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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, September 03, 1876, Morning, Image 5

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g Star and Catholl Messenger.
OgLUAMS. lnAT. SBPThMBZR a sae.
MEMORY.
Srong that power. whoe setrange control
And bide the waesvu of oocean roll
in their alppoilnt o nre;
Be pewe el are the tlee that bled
The enna of Chlldhood to the mind;
SO flhmli to the hears sberee
The memory of departed years.
Wienc Is thie peson in the breu at t
That when the psat we s view
And thinh on plesene one poseeted,
n Fancy's lfaireet colore dresseed
Those plea.tras we renew I
And why do Memory's pains Imrart
A pleasing sadness to te heart I
What potent charm to all endears
The da3e of our departed yearst
tie; many a rose-bd blonoming gay,
LEgO's opening path adornse
Bit ell who tread that path will say,
That 'mid the floweres that strew its way
Are amrs's coroding thorns.
Yet still the boseom will retain
Afeotion even for bounr of pain;
And we can smile, though bithed in tears,
At memory of departed )ear,
'Tie distane, our bewildered gaze
On former seens begulilee,
Ani hNemoy's charmse thes ee b etr.
For while esnJoemronts telspm, yI
Androbes t e p it ia emite,
s flatte rine mnrror proves untrue,
Conoels the sorrow from our viewo
And hides the grief the doubts ant fears
That darkened our departed years I
l ime, when our osn. we oft dcesple-o,
When gone. lie iou deplore o T
SeNor til tihe , eting moment des
)o mortals learn Ite worth to prine,
When it returns no more
For this. en anxious look we cft,
With fond rtgret. on hours long past
For thli. the feellng heart reveres
The memory of departed yeers.
gas Of NATCUl X -Peter'a esce, 1876.
ection for the Pope in the Ortave of 58.
and Paul:
an........... .............................4a
S..........................................3
Spig ............................. ...I 3 50
e a............. ............... . e ......... i
.prines ........................... 500
. ......COy
r Vlley e..............................335
..,....................................40 4.1
burg .........................................47 45
fher placee not yet heard from.
gust 30, 1876.
J. OSEPH' COrYEI T, CORNER ST. PHILIp
GOLvIZ STREETr.-On the Feast of the
vity of Mary, 8th of September, at 10
ook, A. a., will take plaoe, in our little
pel, a oeremony of religious profession. The
will also be given to five candidates. We
eatly desire the presence of the friends of
the newly received Sisters and the other
hore of our Community.
SoIao a L. 8., Superior.
remarkable case of longevity, says the
h Medital Journal, is reported In Virchow's
hives," by Dr. Oanstein, of Athens. The
George Stravaridee, died in Smyrna, at
e of 132 years. Although this Methuse
always lived an irregular life, and had
aed an average of more than a hundred
of brandy daily, he retained full pos
of all his five senses, as also a complete
teeth, up to the moment of his death.
continued to the last to attend to the
of his avocation-a baker. This man
rn in 1l43, in the reign of Mahomed I.,
ved daring the reigns of nine Sultans.
So F RETURNING PBOSPXRITY.- Wiahing
ugeot 24 -All the returns for the last
ear having been received from the Cos
onees, the chief of the bureau has just
ad a statement showing in detail the
ties and values of articles imported into
ported from the United States during
t year as compared with that imme
y preceding. The figures are as follows:
e eythe oi aahr
1875 17C6.
domestic, gold ralun..419 te5i 10 Ps toS.47
iforeign ............... 1.r r611 14.u1 424
..........................13 419,711 540 34 671
.................... .33,0t5,43 6 460,711,190
of exports over imports-1876.........9 643.S
of imports over exports-1875 ........ 19 560.,795
Krearseitung discusses the fact that the
i Empire is obliged to import yearly
5 to the value of 120,00.000 marks ($10,.
). It attributes this increase in the im
of food to the impoverishment of the
lders and farmers. Their Increasing po
makes them more and more unwilling to
ake branches of husbandry that demand
e outlay of capital. Hence an increase
turage, which is less productive in the
on, but is considerably lees expensive
griculture. Thearea under tillage has
erably decreased within the last five
hopes of Christian France are in the
population and in the rising generation,
thanks to the liberty of teaching, are as
nuorrupted. Since the fall of the second
there has been a gradual improvement
moral condition of the large cities; for
itself has always been Christian in
which fact is illustrated in the extraor.
