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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, December 26, 1875, Morning, Image 7

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gerning Star and Catholic Messenger.
Jw OrLuAa3. URD.Ar. DZCNMUR, 26. 15s5.
JUVENILE COLUMII- p1
TIE CONTRAST.
It'was Christmas Eve. The white saow
lakes as they floated lazily down, covered E
everything with a garment of beauty. The pi
warm light skine out from the windows of a gi
Isrge mansion, and the shadows on the our- w
tains pictured the beading branches of a ft
Christmas tree with it tapers and toys and d
fruit, and busy bLandsgiving to it the lastlov
ing touches. At the upper windows, bright ii
little faces appeared every now and then, 1
and sounds of merry voices and gay laugh- of
ter, floated occasionally on the quiet eve- a,
ningair.
At length all wa silent, for the little a
ones had said their prayers and" good
night," and bad hung up their stockings in B
the chimney corner for the good St. Nih- a
olas to fill; loving lips had kissed them as .1
they lay down in their cozy little beds, and p
their sleep was fall of bright dreams of the tl
Christ-Child and the angels and the merry
Christmas that would come on the morrow. ii
A short distance from this scene of hap- r
pinese, in a lonely hovel, was seated a a
poor woman. No warm fire gleamed upon d
the walls, no costly pictures were there; a
but through many a crack and crevice the t
chilly winds whistled and the dreary a
snowflakes crept. Will the Christ-Child V
pass in silence this home of poverty t t
Upon a little straw in the corner two child- f
ren, slept closely clasped in each others' arms c
--little, pale children, with wan and anx- s
ions faces. One of them moved, and cried e
out, " Mother, mother, it is so cold I Does c
the Christ Child know it is so cold t" The I
mother heard, and had only strength to e
kiss the little sufferer. "The Christ-Child I
will come," she said; " I have seen Him
to-night, and soon we shall all be warm."
And the three slept in the cold and dark.
ness.
The drifting snow wreathed white chap- I
lets on the brows of the sleeping children I
and the mother, and covered them with a c
shroud, white and pure as their silent hearts a
-silent now forever; for the Christ-Child I
had come and taken them to Himself.
Christmas morning dawned, and the sun
rose brightin the clondness sky. The bells I
pealed forth a merry chime, and the sonund of
the Christmas song and Christmas greeting
was heard on every side. Happy hearts were
full of Christmas joy, and sad hearts
were lighted and consoled by Christmas
hopes. Everywhere and to every one of
goodwill-to some the gladness of earth,
to others the joys of heaven. For if
to the poor, the sorrowful, and the suffer
ing, the Christ-Child seems to give little
part in the joys of Bethlehem, it is only to
unite them more closely with Himself in
this world, and crown them more glor
iousnely in the next.
PARyTY OF REASONING.-I am always
glad to tell you a tale when it occurs to
me, and that is why I tell you the follow
ing. A county-gentleman had'a small son
who having been early taken about to the
stables and the kennels and initiated into
their secrets, had become quite a baby-ex
pert in all matters pertaining thereto, and
quite ready to give his opinion as to a
horse or a litter of paps with as much ser
ious certainty as though, instead of being a
child, he were an old and hardened sports
man and fancier. The country gentleman
had the good fortune to be presented with
twin daughters by his wife, and the boy,
after his usual rounds among the animals,
was taken to see the little creatures as they
lay in their cradle. The child looked at
them gravely, pulled their legs, pinched
their arms, opened their eyelids, and, after
a moment ot reflection, pointing to one of
the two, said, "Keep this one."-Vanity
Fair.
DISRESPECT AT IIoME.-One of the dan
gers of the house life is this habit of disre
spect-that which is bred by familiarity.
People who are all beauty and sunshine
for a crowd of strangers, for whom they
have not the faintest affection, are all ugli
ness and gloom for their own, by whose
love they live. The pleasant little pretti
ness of dress and personal adornment,
which mark the desire to please, are put on
only for the admiration of those whose ad
miration goes for nothing, while the house
companions are treated only to the ragged
gowns and thread-bare coats, the tousled
hair and stubby beard, which, if marking
the ease and comfort of the sans fason of
home, mark also the indifference and dis
tespect which do so much damage to the
sweetness and delicacy of daily life. And
what is true of the dress is truer still of the
manners and tempers of home, in both of
which we find too often that want of res
pect which seems to run side by side with
affection and the custom of familiarity. It
is a regretable habit under any of its con
ditions, but never more so than when it
invades the home and endangers still
more that which is already too much en
dangered by other things. Parents and
up-bringers do not pay enough attention
to this in the young. They allow habits
of disrespect to be formed-rude, rough, in
solent, impatient-and salve over the sore
with the stereotyped excuse : "They mean
nothing by it," which if we look at aright
is worse than no excuse at all; for if they
really mean nothing by it, and their disre
spect is not what it seems to be, the result
of strong anger, uncontrollable temper, but
is merely a habit, then it ought to be
conquered without loss of time, being mere
ly a manner that hurts all parties alike.
