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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, January 14, 1872, Morning, Image 6

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emiing Star and s Catholic e
saW eaftsAs, sexIAYT. JANUR 4. lL
uoza O ITREOUC I>R2ZLBiW
Bordoes Ulsess of Arehbishop
We are pained to. announce that t -s
Sfrom whibch the fmt ARev. Arebbidiop
Spalding a he guibring for the pet
fortnight, has assumed a very serionu eiar
actar, and that his Grace now Jiea danger
oust ill at-te Arch~iepiecopa residence.
His llness ega fist ith a bind cold. h
bronchial menmbrane became iavolved, and
the disease has assumned. an extremely oriti
cal form. she viscid matter which aa ac
enmulated upon the chest renders respira
tion didlcult, and grave apprehensions are
felt lest the lunge should become compro
mised in the development of the disease.
Our beloved prelate'a condition, during
the past three or four days, has been oneof
most intense and acute pain. His phylsi
clans, Professors Smith apd Mcaherr , are
assiduona in their attendance on their dis
tiaguished patient, and all that medical
sienece can accompliah torelieve lis auffer
inga will be done. The disease is extreme
y obstinate, strangulation having to be
narded against constantly. As we write
ednesday afternoon, January d, the
rchbishop' a condition i regarded as
slightly easier. May a kind Providence
vouechafe to sparye lis most valuable life,
and restore him once more to bhi flock.
Poeteeiipt, Thiday-iiiorning, Jan. 4th
-The Mot. Rev. Arhbiahop passed a lee
tronbled niaght, Wednesday, than for seve
ral preceding nights and is a little bette
as we go to press. 3altimoreMifrror, Jan
6th.
Illness of Biskop icGill.-Bilshop McGill
is likewise stricken by the hand of disease,
and at our -last advicesa from Richmond
continued in a critical and preearionus state.
We deeply regret to announce that but
aligbt hope ef his recovery is entertained,
although for a day or two past some little
improvement in bhis condition has been re=
ported. Two diAtinguished prelates in the
Church are thus visited by dangerous sick
nes, whose lose woeld be universally de
plored throughout the country. Let the
prayers of the faithfual be offered up seal
oaly on behalf of those two great lights of
the American Episcopate.-Ibtd.
Father Walworth.-Oaiotenrporary, the
Cincinnati GaCette, has twice, within a
year, soothed Its troubled spirit, and all
the kindred spirits among its readers,
which we trust; are few, by the story of
Rev. Clarence Wilworth's defection from
the Catholic Church. The Garette went
even so far as to state why the apostacyoo
curred, the reasons thereof. And yet, the
truth is that Rev. Clarence Walworth, si
far from relapsing into error, has so edified
. the Church authorlties that he lhas been
presented to and approved by the oly oa
ther for his orthodoxy and purity and seal
as Bishop of Syracuse, New York-for
which See he is soon to be consecrated its
first bishop.-Olscdaaati Telegraph.
IL T. Walwbrth and Dr. Dollinger.
The .letta ist of the 2d insfeet. contains a
cltvcrly written letter fronm Mr. M. F.
Walworth, in which he boldly avows his
desertion of the Pope and hisl adhesion to
Dr. Dollinger and the Alt Katholicks of
Bavaria. The letter is rather long for osr
columns, but we cannot forbear laying.it
before our readers, as a curiosity in its way:
Messrs. Editors:-According to the New York
2imes, of November 12th, 1871, the Methodist
s :We know of not a single prominent clerical
or la Catholie in the repnubtlio who has dared
Sopenly to Join In the noble protest of Dollinger
andl his assocites."Y
The termpramisst is susceptible of several
construootions. Se If the tollowing description
answers to that term:
My fatherwasithe late Chancellor Walwortb,
ef New York Stan, for twenty years the Chief
Judge of the Court of Chancery here. Shortly
before bein admitted to prantlee law in the
courts of ths State and the United States I
became a convert to the Roman Catholic
Church. In order intelligently to speak my
new faith, I purchbased a library of Catholic
standard authorities, several hundred volumes.
They were the works of eminent theologians,
dogmatio treatises, churobh histories of unques
tioned authority - among them Dollinger's
Church History, Mobler's Symbolism, Bishop
England's works, Lingard's works, and, in
deed, all first-class standard authorities, such
as Roman Catholic prelates and the more aso
complishebd of the clergy in this country place
upon their library shelves. I made myself
perfectly familiar with the dogmas of the
hurcb the scriptural authorities and the tra
ditiona of the Church upon which they were
founded.
The cogent reasons which induced me to
connect myself with the Church of Rome were,
that other-churches were constantly changing
their dogmas, and that truth, divine truth,I
must of its own nature be unchangeable. I
was instroucted that I had joined a Churl
whicbh held one set of dogmas, from the days
of Christ to the and of all time, and whiah,
being the Church established by Our Saviour,
could not teach in one age and to one genera
tion of men what it did not teach in another;
that whatever dogmas a man of the first cen
tory proclaimed as the dogmas of his Church, I
must be each and all the same dogmas that a
man of the nineteenth century announced as
his dogmu. It was reasonable to belloeve that
no more doctrines could be required of the
latter than of the former.
