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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, June 10, 1877, Morning, Image 3

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Morning Star and Catholic essen ert
S mW r .A*S, . S1NDAT. JUNI 10 it7.
(Irae tmhe a FramU e Melter )
TELLING TEE BEADS.
Over the bate t th Jewle , -,
Hanls wh ere t te neer ef ted.
To folly sbdr AVe Maria.
)Isar tth Ar S[ I_eaMht r am e
ire asras.afrills ,- ads t f glus.
t "Av Mari."
Sother finSe A jMeN U h a" n-
lobe to UA i the "we Majonor
Over te bhar af the edsewa,
rewn weary with gding the par
_a tah faiead ra eeto t roe fmrs-
t lia cu bh vrrzerdmson.
irn as T L the st w ishalleafr Uhbaa
That L ban at the Oalm right
(Lo down 1 ster MAvbe r.)
As be mo ehsa abaes by the way
0ea allh er bead d w wd owa
ias cwarsetso. brohae weth uighh.
Clams be fl. ad at hiaL Ma.r,
o voe thU eria ma the ~la.orle
-he aars u erntey was cntined, Jar
aty L bedl rt i is aulde, ayd oer
8•Inn w f h is of l -
'beath the e bnnero tirhus l nertd".
SnW either s, iebr at fr the iprta o,
a a hein b.. aS a..4-srso.
Mses of I e Jlweutof la tof Werth.
Ah the C yar brlde ThE hU.s1els b lg
(Londo Aven e a ar a."
eo Meothe f ae. wh hesu giver lt
Tabl thou ano a antd all n the otpln a Par
ament oy prved how much eriteent was thae
clT e aunder th Usels eri care ied
May ueoh bead th I. told i tey honeor
Seine fair In t n the reco of love,
dat win for thy olrvan weet gadreon,
t home to the marnseao above.
"Ave Marta."
IthAIL the . w r IT f em ai
THE VICTORY OF THE CHURCH OVER
BR VOL UTIOY.
(London egister, May e19.)
Probably no debate in the Italian Parlia
-mont an caued so mch erxcitement as that
on the "Cerical Abee Bill." For nine dayr
the angry contest wan continued, . every
Dpolputy being preaentin hia plac, and the galte
oier obeingrowded with liltener. The vio
tory on either hide would be important beyond
any victory obteained in the alian Parlia
ment; for it wse not only a queation of the
future of Italy, but of the relatio e ofItaly
with the Catholic world Thois wa felt by an
preeont to be the ocae. The superficial at
tem pts which were made to exclude e "foreign
the" from exercising any influence on the Par
liament only proe d how very real rwa the
vihatose that lforeigner' hao d every inten
tie of beit g heard. It wasl no light matter
for Catholi Itly to cffed the sentiment of
Catholic world ; nor would it have been a
policy to atimla hte that world into open
W ent or bwasttle. We give little credit to
revoluitionary Government for tendernea
feonacience or for repentance; we are sure
that the majority wan wrung from ar Prlia
insepired in the main by alarme
hargnments whioch werae urged againat
te antih-Christian Bill, especially by o igoor
Ceor Cadorna, were so powerfaul from the
political point of riew, that the religion.
point of bview wa not needed. Theee argo
ments may be summed up as follows: First,
the new Ball wan eesntllly a olae Bill aimed
at one aection of citlzens; and, consequently,
it wa a Bill moseet invdious and equivocal, or
rather most ungenerous and unjust. No teal
statesman ever alms blows at a class, unless
that clas is I believed to be anti-national; but
tosay t l ttthe Catholicolergy are anti-nation l
ios to conwaiio the religions sentiment of
Italy which ~ firet Catholic, then Italian,
but Oatbolic before all things in the world.
