGNANIMITY, for UNION ! -
And lie resp -ctfudy asks every fellow citi
zen whose eye may fall upon these lines to
ponder with CANDOR, and in the light of
TeuTH and PATKIOTISM, the foIIowingFOUR
TF.EN REASONS why the radicals ought to
fail and the conservatives ought to succeed
at the coming election :
1. Ihe radical wing of the Republican
partv have abandoned the great objects of
the war, as laid down by Congress and
President Lincoln at the outbreak of the
rebellion, Those objects were to maintain
the Government and PRESERVE IHE UNION,
but the radicals are trying to prevent the
restoration of the Union. The radicals
ought to faih
2. B cause thov are opposed to the pol
icy of ieconst ruction laid down by Presi
dent Lincoln, and which he had partially
inaugurated before his death. His
messages and proclamations all cleaily
prove that his policy was the same , that
President Johnson now recommends, and
Mr. Seward ami all Mr. Lincoln's confi
dential advisers now declare that it was.
3. Because the radicals aim to prevent
the restoration, FOR THE SOLE PURPOSE OF
PERPETUATING THEIR PARTY SUPREMACY
thus sacrificing COUNTRY at the shrine o
PARTT,
4. Because Congress and Mr. Lincoln
declared that a State COULD not and SHOULD
not go out of the Union, and sent armies to
maintain that position. The armies did
maintain it, and kept the insurgent States
IN THE UNION; bit the radicals say they
did not —that the war failed of its ohj ct,
and that secession was accomplished !
5. Because the radicals sgy that eleven
States weie out of the Union, and prac -
tically a FOKEIUN NATION ; that they are a
CONQUERED nat on,and to be treated as such.
They thu- make Davis and his compeers
PATRIOTS, struggling for their country, in
stead of TRAITORS, and place them BEYOND
THE REACH OF PUNISHMENT ; for the laws
of nations will not permit the military and
the mag sf acy of a CONQUKED NATION to be
punished as TRAITORS.
6. Because the lfadical majority of Con
gn ss have passed laws to swell the public
debt, with a recklessness never heard of in
all pas' history. This-increaee was demand
ed bv no public necessity, but millions up
on millions have be* n voted away under
pretext of improving rivers, harbors and
the like, but really to afford pickings for
their favorites. And whilst the people are
groaning under crushing burdens of taxa
tion, these men shamelessly increased their
burdens hv voting an increase of their own
pay. When elected to Congress,it was
upon the implied contract tha' they
would serve 'or the ten months usually oc
cupied by both sessions of a Congress, for
the sum of 56.000 ; but they violated the
contract, and added #4.000 to their own
pay, making it SIO.OOO, or about #I,OOO
a nvnth! Will the people send these
mer. hack, or men who approve of their
own course ?
7. Because, while increasing the public
debts, thev squandered an important means
of paving it, V'z : the public domain. They
voted away, n; railroad compiniea and oth
er speculating organizations, millons of
nCD-a of the public lands. These lands
ought to he sold to pay the national d<-bt
and diminish taxation ; but this Congress
has squandered vast portions of it. And
wlul-t doing this they attempted to -addle
the country with a Freedmen's Bnre u
| system, that would have cost from twelve
to fifteen millions every year. No citizen
can read the journals of Congress without
being st rtled at the utter recklessness with
which thev squandered the people's money!
,8. Because the radicals have violated
and insist upon continuing to violate the
great principles of civ 1 liberty involved in
our Revolutionary struggle and set forth
jin the Declaration of Independence One
of these principles is, "NO TAXATION WUH
orT REPRESENTATION and yet the radi
cals ini<t npon taxing ten States of the
Union whom they exclude fiom represen
tation in the Legislature that lavs the tax.
The men of 76 savin the Declaration:
44 We hold this truth to he self-evident—
that all governments derive their just pow
ers FROM THE CONBENT OF THE GOVERNED;"
and y<t the radicals propose to amend the
Constitution, the fundamental 'aw cf the
nation, whilst they excluded eleven States
of the Union from the C ngres? that pro
posed tlie amendments, thus imposing up
on eight or ten mi'lions of people a PERPET
UAL BULK of government without asking
their CON-ENT Tims would th se men
trample upon the pr neiples of' 76.