The Christian of the frst century did not.i
believe in the infallibility of the Bishop of
Rome; the American Catholics of 1860 did not 4
believe in the infalliblity of the Roman Pon- 4
tif. It was not taught to him, nor did be be
lieve it. Ig 1871 it is taught to him. and if he
does not believe it he cannot have Christian (
burial. Thus the good Catholic who died in i
1860 held just one doctrine less than the good.
Catholio of 1871 holds when he passes into the
presenoe of hbl Creator. Is this unityof faitth I
Is this belonging to an unchangeable Church ? <
I have been a member of the Roman Catholic I
Church for eighteen years. I published my
irst work as an author in defenceof the Roman I
Catholie Religion. The book, "The Mision o
of Death; or, a Tel. of the New York Penal 1
Laws of 1741," has pessed through many
editions, and Is to-day a living book, ne
editions isuing yearly. aud it can be found on
the shelves of manoy colleges, ceourvts and i
schools of the Catholio Cnurch in America. 1
wrote tbat book to in8uence othere to join an 4
unchangeable Church. The noohangeable
Church has chanced since I wrote that book.
When I wrote that book I denied the infalli
bility of the Bishop of Rome. and avowed my
belief in the infallibility.of the assembled
Bishops of the world defining articles of faith.
I wa at perfect liberty to do so. If I were to
do it toads I should he deolared a heretio and
refused Christian borial.
But I do doeny the infallibility of the Bishop
ofboms,jout as I denied is then; jnat aAroh
bishbp Purcell, of Cincinnati, denied it; just
as the learned, the great Roman Catholic
Church historisu, Dclii uer, denias it. H~e
keews, as I know. and as the prelatenefthe
Usited 8tates know, that it i neaw; that it is
aet what men were required to believe In l860, 4
sad In thietinof Chewe ead His Apstle. It
1sa as " valiation l ih asseay ariatioU
by4Sh rnessot I his esuel O
" Vadaieeallooof-4b.Pret55
s e of te va a p _ e Cyr tun .
to labs.me t -.@osrP the~ th@ OsteU
Changeble C Anreb. ' 5 - oa l i N ~uae
Ahfled oiasa, stulti m1ys bblisvis
cetradietioast I want to *elli Whitthe
old Caeolie Chmiro' believed, and no mete. I
I would be ecrsed new for asserting jst-the
detriaes I avowed is 180lO I cannos aeept
this new religiee. If ob change, e vari
ation is made 'in my short life, how many
changes will be made in the next quoe thonsand
yeaaTs? Wby, the COtholio Christians of 4879
would not consider tshe Cathollo Christian of
1879 as orthodet at all. One drhoes into the
celestial city with doctrines wbhich the other
is totally inorat of. Is this "one Lord, one
faith, one baptismr
Dollinger I believe to -be right. I am an
American citizen who fears not to endors
and the old Catholics. I am willing to c
the consequences, temporal and spirital.
reigns, and is not nijecat to mutations. He
will And some way to protect men who en
deavor to be consistent, and this is exactly
what Dollinger and the old Catholics are en
deavoring to hbe.
I am a yan, theb athor of six books whichb
bhre sold j tenst of thousands over the United
8tates. Possibly I may answer to the Method
ist's term, "prominent lay Catholic." If not,
then I am only a simple lay Catholio, who
fearlessly endorses-Dollin rger.
M xrctspa Taacr WAxLwo ru.
Mr. Walworth is a layman, and claims to
have been aprominent Catholic, and a dis
Stinguaished Catholio author. His father was
a prominent man and a distinguishedjarist,
his brother-the Ret. Clarence A.rWalworth,
is a prominent Catholic, a priest, and an
able and polished writer. But Mansfeld
has never been known as apromineat Cath
olice layman, and his pretensions to have
been a Catholio author are very slenoder.
He has written and published several
novels, bnt rather anti-Poritanical than
Catholio.in spirit or tone, and better fitted
to encourage a free, rollicking life, than
Catholic faith and -plety. In his "Lola,"
there are some Catholic characters intro
dauced, as well as a caricature of his own
father; in his " Hotapur," there is nothing
to indicate that it was written by a Catho
ie. There are none of his works which
are pervaded by a Catholic spirit, unless
it be his " Mission of Death :" none of
them are as truly Catbolic in doctrine,
morality, tone or tendency, as "Merton
House," recently concluded in Appleton's
Journal. He has always seemed to us as a
writer to be one who has conformed rather
than been converted to the Church. All
his bopks, that we have read, have disap
pointed us, and have struck us as far in
ferior to what the writer might andchwould
have produced, had he been in earnest and
done his best We .do not think he has
ever been distingaluished among Catholics
as a Catholic anthor.
