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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, October 07, 1877, Morning, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1877-10-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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Do..c' "Star and Catholic MesaenlgR
* W OIANO '. SOLDATY, OCTOBER t7 t re
RE. 5JOIIN McP:LBOY. B J.. THIE OLELS tl
JESUIT IN THIE WORJ.D.
AN EVENTFUL CAREER IN TIIE eACRi, it
MINISTRY.
This aged servant of God, a hose death oc-I o0
curred at the novitiate house of tilhe Jesuit cc
Fathers at Frederick City, Md., on the 12th p
of September was, ineety-five years of age, it
havlngbeon born in the year 1782. in Enunis- t
kIllen,county Ferma.nagh, Ireland. Asketch nm
of his eventaul life is in fact a history of the e5
early struggles of the Church in the New A
World and as best told in his own words. 1
In May of last 3ear, being totally blind he vi
gave the following
ACCOUNT OF 1119 LIYE. m
"I was born in the province of Ulster, at
the moat northern province of Ireland, in ,
Enniekiliio, county Fermningh, in 17L2, he
and am at tresent the oldrt Catholic w
priest in the United States and have been th
for five years the oldest Jesuit in the world. ia
A ecaa ketpagru irths deaths, hr
and period of ministration of all thie esnoIll
throughout the world, and hence I am able pa
to make the statement with accuracy. At wi
the time of my birth Catholic emancipation ag
had made no iheadway in Ireland, and hence it,
I received simply ia common education, ch
such as was given to Catholics at that time. TI
I left Ireland for America in 1803, when sit
-twney--onears lJ.
O'CONNELL IAD JUST MADE 1115 DESUT st
in the character of an emancipator, and
had given thus far but little promise of that Fi
extraordinary vigor and power of control- er
ing popular sentiment for which he after- all
wardsbecame so famous. I landed first in w
Baltimore and went from there to George- er
town. Jefferson was President of the ve
United States when I landed. I have met ju
him several times and often had occasion cl
to admire his republican simplicity. When tLI
I took the stage in Baltimore to come to ha
Washington, it was an old, rickety open to
wagon with leather curtains tlapping in the w
wind and no springs to it. As we came tic
down Capitol Hill and saw the cattle brow- th
sing about Pennsylvania avenue, I asked A
when would we get to Washington and was gi
surprised to learn thi' we were there as
already. The President's honsu was the at
only place worth lobking at in the city. tL
There was an old post olice whetre the tL
Patent Oflice is now, and a colony of Irish ea
WHO COtLIDN'T SPEAK A WORD OF ENGLISHI
had squatted on the hill. Georgetown
was a much more active place of bust- 1
nfss than Washington, and A'exandria
was more importat t than either. 1
knew Captain Hobart, the architect of the n
White louso,. lie told me he intended to
put another story on the building, buti
Washington did not approve of it. When
I came to this country the Jesuits had been
suppressed. They were suppressed by
Clement XIV. in 1774, and not formally tl
restored until the restoration of Pius VII.
to his functions in 1814. Archbishops Car
roll, Neal, and a number of others went to
Europe in the eighteenth centcry to study
at a Jesuit college, but upon their suppies
sion these all returned. Jesuits, Jou will
understand, cannot.accept any honors, but
they ale obliged to obey the orders of the a
Pope. Both Archbishops Carroll and Neal m
were Jesuits. Archbishop Carroll was at i,
the head of the Church when I reached in
America, and the only archbishop in the tc
country. Bishop Neal was at that time re
president of Georgetown College. I knew o0
Archbishop Carroll well. lie was above io
the medium L.eight, very grave and slow in at
speech, but very amiable and interesting p
and very refined and gentlemuan'y in his A
manners. lie and Carroll of Carrolltono
were first cousins, and not brothers, as has ti
been erroneously supposed by many. The
family was from the county of Cork in Ire f,
land. There was but - t
ONE CATHOLIC CHURCIH IN NEW YtFVE
at that time, and indeed for a long time
afterward. I said mass as late as 1818 in 1
St. Peter's, the old church in Barclay street,
St. Patrick's church being then in course of
construction, and there were only two
priests in the whole city. St. Joseph's in
1803 was the only Catholic church in Phila
delphia. It was in this church that Wash
ington and his staff assembled after the
battle of Trenton to hear mass. Now there
are as many churches in Philadelphia as
there are in New York. I went to George
town, as I told you, and entered into conm
mercial life. Just about this time Arch
bishop Carroll was directed quietly to
establish a noviciate for Jesuits in Mary
land, at Georgetown college. It contlnuedl
there for about two years, and was remnoved
to Whitemarsh, in Prince George's county,
Md. Subs, qaently it was removed to
Frederick hfr a short time; after which it
was again removed to Whitemarsh, where
it remained until 18k4. I gave up mercan
tile life to go to the college in Georgetown.