When the Pope wan made the object of insult,
the whole Italian nation wasoatraged, for that
nation han derived all ire honors from the
preaence of the Pontiff at Rome. Secondly,
thedestruction of liberty of conscienoe whion
was detigued, ned would have been perfected
b tbie Bill, was a sorry comment on that
glorious religious freedom which wae supposed
to be the bulwark of revolution. Revolution
means, bypothetically, freedom; the new Bill
meant, practically, tyranny. The new Baill
was, therefore, the complete moral suicide of
the maein principle, or profession of the o
ment. Thirdly, Cavour's policy of "a free
Church inn free State" was reversed by this
iniquitous Bill; for the freedom was to be
wholly with the State, which might torture
the Church as it pleased. Fourtbly, there
w-sno tangible pretext for the introduction
o(neow measures of severity, since the measures
whieh exist are alreedy quite despotic in the
direction of the supremacy of the State.
Fifthly, the new Bill was a practical revooo
tioe of what had been called "the Law of Ps
pal Guarntees ;" that law giving to the Pope ý
a full spiritual autocracy i the direction and
governmoht of the clergy. Added to these
reasons were three others, of a different om-nt
peer or kind, but each in itself very strong.
Sist h it hod never been demonstratetd-ib had
not even been asserted-thnt Italian priests
had broken the new laws. There was no plea,
therefore, for restraining such tendencies. On
the ontrary, it wu urged, end no oneo ould
contradict this, that the Italian clergy were
ereedingly7 good eoitlens, that they hd seat an
exame.of law-keeping to the laity, and that
th h ad even done more in the way of pro
sevilg national qiet s than ay other setion
o the community. seoond reason, whitoh
wa very powerfaly nrged, wa that to 'op
pre"e t the me tire t do "exlcte;" and
that the newr Bill would necmsrily make
nemlr of tihmoes who had thus ar been pa
tient. Thirdiy-md heare we touch the
stronget argument whioh oeould weiglh ewith 1
revoltionay Government-it wan manifmt
that to offend foreign nations wan not the best I
way to concillate them, and that therefore 2
"Italy," which eadly wanted friends, should p
not alienate half the Christians in the world.
Thin wan nndoubtly that inincible argument
"hich won the majority in the Parliament. u
iYen who care little for religion, and oorre- p
dingly little for honor, do not like to sa- o
that popular favor wrhih is absolutely o
.5rytosuocees. To have excited distrusto
a.altprotestant minds, and repugnance and e
i Lat nallCatholics wan not precisely a I
eo which speculotive revolution would p
-.wo u ?: asdative u o power. It would s
sewouldSthef,; so she "threw out" what q
,hoe weav e loved to make lnw.,
a--ere we uch once more that delicate en- o
'="Whatdo we understand by 'Italy?"d
t rn e swer plainly that the Government of p
Sgnor Dupreti is no more Ital than it in Ire- t
C.d..or pain. II a lamentable fact that A
ie.natinotens will not ext thoemslves to |i
S..t iiSdel Deputie bhu will sit patiently, or e
_-_- rstiaueaiagi,.,____ w le , sob
'ler'' ci ..m ,,ur I
obscurity. But revoltion is so noisy, and
piety eso quiet; bad people are so ambitious,
nfdnnoodr people are so modest; that "thbe
wor odto ontemplate the spectaoole
of Catholic nations "represented" by Infidel
Governmetse. Daniel O'Connell one, ob
served, with pardonable warmth, "Heaveu
save as from plece fools!" But had he said.
"Heave give more oosrogo to pionus people i1
he would have breathed a very Chritian
prayer. A greater than Dantiel O'Coanell,
Plse I., remarked a few weeks ago to a
Bishop, "The OChurch nede soldierse. We
undresauad all that was meant by taat aimg.
When the enemres of the Church are Agtig,
OCatholics most either fight or be crushed.
