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Baraboo weekly news. [volume] (Baraboo, Wis.) 1912-197?, March 28, 1912, Image 1

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BARABOO WEEKLY NEWS.
ESTABLISHED MAY 2*
Hif’S ADVANTAGES
AS PLACE TO RESIDE
Place Rivals Other Towns
as to Sanitary Condi
tions.
CITY IS GROWING
Improvements Permanent
and Include All Forms
of Advancement.
Baraboo has exceptional advantages
as a place in which to reside. Many of
the leading streets have been paved to
the city limits and far into the coun
try. The courthouse, passenger sta
tion, high school building, postoflice
building, many of the churc les, city
hall, Y. M. C. A. building and other
structures have been recently built.
The water is pure, the lighting system
good, lawns the best kept of any place
in the state, a pretty river and impos
ing hills round about. Within three
miles a state park has been established
which promises to be a great loadstone
in the way of bringing visitors to this
section. There is not much else that
a city the size of Baraboo could wish
for. The people are prosperous, con
tented, public spirited and astir.
Prosperity Ahead.
Prosperity is ahead. As soon as
spring opens work ot erecting the new
Ringling theatre, parochial school,
consolidated Fairfield and Excelsior
creamery and the Philbrick —Mather
garage will begin. The contractors
also have a number of new residences
to build. For some time there have
been but very few vacant houses in
Baraboo and the demand is for many
more. Property has felt a material
advance within the past few years.
Center of Iron Field.
During the past few years a vast
iron deposit has been located in the
Baraboo valley. Two mines are now
active near the city and there are re
ports that at no distant date there will
be a great boom in the industry. Other
companies have holdings which
promise much for the prosperity of this
region.
Small Farming.
The location here of the Herfort i
Canning company and Heinz j
station makes small farming very
profitable. One citizen has raised peas
valued at over SI,OOO in a single season.
The sugar beet industry has grown be
yond all expectation.
Fruits, potatoes, dairying, poultry,
and all kinds of farming is exceeding
ly successful in the rich and varied
soils.
The Water Powers.
Baraboo has four dams within two
miles and nearly every foot of the
water power is utilized. Power is de
veloped for the Island W oolen nidi, j
the linen mill, the city water plant j
and several small concerns. -
Baraboo has one of the best drainage
systems in the state, the Baraboo
river being much lower han the city.
Baraboo is the greatest circus center j
in the world.
Building Haterial Near.
Baraboo has a great mass of building
material close at hand. These include
sandstone, limestone, gravel, sand,
clay, rock for street work and ma
terial for cement work. Many
cities must get this from a distance
but at Baraboo they are at hand. To
continue to improve is Ihe policy of
Baraboo.
The Parks.
Baraboo is the county seat and the
courthouse is situated in the center of
a beautiful park. The courthouse is
new, built of Bedford stone and at a
cost of about §BO,OOO. The park slopes
in all directions from the buildiug and
the business section of the city sur
rounds the beautiful block. About 200
beautiful shade trees, a soldiers’ monu
ment and convenient walks make an
attraction which few towns possess.
Ochsner’s park is often used for pub
lic gatherings s-s is also the Riverside
park. With the state park ihere are
more than 2,000 magnificent shade
trees.
(Continued on Last Page.)
Beautiful Baraboo Has:
Seed store.
No gossips?
Six hotels.
Two florists.
One ice firm.
Four bakers.
Three wards.
Two circuses.
Five garages.
Two theatres.
One gunshop.
Two tin shops.
Two laundries.
One fruit store.
Seven dentists. ,
Two feed mills.
Two fur stores.
One linen mill.
Oiie book store.
One dye works.
Ten physicians.
Two orchestras.
Six rural routes.
Business college.
Thiee coal firms.
Five drug stores.
Two auctioneers.
Five pipe organs.
Humane society.
Two cigar stores.
Parochial school.
One book binder.
Three dray fines.
Two stage routes.
Two piano firms.
One woolen mill.
Three restaurants.
