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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, December 18, 1870, Morning, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1870-12-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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Aid A001 t o" ped at their
Hall IS, C-M gg ts at f w. X. on
disdadr ~aial, Deember. They prm
ceeded In a l to:i, gether with tt
guests from thepther Branches, to tbhe
-.ehoolboaeuf-ithrn Rev. Father Keniy, on
E .te the flag .tra ited
by Misst y,, actting for Mrs. ~inne
.an, _4:supervised the able at which i0
°: Qfor. F r Ka ry ad
e assemblage, gij t1q dzbme
advice, tber whlch : Mis ;Gibuey
ted a beautifgl; .wreath rand two
ing bon -tothe AsseelatioR., In
Sfew felieito Well timed remarks she
Yhopen prse in that modest and
b ecoming manni+% 'bhareterIstic of the
4relfsmati en.side.
s After oeelsigrAi'tae e &ssooiion re
Sore, aid erenide.' he Rev. Father
BennyMtus Nolan, the t6or of a beaunti
f: l w . An tShitr. last anniversary, Mrs.
B. Ptinae and MiW Gibney, our well
S4 now townseman John e(ell, and the
a.n~tod. newspaper oflioe rafiter thdch!they
Mr. Joh McePhelin, d Abtrii thet flag
1-h ltI'blf of the Assoelation, -m ,. the fol
ltowing remarks:
"hi2e. Faie , `ifsG aine and Ladies
'Wpehd myy ut rthy ~lton has devolved
the pleasing task of receiving from youear
an this beautiful sike flag; and in
d.oiI* my. only gret is that a more fit
ting and des ng agent has not been
iseen by the sel ty, 0-which I have the,
'bonor of belonging. fut although capa
aciy may be lmkin, believe me my feel
-tTnp are none the less sincere than if ex
weedt" by. the most eloquent tongue in the
t glowing language, and I hope that
Si1ei tlon will be taken ' a .token of
1 fain would say did-I bat possess the
pot*er Ladies, to you who have worked
so, ealously in the cause of charity, whose
. ptiriag and self-denying seal hate drawn
'forth from the fair such Iabounteous bar.
vest for the noble work of the Rev. Father
Kenny, and whqse beaming eyes' and
smiling faces have added life and beauty to
, the surrounding throng, a debt of gratitude
is saurely due, and in behalf of my fellow
nembers, in the name of charity, of Chrie
tain education, and of all who admire
lpurity of character and integrity of par
,: .ose, I tender youmy sincere and.heartfelt
-And to Miss Gibney, who has so faith
fully presided at the ballot-box, and en
. hanced-by her fair presince the beauty of
, he flag, I haveaýbt to wish that the spot
' Lis p orityf her character may ever re
4n -l etai- l.d unsullied as the beautiful
bouquet whib h I hold in umy hand, and may
shte, to day, be ever the embodiment of
a truly modest and charitable woman. To
.-Mra.B. Finnegan, and the ladiestwho so
Sably eonded her efforts, I can but say
that they have, proven themselves worthy
p f their well-known -character for charity
and benevolence.
-t. To our brethren of Branch No. 5 I but re
lH eho the feelings of every member's heart
Sahen I tell them that we stand not heTe
ti-=db as enemies or rivals triumphing,
overythe vanquished, but as friends and
.broth, . rWei contended for the flag, not
with rmeoir- iiin ouar' .hes, not to secure
honors for oaursdv ntlt' ese of our
brete usaifbe a
r eU ti C edr, the
o ";pf the rrowing irdow
.and extend te hand
of feljobinag4 brotbli -love to our
'aueni k eeiia wbtn ini need, we
have noa in tl#b 'o rest lost sight of those
primary objects, nor of the fact that the
me mbers No. I are co-workers in the
.ti p.ap rious cause.
-ompetition was invited, the treasury of
" the fair required filling, we accepted the
offer of friendly rivalry from Branch No. 5,
we met them in their own parish-and we
won. But, gentlemen, though justly proud
of our triumph and of the beautiful trophy
which we have secured, we are just as proud
of our honored competitors. A sister
Branch, younger in years and still younger
in'numbers, has succumbed to the superior
force of the oldest Branch, numbering at
least three times as many as themselves
and were the result different we should be
ashamed of ourselves. And believe me,
gentlemen, that althouglL proud of the
honor. conferred upon us to-day by the
receipt of this handsome flag, we would be
none the less so although fortune had
smiled upon our honored brethren of
Branch No. 5, and should occasion ever
offer, we shall but ho too haplpy to testify
by actions wha:t I can now but express in
words. Let na then, gentleniett, always
endeavor to culltivate towards eacht other a
feeling of charity apd brotherly-love, ani
mated as one man with a desire to do good
to our fellows; and believe me, gentlemen,
that organization which, tlhree short years
ago, numbered but one Branch, and now
counts in its ranks sevqn distinct bodies,
shall continue to increale in nuonbers and
usefulness, until it commands the respect
and admiration of the entire community.