And it eeortsain that the fight which Oathollic
have exhibited, since the intreductiLc of the
"Clerical Aboses Bill," bas been the sole canes
why that Bill was withdrawn * it was not
only the chief an, but the only one. Had
Catholics looked on and folded their hands,
that Bid would most certainly have passed. Let
this be our enoouragement for the future. If
we intend to bold our place, not only as free
CathoUc, but equally as fr ee itiens of States,
we must insist tost our rights shall be respeot
ed by those Governments whom weak Catholics
have allowed to ri to power. We have only
ouarselve to blame for the pet ; let us wipe
oat the disgrace in the future. There should
not be a single Deputy in any Government of a
OCatholic Stato who Is not first bound to be a
Cathelie If all Catholics would be "soldiers"
as pla IX. has expressed it, there could not he
oontiuanoea of unob scandals. But en lon u
Catholice prefer "peace" to honest fightng,
thy mut expect double war is the od. Wbr,
sooner or latur, is the l nbssl of ouewardle
in stngup toea to loprteieip ; for if there
be not war there meat be duerettia; and
that is imposible to the OChreb. Let s make
it known to all the Powers ti B repe that we
intend the Holy Father to be free ; and revo
latoniets will spare us the troble of taking
up arms that be may be so. But if we are
half-hearted in oontest, ear punishment will1
assuredly beho this : That a state of disorder, of
wantoo tyranny and persation, will make it
neeesary to embark In a crusade. in which,
though we should be ultimately sneoseesfl, the
coest would be terrible to ourselves. This may
yet be avoided by earnestness. Let us be as
busy for truth and for justioe as our enemies
are busy for their contraries, and it is certain
that there will be no more Clerical Abuses
Bills, and no more robberies of churches and
religious Orders. These scandals could never
have occurred had Catholics been united in
energy. It was want of "soldiers," in the
moral and mental sense, which rendered auch
"atrocities" possible.
THE UNITED STATES AND SOUTH AME
BICAN TRADE.
A LITTLE INTELLIGENT ENERGY NEEDED.
The United States are fitted to occupy the
leading position in the trade with South Ame
rica both by nuture and the energy and inven
tive genius of the people. South America pro
duooes only a fraction of the amount of the
necessaries of life which her people consume.
She finds profitable employment for her people
in raising purely tropical products, cotton,
coffee, India rubber, etc., and for generations to
come there will be little or no temptation for
her tq employ them in anything except those
occupations. South America accordingly does
now and will for years go abroad to buy the
greater part of her food, clothing, furniture,
building-materials, etc, which she would
rather buy than produce. All these things, or
nearly all, can now be bought in the United
States as cheaply as anywhere in the world;
but American merchants have simply neglect
ed the market, and the consequence is that
nine-tenths of what the South Americans im
port is shipped to them by Europe from points
1000 to 5000 miles further away from them than
the ports of the United States. Here is an
illustration of the inferior position occupied at
present by this country in that immense and
profltable trade. No figures can be obtained
later than 1874. In 1874 the United States,
England and France sold to South American
countries the following amounts of goods (the
figures for England and France being for tue
calendar year):
Unied tates. England. Franes.
te. .............. $ 69,96 $9 149,68 $0.498,61
U. S. Of Colombia.. 5.359.344 12 80,780 4 705 65
Malico............ 6.t*4,310 7 614,3'0 4.5l 740
C ..............9,eL0l.,9 14.464,491 9,99 970
Uruguay.......... 1.147,9 659 0,790 " 6,976,S3
Brazil.............. 7,778,.671 40.93,710 16,658,915
Totals ............$e83s9,e p86 ts9eoo,s0 ass4,396u543
The United States do not, therefore, now
send to the whole continent of South America
and to Mexico over $30,000,000 worth of goods i
in the course of a year, yet they buy $75.000,000
worth from that region of the world annually.
And yet the United States are now no longer
beaten in the markets of the world in respect
to the prices or the excellence of things which
the people south of us bouy in any quantity.
HEALTHY STA"E OF TRADE
OUR EXPORTS LARGELY IN EXCESS OF OUR IM
PORTS.