revival of practical religion, in the
es crowded with men--in the numerous
ages to make reparation to God for the
and I:lasphemies of theage. The cityof
while the recognized seat of art, litera
d science, after the disasters of Sedan
e Commune, realized the fact that her
ry h~d ceased and that she was to be
ted no longer to dictate politically to the
2O0 of French citizens outside of her
•24th July, at Peiskretcham, Silesia, there
an assembly of the parishioners for the
of hold an election for a parieh priest
rdiug to the May Laws. The assembly
been convoked by the provincial anthori
at the reqoest of ten (!) "Catholics," who
dissatisfied at finding themselves without
inistratious of a parish priest, although
5 there was one they do not appear to have
availed themselres of his services. The
question put to the meeting was, whether
would proceed to the election of a parish
t. There were 330 noes, and only 6 ayes
ther four pious men did not appear at all.
ere are no clergy in the plaee this is
y an expression of lay opinion, and as
OUght to centeot the national Liberal
RBLIGION IY POLITICB.
BOW A OEORGIA CONSTITUIENC VIZWS THE
QUESTION.
The Augusta, Georgia, correspondent of
the Savannah Oro"s, under date of August
21st, writes:
Early in the present year an anti-Catho
lic combination was inaugurated in Augus
ta, by a few white demagogues, who fan
cied they could drag themselves into noto
riety by inducing some ignorant whites
and a few deluded negroes to league them
selves together, in order to oppose the re
ligious and political interests of their Ca
tholic fellow-citizens. Scarcely any notice
was taken of their organization, from the
fact that the members were of a class whose
social and political standing in the com
munity was not considered much until
brought into the political arena at the pri
mary election on the 12th inst., headed by
one, who, to his shame be it said, had been
sustained in office for years, by the honest
sunffrages of his Catholic fellow citizens.
For several years the county of Rich
meond has been well and ably represented
in the Lower House by gentlemen of the
highest attainments, and the people knew
that men, whose abilities were so well
tested in the past, were the best selection
they could make to guard their interests in
the future. The anti-Catholic element
thought they wou'd oppose the nomination
of these gentlemen on the plea that one was
a Roman Catholic. How well they sue
ceeded we will see from the records.
Never in the political history of Rich
mond have the people acted with more
magnanimity or with a firmer determina
tion to crush that contemptible spirit, en
gendered as it is, from the drossy dregs of
Radicalism, and it is to be hoped that the
shameful defeat given to the leaders of
this faction at the primary election may
teach them a salutary lebson, it they will
only take cognizance of it. The Catholic
candidate received thirty-one out of forty
conventional votes, and was nominated by
acclamation by the convention; while the
standard bearer of the anti-Catholic faction
received nine votes, and these through the
influence of his colleagues. Notwithstand
ing the fact that this anti-Catholic leader
had the confidence and support of the ma
jority of voters in the county-prior to
this canvass, yet, so obnoxious were the
principles of his party in this contest, that
he could not get the support of his nearest
friends.
Every artifice that low canning could
devise was arrayed against the Catholic
candidate by his unworthy opponent, in
order to spring an issue between thorough
Democrats on account of religion, and the
old hobby was resorted to, of course the
bigots adopting the motto-" calumniare
audacter, semper aliquid adhaerebit.-" l1
boldly, some of it will stick."
This seems to be the fiast instance, at
least in the South, in which this new-issue
of Radicalism exerted its influence (if it
really has any, I think it would take a Don
Quixote to find it out) against the well be
ing of the Catholic people, and it may be
well for these deluded hirelings to know
that their future efforts in that direction
will, as they have in this instance, signally
fail.
Their leader now sees the injustice he
attempted to inflict on a body of citizens
who had been his best friends, and he sees
also that in accepting the political doctrines
of a party, whose principles are antagonis
tic to American freedom he must necessa
rily accept the ignominious defeat brought
about by such partnership.
The people of Richmond have determin
ed, like true Americans, that a man's reli
gion shall not debar him from filling the
station which true merit assigns him. I
presume therefore that this defeated leader
will never again raise an issue among the
people of Augusta that is not more worthy
of their consideration than the religious be
lief of an honored citizen. I trust he will
act with more prudence the next time he
solicits the suffrages of an honest people
He is already penitent, and says he was
led into the mire by friends. This may be
so. He says he will never again be en
snared into wrong-doing by fanatical lead
ers, and I don't think he will because
"burnt child dreads the fire."
A Magnificent Spectacle that was seen from the
Deck of an Ocean Steamshlp.
(Sunday Mercury.)