Mr. Walworth speaks of the library he
e of stantdard-Catholic works. Un
happily, he names not a single work that is
a standard authority on the question on
which he disagrees with the Pope and the
Council of the Vatican. He seems to have
studied his theology-in a bad school, and
to have plistalen the opinions of some
Catholics, not expressly ndengned by the
Church, as the faith of Church, thnus
confounding seteneuia in Ecci witje sea
tentie ecclesiao. The Gallican inion was
an opinion in the Church, but w never a
doctrine of the Church. Mr. Wlworth
was never taught it as Catholic faith, but
at most, only as an opinion, which the
Church had never explicitly condemned,
and therefore an opinion which he might
hold as an opinion, but not aCatholic faith.
Mr. Walworth says, "The Christian of
the first century did not believe in the in
fallibility of the Bishop of Rome."- On
what authority does he assert that Uow
does he know thatt "The Pope and the
Conncill of the Vatican teaches to the con
trary. How does he know that they are
wrong and he right. The American Cath
olic of 1860 did not believe in the infialli
bility of the Roman Pontiff. It was not
Staught tohim, nor did he believe it." We
know nothing of American Catholisea,
though we know some very worthy Catholic
Americans. Catholicityknows no national
distinctions, and has nothing to do with
them. Catholic Americans in 1860, as Ca
tholics throughout the world, were taught
that, whether the Pope is infallible or not
is a question not yet formally decided by
the infallible authority, and no written
opinion can, pending the litigation, be pro
nounced orthodox or heterodox. Gallican
Ism, to say the least, was nowhere taught
or permitted to be held as Catholic faith,
and no one ever pretended that the so-called
Ultramontane doctrine had been explicitly
and implicitly condemned as repugnant to
the faith. Mr. Walworth is a lawyer. The
dispute has been carried up to the Sanpreme
Court, and decided. Does he pretend that
the decision of the court has changed the
law that in declaring what the law is and
tways rfis- beenti-a the point disputed, it
introduced a new law If so,God help
his clients.
The decision of the case in litigation by
the court of last resort, every lawyer
know., simply declares and applies the
law, makes what before has been uncertain,
known and certain and closes the question,
which henceforth is res adjudicata, and it
would be ridiculous to pretend that the de
cision of the court h6ad changed the law and
made that to be law which was not iqw be
fore. The most that can be said is, that the
decision settles that to be law which wse not
certainly known to be law before its de
cision. Well, the question In dispute con
cerning the Papal infallibility has been
carried up to the BSpreme Court of the
Church and decided, and decided in favor
of infallibility, and oar legal friend steps
gravely forward, and says the court, be
cause it has settled the law, that is, the
faith has made that to be faith in 1871
which was not faith in 1860. He then de
oounces the coart, that is, the Church, as
ehangeable, and no longer unchangeable as
he had believed her.
Time Church, in the desintion Impugned,
declares that the infallibility of the pope in
the soeno defloed has always been the doo
trioo of the Church. and has always been
Catholic faith. To prove that she has
changed the faith or introduced new faith,
it is necessary to sbow that she has pre
viously taught or declared the contrary to
be of Catholic faith. Does our lawyer, who
arraigns the defnition, show or attempt to
show a contrary de8nition or deciesion?
Not the lesat io the world. All be alleges
or can allege is that on a debated qlieition
he is no longer free to deny that to be law
which he considered himself free to deny
before the deaision of the court. Suppose
the court had decided in 4ii favor instead
of agaist him?
The Pope and Coulnil, that is, the court
of last resort, has decided that the infalli
bility of the P. the assistance of the
Holy. .a*A e rli stdra mat
k ,94 eaorlas, and always h
bees, ieilded ia Osthlole faith,'or this
doetrine of tble Churb. Consequently. it
has never been )whl to deny itS, and Gal
lleanisa was, n aetaiilways a heresy; what
theologians all mIieiw1 heresy, and could
sever have beoen asirtd without incurring
isToro conseeleafe, the ails of heresy, un
less excused by iavtnelble Ignorance; bu
not in the exterior M~m, because prior to
the 18th of Jaly, 10, there was no canon
of the Churob explictly condemning it.
Why the Chtch did not condemn it ex
licitly sooner, she has told us, and we
ave no right tpeak her for her reasons.
Possibly her reasons are prudential, like
those ofthe bishops who in the Council of
the Vatican opposed, not the doctrine, but
the definition. She has thought it best so
longu Gallica) accepted and promptly
obeyed the Papal Constitution, to leave
them in good faith, and not to change their
material heresy into formal heresy. Mr.
Walworth does not appear to be aware of
the distinction between material heresy and
formal, but seems to suppose that there is
heresy only in the denial of what the
Church has explicitly and formally defined
to be dejide, and as no definitions are made
of any article or proposition of faith till it
is controverted, we see not, if his supposi
tion be true, how there can ever be either
faith or iheresy. On his theory an infallible
and unchangeable Church could never de
olde any controversy.
Archbishop Purcell opposed the defini
tion in the Council, as did a number of
other prelates, as inopportone, inexpedi
ent, or unnecessary. not the doctrine itself.