A corrected statement, prepared by the Bu
reau of Statistice, shown the exports and m
ports of the United States for the reu months
ending April 30, 1877. to have been as follows: i
Domestic products exported................$'3.19.(43
toreiga goods re-expolted.................. l 904 S19 i
Coin and bullion exoted .................. 35 95.91
Total ........................................149,b69,074
Inmpost., including coin and bulhlion......... 35,916,351 6
.-- I
Excess of exports over imports............. 6 154,659,7931
Compared with the corresponding period of h
1876, the exhibit, on the score of economy, is s
quite flattering. For the same ten months of s
last year the balance of trade in favor of the o
United State amounted to $90,068 567 against
$164,062 733 in 1877, showing a gain in favor of a
1877 of $63,984 157. For the ten months end- ii
ing April 30, 1876, the exports of coin and bul. r
lion amounted to $41,082,512, and the imports s
to $13,977,501, leaving a balance against the 1
United States of $7 ,105,011. The exports and c
imports of boln and bullion for the ten months
of the present fiscal year are as follows: Ex- C
ports, ~3,2859125 ; impors $38,331,534; bal
anoe In favor of the United S~uttes, $3,046,329f. h
ECLAMATdI ION OF THE SAHARBA.
To the Idltor of the eisatihfl Ameurlean
Your article in the 8ealtVfe Amsersai of May
12th (republished in the oRNIao STAR of May '
0tb), entitled "Lands below the Ocean Level," 0
presents a statistical diseuesion of present and h
uture results of converting the great ·hbars O
Desert into an inland sea, by connecting it
with the ocean. The conclaion that the ex
piration of 100 years would be somficient to I
convert the great desert of sand into a desert W
of salt is doubtleess correat, on the supposition t
of a communication having a water discharge
equal to 525 times that of the German Rhine.
But the construction of esuch a channel is
practically impossible. A channel conveying, g
say, ten times the volume of the Rhine might, a
towever, be possible; and from it entirelydtf- 4
ferent results would probably ensue. The
luantity of water delivered by sueach a channel a
roold cover 10 525 of the area of the desert, fr
or about 76,000 square miles. Almost imme- f
diately upon the admission of water to the arid a
plain climatic changes would ensue, reducng It
he temperature and the rate of evaporation.
Aa the formation of the new ses progressed,
it surface and shores would become the relcipi- di
nta of the gentle shower and the driving w
storm. Tseus esae yldcontine to operte hi
-l Irail(r~~~
Smenlt/, having as area of 16.000 square miles
s that is, the ares will have been doubled from
ae tbhe two easses-an area onehalf larger than
l that of the Caspian Sea. The pressuce of eaob
al an mormous body of water n the Greats Deert
. woueld, we may well eouneive, establish a td
a butary river system of its own and maintain
1. an independent meteralogioa area of vst
I' extent. Taking 15 feet as the annual evapo
a ration (since we have eupposed it to be &I
I, minished one-for b), and allowiog 9 feet rein
a ll yearly as sufficient to Insure prodootive
s nes of the earrounding desert, we shall have
g. an area 7 times that of this new sea, or 1,160,
1, 000 square miles of reclaimed territory, to say
L nothing of the ineidental beneft accrroiog to
a Morooeo, Algeis, sad Tripoli, and possibly to
a Egypt and Nobia also.
e As to the stabhility of the sew condition of
at things, no present fear need be entertained.
d For, sinae 62 times the fow of the Rhine
t, would require 100 years in whioh to fll the
at great Sahara with a deposit of salt, the pro
If posed 10 Rhiae ohannel would ocoupy 15.260
e years in accomplishing the same end. In
m, deed, it is doubtful if a much longer period
i- would aseomplish it. For it must not be for.
s gotten that a sea fean and fora would be de
I veloped, eapable of oonverting a very large
e amount of salt into organic compounds, there
I by eliminating is. Moreover, the consumption
a by humanity and the surrounding animal life
s would effet a not insignificant postponement
' of the sopposed fnal result.
Platte City, Mo RT.T. Erarr.
A BEIrBION OF THZ TARIFP.
5 TBH POLICY OF THI TWO PAYTINS As OUTLIUD
BY wssas aVABT AND EANDALL.
The signa multiply that both parties will
move for a revision of the tarif sett October.