FATHER's PROVERBse.--" Of all father's
children, I love myself the best !" was the
gentle reproof that met any little act of
selfishness on ourpart. Sometimes it was
merely appropriating to our use the best
chair, or taking the best piece of cake, or
failing to show a proper consideration for
our brothers or sisters. Father had agreat
habit of repeating these proverbs instead of
administering the reprooof that is usual in
such cases.
If we were late at breakfast, or made our
appearance with disordered dress or hair,
we were sure to hear, in a very serious
tone, " Like to an owl in an ivy bush, what
a frightful thing am I."
If, through our carelessness, anything
wasbroken about the house, we were re
minded that "The want of care does
more damage than the want of knowledge."
We dreaded the infliction of a proverb
more than we would a scolding, and it
made a greater impression upon our minds.
The most effectnal way for a boy to learn a
bee sees-by just putting his finger into the
hive.
TRIFLE&.
(Mobile Register.]
Saxe, singing of " Proud Miss McBride,"
plaintively refers to those at
Who lve to grow rich
By eaviag oandle.ends and stoh
But even the vaunted economies of New I
England are thrown in the shade by the ft
peculiar value of trifles, in the hot strug- ft
gles for bread in the geyost metropolis of the
world. Itis ealculated that there is a profit of o
fully £10,000 a year in Paris from an in-.
dustry based on the collection and re- v
manufacture of the cigar ends cast aside ft
in the streets by smokers. Now, this col-. t
leotlon is not your ordinary cljfomnter, k
or rubbish bunter; he is a chasseur de ig- ti
ares, which we might Americanize into a t
stamp-hunter. He begins work at the p
earliest peep of dawn, paying special at- t
tention to such fashionable precincts as the a
Boulevards, the Champs Elysees, gathering a
up as be passes from street to street .
stumps of all dimensions and qualities, or a
purchasing them at wholesale prices from s
the garooa of cafes.
By seven o'clock the labor of collecting 1
is finished and the chasseur has carried its a
results to his workshop. Here the better t
stumps of the " Londres " and the better f
description of cigars are sorted from the a
common kinds; and with a working capi- t
tal consisting of a block of wood, a knife z
and sharping stone, the honest tradesman I
produces a coarsely ouat description of pipe r
tobacco. This, naturally, finds market far t
from fashionable. It is sold to rat-catchers, a
chiffonniers, street-sweepers and the like t
at fair prices. And how these strange toil- i
era of the sewers can afford to pay, is an- t
other proof of the infinite resources of the i
French mind in the utilizing of trifles. To
as, in the South, there is as much moral as
amusement- in this queer traffic.
Did the people of the South-especially t
of its cities-pay as strict attention to the
utilizing of each small means of livehood, I
the sum total would be sufficient to pre- 1
vent much of the cry about no work to do.
If the street Arabs of Paris can live by
collecting cigar stumps, may not a re
spectable living be had here from manu
facture of matches? If her street sweepers
can buy the luxury of a regular puff, why
need they who only walk the streets with
hands in their pockets grumble because
good cigars don't grow on the bushes
The expression, " Of all others," though
utterly absurd, may be called a respectable
blander in one aspect, as in another, and
more essential one, it is quite the reverse.
.It is not simply a slip of the tongue or pen,
but a slip of the head, and hence reflects
on him who commits it a double discredit.
In this aspect the blunder is anything but
respectable. Yet the long roll of those
who have committed it is thickest with
names respectable for both thought and
expression; so that it borrows from them a
shadow at least of respectability. We are
a reminded of this just at present by a pas
sage in the recent banqueting speech of
the British Premier, surely no common
master of expression. " A war with China,"
e said Mr. Disraeli at the Lord Mayor's ban
D quet, would have been a war with a coun
try with which, of all others, England
would not be placed in collision." Mr.
Disraeli, we believe, is the last who has
made this slip. And barely the last ; for
Professor Proctor, in the Cornhill .laga
sine, was only a few days before him. Al
luding to Leverrier's discovery of Neptune,
the eminent-astronomer said : "To the
outside world indeed it was the achieve
ment of all others most deserving of notice
y in Leverrier's work." A short time before
It that Arsene Houssaye, whose airy genius
d begins and ends in expression, had said in
r the Tribune : " In America, as well as here,
you amuse yourself with the life of the
springs and seaside. It is the place of all
others to study society and fashion."