I went there as treasurer, and attended to
all the temporalities of the college for eight
or nine years. I studied during my leisure,
and was ordained priest in May, 1817, when
ago. I remained in Georgetown four years,
filling the same office I oceupied before I
was ordained, and came from there here in
September 1822. The noviciate here (Fred
erick) commenced at the end of the last
century. When I came here in 1823, there
was a small centre building. The fiBrst old
church which is now incorporated with the
main building,
WAS ERECTED BY FATIERL DULBOIS,
one of the great pioneers of the Church in
this country, the lather whofounded Mount
St. Mary's and St. Joseph's, and was after
wards a bishop in the Church. I remained
here until 1845. During that time I erected
the sentre building of the Academy of the
Visitation, over the way, for the Sisters of
Charity. The Visitation Sslaters afterward
took their place. Tihe church which you
see opposite (St. John's) I also built. I
paid on it before I left $3,000. I was
removed from here in 1845 to take charge
of a church in Georgetown, of which I was
pastor from September to iMay. The Mex
ican war having broken out, President
Polk callhd upon the bishops for a chaplain
for the army. I had the honor of being
selected by them, and was sent with Father
Bay to the arnry. We were tlhe only chap
laines In the zarry, a fact which createtd lmuchl
dissension aud bad feeling among the other
denominations at the tinmo, but t!'e riresi
dent said all the Ilexicans were Cat1:,lic.
and munt be conciliated. I sent for Pather
Ray to come and assist in preparing Scott's
army for their departure from Matamorase,
and I never beard of him after he startod.
Dqobtles
HIE WAS ASSASSINATED lY THE MBExiCAN8.
Taylor was at Brazes Santiago, getting
ready his fiatbosts or rafts. It was sup
posed by the Mexicans that he would attack
the fort in front, which they deemed in
pregnable, but toe went by land and flanked
it. I remained with the army as chaplain
for one year. In July, 1847, 1 went to
Boston to see Bishop Fitzpatrlek. He
offered me a church, and my provincial
t consented. In October following I was
h placed in charge of St. Mary's, and was
,there about seventeen years. The Bishop
told rin there were about 3'1,000 souls under
h y chargo My life in Boston was at tmes
b somewhat tempestuous, but it pleased the
v Almighty to bless my labors abundantly.
I can roever forget the kindnesses and ser
vices rendered me on many occasions by
persons of a totally drt.rent way of think.
ing from myself, and whose public positions
made there shining marks for the envious
+ and discontented. I immediately set to
I work and built a number of schools. At
length what were known as the jail lands
were L ft red for sale, where formerly stood
the jail, the old Court House, etc. The
land was purchased by a gentleman for
building purposes, and 1 succeeded in indu
cing un to pat wi a ,
purpose was to erect a college. The fiith
ward of Boston was very much prejudiced
against the Catholics. A great hubbub was
the consequence. The cry was raised of
church or no church, Father McElroy or not.
The opponents of the Catholics resorted to a
singular device. They said the land was
begdileattached hatl
stores were to be built upon it.
A DESPIRASTE STRUGOLE INSUED.
Finally, to quiet the storm, I sold the prop
erty back to the city, and bought a lot,
almost an entire square, for one-fifth of
what the jail lands cost, and on that I
erected a college, which is at present in a
very flourishing condition. A violent pre
judice was manifested against granting a
charter with college rights, but I secured
the services of General Cashrng, whom I
had known in Mexico. lie iutloduced me
to the Legislature, by whom I was received
with great kindness, and my modebt peti
tion was granted. It was on this occasion
that I was first introduced to Governor
I Andrew, who informed me that it would
give him great pleasure tai sign the bill as
3 soon as it had passed the Legislature. 1
s eubsequently built and dedicated in 1861,
" the Church of the Immaculate Conception,
a the finest church in B13ston. It was conse
i crated a few days ago with imposing core
- monies. Sinceleaving BIston 1 have been
n engaged in the ordinary duties of the min
istry, my failing sight having curtailed and
impaired, to a great extent, roy usefulness.