Seoretary Evarte' speech in New York out
SIlined an Administration pollcy in this diree.
lon. Speaker Randal's letter to bie Texas
friends tay be taken as the first unoofficial
saggestion of a poseile Demoeratic policy.
Evanst spoke for fres ships, whi0h should
make trade possible. Readall speaks for a
s Boath American trade, which will.make ships
necessary. The letter is cot-and this may be
stated authoritatively-a step towards the
subsidies, which Mr. Randall has uniformally
opposed, as has been already charged by a
prominent Republican organ. The letter looks
to such changes in the tariff and such alters
r ions in the general course of legislation upon
t foreign commeroe as may give as a market.
Farther than this in the development, in Mr.
Randall's opinion, of a party policy it would
not be safe at present to go. Is is the opinion,
however, of those who are in the best position
to know the sentiments of tWe manufacturing
districts of Pennsylvania that a strong and
probably predominant sentiment exists there
to favor of legislation to secure a market-leg.
islation to protect manufacturers. Pig iron
was instanced in a conversation recently with a
prominent Pennsylvania Congressman as a
single protected industry which, with or with
out tariff, could be produced more oheaply at
home than abroad, so that Pennsylvania pigs,
if the tariff were removed, could be sold as
cheaply in a foreign port as pigs from any
foreign furnace. Coal and all the coarser
varieties of iron are both, it is claimed by
men hitherto strong for extreme protection,
p roductions whose supply exceeds the demand.
It is wiser, they say, to seek a market for them
abroad than to continue the present plan of
stimulating a market at home, already over
supplied and overstocked. The response to a
sentiment of this nature, already felt by Rep
resentatives and likely to increase rather than
diminish, will probably have an important
influence on the September platform, as well
as upon the organisation of the next House.
No one talks of free trade, but such legislation
as will make some trade possible is very seri
ously talked about, and most of all by Repre
sentatives of the experience and influence of
Speaker Randall.
(Extract from the speech of Count de Mon. delivered
in the French Assembly. May 4, 1877.
The Pope I gentlemen, I have uttered a great
name. Permit me to linger a moment at this
word. The Pope! Whoever you are, on
believers or believers, if you ever have turned
in good faith your thoughts upon this wonder
ful power, which for nineteen centuries has
survived every tempest, and has seen empires
fall without being crushed by them, this
power which fills the world with the eohn of
its name, and whose history is bound up with
that of every people; it you ever contemplated
this humanly inexplicable fact you would not
be able to repress a sentiment of respect and
admiration. (Applause from the benches of
the Right; derisive interruption from the
Lett.)
You laugh, gentlemen; but I expected fully
this proof of your weakness; I expectedthie
declaration of your impotence to bring any
argument of reason against the grand prestige
of the Papacy. On, there is nothing more for
you to do but to resort to insult, as your for
eign friends do in the press; but to them, too,
I say : Do you offer insultes Then you are
afraia. (Interruption from the Left.) And
seeing, in spite of all your accumulated eflorte
to destroy his immortal glory, the Pope still
the principal object of the thoughts of the
world. you find no other means than interrup
tions left to prevent you from fulfilling the
duty of admiration. Let incredulity multiply
its conquests, but in this age in which free
thought proclaims its sovereign empire, be
hold one man amongst all who draws to him
self the minds, who agitates the opinions, and
ooeopies the public deliberations and the
councils of governments; and that man is the
Pope ! Woo is this, then, that bears at once
the naturai and the divine stamp f It is the
head of the Church, it is the Church, it is the
soeiety of souls, because the Pope is the neces
sary bond of all those who belong to the Cath
oliochurch.
Now, all that belongs to the dominion of the
soul is inviolable and sacred, and whoso attacks
it finds himself face to fae with formidable
resistence. The Pope belongs to this order of
spiritual things, and who so threatens his ]
liberty threatens the liberty of our conocien
ces. Representative on earth of the God whom
we adore, appointed by Him to govern the
Chrchb, whose sons we are, he has in the
world a mimion which no one ean take from
him, because he has not received it from men.