There is here, indeed, a grammatical blan
- der superadded, but possibly the transla
- tor, some member of the Tribune's accom
. plished staff, it may be, is responsible for
e both. Mr, Hardy slips likewise in "Far
y from the Madding Crowd," where referring
i- to Boldwood, he says"nobody suspected
se that he had shown unequivocal symptoms of
i- that mental derangement which Bathsheba
t, and Tavy alone, of all others, and at differ
n ent times, bad thought of in connection
I- with him." The offenders on this point,
e however, are not merely among the crowd
d of fine writers and the host of commonplace
d ones, but also among those whose names
we do not expect to die. Coleridge in
f " The Friend" speaks of " truths of all
s- others the most awful and mysterious," and
te Milton, although he does not use this exact
id expression, fairly revels in the confusion
ie of thought which makes it what it is, sing
of log of Adam and Eve as first seen by
a- Satan from his " lofty stand " on the Tree
h of Life:
It 80 hand in hand they passed, the loveliest pair
1. That ever since in love's embraces met ;
it Adam the goodliest man of men since born
11 Ad she the fairest of her dav3ters Eve.
This, we think, will do. The force of
blunder could no further go. Nor could
the force of example in extenuation of
n blundering.
re SILENT INFLUENCE. - Little do we
in know of the power of the unconscious in
it fluence which we exercise on those around
y ns. Like the unseen but ever active power
-. of gravitation, so. the influence of our ex
It amples and of our lives, though unknown
it to us, may be uninterrupted and powerful.
ae The words we drop are remembered by
e- others long after we have forgotten them.
Our actions, our tones of voice, our looks
and motions, and our very peculiarity of
thought and feeling and action, may be
r's producing an impressiow'upon the minds of
he others which we never know, and which we
of can never remove. Actions have a louder
as voice than words, and example is more po
ist tent than precept. And thus things which
or we say or do without thought, or conscionus
ror ness, or recollection, may exercise an in
at fluence upon those around us, not only while
of we live, but after we may be silent in the
in grave. Only tbhe day of judgment, which
reveals the secrets of all hearts, can disclose
Or the mighty eflects which our cond::ct may
ir, produce. Srclude ourselves as we may
us from the world, or even hide ourselves
at from our friends, yet still tihe power of our
example, the things we do, the things we
ug leave undone, our likes and dislikes, our
re- habits, our manners, our indulgences, our
tes pleasures; all these may be fixing the
8." course of some one around 2s for time and
rb for eternity.
it _ _
d" Said a New York dry g,.... dea.te: " O
course we lose money on every iece ,t "hos
a goods; but, my dear mndlau, re ,!A su'.
he enormonats quantities of theb- Wl 1 cte
political ecouomists exp!al t
The egg-Dases in InUta.
iSibSner as Natiy.l
A much more pleasing performance, N
and one which might perhaps better have
.been mentioned in conneotion with the
exploits of the jugglers, is the" egg- CI
dance." This is not as one might expect
from the name given it, a dance with these
fragile objects. It is executed in %hie
wise : The dancer, carries a willow wheel w
of moderate diameter fastened horizontally.
upon the top of her head. Around this
wheel threadeare fastened, equally distant
from each other, and at the end of each of
these threads Ia a slipnoose, which is m
kept open by a glass bead. Thus equipped,
the young girl comes toward the specta
tors with a basket fall of eggs, which she a
passes around for inspection to prove that
they are real and not imitations. The music
strikes up a jerky, monotonous strain,
and the dancer begins to whirl around
with great rapidity. Then, seizing an egg, A
she puts it in one of the slip nooses, and, se
with a quick motion, throws it from her
in such a way as to draw the knot tight.
The swift turning of the dancer produces
a centrifugal force which streaches the 1
thread oat straight, like a ray shooting
from the circumference of the circle. One
after another the eggs are thrown into
these slip nooses until they make a hori
zontal aureole or halo abontthe dancer's
head. Then the dance becomes still more
rapid-so rapid, in fact, that it is difficult A
to distinguish the features of the girl ; the
moment is critical ; the least false step,
the least irregularity in time, and the eggs
dash against each other. But how can
the dance be stopped I There is but one
way-that is to remove the eggs in the V
way in which they have been put in place.
This operation is by far the more delicate
of the two. It is necessary that the dan
cer, by a single motion, exact and unerring,
should take hold of the egg, and remove it
from the noose. A single false motion of
the hand, the taset interference with one of
the threads, and the general arrangement
is suddenly broken, and the whole per
formance disastrously ended. At last all
the eggs are successfully removed; the
dancer suddenly stops, and, without seem
ing in the least dizzied, by this dance of
twenty five or thirty minutes, she advances
to the spectators with a firm step, and pre
sents them with the eggs which are im
mediately broken in a flat dish to prove
that there is no trick about the perform
ance.