Mr. Walworth, by hlis own principlaesor the
Catholicity he accepted when he conformed
to the Church. is bound to accept Papal in
fallibility, fprheadmits that he was taught
that the fallibility of the Church is ex
pressed by General Councils, and this defi
nition is certainly made in a General Coun
cils. Te attempt toevadettiis by 8ontend
log that the definition was not made by the
free action of the assembled bishops, that
they were even forced by the Pepe, and
intrigues and factious proceedings of the
Jesuits, to make it, is perfectly idle, and to
forget that General Concils are guided
and assisted by the Holy Ghost. The Pope
exercised no restraintla but such as Popes
iave always exercised over Generiif Coun
cils, far les, than some of them, St. Greg
ory X., for insatance, in the Second General
Councilof Lyons; and the factions and in
trigues of the Jesuite were not, at worst,
more effective than the inflauence of the
Emperor Marcian, and the Imperial Court
at Chalcedon. All definition in General
Councils are usually made by the Pope,
who presides in person,-the-Sacred Council
approving, and no acts of a Council not
approved by the Pope have any legal value,
for the Chiurchbs Papal, not simply Epis
copal. If the Council of the Vatican was
not (Ecumenical, there *ever was an tEec
meaical Council, and if the definition of
Papal infallibility is invalid, no act of any
Council can be proved to be valid and bind
ing on the faithful.
Mr. Walworth says Dr. Dollinger is right,
and of course, the Pope and Council are
wrong, and as a brave man and a "free
American citizen, lie will stand by him and
the Alt Kathblikse. But we would remind
him that he cannot do so, and still pretend
even to belong to the old Catholic Church.
The Catholic Church has always been gov
erned by the Pope, and bishops, and more
over, has always, since St. Peter erected
his chair in the city of Rome, recognized
the Roman Church as the " mistress and
mother of all the chnrches." Your Alt
Katholiks do not recognize the authority of
the Roman Church; they have neither
Pope nor bishops, and no means or authori
ty to reproduce either, and they are and
can be at best only Presbyterians, not so
much even as Eptscopalians. Besides Dr.
Dollinger holds, whas is certainly an inno
vation, that the Church, even Popes and
Councils, must be governed by a body of
learned and scientifico men, thus making
the Church a purely human institution,
depending on the wisdom, sagacity and
learning of University professors. Does
Mr. Walworth say be is right In thist If
he does, what right has he to call himself
an " Old Catholic " Dr.-Dollinger is
neither an old Catholic nor a new Catholic,
for he is simply no Catholic at all, mince he
virtually denies the supernatural guidance
ad assistance of the Holy Ohost. Does
Mr. Walworth do the same f Places he no
faith in the promises of Our Lord to His
Chuorch
Mr. Walworth must pardon us for sng
esting that it is possible that he has, in his
aste to assert his freedom as a free born
American oitizen, not duly considered the
position in which he has placed himself.
He has renounced and denounced the Ca
thollo Church, and in so doing he has de
nied that God has any Church on earth, or
that man has any means of salvation. He
ham deprived himself of boause and home.
Will he return to Protestantism I But the
Protestants sects are none of them any bet
ter than they were, and he has all the rea
sons for leaving them that he had when he
originally left them.- Build a new Church I
Man is noChurch builder, and a man-iade
Church would be no protection in this
bleak and wintry world. We see nothing
for him but to stand out in the cold. Yet
what is to come of his poor soul t We
pray him, for his sake, not ems, to recon
sider the matter.-N. . Tablet.
The Moaxxo STAR is always for sale by Mr.
Chas. D Elder, 124 Camp street, who is also
authorized to receive subscriptions for the
paper
Attention is directed to our special notice
column.
E, A. L- ER
-Dealer in
TINE WATCHES, CLOCKS, DIAXONDS,
JEWELRY, SILVER AND PLATED WARN,
Bronzes, Parians and Fancy Goods,
WATCHES REPAIRED.
11s................CANAL STREET...............115.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
Jewr and Sileterwere manufactared to aegr.
delos.
S----f- SE FURNISHING GOODS. -
FRaNCi8 LAUEB,
Imspoters and Dealers la
CHINA, GLABS AUD EARTHEN WARE,
S ILVE-PLATED AND TABLE CUTTLERY COAL
n YOIL IopaOO o ETC., -
615.......... MagaineStrsue.....,. ....615
Corner of Josepine
Has Just received a landeome and well seleeted an.
sortment of CHRISTMAS PRESENTS 51 va low
priles. aol5 m
JOHN BOIS,
291 ............Camp 8treet............291
-eturns his sinLere thanks to the ubli for the liberal
natronae bestowed upon him in thpesta rspect.
Iully e solits a arontannce of the sah, seeA
in all..m. u.. C fail tishotla. . . bhahd hi1
establishment TEOEUUIGRLYb RIoTTD andEU.
PAl lED, and now offers for sale a ine lot of FURI
TURE LOOKING GLASSES. PIOTURES, SHADES,
coaDa eto.c
Pictures and Looking ,Glar Framed. Upholstering,
Raent ingnd V sing e done in she best matose,
andFurnlfure moved with care and dlspetch.