Capt. Kengut, of the steamship State of Penn
sylvania, from Liverpool, reports that at about
3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th inst., while
the steamship was in latitude 4d* 50' north.
longitude 490 Sc' west, the cry of "sail ahead !"
came from the sailor on watch. In an instant
all eyes were turned to the horizon, where a
large white object, apparently a vessel under
full sail, was outlined against the cloudless sky.
As the steamer gained upon it, it was seen to be
an iceberg. The night was clear and illumi
nated only by the faint light of the stars. Tow
ering fully 150 feet above the sea, and sweeping
majestically onward in the current, the iceberg
gli tered like a huge diamond as it reflected
back the faint light of the stars above, and bor
rowed an additional charm. The iceberg had
evidently been subjected to the heat of the
sun's rays for some time, because, to quote the
Captain's expression, " it appeared to be liter
ally rotting away," chunck alter chunk, and all
perforated with crevice, from which miniature
rivulets were streaning, became detached from
the main body of the iceberg, tumnbled down ite
sides with a loud. crackling noise, and dsap
peared in the depths of the ocean.
To the north of this iceberg were many
smaller ones, forming a very pleasing picture.
This group of iceberge lay directed in the track
of the steamer, and she was conseq,enrtly
obliged to make a detour in her course to avoid
them. They were safely passed, however, and
had almost ceased to be a topic of converea
tion among t' e passengers, when word
was again sent from the sailor on watch
that another iceberg was visible on the
larboard bow. This iceberg was fully
twenty miles off, but was such an im
mense one that it could be distinctly seen
from the deck of the steamer. It had a wild,
unearthly appearance, and looked for all the
world like a mountain that was rent and torn
by fissures and chasms. It was tipped with
snow which sparkled in the beams of the
morning sun so brightly as to render a good
long look at it exceedingly painfal.
One of the most interesting things in the
Holy Land is the fact that one meets every
where in dally life the things that illnustrate
the word of the Lord. The streets of Jerusa
lem are very narrow, and no one is allowed to
go oat without a light. Throw open your lat
ticoe in the evening, and look out; you will see
whabt seem to be little stars twinkling on the
pavement. You will hear the clatter of san
dals as the late traveler hastens along. As
the party approaches, you will see that he has
a little lamp fastened to his foot to make his
step a safe one. In an instant the voloe comes
to your memory, written in that same atty
three thousand years ao: "Thy word is a
lamp to my fees ·ad a light to my path."
Dr. Tatt's etsotereat.
H"u the great Author of nature provided no
remedy fot consumption end the disusese leading
tbereto HaN he Ioft usa withoul en relief from that
fatal soourge f No It is not so. Da Ttur's xrPc.
TOrAer. formed by clemiaol extracts from roots, barks
and lheves, relieves all cas of consumption, and
effootuallf cures it wbon it has not proersd so far as
to be beyond cure-relieves the moot inveterate cause
of Asthma, stops raming of blood, and removes every
hind of affetion of the lungs The remarkable efcacoy
of this medicine bos excited among pbyselotas great
coriosity au to the nature of its lngrediento.
Ordinary Notieso of Marriagejr and Deaths wiU, hearester
be inscrted for iftly olen. Obilotaries ill be charged
at the rate of ten cent a line.
MARRIED:
DEVEREUX-DUNNINtG-On Tuesday, August 22,
1i8s;. at the Chuerh of St. Ifuse de Limas by the Rev.
F. Mittelbroun, Juohn f. Devereux to Mrs. Amanda
Dunning, daughter of J. C. Van Wiokle, E.q.
COLLINiS--FOLEY-On Truesdai, August 8 1870 at
St. Joseph's Church, by the Rev Father Doyle, Daniel
Colliln to Mliy Ellesn roley, aoth of this city. No cards.
DID:
GIBNEY-On Friday, September I. 1876 at7 P an.
Mrs. Catherine Giboey, wife of Jame. Gibney, aged 69
years, a native of county Waterford, Ieeiand, and a
resialdent of this city for the last forty-fve years.
Her funeral will take place from her lete residence,
No 57 Elysian Field, street, at halflpust 3 o'clock, . u
Saturday, September 2. Toh frinds of the family and
those of her sons in law. Was Hannon end Peter Mar.
key, are re-pe, fully invited to attend.
Galveston papers please copy.
ELLY-At Sialpbhur Springs, Mdallon Counly'
Miss., Augdet IS. IS C1 Ellen Noa rKelly (maiden name
MFtavatrlckl, aged about sreveny.six years, born Io the
townlaed of Suttaclogber patis of Drumlaue, County
Cavan, Irreand. R I P.