CHALK.-- oSt people looking at this
substance would take it to be a sort of
hardened white mud. Such is not the
case, as the microscope shows that it is
nt othing but the agglomerations of creatures
almost invisible. Bearing this in mind,
one is astonished at the power of organic
1 life, which can produce masses that form a
a rampart to the coast of England. Their
minuteness is such that a single visiting
card covered with a white layer of chalk
contains about 100,000 shells. These are
formed of carbonate of lime, and are so
small that 10,000,000 are required to weigh
a pound, and 150,000,000 to make a cubic
foot of the same material.
d __- --
r. PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
r TEETH TEETH! TEETHI
G- REAT IREDUDCTIOI
3, 130-GOLD AND PLATINUM SETS--33
e Usual oharge, $100.
S$1.5-ALUMINIUM AND 0TElER MATERIALS--15
Usual charge, $505).
e 12-GOLD PILLIINGS--t
R Usual chargoe0..
i-1-SILVER, AMALt*M A~ D GUILLOIS CEMENT
FILLINGS-Il.
n Usual charge, 13.
ie DR. G. A. BETANCOURT,
173 St. Joseph St., bet. Camp and St. Charles,
New Orlons., I.a,
Offers to insert sets of Teeth at the above prices, with
or without the extraction of the roots
Warrants the purity of all materials, as also the fit
ting of plates, stability and duration of fllings, as if
- paid the highest prices.
Extractions and other operations performed by means
ofanestheticagents. Toothache cured instantaneously.
ir Consultatton gratis Jy475 ly
d DENTIST .....................DENTIST
Df JAS. S. NAPP, D. D. S.,
r- 15 .............Baronne Street.............15
t, m375 ly New Orleans.
'd . . FGIEDIGCBS,
* DENTAL SURGEON,
l 1556..........t. Charles Street...........
d my9 75 ly Corner Girod.
D UD ABLE DENTISTEY.
r- Dr. J. H. MALONEY. corner of Josephlne and Camp
street., near Magsazie Market. respetfully forms hi
y patient and the publlo in general that he is Eormtig
e all operations appertaining to his profeseton lIn the meet
sientifi manner. Artificial teeth Inserted, with or
without etotlig the roots on a new plan. Old set
of teeth remodeled, and a perfect adaptation secured.
Teeth extracted without pain by the use of gee or
chloroform. Charges reasoenable. deS" 74 ly
of V B. OLANCASTZ,
Id ATTORNEY AT LAW,
BOOTS AND SHOES-HATS.
en uASUlAcTUanRR ANti DJALEII IN
ly BOOTS AND SHOES,
kT TUNKS, FALISES AND BAG8,
of
Fbe G SIWl AND AMERICAN,
of
5e and 101.-.....Cunal Stre....'.99 and 101
oott vsnw ORLFANs:
ch GEO. J. WAGNER,
n- Boots, Shoes and Brogans,
he Corner Ursuline and Dauphine 8ts.,
he N'ew Ozleans.
ch Erery descrlpt~oo of article in the Boot and Shoe
:Ine for Ladlie', entlomen's and (aaldren's wear con
se staonly on hand, end ofered at the lowest possibte
Sy pr:ers. ocl 3mn
O3 IIN FRIEL,
or Fashionable Batter,
re .54...........St. Charles Street.........54
Two doors from the corner of Grarier,
otr
ohe to Cm 15w oRLzuAs.
nd FOR SALE.............. ...FOR BALI
STAR PLAYING MILL ANVD L UM[BEE YARBD
O Corner Calliope end tampart Streets,
te 583 ,O per thousand feet CEIINIO. dajlered.
hI $11 0U per t.ouan-d feet E.W. BOAED, deIiverd
the Terms Cash NICHOLAS CONNELL.
I ,y5lcsm*
ISPLLNIEOUSADVIERTISEEENITS.
NEW ORLEAN8 MACHINERY DEPOT, s
166 Oraisvr and 17 Union Street,
maw oaLnSas.
CHAS. G. JOHNSEN, C. B. CHURCHILL,
Proprietor. Manager.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS,
Will tarnish Esmaiss said Pluae, and eontroot for the Di
Comeaertlasu ad roeteet f Hl nds a TI
chinery and Irna Work. Manauetuorer of
COTTON PRESSE8 AND COTTON GIN&S. n
Manubetuxers' Agent for
BLAKE'S STEAM PUMP% E
SEAPLUY STEAM E4GINUS.
STRAU'SS CORN AND WHEAT MILLS.
NrEW YORE RUBBER OO.' BELTING,
Ao lar telot aklway an dL which we will supply
to the tde st manoturezs' pree
Also Agents for the
RIADINE IRON WORKS.
A hll sappy eof their P awl sad otir Tubes is Stre.
Dealer in PIPE IrO T E. BRASS GOODS
MACHINISTB' ad E GIrEBB' SUPPLIER.