9. Because the radicals openly and defi- i
antlv trample upon the Constitution of our
country, which requires that "the United
States shall gn rantee to evrrv S'otcs a
republican form of government " So far
from obeving the Constitution in this re
quirement, Congress persist in denying to
ten States the right of self-government,
and withhold from them the rights of rep
resentation, an essential element of republi
can Congresshas a right, as
the President has again and again said, to
judge each House of the qualifications ot
its own mamhers. and he thinks as the wri
ter does, that none but men of approved
loyalty shonld be admitted, hut Congress
ha no power to denv the right to be rep
resented, nor exclude rightly qualified rep
resentatives
10. Because it is dangerous to the Re-
Public to continue long in power any party 1
with such an overwhelming majority as:
the radicals have in the present Congress.
In -11 free governments oppo*it'on\s an el
ement of purity and safety. But when an
opposition is too small to make any resist
ance, or even to exercise due vigilance, the
tyranny of the majority becomes reckless
and corruption unexposed and unchecked
corrodes the body polictic.
11. Because the radical press and stump
orators seek to deceive the people in re
gard to the BABIB OR RKPREBENTVTION. —
They assert that the whole negro popula
tion will now be counted as the basis of
represention in Congress in the Southern
States; whereas THET KNOW that NO
CH'NOE in the basis of representation can
take place until after another census and
another apportionment. They know that
no change CAN take place till 1871. And
yet in their zeal to force NEGRO SUFFRAGE
upon the country, they pretend that there
is new an inequality ; whereas the truth Is ;
that only three-fifths of the non-voting j
population of the North is counted as the j
basis of apportionment.
12. Because the radical policy, or want
of a policy, keeps the country divided, pro
longs sectional passion and jealousy, dc- j
predates public credit, and diminishes the 1
revenue of the countrv, by discouraging
industry and thrift. If they would permit
the restoration of the Union for which our
brave men fought, industry would revive
at the South, property would be able to
pay their proportion of the public burdens
and TAXATION AT THE NORTH COCLD BE '
DIMINISHED. But so long as the radical
policy prevails, poverty will oppress the
Southern people—they can pay no taxes. |
and we of the North must bear the whole
burden!!
13. Because, after claiming to be the
very champions ot free speech and a free
press, they have of late proved the most
intollerant enemies of both ; as evidenced
by the recent instdts to our Chief Magis
trate, by their refusal to let him enjoy the
right of the humblest citizen, to he heard
injhis own defence, and by drowning his
voice with ribald clamor and insulting
noises; all of which conduct the radical
pTessiias with scarcely an exception, ex
ultingly approved !!
14.—Because the policy of the radicals
is in its SPIRIT and its PROGRAMME UN
CHRISTIAN, VINDICTIVE and Bl OoD THIRS
TY ! It is difficult to imagine how any
CHRISTIAN, who pcssescs the spirit of Je
sus. can adhere to a policy w hose watch
word is vengeance and desfruct on! So
long as the rebels wi re in arms, the writer
of these lines was earnest and active in
supporting th" Government an i putting
down rebellion; but now he longs for
peace, confidence, magnanimity. UNION
He longs for the legitimate fruits of victo
ry. Shall we have LINTON, PEACE and a
DIMINUTION of TAXES? Or shall we, by
voting- with the Radicals and keeping
them in power, have DISTRUST, DISSKNTMN
EXTRAVAGANT GOVERNMENT AND IN
CREASED TAXES /
My fellow citizens, I implore you to
weigh my FOURTEEN REASONS candidly and
dispassionately. Lav passion, prej tdiee
and party a.ide ; and vote in the fear of
God and with an intelligent love of coun
try.
As UNCONDITIONAL UNION MAN.
Head and Decide.
If yon are opposed to taxation without
representation— VOTE FOR HIKSTER C'LT
MER.
If you are opposed to inob law an? ille
gal gatherings designed to create war and
its incalculable evils— VOTE FOR IIEISTEH
CLTMKR.
If yon are opposed to placing black men
upon a par with tho>e of your own race—
VOTE FOR HKISTKR CLYMEK.
11 voii are in favor of cem nting anew
the States under the Constitution— VOTE
FOR HIE-TEK CLTMKR.
If you aie opposed to encouraging pas
sions calculated to prevent a -p'rit of mutu
al forbearance and good will between the
Northern and Southern people —VOTE FOR
riIESTER JLYMER.
If you are opposed to the revolutionary
measures enacted by the self styled Con
gress of the UNITED STATES—VOTE FOR
HIE.-TER CLTMF.K, who stan is committed
AC-AIN'ST all these political interests so zeal
ously expressed by Stevens-Geary <fc Co.