And now, fellow members of Branch No.
1, into your keeping I commit this flag.
Guard it as a maiden would her sacred
honor cherish it as a mother would as
only child; cling to it as the ivy to the
mouldering tower. Not for its intrinsic
worth, not for the beauty of its folds or the
exquisite wbrkmanshbip that adorns its
centre, but for the dear, and honored, and
grand old associations that cluster around
i. The foldr of that flag, or those that
stood beneath it, never knew dishonor.
'Tis the connecting link that binds as to
the glorious past of our poor, down-trodden
Ern. 'Tis the flag beaeath which lived,
and toiled, and suffered, and died, a Sars
field, a Wolfe Tone, an O'Connell, a Cur
ran, a Grattan, and coauntless other patri
otic souls. 'Tis a flag for which the' critn
son gore of the martyred Emmett was shed,
andbeneath wifose folds, upon the bloody
field of Fontenoy, the grand old Irish Bri
gade retrieved the fsallen fortunes of the
day. and hurled back thie invader when the
. fiower of the French army failed to with
stand the shook. Gentlemen, with such
reminiscences before you, need I impress
upon you the necessity of proving your
selves worthy sons of noble sires. Need I
recall to your minds the joys and sorrows
of our native isle, which are indissolubly
linked wish that dear old flag-a snag which
ranks amongst the most aucient and honor
. able, and whose record fears no comparison
with any on earth.
" Live there a man with soul so dead
Who never tL, himself hath ald
This io my own, my native land."
And whean I look around me, upon this
-epturned sea of faces, and mark the dancing
.yes and heaving breasts of. my fellow- I
yar tlne
mea could ::ore
*of myacrt whe ook
dant fbl4iototwb*Itifal
y 0 : Inldee4d mu st'be th. b aqnid
od loeling that i m ew with'i
rone tgoldea harp that.ado rns thf,
or iaui ·anmoved, ;poh that ancient1 aotto
lagleas bea - Erin go brag W'-a
motto lanctilled by the tears and sighs of
Ireland's wives, and maids, rd widows,
mnade sacred y the wail of ber orphaned
children, and baptizedd I the blood of
her bruag4fonse. Then take-this lag, and
treasure it with-r evotion, for around it
centre the hopes of our country's freedom,
and though our iitiaston be one of peace and
good-will to all mankind, that fli is none
the less fitting for our guidance. Let the
charity of our hearts be ever as green and
unsullied as are ite fol44d and let every
string of that golden haik fi1b within our
souls a counterpart of sympaify and love
for our fellow mln, until the good seed now
sown bears fruit in the breas pf overy true
Irishman, and, believe me, day is-not
far distant-when we, wanderers.,i aforeign
land, may look with joyou eyeser'ascross the
broad bosom of the Atlabtic Ocean, and
exclaim, with Ireland's illustrious son:
Our country stands as before, "Redeemed,
Regenerated and Disenthralled I"
-~ ~~~ !hjsskne 5
The Catholic relief bill of 1793 was pass
ed by the same majority which a few
monthl before had rejected it with scorn -
for the flame of democracy- were being
kindled even among the Presbyterians of
the north. The Catholics were allowed
the right of voting for members of parlia
ment, aad they were allowed to exercise
s'ubrdinate civil and military offlces,-for
It was necessary to detach them from the
republican party, and avert the revolution
which they might otherwise have effected.
The concession thus made through fear was
more valuable as a precedent than Is a
privilege really regained. The franchise
granted to the Catholics was turned by
their masters to their own advantage. The
Catholic tepants weke compelled to vote
according to the dictate of their landlords,
and-their votes were regarded as part of
the landed property. The relief bill, too,
was accompanied with fresh measures of
coerplon; public meetings were dispersed
by the military; trials for sedition became
frequent; and editors of newspapers paid
with heavy fines the penalty of outekoken
truths. The hopes of the Irish iere raised
high by the appointment of Lord Pitzwil
liam as Vicero), for he was an amiable and
large-minded nian, a kind landlord, and
pledged to accomplish, so far as in him lay.