II still say mass and preach here at the
novitiate, but I am not able to travel with
e out a guide, and tiat would be making two
do the work of one. I have often known
one to do the work of two, or even three,
but I think the ievereal of the ru e would
be unprofitable."
Tus a spoke th.e feeble old soldier more
f than a year ago, and now that he has gone
to Ias reward his words are of tn tfold
interest. ilequiescat in.'ace.
I- -~ -
A CLHA'TER OP' FRENCH FINANYlCIAL
t The future historian will probably place
Sa high estimate upon the wisdom of the
managers of the Bank of France who, early
t in the Franco-German war, in her own
d interest as a private corporation, advanced
e to the Government of France (as per
e report, Nov. 2, 1873, of M. Magne. Minister
I of Finance), the imperial sum of ] .5i0,000,
0 000 francs (say $306.000,000) payable in in
n stalnmenta ot 200,000,000 francs ($40,000,000)
g per year, with interest at one per cent.
i' Almost simultaneously with this aid to the
n central executive departments of the na
n tion, they carefully nurtured with singular
e providence the productive and commercial
functions of the nation, neglecting not even
the humblest.
By the kindness of Mr. J. W. Shuckers,
we are peamutted to copy the following
e report of the matter made by the late Mr.
" Thomas Balch, who obtained his informs -
t, tiaI trom leading bankers of Paris:
•f It became apparent very soon after the
0 beginning of hostilities between France and
n Ger many, that the Armies of tie Empire
were too weak (the military organization
had been "worm eaten," as was exprese
'e ively said) successfully to eesisat the cure
re and swift advance of the Germane upon the
s French capital. Various inconsiderable
encounters took place even in the last days
' of July, which clearly foreshadowed the
subsequent immense disasters that over
to wholmed the Empire and ended in the con
V_ quest of France. On the 20 of August;
1d Ir70, the advance of 1041,000 Imperialists
upon Saarbrucken. withoutdecisive results,
' had a powerful effect upon the public sec
to timent of the French people; on the 4th
the battle of Weissenburg, in the actual
re defeat of their army, on the 6th, the battles
n- of Woerth and Saarbrucken (height of
°' Speichern) ended in the beginning of the
to retreat upon Paris, and on the 7th the city
was declared in a state of siege. These
e, events followed one another with extraor
en dinary rapidity; and amid the consterna
,r tion everywhere excited by them, the haute
t' finance of Paris took the alarm and a great
anxiety grew up lest, with the threatened
in destruction of the military power of the
it country, the native industries-the main
spraing and support of the credit and grand
Seur of France-should perish also. The
French floanciers-not the French politi
he clans--foresaw the impending danger, and
with chlaracteristic sagacity and courage
provided the remedy.
in "The managers of tihe Discount Bank.
nt of Paris met together at the call of M. Pi
nr- nard of the Comptoird'Escompte, and con
ed sidered the state of the country. The reesult
ed of their conference was a resolution to ex
he tend financial asslstance wherever it conluh
of be made available for the general good
rd They appealed to the Bank of France fo.
on help. Tthe officers of the Bank promptly
I responded, declaring their willingoness and
as desire to make common cause with the
ge Banks of Discount but said they could only
as do so in conformity with the fundsmenta
x- law of their establishment, which restrain
nt ed them from making loans except upon tilhe
in security of three names of known respon i
ng bility ar upon prescribed collaterals; bu
er they would, the necessary requirement:
p. being met, extend all the aid in their power
ch They pointed out at the same time ti,
ter prime duty of preserving tihe resources alc
i- CRIEDIT Of the lank intact for the wore
ico emergencies. The result of this answes
cr was, that the Diecount Banks determinec
ts to become endorsers for the advances mada
s, by the National Banks; and accordlnglJ
d. with this co-operation of the Bank o
France, bills were discounted, during the
irst week after this artangement was
g agreed upon, to the amount of Eighty
Millions of francs! and during the recond
k week to the amount of One hlundred Mil
lions (a tonal of say nearly Forty Millions
d of Dollars !)-the B3nks' doors being kept
n open till ten o'clock at utightand adnliri,:il
o clerical force employed, to meet thei le
e quIrementa of this extraordinary occ:atsin.