Thirteen lawyers.
Two daily papers.
Two pop factories.
Four livery firms.
Five barber shops.
Two veterinarians.
Thirteen churches.
Five milk dealers.
Two harness shops.
Two tea cent stores.
Three stock bjyers.
Three lumber firms.
Two plumber firms.
Oae fair association.
Four meat markets.
Four jewelry stores.
Four milliner stores.
Two abstract offices.
Two furniture firms,
hive hard ware firms.
One canning factory.
Three photographers.
Three weekly papers.
Three woman’s clubs.
Dement block factory.
One pure water plant.
One express company.
Three produce buyers.
Six blacksmith shops.
One second hand store.
Five job printing shops.
Tne population is 6,324.
Several fruit farms near.
Women’s Civic League.
Seven real estate dealers.
Great .Northern Nursery.
Postal receipts of $15,000.
Three cement walk firms.
Two iife insurance offices.
Four exclusive dry goods.
Eleven resident ministers.
Two flour and feed stores.
Several social centers near.
Mayor and nine aldermen.
Four exclusive shoe stoies.
One circus wagon factory.
Eight hundred fishermen.
. One pickle salting station.
One spot cash variety store.
Two farm implement firms.
Thirty-eight secret societies.
Library with 9,000 volumes.
Mutual insurance company.
Five fine looking policemen.
Three merchant tailor shops.
Five public school buildings.
Plans made for trial orchard.
Two hundred business firms.
Pansy farm three miles away.
One local telephone company.
Four exclusive clothing firms.
Two street lighting companies.
The city covers oh square miles.
Marine band—best in the state.
Railroad division headquarters.
Chicago & Northwestern shops.
Elevation above the sea, 890 feet.
Miles and miles of paved streets.
Historical society wfith museum.
One creamery; plans for another.
Young Men’s Christian association.
There are 14 passenger trains daily.
Fourteen grocery and general stores.
Cahoon iron mine two miles away.
Iroquios iron mine ten miles away.
Two-hundred with automobile fever.
(Continued on Last Page.)
BARABOO, WIS., THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1912.
FAMILIAR SCENE IN SAUK COUNTY
THE accompanying picture is one which has been a familiar
scene in Sauk county for a number of years. The building
of good roads has become a necessity and the county is now
expending about $60,000 annually in the work. The picture
shows a big roller on the West Sauk Road near Kings Corners
doing its duty. Soon there will be seen in a number of places
in the county, iron monsters crushing the rock into permanent
highways.
MERRIMACK POST
NOW 7 NUMBERS THREE
Once There Were Thirty Members, but Today There
is but One Smaller in the State of Wisconsin
That the veterans of the war of half
a hundred years ere p issing to the last
camp ground is solemnly impressed by
the fact that at Merrimack but three
remain n tne local post. Ge /ge Par
son post No. 195, once had about 30
members and now there are not
enough to fill the officers' chairs There
is but one smaller post in the state and
as the years go by the charters of the
organization, one by one, will be sent
in. The officers of the Merrimack post
are:
1 IFEE ©MTUSTT
PERPETRATED BY WALT AYDOUGALL v
.........
COUNTRY BOV. ALLEGED FRESH EGGS. HE ptu C MBER S ASSISTANT
HE DftIV.SAHA.KANP READS ’NKSwSSwKSm. .
HICK CARTER. RALCSSIER _
HE OPENS A LAW OFFICE IN
tHE C-ITCHASTUFF BUi LDfNG- - THE PiCKLSLD TRIPE TRUST. OF THE SUPREME COURT,
These McDougall pictures, cartoons and other illustrations appear in the Daily News
from day to day. The paper is only 25 cents per month by mail. Try it for a month.
Commander—Charles Pigg, Merri
mack.
Adjutant—William G. Clark, Mer
rimack.
Treasurer—Charles Odekirk, Bara
boo.
Buried in ihs Glen.
vjpi 'A'- - <
A young son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Me Intyre was buric i r l huisday in the
cemviery at Durward’s glen. The
cause of the child’s death is spinal
meningitis.