Send for Illustrated Coataloue sad Price List
nolt4i ly _
187E 1876,
Ar
'I! SOUTHERN STATES
Commencing February 26, 1876,
CO.TIVCING TEA" I; .IS,
I. N. MARKS, President.
SAMUEL MULLEN, General Supselltendeot
EECTIVE COXPOSITTEION L:
WILLA. BE BAELDWION, ChE FAIrman GROUNDS ;
JAMES I. DAY, W. B. SCHMIDT,
1 COL. J. D. HILL, JORN G. FLEMING.
It is the aim of the Board of Commissioners to make
k it a thorough Exposition of the Agricultural and
r Mechanical Products of the Southern States, Meaico
and Central America, but it will be open to competltors
throughout the country, and the general premium list
will embrace all articles comprehended in the general
O design of an Agricultural and Industrial Exposition,
including special premiumh for strictly Southern pro.
o ducts.
The Premium List, which is now in course of publ.
cation, will be on a liberal scale, and the rules will
provide for a just and impartial system of awards, by
competent and disinterested jurors.
The eair Grounds are generally conceded to be the
handsomeat4p the United Statee, comprising 120 acres,
within fifteen all"nde ride By street care from the
center of the city. The grounds are shaded by a
beautiful grove of live oaks, and the buildings, which
are of recent constructlon, are amply snlficient to meet
all the necessities of the most extensive exhibition.
The Racing Ceurse, which is used by the Louisiana
T Jockey Club at all its meetings, is justly famous
throughout the country, and the accommodations for
stock are unsurpassed.
It is the first time that such an enterprise has been
inaugurated at the South, and being held at a time
when the city of New Orleans is thronged with thou
h sands of visitors to participate in the festivities of the
t Carnival, it affora unusual inducements to exhibitors
if from every section of the country.
The Commissioners earnestly appeal to the people of
the Sthe outhef States to lend their aid and econagement
to the Exposition, and to make it In all respects a com
plete exhibition of Southern productions, and it is hoped
that manufacturers, producers and others in every
section of the country will participate.
Ample arrangements have been perfected for the
15 transportation of goods and visitors from every section
at reduced rates.
For detailed information, address
SAMUEL MULLEN,
General Superintendent.
oc3 3m No. 8.' Camp street, New Orleans
1 w. OnMo. use. aDA ounco
OFFICE OF
GREGG'S
GENERAL SEWING MACHINE DEPOT
Dr AND
is
PURCHASING BUREAU,
154................Canal Street............. .154
NEW ORLtnAs,
First.clas Machines of all kinds at oweat rates.
Second-hand Machines, in good order,s, half price.
The latest and best Attachments for all mochines.
Tuckers. Rlers, Corders., Binders, Plate Hemmers,
etc., etc. *
The beet Needles for all Machibnes.
The best Prepared Sewing Machine Oil.
The best Bewing Machine Silk and Spool Cotton.
We Repair all Machines at Low Rats.
We take Old Machines in part pay for New Ones.
Machines Rented at St Per Week,
and Rent applied to the purchuase of any Machine that
may be afterwards selected.
Sewing Machines, Pianos and Organs
Sold on Monthly Payments in the countey, to partle
giving references.
MRS. ADA GREGG
o0 Respectfully offers her service in PURCHAOING anod
FORWARDING any article of Apparel, Personal
Adornment or Domestic Goods for Ladies 'and C:hil
dren's une, includling Millinery, Dry Goods, Jewelry,
Fancy and Toilet Articles, Patterne. Underwear, Trim
mings, Bridal Troussoeaux.n eto., etc.
Any article of Ladies' and Children's Wear m·nufar -
Cutting and Fitting a speclialty.
Plain and Fancy Stitching done to order.
PAPER PATTEBRNS, of all the Latestt tnle~, re
oeived s soon as Iued, and for sale
D All the FASBION JOURNALS will be found on our
table.
Ceall and see uc, or write f.r circular anl <atnalogue.
ad Addrees,
GREGG'S PURCHASING BUREAU,
mh! 5 ly 154 Canal Sireot.
EDUCATIONAL.
ST. MARY's DOmINICAN ACADEMY, Ij
GREENVILLE,
Corner St. Charles and Broadway Streets,
New Orlseas.
This Academy, under the charge ot the Name of at.
Domnalc, ecoaples a beaeifnl site neear New Orlesee. 3M
The plan of instrctioea unitee every dvstage whiae P
nem oentrtbute to an ednoation at aes musd nd tr.
fned. e
Beard and Talton, per anoam.............. t0 00o
Mauie, Drewlag and Platltag rm extra charges. a
Bhoalse duties are resumed the let of kptember. l
mer further partleulare addreo
Doe 75 ly MOTHER PRIORNak
ICDUSTRIAL BCHOOL B
op
THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION, u
Thirty-Ninth and Pine Streets,
WEST TPRELADZE.PRIA.