BONNET-On Tuesday, Auaust L9 1676 at s A. It ,
J. A. E. Bonnet, aged -vetnty yrers and f.ur moiths, a
native of Bordeaux. Frace an d a resident of Now
Orleans for over fortycfive yea a.
KA--On Thursday. August 1), l7t6 at 9t A. A ,
after a loEg andl painful ai, s. , Thmaas Kerr age
fifty six years, a nailve of County Louth. Ireland. and
a eeidnt of this city for the eist twentyflve years.
ROMAN-On Tuesday morning. August 29. 76 l at
So clock. Charles Roman. aged rftl-nine years, eldest
son of tile late Gov. A. B haoman.
KENNEY--Ou Saturdsy. August no, 174l at ten
minutes to 3 o'clock, Mr. Thomas Kenney, a netive of
UCatle Punktet. County Roscommon, Ireland. aged
si0xtvthra years and a resident of this city for the
last thiaty yeats.
-CHNEIDER--n Monday. August 08. 1876, at 5 a.
n.. of apoplexy, on the train, near Usyka Louis
cbhneider. aged forty-two years seven months and
eighteen days.
CARTIHER-On Wednesday. August 30, 1876, at 8:30
A. N, Dr. Jules Mars Cartier aged fifty-six years. a
native o France, and a rtsadent of New Orleans for
thirty years.
JACOB OTT,
BUILDER,
2M9 Magazine Street, Corner of Calliope,
Stores, Counting Houses and Dwellings Fitted VU
with Dlsaptch. Jobbing promptly attended to.
Casterns made end repaired.
All orders for work left at the Office, 29 Magasins
street, or scnt through the Poetoffice, promptly at
tended to. de'i975 ly~p
DR. CHARLES E. KELLS
DR. M. VIET,
DENTISTS,
12.... . D.. Dauphine Street ............12
First door from Canal.
saw onLanae.
Teeth extracted without pain, under the Influence oL
NITROUS OXIDE GAS. mht26 ly5Sp
THE MOUNT CARMEL SCHOOL FOR BO8S.
(now entering on its twenty-seventh session,) will re.
oeive pupils on the First Mooday in September.
Terme made known at the School, No. 613 Magazine
street. between First end Philip streets.
Reference, the first in the city. ee3 4t
JOHN F. MARKEY,
(SucceOsor to Thomas Markey,)
UNDERTAKER,
40,42 and 44...Claiborne Street...40, 42 and 44
Opposite the Market.
Paten Metallica Burial Cases. Mahogany, Black Walnut
end Plain Coffins always on hand
FUNERALS attended to by the Proprietor tn person,
who hopes, by strict attention to busLneas, to obtain a
shAre of publi pa3tronage.
CAR,RIAGES FOR HIRE. J•93 76 IySp
SPECIAL NOTICES.
THE FRIENDS OF FATHER GLEESON ARE
reepectfnliy invited to attend a Solemn ilgb Mass. on
FRIDAY, September 8th, at 8 A. x, at St. Patrick's
Church
ST. ALPHONSUS' ORPHAN ASYLUM IS TO
open September 9th. Any aid towards furnishing this
Asylum will be very gratefully received. I)onations
in Furniture. Bedding, Groceries, etc, for this chart
table institution may be sent to the Asylum, on
Washington street. opposite St. Joseph's Cemetery.
0c3 tf
HALL BRANCH NO. 3--HIBERNIAN BENEVO
lent Association-New Orleans, July 8. 1876-Tbe regn.
lar monthly meeting of this Branch will be held NEXT
TUESDAY EVENING. September 5th. at 7+ o'clock.
Members are requested to be punctual.
By order. PHIL McCABE, President.
JOHN McCAFFREY, Secretary. It
THE I8STERS OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
have constantly on hand RIAADY-MADE CLOTHING
FOR SALE. Plain and Embroidered Under-Linen for
Ladiee; Fine and Coarse Shirts; Plain ones and Over
alls for Laboring Men and Mechanics. All substan
tially made and at low prices. no007 75 ly
HALL MRCIIANIIrS' AND WORKINGIEN'S
Central Council.--Hooks for the enrollment of all
Mechanlca and Labolcro of this city who are in want
of employment, sud the number of their tamtrlies de.
pendent upon tbo,n for support, are now open at the
shop of the President at No. I Ih Carondelet atreet, near
Poydras. All mechanics and laborers out of emplay.
moot arc reolueLtcI to coma at oncr and enroll their
names P. (iRANZIN, President.