L (1i understand that the Discount Banks
,a made the advances in the first irstauoce;
the National Bank rediscounting npoa !lie
p endorsement of the Discount Ban~ks ) This
,r is no now thing in France; it happened in
, 1848 during the eospenasto c ccasined by
e the political events of that year, when t! e
r, National bank, at its principal tflice in 4
Paris and at its several brantc, s, made like
y advances to an limnunt approxtwatinf to
Sixty Millions of Dlilars. (Tooke. History
of J 'rices, volume vi. pp. 5i8 i9) 'Th
is whole transaction was coucluded by the
,o 17th of August, and in the pres-nce oif vast
t military d'sastt-re, and amid civil and polt-i
a ical commotions unparalleled ini thr Il:!tory t
Sof modern nations
e "To whom were these immer.e. ý lsv-inc-s 1
or made T To merchants, ulnunf.-rulters, I
. 6shop keepeia, artizans and litechnlir e; tO
nt.i rti deeed whose books .lhiwed 1
h that their business during a c .
d long period had been fairly prosep'i..ia and
,s whose industry adi integrity mere ,estsb
,f lished, and of course much importance was
attached to this latter fact. Many of the
a advances to artizase and mechanics were
as made without endorsement or collateral at
S allon no other security, indeed, than a
fair busine as ald an hii 1net ait- .- Tbe
effects ot this extraordinary operation
were of commensurate public importance
In the midst of the most frightful and acco
tt mulated military and political calamities
f and the gradual environment of the French
capital by the German hosts, the trade and
a labor of France were preserved anld even
stimulated; and it was altogether owing
a o this patriotic and most sagacious an
dacity that, in a period of special and ter
rible trial, no noteworthy comituereial or
industrial failure eccurred, and that France
d Has afterward enabled to provide for the
paymerint, without serio)us difficulty, ,of an
indemnity intended permanenrtly t 1 crush
her, and which excited by ire in tg,:itude
d the astonirhment of thei who;, wsii.
S Mr. Shouckers remarks: "It iei;Mnir, t.i
beho added tlim, at tie cianr-f r Mr 1t l-'h's
I, recital of these facts to me, (in 1^74) only
, about, six thouiand diliars of ii. great
advarnces nfatle as ahoven statied, w, r: ill
' unpaid, and thisn stnal tntin wtas i in i from
u the unsettled estates of deceased debti",ri ! '
. MISCELLANEOUS.
e TiLE NEWV ORLEANS C
PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
Have removed their rise to the leommodioaeusground
d floor of the building No. 159 COMMON STREET,
formerly ocoupied by the New Orleans Gaslight Co. '
In making this announcement they desire to express
me their thanks to those of their felloe-cltizeraswho have
d thus far extended their aid to this great *nterprise, (.
while again appealing to the entire community to
promptly come forward and subscribe in accordance
L with their means, in order to enable the Directory to I
push with renewed vigor the work already so far ac
complilbed to completion.
Be Every facility will be given, on aptAeation at the
te office tolmpart the Informa'ion regieired to convince
y every one that the sucoess of the road is assured as
n soon as the sumn of $175,00 is reachedl, either in sub
d ocriptiois to the first mortgage bonds, or tolthe stock
ir of the Company.
r In order to place their securities within roach of all
- classes of our people, the Company havre issued scrip
- limited in amoonttot5ruc and madre rocivablesither
) for stock. when presented in sums of $1t, or for freight
t. or passage on completion of the road. This scrip is
e divided into notes of $50, $20, $lo and $5, transterable
a- by bearer, thus enabhng all to aid in this immeasurably
ir important work, the sucoess of which will largely re.
al doned to the interest (f every man. woman and child
In in this city.