But he osan not exeroise this maison unless he
is free; and behold here the reason why, when
his voloe is raised against the obstales, every
day more numerous, placed in the way of bhus
spiritual authority, the whele world is moved.
The Pope attacked in his liberty is the human
conscience threatened with slavery. And be
hold why, when the Pope laments in the face
of the world, the chains that fetter his inde
pendenoe, behold why the Catholi consoeience
hs replied with a cry of affright and sorrow.
and the Minister of the Interior (Jules Simon)
will not be able to stop its echo with his asser
tions of the full liberty of the sovereign
Pontiff.
The contributions to the work for the Props
gation of the Faith dnring the year 1876
amount to a grand total of 5 930 950 francs and
41 centimes, or 133.486 franca and 69 centimes
more than last year's receipts. Of this large
amonot Franoe alone has contributed 4.03ti724
franoos and 91 centimes, an increase of 136.640
france 98 oentimes from last year, and more
than twice cas much as has been given by all
the other countries in the world put together.
A little fellow ran to his mother the other
day, and asked "Mls, can I have some bread
with Jam " mothber, .wishing to break
blnr o the vioess habit, .repled " Waa I
w.- I asyalh b£etweeu
THE
Gna T DU I m THE PRICES
sBsom" M NrIrw wtn 000000 1 mm
88I8 2N 6 66 6 0 60 ll923221 WMi No
I S T N1 x NY *00 0 an3 W
Eh III NM AnN 00
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8LneS I . I.ts e 1 0000068 33I233l3333 11 aon
.*Lhm ln to tihe Nhen.l
GREAT REDUCTION IN THE PRICES
O1 TEE
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IN NOW OFFERED
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MJee the MRediuction 2
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THE SINGER MANUIA OTURINO OOMPANI,
S. E. RUNDLE. Agent,
91. -- .... . --.....-CANAL STREET... ...
m0y13 77 ly aw anwr1e. L
A. P. HARRINGTON,
DEALER IN
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0.44 76 ly
McSHANE BELL FOUNDRY
Mannfacture tho.e Celebrated BELLS for
CHURCHES. ACADEMIES. ETC.
Price List and Circulars sent free.
HENRY McSHANE & CO.,
en2l 771 1 Baltimore. hd
THE EUEOPEAN HOTEL,
Non 4 5 and 6 Bolton Street,
DUBLIN. IRELhND.
YLitore to Dubiin will ead it tbe " European bt.
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CISTERN MAKERS.
P A. MURRAY,
No. 191 Magasine Street,
Between Julta and St.Jesepk N.O.
ALL WORK OGARANTrrD.
Bhbeet Nr, inm . awarded at the
two lhst L .leleae tate Valh, eel d at
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Indutniel Zipottion of 1016.
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beet matertal and workhealp, kept
Soonetllye on hbud. and for a at
a·pl1 77 i PRT(rEI IO iSIT TItl TIMBi.
MATTHEW IIENRICK,
CISTERN MAKER,
Corner Franklin and Erato Streets.
THm OLmkT ISTABuIHMISKT In XMW OMiLANIl
A lot of new Cisterns of the beet material and work.
anohlip kept coonsuntly on hand, and for saleLat
nrý,, o ctlt the itch,,r on-. le_ I
JOHN P. tlOClE,
Jeweler and Optician,
Watches and Jewelry Carefully Repaired.
SBPCTACLE AN4D ZYIBGLAUSf
or na Deapie.
BOUSI FURMISINGM 6036
NEIW SEWING MACHINES
L AT HALF PRIOi
J. BOOTH'S
GENERAL SEWING IACRIIE DI Ei
No. 614 Megesm.. B1et, mea JBest illa
Hawlugt now eemplsbd l keo
to mwlee me ea NeMeING OiN
Sall Mehisero. °r .
xaptt, e r. ando amenM kkram, as ea, 
* Emmmn De.
CARPETS AND MATTINGS.
ELKIN & CO.
168n..... ........ Cnal teet......... L.