This ltaetltatioe, eadueted by tfe ReCgllm e heo
Good helbherd, ha for Is ebjLc the tL .m el
pmu grle In habit. t pi m Lndeusry, Imepa-lag
Musd, 0:4ld mbrolderyand A·4 l llJesiU sk l lg
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
Corner of Common an Baorna streets.,
NEW ORLAl4.M
This Literary I titlutos Ioorpoated'ay the auto
ouisn arn d empowersed to ooUj te dege so sn
dusted by the Fathr of the So.ety of Jesus The bll
em ebard, entirety oat oea fom the street, is e e rd
reeatio so that, from the arrival of the pupil. e*
. a., till their depouture at a r. t., they are ooutly
saluded and euuperltendd.
The Oouee of Instruction Is threefold Preparatory,
Commercial and Cissial.r
m the PraSrtory Course Is for belginners.
The Commercial Counr I. ftr thhoe students who de
ot wiseh to learn Latin and G reek.
The Clisisca Couras I for those who desire to have e
oompleto educ oetion.
reanoc is ttought p the three e eourse.
Ita dent e notedmtted, unle they f know w to
ten arid write.
The mral end drelous tralning of the students Ie the
lemant object of the nromt uctore.
.very month e report is sent to ptreots, sthtina cn.
duet. progress rank in clsses.nd sttsndanoe.
The Pademlata ye roee Its or the flrst of October
mod loses towards the end of Jrly.
TERMS e
lEntraonc Fee, It.
pollegiate Courase payable In advance, and In Untied
States currency, two months, li0.
Preparatory Course. Its.
mhet a Iv ~or. F. OAr TREhLET. Presldes
MIlSCELLANEOUS.
MITCHELL'S
flIair S'ERIES OF GEOGRAPE.4I'SI.'.
PL:I.ISH1IEI) BT
J. Hl. BUrLER & CO.,
723 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Penn.
t OPINIONS OF THEIR MERITS:
Froe the Rev. Fatahr O'Ot nor, 8. 1, formerly Bishop
of reabrrg, I'ten.
c Baltlmore Loyols College. 8evt. . 1W69.
I have carefully locked over the enpy oi Mtesell'e
New Intermedliae Oeography which you left with me,
and tfind it to bhe mat excellent work.
From Very Rrev. ohe 8. ".. Prorincial Of the
I have looked over Mitchell' Now Intermediate
e eogrephy au find it worthy of the patronage of
A Ctholic schools and Collog"JOS. E. ELLE$, S
SFrom Rev. Brother Patribk, Provincial Christian Brofrc .
oh Manhattan College. N. Y., Jan. 7. 1870.
We have adopted Mitchell's New Series of Oeogra,
t ples in all our twhools in preference to 2 U others, a
we consider them the best and mot reliable text book.
i on the subject with whbh we are acquaited.
SROTHItR IATK;/CK.
us Prov. Christian Brthers.
or From the Redemptorists of Chicago, IF.
Sit. Michael's Church. April 20, I .
n Mitchell's Oeographlee have been to use in all our
schools or the lastefor years, and we are satisLied with
te hem in every respect.
We bsve used Mit1oell'e Oeogr phlcal o erles for a
of unmber of years, and consider them superior to any
ethers.
Froam Rev. GeO . I larki, Foud r, r nd Rector of Ate
,ore ,f thI Alorel Gu rdon.
House Angel GuardiaC , Boston.
rI My preference, ald that of all my teachers, s for
Mitchell's Geographles.
Fhe rom ris Grace., the MpH l Ree. Archbishop of Toronto,
We hereby approve of Mitchell's Geogrnphies, as
revsal by t. t- Kegrn, .sq, end earnerlly recom.
mend their use In our cobota
t JOHN JOBEPH LYNCH,
Arobbishop eat Toronto
We cheerfully ooncur In the oexellent roaommge
GeCoiephIa . l reviae anC carl cd i ygra. . a Keegn ,
a.om H0o J . U. LLERoo Sk.
oArbbishop of Yew York.
)T From Heis Grace, the Most Rev. Archbishop of nennat, O.
Clncinnate, Ohblo. July 3e 1871.
A s Mltabell' Oop aphie a e so highly appfovrd o
reoommend their use ooi in a our secto mn potereo e
toany other text books on the sujeJct.
54 Archbisop of Cininnati.
For terms of Introeneton, address as mat onvent
eont, the Publishers, or
M. R. KEEQAN,
se26 4m 45I Twelfth Street, Chigaue. Ills.
IRON COTTON TIES.
"ME ARROW TIE.
for Iale by all De.cers and Cru a:,[try Msrclan.u
throughout the Cotton SElater at
LO-'ESI MARKET A 'tP.ICEN.
R. W. RAYNE & CO.,
ed herera: Ased thie negrican Colleron Tie Co.,
o4- C onide tet rre t t, a
Fo C. C. JIAl ue'WELL,
s. . r, ,:ine Street .............4u
d 'LHL'M ou A ngD GA. , FITTER.