the complete emancipation of Catholics and
the reform of the Irish Parliament. But
these hopes were dashed to-the ground as
by mocking demons when Lord Fitzwilliam
was recalled by Pitt; a member of the all
powerful Beresford family, whom the Vice
roy had dismissed was retained in office;
andothe question of Catholic Emancipation
was set aside. Earl Fitzwilliam was sunc
ceeded by Lord Camden; discord was re
newed; corruption became more corrupt;
rebellion produced coercion, and coercion
rebellion, the exasperated peeple were
goded to revolt-revolt too feeble to ob
redress, yet . serious enough to form a
Sfor the withdrawal of-a Parliament
. :el and l the accomplishment of
meditteid Union. "Two deeper
gta ys_( Grattash "were now in
nt the Constitution. On the ona
d was the amp rf, the reAltj on
the other the ilmp'ef th M3inister ,gh t
er .traitor th , and the ti on of
sthe milust9s Ines the people was infin
itely worse than the rebellion of thepeople
against the Minister."
Meanwhile the"Peep-o'-day-boys" in the
north became lost in the more respedtable
but not less ferocious Orangemen; and the
"Defenders," who were denounced as- re
"rebellions Papists," joined the ranks of
the United Irishmen, in which name,that of
"Defenders" became almost entirely ab
sorbed. It was a mysterious and much
dreaded body, which owed its existence in
the first instance to the Protestants of the
notth. Its main objects were emaucipa
tion and reform, but its ultimate intentions
were not clearly defined. It looked to
France for assistance; bound its members
to secresy by an oatl,; and justified its hos
tile attitude by the instincts of self-preser
vation. The Orange yeomanry became in
October, 1796, an armed and paid associa
tion, and the United Irishmen felt that
they could be a match for them only by
converting their society into a military or
ganization. Secretaries were metamnor
phosed into sergeants and corporals; dele
gates were turned into captains;- colonels
we-re appointed, and generals over themi;
and the entire body was placed under thre
direction of an executive of five. If tihe
Catholics in large nunmbterjoined a sciety
from which under ordinary circumnstan;ces
they would have held aloof, it was because
the Government turned a deaf ear to their
just complainits, and enconr'aged their bit
terest and muost violent foes. It was be
couse t800 Catholic families had been ex
pelled frion their native county of Armnaghi
cried in vain for protection to thie mntgis
trates in their neightborhood; and theit
homeless and penniless were driven and
scattered over all parts of Ireland, carry
ing with them everywhere thie appalling
history of their eviction, of thie savage cry
of "'Io Hell or Connaught" with which
they had been assailed, and the alternative
of death or expulsion which was forced
upon them with bayonet and blunderbuss.
In the outset of the efforts of the United
Irishmen, their opposition was altogether
unsustained by treason. The Irish Ca
tholics who joined them were influencedby
the simple desire of improving their con
dition, and of escaping from bondage by
constitutional means, and by these only.
They represented the vast majority of the
nation; they belonged to the moral force
party; and they did not entertain a
thought of having recourse to foreign aid
and physical strength until' hope, in the
public mind, had been succeeded by de
spair. Lord Cloncurry has borne ample
testimony to the fact in 'his interesting
" Life and Times," and he answers with
eq'al contidence for the purity of the mo.
tives of " the Protestant martyrs and
champions in the cause of Irish liberty."