With regard to the flret'mortgage bonds, no one can
a, doubt their being a first class investment, apart from
g the collateral advantages which will be derived by the
.rescdentsof this city. and that they will be so regarded
by our moneyed instltutions, the Company refer to a
recommenac ation made a short time since by the Presi
ie dents of nearly all our Banks and Insunrance Companies
od f the second mortgage seven per cent bonds of the
i Company, when easuch an issue was contemplated.
n To show the confidence felL by these ies itutions in
tire piopseed road, tteilr (eioers recommend the second
mre ortgage bonds of the New Orleans Paettlc Railway
he Company as a " flret-class seven ter cent per annum
i:e interest-paying investment." and say "they will be
ya received by their several institutions as security for
he loass with as much reainess as any other seven per
it cent security of the State of Louisiana; they unbesila
- tingly commend these bonds for investment."
t With this inducement, eapplemented by the assur
its ances that the Company can obtain ali else necessary
t, to place the entire load.in working order when this
seemingly small sum shall have been provided for, and
thurthrthr. that instead of second mortgage, first mort
igage six per cent bordsare lubstituted. can any citizen,
lea who really desires the prosperity of th!s city, which
of has been so long retarded by the simple want of proper
he communication with thealmost Inexhaustible resources
t of Texas, Arkansas and Northern Louisiana, fail to
se respond promptly to this appeal t
SE. B. WHEELOCK,
S seO23 im President New Orleans Pacific Railway Co.
t THE CELEBRATED
ed Glenn Waukesha
- MINERAL SPRING WATER.
id
he GEORGE McCLOSKEY,
SOLE AGENT FOR LOUIBIANA.
ge For sale at 83 S Chasrles street, under Masonic Hall,
- ad 121 Cams1 rtreet, Tenro RBIlding. as Im
STAINED GLASS for CHURCHES, etc.,
Guaranteed q.al. to lmyorted, ard much cheaper
Good Art luas, supplied at the Prices cuargei lot the
interior article peculiar to this country.
A. FITZPATRICK & CO.,
STAINE.D GLASS WORKS,
SrAPLETON, STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.
N. B -Late cf London. Postlelco For 216.
- PRIZS IRECEIVED -
Lodon,. 1871. Centeonnil x'lhition. Philadlphil, 1l76.
Willi 77 ly
']'Inl 131:si
Photographs in the South,
PrI:FE(I'ION IN L1XENISJ3, 1'CII IN TONE,
1YNIQUALLE:) IN ''VERY OTHER WAY.
AilX M1~I'. AT
WASHBURN'S
NA W IPIOTOGRAPII GALLERY,
Corner of Canal Street and Exchange Place.
ElegLaznt Drn gni, with all Modern Irprorementa.
mU4 ly Finet Art Work. Trice. Moderate.
MIS'kELLANEOUS ADVERTiSEMENTS.
OFFICE OF THE
AMFRICAN COTTON lIE CO.,
LIMITED,
47 ........... Carondolet Street ........... 47
NEW ORliANiO.
IMPORTAN'T SVI'CIAL NOTICE.
The AMERICAN C'OTTON TIE COMPANY
(LIMITED) having fixed tOe price of the celebrated
ARROW COTTON TIE
at ,~_ 50 per hurdle. less tl per cent dipceunt for cash,
the Goneral a gents hereby authorise their Sub-Agents
in this ettir (dealers in Osaiing Stiff.) to sell to and
contract with Factors and Country Merchants. for
future delivery on the above-naied price and terme,
In qnantities. from tine to time. as may be required,
settlements being made on delivery.
The Company ILaving a large stock now on band, and
having contracted for an aburdfe. Sulp'y to nmeet the
tire demand for Cotton Ties threnohi', t the Cotton
States. I ARROW TIE will he paced
upon the arket geneord a id by their unerous
Agents at the pr'e and terms albue stated, it being
the object an purpose of the nCompany to merit the
CAN'T BE BEAT !
CUSTOM-MADE
STILE, DUIRABILITY AND CHEAPNESS OUR
MAKE OF CLOTHING CANNOT
BE EXCEL.LED
We make all oar (;laih7itg n the t.remies, and keep
no Northetn-made Goods.
We cut from the IBet of Clothe, Diagonals. Mohairs.
Tweeds, Casasimeres and fine Jeans.
We employ llratclass Tailors and Cutters, and always
give a good st lish tit.