Mr. Bois' charges are VERY LOW. saes4 a
WALL PAPER, PAINTS, WINDOW GLASS. Eta
11.9..... ....e Common Street ........ 119
The undersigned, formerly of 10 Canal street, an.
rounces to hisfrtendsa and the ubllo thae bo Ianow
located at 19 COMMON STRE E, betreiw Camp and
St Charle trets.
He calls special attention to his stock of WALL
PAPER, rangin In priA e from 10T. roll uwardrs.
HI stocD of ROT, O GA. WNO
SHADES. eta., being vary large, and his aexpenac
being rnch lower than fomerly. be i enabled to sil
all articles in his line at Greatly Reduced Prices.
Call and ea for Eders elv , C
l WHEErLAHAN, lip Common at.
Genuine English WRITE LEAD (B. B) always on
hand myld 71 ly
L. R Impor ter arndDealer n
FRECNC AND GERMAN LOOKING GLASSES,
Fine Oil Painting. Engravinga and Lithograph. in
Colors and Plain Chromes or all Publicartions. Oval
anl Square Portrait and Picture Frames of all
sites and patterns" Artiste' Materials for
Painting i Oil, Water and PastelColors;
Carpets. Mat. MaItting and lIege.
Lace Curtains. Window Shades and Cor.
niuco, Curtun Holders. Picture Cord and
Tpasels. Photograph Albume, Prayer iaoke,
SCrunfixsCarved Wooden Goods. etc. ine French
CARVED OAK DINING ROOM MIRRORS.
135 CANAL STREET. (Tanro Bow)
mnhlO 7t ly New dvieaas.
GAIN" ft KELP,
Branch Store.so. 659 Magazine street.
urroarass AND Dntlnns IN
CHINA, GLASS. EARTHENWARE. HOUSE FUR.
NISeING ARTICLES. CUTLERY,
cut 3m Builders' Hardware, stc.
WILLIAMYI EGAIL,
Manufacturar and Repairer ofSpring,
Hair. Feather, Moos and Excelsior MATTRESSES,
Also, Pillows. Sheets. Blankets and Mosquito Bare,
Ne.t BSLENVILLE STREET. between Royal and
Bourbon streets, New Orleans.
Steamboate. Hotls and Boarding Housee supplied at
short notice and low rates. Lo, Storage received
and carefally stored. soSe 7 ly
F 1tRNITIUIE FOR SALE AT HUGH FLYNN'S.
167r Poydras treet, between St. Charles and Cmon.
deletatreeta. Second-hand Furniture bought in large
or small ilantitieci Furniture received on storage and
well cared fora One mud Household Furniture sold at
the most reasonable rates. Also a lot of Iron
Bedsteads which will be sold cbeap. Offe and sales
room. 167 .ydras. between St. Charles and Carondelet.
all v
HARDWARE-STOVES-COOPERAGh.
THE AMERICAN STOVE.
TEE VICTOR AT FIVE STATE FAIRBS.
For DURABILITY. ECONIMT IN FURL. PER
FERT BAKING QUALITIES, It rivals any Stove
made in this country.
THE COLUMBIAN COAL ORIL WOOD STOVE
is the BEST COMBINED Fuel Stove ever offered to
the public.
A General Assortment of
COOKING AND HEATING STOVES, TINWARE,
GRATES, HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,
BIRD CAGES, ETC.
Country and City Orders solicited for ROOFING and
GUTTERING.
PHIL. McCABE,
aeS4 m American Stove Depot. 100 Camp street,
S. aAITHENS SON,
236-....... rTnourrrovE.As rnrr........!66
DEALERS IN HARDWARE,
Iron. Steel, Copper Brass. Lead, Galvenized Spikes,
Brass and Composition Ship Hardware, Builders' Hard
war and Fire Orate.
Locksmiths' and Bell Hangars' Materials.
Together with the greateat variety of every description
of Meohanica' Tools and Hardware to be found In the
South, at reasonable prices. Je '71 ly
G. PIT - uj 55
DrarsS Ut
Builders' Hardware, Grates and Maptels,
PAINS. OILS, VARNISH. TURPENTINE,
WINDOW GLASS and WALL PAPER.
349. ........ Common Street..........49
my14 I_ Near Claiborne Market.
MISCELLANEOUS ADVERTISEMENTS.
A. MURRAY,
CISTERN MAKER,
183 Magazine street,
u )(nearJula,) Ew oSLWIa
All work warranted to give entire
satisfaction.
All kinds of Cisterns made to order
nd repaired.
Orde promptly attended to.
A lot of Cisterns, made of the-best
material and workmanship keptcon.
slanlg on hand. and for safeat Prices
to sntt the times. de241 7lv
E. LALMANT,
DRUGGIST,
Has removed to his large and commodlous store,
Corner of Cialborne and Gasquet streets,
where the uhllo will fnd a large and well-assorted
stock of DRUGS and MEDIOINES, together with-all
the requisites whioh constitute a First-elass Drug
The PBESCRIPTON DEPARTMENT eareAfly at
tended to at all hours.