IHe came of a Catholic stock. Both his
grandfathers were Catholics; and his father
was also, who had settled in France. This
Lord Cloncurry, "probably having pre
viously experienced more substantial anu
noyance,s was finally (it is his own child's
account) so nettled at the partiality shown
by the Cure of his parish in administering
thIe honors of the censer to a neighboring
Seigneur (who, as he thought, had no right
to be incensed before himself) that he sold
his estate, and returned to Ireland, where
he conformed to Protesteatism, and be
tie
t tine q pa ill
"O r
of the m set d p
with not less certainty
Curran, Arthur O'Connor and
Duke of Leluster, that they be
outset of theircareer, tud t
earnest love of the, rlti
and that the truly patrinttq h
they aimed was noinig e
tension to Ireland of tioa d
guarantees of libery, vil
the principles of wh ch ar
the texturd of the Constitution
of England." We need not in tt e
pause toexplain Lord Cloncurry's be
termC" religious liberty." His fathe
unfortunately brought him up inz'te troe
testant reli gon, and he writes as he ma
be expected to"write on such subjects. We,
as Catholics, are always "obli d to eipOy
the words "religious liberty in, a seuge
tndbly~ out owe, notforgett ug, unddry
oircumstaoces, that in theoythe Catholic
"Chirch should have no rival, t reigsn qq
pireme.7, "
As time went on, the leaders of the
United Irishmen cdhanged their opinfoins
and became penetrated with Republican
principles. Many of the Catholics and of
the loyal Dissenters seceded from them,
and th~aghltit better to enidih tle" evils
of bad gqneroment 'Vatber -than' !the fmorb
terrible and untried evil of having na gov
ernment at all. The loyal, element bebfg
thus eliminated from the society, it was felt
more free to prosecute its Revolutionsry
designs. Roche and -Ggou ywith
powerful fleet, were on thei t to tlb
Irish coast; and ifthe windase4a Waves hl
not befriended. > gland as of pol, if t
French ships of the line, frlateeand cor
vettes, had not been scstWred by'a fprious
tempebt, Ireland tcight havebeen raised for
a time into an independent Repnthie, or
made a tributary of Franceand the French
Directory. The United Irishzben, however,
continued to hope; and Ajei "repared for
insurrection notwithstanding, a second
fleet despatched by France was dis
persed by Admiral Duncan in the
Battle of Camperdown, in -1797. The
hoped, they prepared, but: they de
also, and their delay proved,fakl to t I
hopes. They fancied that the Cathboa
bishops and clergy would be drawn into
the popular movement, and give the sanc
tions of religion to the projected outbreak.
But Wolfe Tone, whom they sent on an
embassy to the French Government, was
as much deceived in this respect in 1796, as
Smith O'Brien was fifty-two years later;
and when he would have landed, in Bantry
Bay with the scanty remains of Gen.
Hoche's storm-scattered expedition, Dr.
Moylan, the Bishop of Cork, Was issuing a
pastoral to his people, in which he warned
them against the French Republic as vehe
mently as Edmund Burke himself. Though
a Catholic priest may be found.heie and
there who will favor insurrection, the i
clergy have, as a body, too much patriot-1
ism to countenance the invasion of forelw
armies; too much sense not to see w
defeat is inevitable; and too' much p
not to know that few evils are
than those of rebellion, and tha it tis
tert far better in general, to endure,
and pray, than to endeavor to fores
dealgas of Provlde etand
Light of amen.e sad the Dwafalli tf Ca.
tholeism.
This, gentle reader, is the high-sounding
title of a lecture advertised to be delivered
in Pike's Music Hall last night, by Isaac M.
Inman. At eight o'clock the gas was
turned on full and disclosed an audience of
eleven persons, includnig three reporters
and loungers at the door. The stage was
furnished with a lecturer's stand, water
pitcher and goblet, two upholsterer's chairs,
and in due season with the lecturer, a slim
young man, with dark hair and sallow vis
age, who introduced himself to his select
audience by saying: "This is just my luek,
ladies and gentlemen-nothing. Still I
don't regard it as a failure; in fact, it is a
success." (Here the ladies and gentlemen
looked at each other and smiled.) "I think
the papers did not treat me fair," he con
tinued: '' for every place I have been Ihad
large audiences, and I don't think it re
spectful to you to dismiss you without say
ing something. The title of my lecture
that I intended to deliver is tihe ' Light
of Science and the downfall of Catholicism,'
and I might say that I will read you a few
of the points to let you see."
Mr. Inman here unfolded a little scroll of
paper and spread it out oni the stand, and
then walking from behind to the footlights,
stood for somne moments timoving his arms
aIId twitching his Iligers as graceful
ly and energetically as a jumping
*jack pulled by a string inserted under
the tail of its coat for that special purpose.
These spasmodio gestures accompanied a
string of vapid truisms about the stars antd
solar system, the imUnortality of thie soul
and the dliscov.ries ot science, as brilliant
and intelligible as D)owney's Proverlbs.
Occasiotnally, during the splinning of the
string, Mr. luman would return to the
stand and gravely consult his scroll of
manuscrilpt for a few minutes, leaving the
lapse of a dead silence, which was improv
edl by the audience in smiling, and then
resume his spinning. He made a good deal
of noise with his feet, and pounded the
stand vehemently with his fists.
Touching the downfall aforesaid, he
really had nothing to say, but charged
generally agaipat religion that it kept the
world in darknes. The Catholic Church
persecuted, and would have destroyed Gali
leo. It was maintained by making people
believe that the priests can forgive sin, but
if only all the money that is required to a
keep the Catholic Church going for a year
-the money that is wrung from poor, ig
norant and deluded people-if this money
was distributed equally among the Catholic
people, then the world might hope to t
see the great superstition crumble away
and the light of science prevail.