C AapsCes M eATroaN w, e
  nd Chek elSly
Hasr 0/. G/TaIs
A arp amrk r CASITI, M.  em.V low gem&.
a S. PITARD,
em. a a auaoszm ,
HARDWARE, RAiTi5,
PAINT OI. vA IE. Dw W sow
W1 and ...... Canal Street ...... 81 laS
be 2.1wee. Rampar$ MAt alsa aseeb.
s p lap new oathas.
W ' I[M. "B. RNO U 8,
FURNITURE DEALER,
172........... ..Camp treet.............e
NH ew ocfp the rlarge and .sloe ae171
s btrebetweee otred apdIJla7 lyaee
oC ore i fore th porpoee of TING o! t
ON STONAE at the lowet ras e.
All biade of Upholelerier aaT rl.la ee4&*
dtie pa. ea Mattreeee o all kiad. mde M
vry thIn at lewest rateea ad all weork t
oun order. sollotaed ad prpl
0.11f.a xmie cpor hng el heewos.
" ap1i77 ly
FURNITURE
HUGH FLYNN'S1,'
167 a.d 169.....Poydra 8treet....167 ad 111
rINE vi oRIA BEDROOM STS. redaset UaY
per ceat.
CHEAP VICTORIA BEDROOM SETS, at St.
] COMMON I URNITURB away dowm below emyJtle
yet In the market.
Cabsh buyers are Invlted to cal. ee 7e ly
TO THE PUBLIC.
JOHN BOIS,
FURNTURE DEALBBR,
159..,...........Camp street.......... ....16
Now ooccples the storm Ies and 164 Camp eksat.
o t poenr caofti!Lng FURNITURE ON STOR!gE
LOANS MADE AND SICURED ON PURnITURE
He will also continue to BUSL RUPATS. X11.
MOVE. PACK and SIP fUIIT rE with •
ten, at
f*95 77 ly NN. 1no ad 1t6 Gam Slst.
' BIRI, t
l mportr. a aadmaetrm a Dealer IN
WILLOW WARE. WAGOIS OCRADLIW
MARKI1 BASKETS.,
Work Baskets. Cbas OL eth GBe an  e e
rraok y PBaskets., eo.
120, 288 and 253 Obartree StretS,
ds17 7e ly WNW OeLsAm
A. BROU88EaU & SON, -
17............ .Cbartree Street............
IMPOiTER AND DIALEa IN
Carpetings,
YLOO OIL-CLOTKS,
HINA AND OIA MATTING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVERM,
CBUDE OLOfI HI RUGS. MATS
,ARRIAGE. T ,ABLI AllD IMr LI" ri5
WHOLNBA.i8 AND iNAILt.
Corne Beads Pis., Gimpa, Leops"t ToEsl
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticklng and u 0
BUIRLAPSI by the Bale sad Plees. es i7 e y
Respectfally Sfonrm his Mie smad the pbie th at
his new stear,
144............. Camp Street .....14.....
H has a fresh and well-soleeed aassratmlt ad
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpentere' Tools. Orates. sotv e Had Be.sti'
log Goode of all eids.
He ts bater proosd the ever befaor e doe CEpes,
TIn ad ShsIt I.n Work, asd wll frm
to alders ad ethoers., and guaratage sea1
to ll. . __ .I lr
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
G. J". aIEDSICHE.
DENTAL SURGEON,
mySO 77 17 Osrmer 14.
p. P. CARROLL,
A2TORKBY-AT.LA F,
26........... s. ObhatLes 8reo. .S........S
O-srse rp atteaUe iso all legal
W . B. EIIOPETEr,
NOTARY PUBL.IO
COMMISBIONER OF DEEDS,
61...-........ Cmp Street ....... 1
el3 17 ly Cror ef Cemmorselal Plo.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
.c ............. Graer 8treet..... - .
dSe Iv letwme Cams samed Nt. Ibheies
GROCERS-COUEISSIO0 MERCHANTS.
pETER ELIZARDI,
GROCEE O VIBIOB,
Corner iorgond .. e d ll.tete,
- m., . ,.A7- ALA

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