HUMANE SOCIETY
IS ORGANIZES
Officers And Board of Di=
rectors Are Selected at
Meeting.
In the assembly room of the high
school building on Friday evening the
Sauk County Humane society was
organized. H. L. Phillips of Milwau
kee, the state secretary, was introduced
by F, A. Philbrick, who has been in
strumental in securing a list of those
who desired the local society organized.
He gave a talk on the needs and pur
poses of such a society and said that
no community could boast of freedom
from brutality. More men and women
are needed to extend the zone of hu
manity in this reform movement.
It was Henry Burke in 1862 who
organized the first society and it has
been found that the older we get as a
country that the more is the need of
humane societies. This is because the
human standard is higher and the
struggle on account of competition is
more keen. Fifteen states have humane
societies with 464 branches. Last
year there was paid in fines the sum of
$85,302.66. The states have aided by
giving the societies $155,000, the
counties have contributed $121,751 and
the cities $149,824. During the p si
year 136,493 children were aided,
1,463,123 animals were relieved and
31,424 prosecutions were recorded.
Miss Farwell gave a musical num
ber.
When it came to organizing Rev. L
A. Goddard was elected chairman and
the following composed the commit
tee to name the board of directors: H.
H. Sianley, E. P. Me Fetridge, Attor
ney E. Aug. Runge, F. A. I’hilbrick
aud J. P. Witwen. The report in
cluded the following officers and
directors, who were elected:
Officers.
President—E. P. Me Fetridge.
Vice president—G. T. Thuerer.
Treasurer —L. S. VanOrden.
Secretary—F. A. Philbrick.
(Continued on Last Page.)
READ BY EVERYBODY
LEGISLATURE
MAY CANCEL
OBLIGATI
Dam at Black River Falls
May Not Be Replaced
by State.'
MTV, GENERAL'S OPINION
Other Elements Which En
ter Into Steps to Be
Taken.
That the legislature may cancel
the obligation of the city of Black
River Falls for money loaned from
the trust funds, at the same time re
placing in the trust funds, the amount
so cancelled, is held in an opinion by
Attorney General Bancroft yesterday
upon request of Governor McGovern.
Black River Falls borrowed $31,000
from the state.
Also it is held that an appropriation
for the preservation of the public
health or to relieve distress is valid;
that moneys in the drainage fund
may be appropriated to build a re
taining wall only upon the theory that
it would assist in the reclamation of
lands granted by the United States
under the swamp and overflowed
land act; that the state has no right
to replace the dam at Black River
Falls.
As to the stricken city the Attorney
General recommends the following:
Relieving the city from its indebt
edness.
Relief of present suffering.
Aid for the schools.
Preservation of public health.
Building of a retaining wall to
protect the city from further damage
by flood.
11 TAKE PART
I MEMORIAL DM
Sons of Veterans To March
On Decoration Day--
Badges Arrive.
The Philip Cheek Camp of Sons of
Veterans met last night in the G. A. R.
hall. The badges have arrived and
were given to the charter members of
the organization. It was decided be
tween the Grand Army men and the
Sons of Veterans that the latter would
take part in the Memorial Day exer
cises given on May 30. The younger
organization will march in the morn
ing and have charge of the regular
exercises at the cemetery. The Philip
Cheek camp urges that all eligible to
become members of the organization
fill out their application before April
Ist as the fee will be raised after that
date.
OFFICERS ELECTED
Meeting of Presbyterian
Missionary Society
Wednesday.
The annual meeting of the mission
ary society of the Presbyterian church
was held Wednesday afternoon in the
church parlors. The following officers
were elected:
President—Mrs. J. W. Wright.
Vice-president—Mrs. J. Newman.
Secretary and Treasurer—Miss Jesse
Holden.
A talk on the Panama canal was
given by Miss Margaret Gattiker.
Mrs. F. R. Melcher has returned
from a trip to Chicago.

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