N. -Modern and Oriental languages spoken.
del am
SrEABh
VARIETY' WOOD WOREKSI,
SMITH & DONNELLY, Proprietors,
104..........8St. Joseph Street..........104
naw 0mw.sa~,
LUMBER DRESSING.
Straight and Circular Sawing, Wood Turning,
inte., Etc.. f -
CISTERNS mae and repaired. Stair Banisters and
Mooldings mads to order. The manufacturing or Cot
ton Presses sod Agricultural Implements receive our
specal attention.
Add r Box 18, Merbhants' and Dealers' Exchbange.
art 71 ly
P. BUCKLEY,
8................Camp Street................
Has for Sale, at Low Prices,
FINE GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES,
American, English and Swiss,
Fine Jewelry, Sterling Silverware, Gold, Silver
and Steel Spectacles and Eye Glasses,
Partieular attention given to repairing all kinds of
I amo dsremouted and Jewelry repaired. de
Dimonds remounted and Jewelr repired ds4( *m
INSUMRArCE COPANIBS .
MERCHANTS' MUTUIAL INBS NCE CO.
or NEW ORLEANS.
I a ofaormlty with the segulrsmeats f thskleartser,
the emnar publish the allowlaing sbmeat
Prealsesisved daring the dear madinsg i Wt,
iseludia unemrned psemiums adwthe plsFeiauy a
thg WireEhes.e631* 2T3
Os Ma re 1k 6..i................ ..
On River Riss............................ 35
Total Prmims ..................... ,0,0! 64
Less Umetasasi Premiums .........8132,412 to
Net earned Premiums, May SI 1........ $878,040 64
LesesePalds -
Tointal.. R ................$...67,16 37
nsase.i. ks. 4.,851 W 1
OnRher Rompkn hv t............wi721,79ets:
Total eat......... ................... $17,81 0
3Reinrascea and return pre.
t 0ate b.... ...................... ... 30,0O
STotal. ........'...... H. l..36. 35
Deduct Intereset, lees xpneoses. 325,860 75- 6415,135 60
Pret. ............ ............. $3,.00
The company have the the following assete:
C ................................ $S110,! 11
7 45,0508,3 0
Bank and railread stocks. t.............. ... or4e 0 ta
Nfotes osured by martegab ore ..e. h 4 o41 0
oteessred bypladge ................ ...o ,
thr ay of Ji une, ISTI, eo 41t 1 was resolved todalr
Bils rossiaa........................., 81.755 4
B h~oridiidndo ThIrT pher e ~lmnt eathena re
Premiums in coaxes of collection..... -...,02 H
Stat bends.. ........ ................... 15004 0
Soripe of ether couapaulee ................. 6,119 sa
Stok of Valette Dry Dock Company..a. c c80o0
secnd Monday ;iin July next the whole issues nof Scr
Stok of Leaver Steam Cotton Pres...... ,3000 0
kr of Malin Dry Dock and Ship Yard
oBmlpny D........................ 3, 7009
Harbor Protection Comnnaan................ 1,500 00
Mortgage Bnds Grand Lodge of Louisiana Ca 00c
Mortgage Bondsorere' Aeocation...... 4000 00
Morit e ionde Odd Fellows' nall .........c c
to ..on..a.... Association............. ,0o00.0
Jud ants18.15410
Oal anea...........................o 381 Yor.
Less-Unclimed Interst n and Annuity Compan,
Uneartoned premiums on May31,o f o
boThe~ Leadin lasurae Co e' ofl... the 0 UntdStt
1871oro oe d............................42,5 00-81,57 90
Tat9l wtr No ro e
The abo statement Is ajust, true and correct trans.
itree wasrl laly nex . 36,01
cript from the hooks of the company.
P. FOURCEY, Prealdent.
0. W. INOTT, Secretary.
arhofSTAT : 0 LOIiaA,
risofOrleans, City or Nlew Orleans,
Sworn to and subscribed before me. this third day of
June, 1871.
JOSEPH CUIVILLIUR, Slotaxy Public.
At a moeting of the Board of Directors, held on the
third dsy of June, 1871, It was resolved, to declare a.
Scrip dividend of THIRTY par cent en the netearned
participating premiuma for the year ending May 31, 1871,
for which certificates will be Isued on and after the let
day of August next. Also, to pay, on and after the
second Monday In July next the whole Issues of Scrip
for the yeasr 1863. 1864 and 1865, and SIX per cent in.
trest on all ontetuading Scrip 6f the Cempany:
olugcroass
P. Foarchy, L. F. Generes, P. Maspero,
P.S. Whit, D. MoCourd, S. Z. Relf
M. Puig. - Joseph Boy, D. A. Chafflaix
Charles Leitte, J. .. Fernandez. jell 71 ly
P. A. BARKER,
Fire, Rivor, Life and Marine Insurance Agency,
CASH 5 ASSETS IEPRESENTED OVER SIXTEEN
MILLIONS.
,BTNA........................of Hartford.
HOME.......................of Now York.
Security Life Insur nce and Annuity Company,
of New York.