JOHN TAYLOR. Acting Secretary m) 14tf
Sr. ALPIHONSUS TOTAL ABSTINENCE ASSO
clation.-The regular mounthbly meeting of this Aenocla
tion will be Lold THIS (Sunday) EVENING, at 4
o'clock, in St. Alphon.;os Hall, St. Andrew street, be
tween Magazine and Conatance streets. A full attend
ante is requested.
Gentlemen wisbing to become members are cordially
invited to attend.
D. It. IICCKLEY, President.
J. H. HESLIN, Secretary. It
'. JOHN TIE BAPI'IST CATHOLIC TOTAL
ABSTINENCE ASSOCIATION. - The officers and
members of the above Auociation are hereby notified
to attend a regular monthly meeting TLESDAY,
September 5th. at 7I P. M., in St John'a Schoolbhose.
Gentlemen desirous of becoming members are Invited
to attend.
By order : M. D. GARDNER, President.
THOS. W. CURLEY. Secretary. It
ST. ALOYSIUS TOTAL ABSTINENCE CADET
ASSIOCLATION.-The regular monthly meeting of this
Association will be held in the Star Hall. 116 Poydraa
street, corner of Camp, THIS AFTERNOONN (Sunday,
Sept 3, 187l), at I o'clock. Every member 1a expected
to be preeeat.
Boys wishing to Join are invited to attend.
WM. J. DIVINE, First VIe Pr. Lt.
C. F. RENOCB, Beretart. 1i
YOUNG LADIES' ACADEMY
LTIDER THU DbmtemC OV
THE UBBULINEB,
TWO MILES BELOW NEW ORLEANS.
Thils Inttutilon. which the inhabitante of Loutalena
and the oaJcent states have kindly favored with their
patronsge for more thai a century. needs no particular
recommendation to be introduoed to public notioe; it
will therefore suflire to give an oullhne of the plan of
education puresued by the Tntoresees of this Esteabibh.
-ent.
MORAL EDUCATION.
The objeot coneteotly kept to view by the Ladles it
the adorning of their poup.'' minds with knowledge
and the forming of their hearts to virtue Tn accustom
them toe polite and amiabl de portment, as well as to
habite or idnstcrv. order and metnetus. They are over
snffered to go bIeyood tile reach of a watehful hot ma
tedsrei oiptln:e.enue.r, wehoee viglance aecures the
preoervadtio of muorle and the willing observaneti of
the rulIe l'tbir.gt the memtoem of thise Community
are c elusively lO.tholhet pup.ls or ell denomlnatione
are amittld eand no Intorteien a is used upon the
score of re.laion, but for tie sake of order ll are
equally required to selit at the reerolen of Divlne
Worhi ab p.
PIIYSiICAL EDUCATION.
The health of the pbtil is en object of unionterrupted
solicitude for the Lalles. Particular attention is said
to their food which lisalwae wholeeome snd abuodant.
The hours of relaxation ae so distributed throughout
the day, that neither tae mind nor the bodr of the
eudnt sutors from their application to their classical
dohtls.
Wheo sick, they are always attended by one of the
Ladles. If necessary. the Ptbylctin is in immediate
attendance. end timely otios tis given to their parente
or guardians
TDITION.
The system of instruction embracea the followin
oocTet. The English end French languages, planlu sand
ornameotal Writing Arithmetic, Geography, the use
or the Globes, Historye (nclent nd mdlero) ey theiogr I
Chronology Englith ie d Fretich Literature, Astrun
omy, Natural Philosnphy, Rtay and ch:iemistry are
taught in the highler cl se. LDrewing, Psitein.l in the
varione str en, Water,,lllr. nl'ati, and on Velvet etO
Artlflcial Flnwetis plalil nd ornamentaull Needle Wok,
etc.
Particular eattenton ie paid to Ineloo.
- TERMS:
The echo'avtic veer. of 1.n monlhl and a half,. oom.
metloce on ti. itd of Nocuiebor snd ends hbout the
middle of Septem her.
Board end Tuition, per serehi,, 124i,; payable is
Edveno;o the firest ter in November. the mec.
ond end third in Febrlary nd In Juone. nach..6I) 00
Day Scholarn, per sesion, sIs, payable to ad
ailtos each term ............................. 46 Co
Entreance for the Boarders ........................ 7 00
Entrence for the I)Day Scholars ................... t l
No deduction ise made for theoe who are withdrewn
before the end of a lerm. nor for accidental absences,
nor for thee who prolong vcation time beyond the
appointed day for their return.