If you are in favor of taxing the rich
bond-holder RS well as the poor son of toil
VOTE FOR JLLKSTER CLYMER.
If you are in favor of sustaining the ma
jesty of the law and opposed to every step
tending to create discord— VOTE FOR HIES
ter CLYMEK.
If you are in favor of retaining political
power in the hands of white men— VOTE
FOR 'LESTER CLTMKR
If you are in favor >f a speedy return of
all th< |States to their rights und r the Con
stitution—VOTE FOR HEISTER CLTSIER.
If you are in favor of cultivating the
friendship of the citizen* of all sections
VOTE roa HEISTER CLTMER.
some laws by legally constituted bodies—
VOTE FOR HIESTER CLVMER, who stands
committed in favor of all these political
interests so zealously opposed by Stevens-
Geary &c Co.
MR. GEO. ASHMUV, of Massachusetts,
who is known best as Presidcn* of the Chi
ef go Republican Convention that nomina
ted Abraham Lincoln for President, has
written a letter to a Johnson meeting in
New York, in which he says :
44 1 know Mr. Johnson well. He is hon-
est, sagacious, true, and firm, and all such
imputations upon his motives are most un
just. I know, too, that he is faithfully fol
lowing the same line of generous and far
seeing policy which guided Mr. Li .coin up
to the hour of his death, and 1 cannot be
brought to doubt either its expediency or
its justice. Certainly no higher or holier
motive for action, in a public servant, can
he suggested than that of a desire for the
immediate restoration to friendly relations
of those parts of our country which Imve
been alienated. The war, followed by a
solid aud lasting peace, may, after all,
prove a blessing. But a hollow truce, out
of which fiery passions and unscrupulous
personal ambition seek to make profitable
harvest, cannot be anything but a curse."
SENTIMENTS or T&E SPEAKERS AT TBI
REPUBLICAN MsttiNo.—Thaddeus Ste
vens was the dhief speaker at the Lancas
ter meeting on the 27tb. He said :
The great issue to be met at the election
is the question of negro rights, I shall not
deny, but admit, that a fundamental princi
ple of the Republican creed is that every
being posse-sing an immortal soul is equal
before the law. They are not and cannot
be equal in strength,height,beautv,intellect
ual and moral culture, or social acquire
ments; these are accidents which must
govern their condition according to circum
stances, But in this Republic, the same
laws must and shall apply to every mortal,
Ameiican, Irishman, African, German or
Turk.
John W. Forney was another speaker
and a big gun. Jle then said :
. " Entertaining very clear and Jeeided
opinions on this subject, Ido not hesitate
to state that 1 believe the true solution of
all our complications and the lasting protec
tion of our free institutions, is TO CONFER
IMPARTIAL SUFFRAGE UPON AMERICAN CIT
JZA 8 OF WHATEVER CKEKU, COLOR OR NA
TIVITY. if this makes me a radical, lam a
radical and 1 glory in the name."
The thunder storm is gathering—the
storm may soon break—and the sooner the
rebels accept the terms offered by Congress
the beticr for iheir'jTtiilty lives. TH* COL
ORKD MAS WILL HE CLUTIISD WITH' TIIK
RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE.
Local and Personal.
DEMOCRATIC
MASS MEETING.
The friends of JOHNSON And CLYMER will
u.ei-t in council, at
itfiC/iidljigorj,
On Friday, October 5* 1866.
GEN. E L. DANA. HON. R. Rv.
LITTLE, R. H. M'KUNE, J. B.
M'COLLUM, ESQ'S.
and other eminent Speakers will adJiess tbdfc meeting
Let there be a
GRAND It AL L Y
Of tho Conservative men, the Friend- of
JOHNSON it CLYMEH,
The mcetliigjWlll commence at lO o'ciocit;
A. N. By o dor of the COMMITTEE.
HON W*. ELWLLL, our candidate for Con
gress, is invited, and will probably attend.
Nicholson Sejit. 27. ISG6.
Mr. EDITOR.
The Republican of this week con
tains an article by a corre.p>nueut froi* this place
which contnine some statements in rela'in o a
"seene" that occurred at the Olenwood Fair, so
gro-sly tnlsc ai>d unjust as to demand some notice ;
although its low-lived slang, and its Pharisaical in
sole i ee end egotism entitle it only to silent contempt.