And so on for quality. Fom' quantity
there was half an hear of similar drivel,
without a single redeeming characteristic.
Before the half hour elapsed half of the select
audience glided out of the hall on tiptoe,
and Mr. Inman killed the other half off with
a "pome" whidh he asked permission to
read. We would like to lay it before the
readers of the Commercial, but refrain from
transcribing it purely from consideration
for Mr. Inman, who, like most distinguish
ed lecturers, prefers not to be reported in
full.
Last week we had lectures by an es
caped nun, this week by an escaped-
well, a gentleman away from his friends.
Wha et net-Cin. eommsrciaL
[c-No. 33 Caondet lest.
ý s;.. 2e 3XCKiia ....;..Pec
W.., O .3. BITCHES, LD.
m remaw oaiaa RsoosEa o r
as. Jaeka n CoL F H. Hatch,
a rsOctaVe 1oorhis, L. A. WiltI,
binidsofeLife olde.q . issued by this Company
| aoerft,~stng ,after- an annual pRay nt. jal l
, N'I.CS' AND TRADERS' NlSUttANCE CO.
5.N. 14 Corondelet Street,
NEW OOLERI S,, i, -
Solicit Fire, Marine ad nrivr Risks at Lowest Rates.
Cate. EasoTaEt, LnLOND .COLE lo . N
Snortaery. Presitent.
o Piackney Smith, eRsq. Robert L Moore, eq.
Chs. A Green, " John D Cobb, es
aB James, " A N Sutton,
A. Aiken. " Thus B Bodley,
R C Oglesby, . amc Bleoom, "
Frfederick ting, ' 3ABreselcan,
OT e 8 Waterman, C" ot C R Bailey,
I L h e es. " GeeW Church, "
B Coyes, " Gee Wei Logan, Jr.
PTodd. BD Geroeo , "
B Limer Bader, '." Thoms Murrsay
J 8 L ames, F i M uekford
Johu A Lane, * " Wim J Britten,
R H Noble, " N C Gullet,
Joh Myers, Edward Thompson,"
RM. B. MORTRIUS CO.
Fire, Rive' and Marine Insurance Agency,
CASH ASSETS REE'RSSENTED OVER. TEN
MILLIONS. "'
rTNA. ............ ........ .......of Iartford.
HOME ......................... of Now York.
The Leading Insurane Compznnies of the United States.
Record of Losses Paid ............$40,000,000
All busines of Insurance transacted promptly. Rates
low as hazard will permit. Adjustment of Loeses at our
office without refreence or delely.
WM. i. MORRIS &D CO., Agents,
Jal ly T -No. 57 Carondelet street.
NEW ORLEaS MUTU.S .
INSURANDE COMPANY,
Office, Corner Camp and Canal streets.
Premiums received endingthe year 1869......n 38,177 4
Lases, Taxes, Expenses, etc., paid during
the same period....... ............... 19,19 93
Ausete on the 31st of iDeohe~ erjs i69 ...e... 3.2 82
Hw. HW. msoa, Secretary, . Turs, President.
Dir;ectoter
Gee Urquhart, A Rocheman, Ml Payro.
SB Blanechrd, W. Steven, - & Dulbho,
SW Babcock. W T WillIams, Aug Reichard,
U Mihenberger, W BSchmidt, S. Tuye.
VfWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL STATEMENT
CRESCENT MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.
PFor the Year ending April 30. 1I8t.
Gross Premiums forth eatr.............. 59*94.99 62
Assets of Company, Apr 35, 1880.0........ 990,627 62
The Board of rmtrsteeareolved to psy inteest at Six
per cent in cash on-al outstanding Certificates of erlp.
.and also to pay in eas the issue of 1850, to the legal
bolders thereof, on and after the eond M3onday, of
Jun next.
They have also declared a Scrip pividebd of Eighty
oht ot tbe earned premiums ditled to participte
the~ny ding April 3. 1870, for which certitoates
dbe  on and after the first Monday in August
free of Government tax. , -
THOMAS A. ADAMS, President,
C. T. BUDDRECE, Vice President.
V. OGDeN, Secretary.
raus res y 'e
E. SImms John Phelp.
A. Elmeg Bader, E. H. Summers. myl9 ly
THE CHEAPEST AND THE BEST.
WORKINGMEN, inure yo, we, and your wives
lives, in the
Workingmen's Mutual Insurance Society,
- o. 60 Camp street, up-stairs.
Only one payment and that 25 cents rfo-each year of
yeour age, when insuread, until some insured person dies,
oanl then only 30 cents to be paid by each survivor in
the elss in which the decease Is insured.