EXTRA CHAROES.
Stationery nd use of Maps nd Globes, per term. 0 00n
Music. per mneath................................. It 00
For the use of Muiecal Instrumente. per month.. S 00
Drtwtng. including paper asd pencils, per month S o0
Artifinial leere, per term...................... 0 0o
Washing. per month ....... ...... . ...... c
Expenses for thebathlng season.................. 4 no0
Ordinary Ifirmry expenes ..................... 1 00
Books necessary for the dirent classes may be fuor
niched by the parents thee elves, or procured at the
establlsbhmnt at beokielluls prices.
DRESS ANi FURNITURE.
No particular dres is required except on Sundays
and Tbursdays on which deays the young ladles must
have, in winter, a blue mellon dres nnd cape with a
black belt, ad in summers white dress and cape, blue
belt and ribbon.
EBoo young lady must he provided with twelve
changes of linen. twelve pocket handkerchiefs, twelve
peair of stokings, eight towels, eight tablanpklns,
one black slIlk apron. a white veil, three pair of sheete,
two mosqulto nets eix and a half feet high, two large
bags of coarse linen, two smaller ones, a sun bonnet,
three cambrloor Jaconet capes, having the rufcme edged
with lace onei inch wide. The cepes as else the rufles
worn with the winter uniform must be made according
to the model adopted by the erstablishment. All the
above mentioned artliles marked with indelible ink.
A silver speon and fork, a knife snd silver tumbnhler, a
mattres five end a haeir feet long by two and a quarter
wide, bolster, two blnnkets, a quilt, a pillow two feet
long end one foot sod half wide with sin pillowcases,
a weeh bowl end pitcher, a small bucket, a toilet glass
with drawer, locak nd key a little chair, and smell
work box slso with lock and key.
OBSERVATIONS.
Vislts are limited to Sundays and Thursdays ceclu
riotl., sod can only be made to the popils by their
atehrs, mothers, guardians, brothers, sisters ; nd on
the above-mentioned days the parlors are opened only
from ten In the morning until noon, end from bhalif.past
twelve until half past four In the evening. The young
ladles are forbidden to receive frults or other delicacies
at the parlor.
There is a yearelI vacation, which commenoes sboot
Ihe middle of September, and ends on the 3d of Novem.
ber. Parents are reqluesated not to prolong that time in
order that the young ledies may resume their studies
on the same day. Nio other absence is ever slhowed
except in cate of sickness.
Young ladies wishing to make their first eommunlon
in the establishment must enter in Nfovember.
sa3 3m"
S-r. JOSEPHI'S CONVENT,
Corner of St. Philip end Galvez.
The re-o:ening of the Scholastic .Snesvion will take
place on the fibth of September.
Parente who have a slcre desire for the succes Of
their children are earnestly solicited to send t'om at
the fixed t me.
BAY ST. LOUIS.
Two Sisters of this Academy will remain In the city
until the i0th, to receive and take under their oharge
those pupils whose parents will he unable to eccomp nmy
them at the etaled time.
They will return to the Bay by the first train on the
IIth of St pl'mber. .e3 tf
LEEDS' FOUNDRY,
iEetnllisbed in 182,)
Corner of l)elord and Fonoeber Streets,
NEW OHI.aANe.
We ate prepired to manufacture Steam Enginee.
Ro:lins. Sugar Mill Suoger Kettles. IDraining M
chines, Saw Mill., Cot.tn lreseee, Neell rccrews.
(in lGearing. P'onice Miuiiin. Grate luare, Judson'e
G evlernor end eall hinds of Piantation and it.n lnbost
ine. Ont every d.lsori piile of Machinery for the South.
We l... ' t., c.il e;.i(Il attentlon to our large stock of
Siu:tr i tile.el. it i.,g prclhasued the entire etock of
the '.ta,.-r Ir,,n Works of Ten eesoe. for which Mr.
E. F. L,.Vlii,.iivrr e w, fourmerly agent, land the only
retillil. In"., .at. Kliile In the ertet,) we offer thlbe
l,,. I.,, -tea col as thoseof o Oir own manufaclure,
st ,t,li,I "rt i.', i,.eo lilts of which we will he pleased
to, lllltn nii l l o l, spy, tiill
-. 70 ly IEEI)S & 010.
tEI'LENiSIi YOUR WARIIJROHE
B. T. WALSHE'S.
Ceol X-Il{T. hidher White or Fancy, at VI 50l, 60,
.lli '5al, 'l 5, 5-eah.
l[di (lezee UNDKERSHIcTS, all stres. Sr. f~sc nd
In elte aOsze IDRA WEltS.q tiahlly low
Pinoet Silk UNIIEIt GAtHiKN'ErI, all e.