Our prices are so low that everybody can Indulge In
The luxury of a FINE SUIT OF CLOTHLNG
FOR LITTLE MONET.
A FEW OF OUR PRICES.
BUSINESS SUITS......... Durable .....1 50 to $12
(ASnIMEItE SUITS...... Neat......... 9 n to 14i'l
FLANNEL LUITS........ loe......... It, 00 to 15 00
pIAtONAL SUITS. ....... jlerant..... 13 0 to 19 50
BLACK UITS ............ Dress ........15 00 to t t0
BLACK COATS ............ Frock ........9 00 to IS oil
DIAGONAL COAT...... Sacks ......... 00 to 9 O
ALPACA COATS......... Cool....... 1 50 to 3 5
LINEN COATS........... Ary . ... 75 to 1 50
CASSIh E PANT'S ....Stylish........ 2 73 to 4 50
BLACK PANTS...........Doeskin......4 00 to 650o
JEANS PANTS ........... Everlasting...1 50 to 275
LINEN VESTS ............ A La Mode .... 25 to 2a50
YOUTHS' SUITS .......... Nobby........ 6 10 to 14 Ide
OYS' SUITS ..............All Sree...... 4 5 to 00
- ALSO -
A special fine line of Imported CLOTHS, CASSI
MERES. etc., from wh!ch measures are taken
to order at equally LOW PRLCES.
Special attention given to orders from the country.
Goods sent on rocelpt of oseh or C. O. D.
COGAN & SONS,
19 ......... Canal Street ... _......19
Between the Customhouse and the River.
Osa untll i r. on IRndavs. fells 77 ly
JOHN P. ROCHE,
Jeweler and Optician,
,Watches and Jewelry Carefully Repaired.
SPECTACLES AND EYE-GLASSES
Of Every Deocrlption.
Particular attention paid to suit the eight accurately.
No. 98 CampStree
do31 76 ly NEW ORLIANP.
NEW ORLEANS SAVING INSTITUTION,
15. ........ . Canal Street........... 156
- oFFICEnS
D. URQUHART. President.
THOS. A. ADAMS, First Vice lPsident.
THOS. ALLEN CLARKgE. Second Vieo President.
CHARLES J. LEEDS, Third Vice President.
CHARLESr KILSHAiW , Tresurer.
SThomas A. Adams, George Jonses,
0 Thomas Allen Llsrke, John O. Gaifnes.
Chas. J. Leeds, Christian Schneider,
Saml. Jamison, Carl Kohn,
A. Moulton, T. L. Bayne,
.A. Palfrey, David Urquhart.
Interest allowed on Depoits. eel5 76 ly1
WESTERN PRODUCE, LIQUORS, ETC.
K. COINER. 3. OOnHR,. JL
E. CONERY & SON,
(Established in 1846.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
Dealers in Western Produoe,
CORNER OF CANAL AND DELTA STREETS
de17 76 ly 51Kw ORLEANS.
J T. GI13BON ,
DZLERB Is
GRAIN, CORNMEAL AND HAY,
57, 59, 1,63... New Levee Street...57, 59, 61,63
ulb;;7 ly Corner Poydras.
j. McCAFFREY,
DEAL*L I.
HAY, GRAIN, CORNMEAL, FLOUR,
ALL KINDS OP
Western Produce Constantly on Hand.
28 and 30..... .Poydras Street.......28 and 30
Corner of Fulton,
uIa17 17 1 W O· L UIII.
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS
Relsectfnlly Informs his friends and the publio that at
bhi new store,
144............. Camp Street .............144
He has a fresh and well.selected assortment of
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpenters' Tools. GOrates. tvea and House Faurnlh
leg Goods of all kinds.
NHo is better pre pared than ever before to do Copper,
Tin and Sheer Iron Work, and will furnish eltimates
to Builders and others, and guarantee aatisfaction
to all. j.1777 ly
NEW SEWING MACHINES
Al HALF PRICE
AT
J. BOOTH'S
GENERAL SEWING MACHINE DEPOT,
No. 614 bMgaizine Street, zrear Josephine.
Havlng now completed s rangements to buy my Ma
chines cirect f(nm the M.nnlusctnrers for cash and
employing no canvasser a to whom large salaries
or comniselons are paid. I am able to offer
greater inducements than any other
house in the city nto parties desiring
to purnbae any of the popular
SEWING MACT INES.