We herebyeanedve tttro u mpro.rm.ent. add~ dm
IU Lgh. eutrs Pe4daftche Pollsb!e Gfeord aphi.
vseoby e t.too l[it., ee,!ad dhoweras athindgsA pprrt.
and aydrrrt· fird up ero~Arllchb tne At cTls shorto*;
Wet ce on the erf l rtnhse tea emrm n.
CtnctnlnJIbbingproat: -, Ohio. J mas le
EDUCATIONAL.
JEFFERSON COLLEGE,
(s'. MAZfARr.J
PARISH OP ST. JAMES,. LA..
situated on the Mti . pp  Mver, Is aWel b
New Ooiema..
This anctest and mageleant stahblhmeak, tag.
perated by a law of the Legelahtare and omspwemd M
m-at dlploma and degrees. will epen oa TW1.
DA, Oetober 5th l5r5. It in *ander the uiea
of the Marts lathers, who oem a sletetn oelatyde.
voted t edad sttw. OIo age Pedat and OCaveat Lad
arseenesesat end re nuaridepla eephsee am eat
sis ndo taerelag frees New Ormans.
Tan
_Payable In U. S. eatrre harel-ayrty in aodv
leed, eliwea .:.killg a aytheto Per asts teof
, .e . moth.. ....
Deoasr's fewameen eee~dleine1* ieaiaey eaoeeo if M1
noe (ferll). po. . a.. . ............................
--enh Pettra an nm
Ontbe or Spanish...............................s
(ar Unie Chage -
Dwisi....... so
eeof soloohelApone n teiee..1
oli or Plane, with eo r of sat, 1per $
Ueni of t tvtue ot n td ete loseem. (Dol e*dl
oer warthern provided by w Ut1e l ]o~rMans 1P
N. B.-Aim endl oesee eao to be peall I ns w ow
to advance.
Hie Grace. the Most Roe. Anahhimh of How Oriem
The Rev. Cleots of Alidogs
For further detains, opal 6 te lb.so. Poogdont.d
she College, or to Graver street. Nw O eans.
Ord7 "I5 I y Ne. 1410 Gunvion mheeetMow Orleomo.
SPRING IULL COLLEGE,
(ST. JJEonR')EG
NEaR MOBILE, ALA.
Tbhie ings-eatablished lneasttltio. so e vrabiynte
to th. petopl o thoe outhL, will souter upon its 1mgai.
ifth ,uhoieatU year on
Wednesday, Ootobeor , 1875.
Wilth the old oadvantagen of a sound Otseeal aln
Comnmercial Eduontion, the Director, of the Co~l..
Tean now offer to their patrons the additwona odyle.
tagees f a firt-olnon building, entirely new, •nd inmoe
S8superior to the former Collegei n poInt Of veMintie,
armrngement and aooommodataon.
The Profeors being members of a Soeiety whibk
for throe hundred years has devoted Sitsef to th
Edceation of youth, have n their favor the grealt od.
vantage of long traditUonl espeorineo. Thbe dmUeato
Ithey prseim st g o ia par eupon elt.gionla.d MoralSt.
n aefor isaem, nr t ontly to adorn the mi.adof the
pupils with useful kuo8wledsh but aleo o instil ltat
their hearts the esteem of vtrtoe and a prtical le
for the duties they will have to discharg in nfter'-Ufa.
ThePan of Instructioon conssts of three priactpsl
Course : the Preparatory, the Ce d c.andth or.
merclaL. The Preparatlory course bats oxn y.er mad
Is Intended to prepare the younger students for a r
csase, either In the Cisseical or omnmercial wores.
Tho CLASSICAL Courms btats ail years, •ad ea
bracee all the branches of a thorough Collegiate ad
University Education. At the end of Bthe sith yean
hoe who give proofs of the requaisite knowledge in e
Greek and Latin languagee, and show euoinnit prod.
cloney in Mental and (uttral l'hllosmphy, COhbelery
and the higher branchee of Mathematics, are entitled
to the degree of . B. (Bachelor of Arte).
The Degree of M ter of Art (A. Mi.) is awrdd
thoe who devote a second year to the study of PhBlos
phy and Sciensem In the Colofge, or who have paesed two
yroIn the practice of a learnedt p~roteeic.
The COMMERCIAL Conuree beinve yearn, end
embraces all the brsnches usually caught in Coolerotht
h Colleges. The third year of thie ourecorresemonds to
the Aith and sith years of the Clasetcel eore.. The
Students attend lecturee in hatural Philosophy and
'm Chemnstry with the otenabers of the Graduating clams.
The age of adslusion i. from nine to fifteen emasi
and to be admitted one must prevtousiy know how tn
reed and write.
Tawns rean session O5 TCX MKtTIlO.
le Entrance Fee, firet year only...............I 1i 00
of Board, lultiaon as.d Waslting, payablo half yealy,
and in admvance ...............................VW 00
Medical Fees ..................................... 14 iO
Bed and edding ............................. 14 00
l" Cirnulars can be obtained by addreesing the
PRESIDENT OF ti';Up t) BILL COLLEGE.
as Near Mobil, Ala.