Cartwriiht & Warner UNDKR GAMEN I d.
bliiosL Liole Threid UNDERit (-AItktE.NTS
laziiV HALF hlOsK. 6t to $. per doin.i.
Wilite or l'r,iwn IiAO .V HiiO . I per dox.n.
i.ALlinllG;AN H(IIERY. onerlom to tinoot.
bilk end Gjngham UMItLILUbkt. irw ay itt.
-In fact -
EVERY ARTICLE USUALLY FOUND
-- Inn-
Gentleman's Furnishing Establishment,
Low Prices.
Pertllolsr tttrltion called Io re nt errlval of ALL
LNdEN otlillui, ot Iti per dosen, as wel as the
varled eauortment of
FINE COLORED 81IIRTS
OF TlE NEWEST MATERIALS AND PATTERNS.
NEW 8TTLER OF
Collars, Cuffs and Summer Neck Wear,
Receivd weekly at
B. T WAL8HE'8.
ItO Ursl seet, sear M. b e.
sunJue te lespeeffisa sedswrews.
HAVING BEEN SUCCESSFUL
WITr OlE
CLEARING-OUT SALE
FOR THE LAST TWO WEEKS,
WE HAVE CONCLUDED To CONTINE' THIE SAME
For One Week Longer
AT
LEVY BROTHERS,
No. 580 Magazine Street,
As the seauon has considerably advanced, and one
of oar firm belog at present in the principal markets
to make preparations for our
FALL PURCHASES,
AND OUR PRESENT STOCK OF GOODS
BEINQ TOP LAROE
FOR THIS TIME OF THE SEASON,
WE WILL THEREFORE OFFER
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Spring and Summer Goods
AT AND
BELOW COST PRICE,
FOR ONE WEEK LONGER,
IN ORDER TO
REDUCE OUR LARGE ASSORTMENT
Or
PIQUES,
GRENADINES,
BAREGES,
LENOS,
LINEN LAWNS,
AND EVERYTRIINO ELSE.
We will soon be receiving a heavy stook of
FLANNELS AND W'OOLENS,
'here're will sell balance of our stork of hsat year
AT LESS TIIAN COST.
DO NOT FAIL
To Give Us a Trial
DURING THIS VWEEK.
LEVY BROTHERS,
5s m - a WaZr hINLA.
CATHOLIC NATIONAL SERIES.
Readers and Bible History.
By Right Rev. Richard Gilmour, D. D., Bishop a
Cleveland.
PRIMER, 6 oeats. BIBLE HISTORY, 60 Od.
FIRST READER, 5S eta. THIRID READER. T Ots.
SECOND READER. 40ota. FOURTH READER, 1I.
FOINTs OF irPEROA'lr)lIT.
The literary haracter and thoroughly Cathollo toes
of the lessons.
The easy and netoral grading of the series. ead tie
generel adaptation to the demands of the sehoel.
room.
The mooanloal execution. tcludinlg the quality of
the paper, the type, the binding. and the beauty and
eumber of the illustrations.
The Catholic National Readers
have met with a most cordial reception from those
entrusted with the educatio f o our Cathelio yoath.
We give here the names of a few who have endorsed
the series. For a fill list of Testimonials we refer to
our School.Book Clrcular.
The Most Rev. Archbibhop of St. Louis.
The Most I.ev. Archbishop of Oregon.
The Moat Rev. Archbibhop of Now Orihena
The Right Rev. IlBhop of Albnay.
Covinegto.
Alton.
S " Ve etMiret.
S tt yaiintb. Cnada.
The Very Rev F. M. efo,. Cleveland.
Rev. WaIltr I. trll. a.J.. Si. Louis.
Rev. . N. rteinshult Provincall. Leytot.
Roe. Joseph Wlr(hb. C 88.K., New York.
Iteo U Puts, Napoleon. O.
R1ev. Vaatel. Pro. Ieoalaiore d BSte. There.
Momntreal, C(anada.
The XavSriean Irnthere Industrial bSchool, Car
roll P. O.. Md.
Staters of Notre Dae. Mliwaukee.
W. K elany. ieq . Eie. Pa.
J. O Itanrret. Eaq , Principal E. E. C. School,
Detroit.
The Urul.ue Sisters, St. Louie,.