As to the uterus of the *|ieecb of the so called "Cp
--l tin'* Tourgee, I do nut propose to sty anything at
Ibis time, further than thai it was very IUIS'.I iu the
style of those of Biowulow and his co-laborers ol the
"Torch aud tU'penliae squat "
.-in e the Fair, the fad is made public that this
man, Tourgee was sentriere by the Ilepub>ic in State
Cominitiee ; but if tile charas-ter of hi- "addiess"
was known to any ef the re<q>onsible representatives
of the Agricultuiui Society, prevent to its delivery,
that r nnw'edjfe was nut eottunnnicated to others who
had—to sty tue least —ns good a right to k tow of
it. And when th-' ch -ruder of bis speech became
apparent, several meinberg of tbe Executive Com
ntiuee and other stockholder.- (who are Republicans)
■ spressed ibeir disapprobation of the at tempt to
impose upon an Agricultural Fair, a pilitical ha
ruiirue Under tbe circuu.i-lances one of the Vi.e-
Prcsi Icn' ? (who is also tbe largest stockholder in
the Sot e' v.anl a member of thr Exrcutivc Cotnmif-
I tee) ascended tbe .Judges stand, and while retuoii
I strafing i'h anoiher member of the Executive Com
mittee as to the impropriety of the proceeding,
Pr sident of the Society eaine upon the staid and;
wasa.ipoale l to by tbe member of the Executive
Coiniiiitte first mentioned ; ami whether in conse
qu nee or the Bugg<st©fur impelled by his own
gentlemanly impulses. ..ml his up relation of the
outrage that was being perpetrated upon his politic
al opp nenrs, is nt apparent or initerial. Be that
as it may the President did attempt and in a very
few moments succeeded in stopping tbe speech.—
Notwithstanding the coio nan.isnf the Executive
Ci mmiiiee man called by Ned, "Manager." backed
by tin' immaculate (!!) ex-marshal of the 12'h dis
tr et in all his formid iLle proportions, neither of
the "lights" Ned speaks of. "poked his head in front
of the speakerand Ned might base spored his
readers the f.rmid.ible array of adj-ctives as well as
h : s false statements. And alth iu?h neith-rof Ned's
"lights" boast the "mnscle argument" it was not
apparent that they shrunk fma the performance of
their duty to the society or its patrons. At to the
manner in whi-h th* whole affair was vietvei by
what he pleases to call "the true men,'' the mani
fest impropriety of imposing upon' an Agrienltural
Fair and its patrons, n political harangue on either
side is fittingly denounce! bv men of ..11 parties
whose opinion is respected in the community. And
"Ned" And the few other very fanatical Radicals
who are airing their i.illingsgate and venting their
equally harmless detractions, in the news papers
and mi the street corners, are manifestly endeavor
ing to turn the popular tide by the old dodge of
"stop thief." FAIR PLAT.
Married.
" ' I
H ART—LOTT—On Sept. 7th. at (be Parsonage in
Wysox.Br idford Co. bv the Rev. Joseph A. Roseed,
Mr. Aionzo Hurt, t<> Miss Louisa Lott. both of
Tunkhannock, Pa.
HALSET-ETIIERIDOE—At Montrose, Sept. 27th
1866, by Rev Jacob G Miller, Calvin C. Halsey
M, D, and Miss Mary Etheridga.
McLAIN—PLACE—At the house of the brides
father, Sept. 29th 1866, by Rev. 6, L Legg. Mr.
Samuel McLan of Auburn Tp. P. to Miss
Amanda 11, Place, of Washington Tp, Pa.
LYMAN—BUNNELL —At the M. E Parsonage,
Sept 20th 1866, by Rev. E. F. Robert*. Mr.
Joseph A. Lyman to Miss Emma T. Bunnell, both
of Mesboppen.
Statement of the Wyoming: National Bank
ot Tunknaonock, Monday Morning
Oct. lat 1866,
RESOURCES.
Loans and Discount*, $64 711.69
Government Securities 122 900.00
Exnense including Premiums Faid, 8 8^4,54
Cash Items, 4 064.07
Legal Tender Notes and Fractional carrency27,Ho6 29
State Currency , 393 60
National do 1,885 00
Due from National Banks, 24,879,84
8254.904,43
LIABILITIES.
Capital Stock, 8100,000 00
Circulation, 90.010 00
Derosits, 69.460 08,
Pmfi anl Loss, 3.135.9$
Surplus, * 2,,000, 00
Due Netiooal Banks, 308,43
$254,904,43
SAWL. STARK Cashier
IP*™", and subscribed this 2nd'
.WGTF, baton •> * *

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