THE JESUIT FAT1IE)ID
is Corner Ilaronue and Common streets, New Orleans,
I'. POUESUNKE, Coliege Agent.
alc 1Jm iy 140 Grraver street. New Oi. oo-
ST. JOSEI'I'S ACADEMY FORl YOUNG LADIES.
3Condzucted by the Sisters of Charily.
tr Near Emmnitburg, Frederick County. Maryl.ad.
lb
Thls institution Is pleaentlyleituated in a heathy ed
plctoresque part of f roderrck county, Maryland, half a
mile from Emmithburg. and two miues from Meant It.
Mary's Coliere. It was cnmmenced In Itiii. and ioor.
ported by theiLeginlaturof Maryland I eli'. Th.
"baufdnil ao oonvenient and spacious.
The academitc ear is divided Inito two sees....o o' flie
months each.
Board aod Tuition per academic year, inrlud.lJ
Bed and Bedding, Washing, Mending a'i
or Doeror's fee..................................its, tf"
Z. J5. -for each ee.aao ........................... *2 St
ALL PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
to The Academic year idivlided Intotwo eflooe of eve
mouthe each, beginnianreepectivelyon ysthedr Monday
se of September and the firt of Vehrnsry.
n. Letters of Inquiry directed to the
MOTHER UtlP2E'lt
not 75 iy '4s. .eeob'ea Asoeedv Zasmjbhc. Md.
S T. ATANISLAUS COMMERCIAL COLLEGE
7 Ba St. Loui. M, men'n.
"Thin ieUtittlae, chartered by the State Legllattre,
i a ea t by the Brothers of the inoed emt,
a, has boon in onceeasfal operetatio elsc. 110$. Mooniit ly
situated on the shores of the of a. eoemmediag ea onion
at,. view of the Guf mad fserdg ualll. W dtmh ad
edoftthe sorbors and Isthlng ltoh4e$ ammer SttUie
did location toee greet incitement beohoalthMu 6218hetm
sad amusement or the pupils. The Cemmoreril oenr
Of eamptieoe all ane hsonahe of a rgood Englieh odifiadsae
nomed and Tultnoa, per enouoa. payable hal yeoaty
se &mg ldIre ....n ..........:.....................9
Be Wa.sig. per a , teon. . .................. .IS
, ,sion. . ............. 0 0
Doctors mes......th........................... 00u
Vacatiea,tif mpoit at thetlnetlintlen............n s.1O
KITUA OAa-aevrt
ci Planoeand Violin, per month, ccch...............6000
Use of Piano, persouth........................a Sit'
Pluto. per month ................................. 430
er'ae eaetrscit, per month ......... . 1i't
Speanih end Gemna languageo., pe metath. ws.. 0
For further partionlaoo, apply to
1i20. FLORIMOTD,
my 'T. lv Dhre-tee of the Gelee"
in DERTAKERS--UILDERS.:-PAINTERS.
F." JOHNSON,
Undertafker',
205 and 207".. .. Mnsaloe Street;.... '205 and30
hoew Orlense.
Akll kinds of Metallic Cesa and Caoketa, Eoeewood
Mhlaozany and l'lodo Cofins.
Fine 'Larrtegee foJr hire at all Slumce. ct i+
U-.'tDLEJI.T.! Kf El,
.. '............hi A(J AZSNF. STIIET ........
Corner Ilelord, Idow Omieanc.
hieiaiiiv, Mahogany. ]Black WaIneot and P~ten CoMine
alwaysottl hand. Bumdte lfmthalned, or l;'l.Inlqndl
and carefully Shihpped. Fun,- ale atteaided t. In per
son iby the Propr-iet-or.
spin 7 ly CIFI~ AlAll t(iK Tfi lftRE.
J LINCOLN nue g
" REMOVES ALL, KflNWo OF PIBU]IDinGS.
AllI oomunnniftlonsenhoeld beao ddreeaod te Be 1OS,
Macimanice and T.raderes EzohangO, nader at. mjnariee
Hotel. Now Orlenom.
- entry a, dere urm~tlvaile to mcl 1o Iv
A[ -. KREINAR THOU. WH1TE.
PRF!A O¶"IOAL. CL.DERS,
1 ' Cusatomhbouee street, near Royal,
e Loeklng Glane end Plir Pqmeo,.Plan a endOma
oftel. mede to erden', Nogleding deoin Uthe vos bsl
ad stye. 01 Palting.• euser oiledzolonaoinee
enforty baeer In thhis qity, the hope to IPe saleeee
anto theltr cmuetmers, aret only In. the eopetom. quatay 01
hothet.r work. bet likewise in theimo O oheomlgo.
set . f-TkegotrOnafe of the trinde eollcited. lIMnteS
f ani"S .'ysF •O m '

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