Ceall or copies of eharter and by-laws. with explana.
tions. A. B. BACON, Preaident.
Joint ROT, Treasurer. Jale ly
NEW ORLEANS INSURANCE ASSOCIATION
- Office, No. 10 Exchange Alley.
Capital ................... ...... ...1,00.,000
Capital Sunbscrihbed.......................... 946,00
Number ot Stockholders....................... 720
This Associatilon Insures against Fire, Marine and
River Risks, and pays lolses in Europe through the firm
of Kraeutler & Mievrille, of London.
C. CAVAROC President.
L. B. POrIIIER. Vie-President.
dsta 11 0. LtALAUX Secretary
SLATERS-CISTERN MAKERS.
E. MAONY. SLATER,
Yard-439 Magazine street
Residnceo--478 Camp street, corner of Orange.
se25 "7l0y _ New Orleans.
SIt, O SLATER,
Curioer St. Charles and Felicity ste.
New Orleans.
LEAKY RIOOFS REPAIIED AND WAR.RANTED.
Orders fromn the country lromptly attended to. J9t ly
M J. WALSH.
SLATER,
104......... GA .II- t TR: T.........104
Between MaStOygazile and Constance.
N'EW ORtLEANeS.
Particular attention paid to repairing. Satisfactino
warranted. 412 IV
p) A. MURRAY,
CISTRN MAKER,
183.Magazine street,
(near Julis,)
Iw oBLrL.EAN.
All work warranted to give entire
satisfaction.
A kinds of Cisterns made to order
and repaired.
Orders promptly attended to.
A lot of Cisterns, .made of the best
material and workmanship, kept con
stnntly on hand, and for sale at prioes
to suit the times. del Iv
CAHILL & COFFEY,
JACKSON CORN MILL AND FEED STORE,
Noe. 726 and 732 Levee street, and 35 aua 41 Water street,
Fourth District.
Dealers in Hay, Corn, Oats, Bran, Cornmeal. Oatmeal
Hominy. Grit. Chicken and Cow Feed, etc.
Goods delivered free of d ravarge mYt2 m
GtNS. PISTOLS. RIFLES, AMMUNITION,
FISHING AND SPORTING ARTICLES.
L. GERTEIS, No. 55 St. Charles street,
Respectfully informs his friends and the pnhublic gener
ally that he has opened the above well-known stand, and
where may be found a full assortment of Double and
Single Barreled SHO'f GTNS, of various makers
RIFLES, PISTOLS REVOLVRLS, AMMUNITIOl4>
of all kind. FISRHING and SPORTING ARTICLES.
MILITARY and POLICE GOODS. etc., the whole of
which are offbred to the trade at lowest market rates.
REPAIRING all kinds done with neatness and dis.
patch, and a.1 work fully guaranteed. nolO 3m
LYNN & WINTZ,
No. 167 8" 5 t, near Dauph e,
THEIR LAX ZAt NIL * ,5 00Z OF
Bios, Shbes, Trunks, Valises and nags,
AT PrICZ THAT DUr -COMPETITION.
Partlicaar attention paid to COs*m.Made Work. ii
which they have gained an envlabl*lpWatuton.
CALL AND SEB THEM I
GLYNN & WINTZ,
der -ly 187 Cana Street.
MARTIN'S OLD+ STAND,
113 Canal Street .. ,.. 114 Canal Street.
The atlention of the numerous patrons of the above
~blishment, and of the publio generallo. Is respaea.
i -ly called to the Fine and Select Stock of
BOOTS AND SfbES,
just received, and ready for inspection.
THE FINEST GOODS IN THE CITY,
And at the Lowest Prices.
A call from all is respoctfully solicited.
ne23'7o ly JAMES POWERS.
WVILLIAM HOGAN,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
BOOTS, SHOES, TRUNKS, VALISES
AND BAGS, FRENCH AND AMERICAN.
Also, Agent for the Empire Sewing Machine,
Nos. 99 and 101 Canal street,
wsl 3m New Orleans.
fIVE CENTS ADDITIONAL
WILL BUY
Shoes With Silver or Copper Tips,
which will save the Buyer the Price of a
NEW PAIR OF SHOES.
Compared with Ragged Toes and Dirty Stockings, they
are Beautiful, to say the least.
W7" PARENTS, TRY IT. .el8 3m
THOMAS HRAlEI
BOOTS AND SHOES
165_............Poydras Street............. 1C
Between Carondelet and St. Charles, New Orleans.