I have also a large stock of secondhand Machinea
all of which have been tebuilt and are guaranteed equal
to now, andw ihlchI can sell at from Ia5 to S'2. 15e1.
change. rent and repair all nS-a of Eewn abhlne.
A complete stock of Needles, Oil and Attachments
for all Machlnee. J. BOOTH.
614 Magazine sareet, New Orleans.
Agent for Botterick's and Mme. Demoreet's Patterns.
mt6 77 ly
CARPETS AND MATTINGS.
ELKIN & CO.
168.............. Canal Stret...... ......168
Fancy Canton MATTINGS,
White and Check MATTINGS.
Floor OIL CLOTHS,
Napier and Rattan MATTING for cfices.
A large stock of CARPETw . at extremely low prices.
oc00i76 ly
ESTABLISHED 1857.
G. PITAO RD,
iUlOITKtE AND ErALE% IN
HARDWARE, G EATES,
PALINTS, OtI., VARNII. ,VINDOW GLASS
WALL API'lhI;. ETI..
221 and 23:-..-.. Canan l , rtt......-'.21 and
Betwecu Ilampart and Batlu .treetr.
at21dly NO.W O'L,. NI.
W M. B. RINGROSE,
FURNITURE DEALER,
17 .............. Camp Street .............. 17
-ow occupies the large and eparions store 17:' Camp
street. between Gtrod and Julia. jllt above dt. Patrick's
Church. for the purpose of T..i.LNG FURNIIUtE
ON STORAGE at sbe lowest ratse
FURNITUKR REMOVED, BU;GHT, SOLD AND
EXCHANGED.
All kinds of Upholetering aLd Varnishing done witb
dlepaptch. aid Mattresses of all kinds made to order.
Country orders solicited and promuptly attended to.
Call and examine befure putehasing elsewhere.
ap5lY7 ly
FURNITURE
AT
HUGH FLYNN'S,
167 aiAd 169.....Poydran Street....l. 17 nd 169
FINE VICTOIhA BEDROOM SETS. reducoed fifty
per cent.
CHEAP VICTORIA BEDROOM SETS, at $50.
COMMON FURNITURE away down below anything
yet in the market.
Cash buyers are invited to call. oc8 76 ly
'. BIRI,
Importer, Manufoturer and Dealer in
WILLOW WARE. WAGONS. CRADLES,
MARKET BASKETS,
Work Basket. tbaimr. Clothes Baskets, German and
French Fancy Baskets. etc.
120, 268 and "253 Chartres Streets,
dei7 76 1i, NW ORLrA:..
A. BRUUSSEAU a. SON,
17............Chartres Street............. 17
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
Carpetings,
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHS,.
UHINA AND COCOA MATTING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVERS,
WINDOW HTADES,
CRUMB CLOTHS. RUGS. MATS.
CARRIAGE, TABLE AND ENAMEL OIL-LOTHS.
WHOLESALE AND ETA IL.
CURTAIN MTERIALS - Lace. Reps. Damasks
Cornices, Bands, Pine, Gimps, Loop. and Tassels,
Hair Cloth, Plneh, Bed Ticking and Springs,
BURT.APR. by the lela and Piece. 0015 76 ly
GROCERS--COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
THOMAS MANGAN,
DEALER IN
CHOICE GROCERIES,
AND IN ALL KINDS OF COAL AND FIPE WOOD,
No. 446 St. Charle' St , curner of Pol1 mnia,
NIW UOLLANS.
Wood and Coal Ya.rd, No.4'S St. Charles street.
All orders promptly attended to, and goods delivered
freeof charge. ael6 77 ly
MATTHEW WARD,
(SUCCESSOR TO MARK R. GILLIN)
DEALER IN
STAPLE AND FANCY GEOCEIRES,
Wines, Liquors, Etc,
129...............Laurel Street.. .....129
Next to corner of Philip.
Goods delivered to all parts of the city free. jyl ly
JAS. P. O'BRIEN,
DEALER IIN
Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco, Tea, &0.
No. 641 Magazine Street, near Jackson,
SWA OrLEAI., LA.