Hartford Fire Insurnce Company, of Hartford.
The Leading Insurance Companies of the United States.
Record of Losses Paid.............. $40,000,000
P. A. BARKER, Agent,
Jaew ly Fo. 58 Carondelet street.
NEW ORLEANS MUTIANL INSURANCE COM.
Ofce Car. Caapp and Canal
Premiums received endlig the year 1870.....3657,001 57
Lodges, taxes, expenses, etc.. paid darlgsame
period ................................... 213,51086
Asseta on 31st December, 1870............ 80,742 07
J. .TUYES, President.
J. W. BINCKS, Secretary.
DIRECTORS:
. renhart, A. Iecherean, T. B. Blanchard,
W. Schmidt, 0. W. Babcock, M. Payro,
E. Miltenherger, Aug. Relchard, - J. Toyer.
,cl, Is
BOOTS AND SHOES-HATS.
NEW STORE................. NEW GOODS
NEW PRICES.
JOHN GEORGE WAGNER,
(SIgn of time Red Boot.)
Corner of Uraulinaes and Dauphine Streets,
Xe oFIrnraO BnARAIS IN
BOOTS, SHOES AND BROGANS,
Fon
Ladies', Gentlemen's and Children's Wear,
AT PRICS WHICII DEFT cOrIPETITION.
Havtig lately moved into my large atore, corner of
Urnilnes and Dauphine atreets, and opened a large
and ell-aelected stock. fresa from the factories, I am
now prepared to offer, at prices which are astonihinly
low, and will afford everybody an opporinnltj to sup
ply themselves with the articles then are In need of. at
J. g. WAGNER.
th ~ ~ ~ ~ g of thede Red Bootlne
oet 3m Corner Urenlinee and Dauphine treets.
rTIHOMAS HARE,
A Dealer in
BOOTS AND SHOES,
165..........Poydras Streot..........165
Between Carondelet and Si. Charles, New Orleans.
Boot s aa hoe made to order at the shortest notice.
Jaly ly
LOUIsIA1NA HAT MANUPACTORY,
JoHx FRIEL, PRACTICAL HATrER,
(Snccessor to A agnlerr)
1 ne............ rT. CHAtLES ST Orisn...........Ur o l
Qersonai attention pald to all ordere. Keeps con.
Inty on hand a choice assortment of Hate, se 7i ly
D HR EY, -
FASHIONABLE HAT AND CAP STORE,
J. K. BAILEY,
246-..........CANAL STREET.... .......24
yVINEGARI
jelts 71 ly BESTABLIBBSED IN 1840.
IusUiRCE COoMuizES.
OFFrCE 9g-8ýE SUN MUTUaMa. INire
RANCE ANT OF NEW OBLEANj
... ....... mp Street..:. ......:s
- FTFZrrg ANNUAL STATENarT.
?aRW O1suaxE, January , lt.
Ia cesheatty withtbrvetuiremaente of their ehau
the company pulblak thbe fofwing statement for th
year adinnjoeaember S1, 1870,
AmeUnt of Preeaiume r the yeexandhng i3ce.Iel31
38702
Onlre Risks ....................01060 e
o Marinse Prik s ................ 4..44 as
an Rive Risks ................... ru o
Add: o4,889 11
UntePlated Risks for 16..... 51511 00
aanot(M76,843 11
Deduct: - '~i
Untheeloeta :rke f 1870...... $461 00
Reoun Pr cias ................ 914 3
Netsuad Premiums forl 1670.......... ... 61
LesI a psd during the some perod, vta
aOnf 1i WRlake..p... boeor o 00
On Maria Risks...... 51,005 61
OR Rine Risks....... 964 0-3-150,510 09
T a ae . ...... g13,913 79
sea lenzpen es.._-. 37,019 72
DLooats en Premiums 1DR1 91r
Interest on Sadp.... 47,434 4
Re~laorasos........ 3.146-117,507 S
Amountr:served for unadjusted
lo lope ieee ..i g .. .. 6,71500 4
Dicont and interest, and proit
and lo..................... 57. 800
116,760 55
rNet p rt.......................... 130To600
The Cos0ay huve the following Assets cetlmated at
the lowest market cash vales, vi:
465 Consolldated and Railroad City bends....35.00
6 State bonda............ ds............. do00
44 City Seven Per Cent bond.ads. °3,e 7s
4 L.00 F.Bonds ........................ 4 00ot
s Grand Ledge of Lisana bond......... S .00040
SN. O. Trne' Aoclation ............... 1.00000
600 Shares N 0. Gs Compan.....m_.. 99,000 0
9046 $aoe Ctt e Baaref Louissana... _ 5,66000
30 Shsares Union k" Bank of Louisisana'..... 11.90041
60 Shares Creecent Cites Bank..... j9
69 Shares Lonlalanu Stets B ............ w.9000
50 Shares Mechanic. and Traders' Bank.... 1,sie ee
30 Shares EHrbor Protection Company...... 1,50060o
5 Shares Merchants-Bak ............... 36 000
Loseson Pledge .......................... 54,8638
Los nMortgage .......................... 745900
U.ll..".o..v...... 9aheg0
Sop of other InsnranceCmpanie .......... 5,31 0
Sate Co upn....... s.................'. 3.457'
Premiums in course of collection....... . 0.,000
Cash on h andn d . 63j= 3
Total .................................. 4 8
Including Dividends.