Hootl and Shoes made to order at the shortest notice.
H. NORTON,
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN BOOTS AN.
SHOES,
iT7.........sT. ANDREW STREET....t__....17
nego ly New Orleans.
IF YOU WANT BARGAINS,
BUY "YOUR HATS
AT
tOOIK'S.
oc30.Oy 84 St. Charles Street.
LOUIIWANA HAT MANUFACTORY,
JoHE FRIEL, PRACTICAL HATTER,
(Successor to A. Msgnier.i
100............ ST. CIIHARLES STIREET............100
Under Murphy's Hotel. New Orleans.
Personal attention paid to all orders. Keepi con.
stantly on hand a choice assortment of Hats. sell ly
GO THERE--WHERE I
TO 8'S HAT STORE,
ISO POYDRAS STREET.
French and American Hats, of the latest styles.
Call and examine our prices before purchasing else.
where. [an7 ly] D. S SULL IVAN.
D. HURLEY.
FASglONABLE HAT AND CAP S' ,
Ta2..... ......;.Peydra Strect..........47
Between Stabharles and Caroadelet, New Orlesas
Constestly oe ad a large sassrtment of WINE BATS
of the latest style Also, Silk sad Cabaere Hats.
Children's Fancy CAPS. ]at ly
WESTERN PRODUCE, LIQUORS, ETC.
-i UNDRIES......................SUNDRIES.
We offer for sale to Grocers and Dealers, at the
very lowest market price, and guaranteed to be of the
best quality, the following articles in lota to suit:
BULK MEATS,
BACON--lhoulders, Clear Rib and Clear Sides,
PORK,
I.ARD-Tierces and Kegs,
Chice SugarCored SHAMS,
BREAKPAST BACON,
FLOUR-of all grades,
WHIISKIES-Rectiiled and Bourbon.
FINNEY & BYRNES,
oc3 tf - 85 Poydras street.
EDWARD BURKE,
WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANT,
186 and 192....Tclhonpitonlae et.... 16 anil 192
Calls particular attention to his fine stock of
VERY OLD IRISH WHVIISKY.
VERY OLD SCOTCH WHISKY,
VERY OLD RYE WHISKY,
VERlY OLD BOURBON WHISKY
at prices incomparably low.
Also, E. IIIRKE a CO. call the attention of the
public to their very extensive stock of FEED and
WESTERN PRODUCE at the Stores 124, 126 ane 128
New Levee street, corner of Girod. fel3 ly
SCAVAROC,
COMASISSION MERCHANT,
5............. Exchange Place.............5
Sole Agent for the following brands of Liquors:
CO('Q PERE ET FILS,
ACIIILLE PETIT,
A. L. DELEZINIER.
Also, J. Roussilon & Co.'s CHAMPAGNE, and Wines
of Seignouret Frerces. del ly
'. A. Finney. Thoe. Byrnes. W. H. Byrnes.
FINNrY & ~IYRNES,
Dealers in. 4
Western Produce and Provisions,
85 .............. Poydras Street ............. 85
oc2- tf New Orleans.
JOM HENDERSON,
WHOLESALS DIALSE in
WINES AND LIQUORS,
No. 85 Tehonpltonlas street,
and 72,74 and 76 Lafayette staeet,
fe2 ly New Orleans
P BRADLEY.
Dealerin WESTERN PRODUCE, HAY, CORN, OATS,
Bran, Flour, Potatoes, Onions, eto.
Corner Elyslan Fields and Front Levee, No 39 and 40,
near Pontchartrain RR. Depot, Third Dist. d19 ly
J McCAFFREY & CO.
BEALERS IN GRAIN. CORN MEAL and HAY,
80............ POYDRA 8TREET............ 80
Corner of Fulton. d5 ly
J-OHN G. RYAN, WHOLESALE DEALER IN
Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors,
92 Tehoupitoulas street, between Lafayette and Girod,
New Orleans. Jy.1 ly
J T. GIBBONS & CO., .
DRAL355 IN
GRAIN, CORN MEAL, AND HAY,
57, 59, 61,63 .......New Levee street....... 57, 59, 61,63
yn2 )y Corner Poydras.