Sister Nepomuene. St Mary's. Pa.
F.M. Gates. Esq.. Fort Soha ler, N. T.
The Catholic Press
Brownonu'e Quarterly Review,.
lhe Cathollo ieoord.
The Cathollo Review.
The Boston Pilot.
The Ciuncinsali Teletraph.
The Catholic Standard. et, oec.
Cateohisms.
Father Maller'sr New Seres of Catechisms of Christla
Doctrine.
No. I.-For Beginner.s, 8 cents.
No. -For Parochial and Sunday schools, IS cta.
No 3.-Fur the Family and Students. 60 oents.
These Catechibms are published with the approbe.
tion of Most Rev. J. Roosevelt Bayley, D.D.. Arah.
bishop of lBaltimore, Md. They are also approved f(
by the Archbishop of Milwaukee, and the 5i1shope of
Wheeling. Wilmlnton. Galveston, P.ichmond, St.
Paul, Maryesvlle and Savannah.
Penmanships.
RIOIITMPER'S AMERICAN SYSTEM OF.PEN.
MANSJIIP. In Thirteen Numbere. Per dosee
Si cents net.
KNOPPI' PRACTICAL SYSTEM OF PENMAN.
BIIIP. In Nine Numbers. Per dozeno. 90o.set.
KNOPP'S GERMAN PENMANSHIP. In Nine Num.
bre' Por dozen, to) cents net.
SPECIAL TERMS FOR INTRODUCTION.
IBENZ[GER BROTIIERS,
aus iysp New York. Citrolnnti and St. Louis.
SCHOOL BOOK......... IOOL BOOKS SCHO OOK
OF ALL KINDS, AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES,
AT
KIRKPATRICK'S
610.......... Magazine Street............ Le
FOURTH D)ISTRICT DEPOT
FOR CHEAP' PAPETERIEU.
Initial Paper at 15, 20, 26 and 30e. a Box.
A fis aseortment of REPI' anod PLAID PAPER
Faery and ttple ST'ATIONERY, BLANK.
BOOKS, ALBUMS. FRAME, Eto.
KIREPATRICKS' CIRCIULATING LIBRARY,
Orders. taken for Printing and BRndlng at Low Rates.
jy3lO 6 lystp
A. r. IIARR[NGTON,
BOOKSELLER,
STATIONER AND NE WBDEALEB,
lIi..............Csanal Street........ - .11
Prtntlno and Bitndl tigpromplly xeeutedattbdl
rotes. Ntaeorlptiuoa taken for magasines and new.
pa re. payable in adrnoe
Havingy bougt the interest of Mr. JAMES A.
GRE-tiAM In the stocl No. 11 Ceanal street. I respae.
fuIll solicit the patronage of the trade sad the reedag
je2.i 3m5p A. P. HARRINGTON.
w. W. DAVIN. J. J. MC MAMAsL
DAVIN & McNAMARA,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers is
NORTHERN ICE,
193...............Julia Street.............194
Corner Caroedelet,
NEaw OsLAMe.
Offices sald Residrnes supplied.
Cuuatry orders oulicite. and pIroruptly atteneddltr.
T J. BROWN,
PRACTICAL PAPER HANGER.
2C3............Camp Htre t............
hIetween l)elord soe alooylsrre.
sew ORLEACS.
A large asoortment ofW Paper. fieold and Velve
Bord.re. Window ilhlleos. (:E.r.aes. Irtr. Gree a g
White IHoullands. Picture (:rd. T.eols etc.., always
hand. Rample IBoobkscut if reqnured. 0c375 ly~ p
J. S. BRADLEY,
House, Steamboat and Sign Painter,
HAS REMOVED TO
I:;..l........... Camp Street.............. 136
Just abors It. Patrlck Ili i
Whir. Ih ekae hie frnand tn rallyr to the esupportof
J),ry lar.p god work and lo w til
WANTS-FOR RENTS-ETC.
ST. PATRICK'S UALL FOR W(T
FOR BALLS, CONCERTS AND FAlRS.
St. Patrick's Hall. the LABOZET AND amf
HALL INI THE CITY, will be reeled, by the nigh
er longer. on reaaoaable torm, for OONOKEEW
BALLS. LECTURES. lAIBB and ZXBIBZTIOEU
Par CEARITAELE EUITETAIHMENITU, wltt
dltfnetaeu of cred. h B all will ba raaua M KAI.
PRICE.
Anti at
IT. PATEI W $ALL "V=WU SMA
a1r'IBVf .. N 8,m

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