The above statement isa osat,. true and correct trane.
Oript from the books of thcMAom SLOYOP.nsadent
THOMAS ANDERSON. Secretary.
Pariah of Orleans-City of New Orileas.
Sworn to andenbeoribed before me, this twenty-AM
day of Janosry, 1871.
ADaEl W HERO, Ji:, Notary Public.
The Board of Director. have recolved to payesa per
cent Interest on the ontatanding Certilcatee o Prots,
on sod after the second Monday of Februsry. 1671; also
ftypeent on the balnce of the of the year
1934, pa lhey on and after the third Monday in March.
1671. an tia hrav further declaerd a divdend of te
per cent on the net earned Psttictpating Pbuminmll~r
the yearending December831 1670. forhi chcoertifcates
will be loaned on Tand aterthe 60th l daayof March next
THOMAS8 SLOO Preeldent.
. JOHN G GAINkS. Vice Preeident.
THOMAS 2NDERRSON, Secretary.
Dnrucrouc:
Jehn 0. Gaines, E. 3. Hart. B. Blscc,
Henry Renahaw, I. Marksa W. H. Seymour,
J. ts K ei Veesh ce, W. A. Kant,
Richard Flower, Hugh Wison, Thomns Sloo.
laM y
TEUTONIA INSURANCE COMPANY
or
NEW ORLEANS.
Insure Fire, Marino and River Risek at Lowtes
Rates.
TEMPORARY OFFICH NO 111 GRAVIER STREET
NEAR TEE dOaiiER OF CAMP.
Capital...........................$1,000,O 0
luheoribed..........................700,000
A. RIMER BADER. President,
EORGE STROM* TR. Secretary
OEOBO~ 8 EB, 8soretaay.u
SIARD 0 Tarruaz
A Elmer Bader M Freak, W B Schaidt-
Theo Lllen tbai Louis Schneider, Frank Radar,
J M Sohbwegt. Newmaan Eloke, F Riekert.
C H Miller. Jacob esuh ger, Cisag d
S 7. Nasle, H. Pohlman, Lonia Schwarts,
0H L L Mayer, i. 6eig X Wasieabaeh,
Joeiqh Kelr. sase Seaseek, E. T. DlSas
jell 71ily
TIWNERS-PLUMBERS-IRON WORKERS
GEoaR CRONAN, ou
(Succeaemor to Bennett ALarges,)
Southern Ornamental Iron Works,
Corner Magnolia and Erato ata.,
Near Jackson Bilroad Depot,
New Orleans, La.
Blacksmithlng and Honuework in general, traits,
Store Pronto, etc., made to order at the atortestfledOS.
Ofce at the Foundry. scltl 1s
LEEDB' FOUNDRY,
(Established in 1825)
Corner Dolord and Foucher streets.
Wa wpreprsdto ananufactue Stnream Engies
Boileyr ~ Su 1'u~I1· oo ettles,, Draining actInesoo,
Saw KillIs Cotton Press. Judooaous Goveorots Newell
Screw., Gin Gearing, Furnae Mouths. Orate tase, san
all kind. of Plantation and Steamboat Works, sat
every description of Machinery for the South.
spl ly LEEDB CO. "
JOaN K'nlTras. to H. AfrrL0AI
McMTY&E & APP.EGALE,
PLUMBERB,
-AND
Dealers in Cooking Ranges and Bollers, Batk Tabs
Water Closets, Wash Stands, ritchen Sinka jJ*
and Force Pumps. Ala Pnaj.Sho ntLa
Brams and Platsd pa' Sheet Cnd ofaPPip
Cr n 191ookso of aupatter s,
14d.............POYD S STREET.............146
NEW ORLUANS,
N. ..-E ate for Colwell's, Shaw & WIllard's Patlest
Tin Lined pe.
tranta put up, extended, and repaired. Ii l -
T HOS. EcKENDrICK,
S PLUMBEC AND GAB FITTER
0(156 Magazine street, near Philip.
itohen Ranges, Rot. Cold and Shower Baths, Watr
Closet,, Wash stan ls. p es, Steam and Waler Pipes,
os S Codeliers, sto.,*ttsd up esrefuly satl at
the shortes notion. teleta
OLD E8TABLISHED TROY BELL FOUNDRY
a'sor, a. Y. establisheod list)
A larg assorment of Church, Aademy, PL.Aless
and other Sells. constantly on hand and made to orter.
Mats of genuine Sell Metal (Copper and Tin.) Bang
with Rotary Mountluge, the best and most durable ever
seed. All Hello Warrauled Satisfactory.
large Itllstrated Catalogue east free apes
tioen JONES & CO.. Troy. N.*
je4 '71 ly or, 100 Dearbera screteChiaego, 0llIs.

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