T BONTEMPS, DYER AND SCOURER, 182 Poydras
*. street. between Caroelelet and Saronne streets, for
merly of Bourbon street Sr a'great number of years
Mr. T. Bontemps informs his friends and the public in
ggeneral that he has reestabhlished himself in the Dyeing
Sosuring and Cleaning bousness at the above pIlae. Al
orders will be attended to with care and dispatch. A
tailor is attached to the establishment, o will attend
to repairing and mending of clothing. Specialty for
mourning. Orders fros the sountr'y promply attended
io. ao/a
Dot
Spanish sad DanMish.
a movedd I i o sedeeame
exe cwh fom 9 te o f
D L JaNO. J. RL, . . ,
Ofie, 451 TeooeupMia tI¶-eu C
panyisly n 1 s
rom 38 Common, to
2d9.........:....Canal strut. ......:...
e s aest wtendgasuof e o
"teIldnce-N 370 COMMON STRREEtL ' Ti".
Oftlee bonane0 ,. t5. T S I sdon to |S . %
:DR ENTIST, A
Vr BT. DryW STrEET, y
Is daily in e tas of ieth as-low: se or -
witsout extrsetinf the roots. • "r'.
All Dental Op.igtlo . asrfiesbn e in he salS 1N
manner. 1 Dre triTt sr
Teeth extracted wtpriebApalr . "
DRa JOHN G. tANGELLt 
itron ide Gas udotherly * e
Operatiens.. "emp.
ETAU L .coGRA TATI, . S. . ..
DO. 8.. ABeOrDe Etrestr, '-ss
B. ides a ttending as usual to spes tk !e
(shoats, wtildevoid a pet ted f$
C'HILDREN, advising on th the-e~trtotlon
teeth," and the treatment of the aI n
various diseases to which the mojths o eilr
pecliarly liable. Conaultation fee, $5. ~pl plr
VRS. ALLEN & COCTkRAN,,
' be consulted at their Dental Reoms,
No. 12 Dryades Street, Near C ..
opposite the Mechanicsl e. asitte eft af
taiuing to Dentistry. Perimanbwhe deatse eie.e
tle same day the roots of dacaad teeth are
G. J. FRIRETICAL A
DENTAL SURGE ON,
155...t....... Charles Street...........3.
feb27 ly Cor•nerGorl.
D O. J. J T ELO ,
Ol 3 e Ro. rtson street,
Between Common and asGet strets, irm Districts
All c1.a night or day, promptly attended to. o ly
DR. JAMES W. BARNUML. DENTIST
50.. 8 M.agazine street.. (near.te oMate)
Jis hpy to Inorm hiC patient ad the apub Nreet
Teeth at extremeo loa prices. A perfect s n l d
in every case. Prticular attention paid tbe p
ation o the186 Laurel teeth. IStreet, near Se ondw
our most proniEsnt citiears can be seem at the oBoe.
PAUL GIRANZIN,
MEDICAL ADERPRACTICAL WATSEMENTS.
NO. 112 CARONDELET STREET, `
Seils good Steel Spectacles at 450, Good missl Eye
,las at . Keeps always oon hand a andstome
ent of Spectacles ad ye Glasses, WBitter ad
Jerwelry .
Pat rattention given to Wat agah Repairingst pholr
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
30..-..........Camp Street.... _. -.. 30
nob ly New OrOeans.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
63.. _ ........Carondelet Street.. ...,.....,63
api 3m " cw Orleans.
TWNAY KNEAT f
oesE. &ap THE LOtre
AORNEY AT LA hW, }4
21..........co Ai PLor BOWELS, ...,
d1n Iv NEW ORLEANS.
Depot JO. LLADOS, Dr
NOTARY PUBIC,
Betwel8 en Cmp end t. Chaes treats,
j24 Thy NewardJesto
AL. PIT . BLANUnbR CIVIL ENGINEER, .
93 areno street between Msagazine and Cam stetts,
Sixth District late City of Jefemeon.
Op his seor Bvicest andy brmostanch of his i0 ru
soth seas givB lines of property. plans Ud Ebllal"
the TrstPctiods ofst hbuilderings, levees, e sst e
canals; goodr Trlling. A lots or r dithes. beAt dBm
Oears' praetice An New Orleans, a. d ioif ,a
for a PILLhare o , employment
t. 6 m iorel Street, near Second,
Ptnrth District, New Orleans,
rcen, lit s t in. Sn. Particular attention given to the
Clrfc a of Wom b I e oiMOases. nol s 1y
MEDICAL ADVERTISEMEItS.
to t, ies sub sta e
This relebtl.mes Bllter is
s d ry ent.Ie aondust Cholera
e o r a oreo tor
and Tr l Dy rivtE LIn5,
from rhe LVER, t., oSBT
Alemr BaOWELS
Depotat W .70. LLADwOS, ~Dr. T st,
eelS 1m Corner Dumane n
iplmas for Best and mot comfortabl Trus ht

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