Firstclass Goods at reasonable prices. Goods delivered
to all parts of the city. jelO 77 ly
pETER ELIZARDI,
DEALER IN
GROCERIES. PO VISIONS,
TEAS, WINES AND LIQUORS,
Corner Burgundy and Mandeville Streets,
NEW ORLEANS.
Country orders promptly filled, and all goods delivered
de31 76 Iv free of charge.
A. GREGORY,
436............ Dryades Street ............43(
Sercond Door above Terpsichore,
New and Second-band SEWING MACHINES of all
kinds and Buttrleck's PAPER PATTERNS.
A full line of STATIONERY. SCHOOL IFOOKS, and
the latest Ioc and 1Oc Libraries.
Sign of the " Red Sewing Machine." Lewing Mach;nea
of ell kinds repaired. c30 em
GARDEN SEEDS
- Sent fleA by mail
New crop rf TURNIP SElE., four beat varieties, ca
75c per Ib; RUTABAGOA PfEED three beat varlet.es, o
hoc per 10; BLOOD BEETS SItED, threebest varitlees
SI per lb. Best sorts of Caulflowers, Cabbages Celery
Lettuce. Raddleh. Carrots, and other aea.onabie seeds
all fresh and of recent importation. Prices at snobc
lgures that will pot no doubt on their reliability.
Purchasers In quantities enjoy a liberal discount.
R. MAITRE, C0d Magmaine st.
Landreth' " Value and Cultlre of the Roots," 5c.
by mall. jbl0 3M
MEDICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
FOUR MONTHS OF
GOOD HEALTH
For 25 Cents.
ANY PERSON WHO WILL BITY A BOX 0o
PARSON'S PURGATIVE PILLS,
and will take one (1) each night f for unlbob l·
will do this bvery third ('di week durtigibe th i .f
June.July. August andl' ptember will hotbetrmnUlej
with FIV1ER and AGOU, nor tMALARIOUS PfIR,
nor BILIOUS 'A itR, nor any of the diseases resh
log from mlasmatsic poison, common in Mussouri ki.
eisalUIl, Louisiana, Arkansas and Tease. If P&R.
SON S FiItGATIV PILLS cannot be obtained at
your nearest store, send 25 cents to the undersigned.
and the pills shall be sent. post paid. by return mail.
Phsstoiir.e Bppliled by mail at 150 per thousand in
bulk. As this s buhot little more than half-prle for
standard pills by the thousad, ucash mnt sooomspany
the ordor. 'I hoe Feoltie will be heerfolly sent to anym
physician on application. We will send Parson's Pills
by mail to resnonlsble parties on oonsasioo at $3 per
dozen, sample dozens at 61 35 cash with me order.
WHOLESALE AGENTS.
COLLINS BIROS ...................... Rt MLa, Mo.
(I. W. JONES & CO................. Mlemphis. Tn.
E. J IIART & CO...............New Orleans, La.
'C. J. LIBUNCOLN CO.............Little Rok, Ark.
S-T-.-2 lJPUBO P KCO ........... ... Gvt ,'.
Address all orders to
I. 8. JOHNSON & CO.,
je24 '77 ly Bangor, Maine. Proprietors.
SARRACE NIA.
The great preventive of and
remedy for
JfALL POX
and all Malarial Diseases.
COSMO G. LOGIC, Surgeon Major of the Royal
Horse Guards. Lerdon, write: "'I have given the
arraecnisa Purpurea a fair trial, and am happy to asy
that eleven contoent rales in cor hands have recovered
under its peculiar influence. The effect of the tbn.
o-nia killed the virus, changed the oharacter of the
diOePse. and did away with the cause of itting. Ian
amply supplied with the Strranenia for the use of mt
rgitment. and advise every c,untry gentleman to hays
a stpply in his medicine cheat "
The
Sarracenia Lifa Bitters
arc delightfelly cordial, and are universal In Alabama
eiorciae an Sandot (nolana n s a ·rp.ctflu for Si("l
LFADA('iE, tlAbTKttI', DF)YIPI'.'fA, L1VE
COMt'Lh IN't. and all disnases connected with thi
toracih . Soldl by
yutltF.ll iCK :O & hL~al E, Druggla is,
Canal street.
WM EOGEL Magazine street.
Dn. J. TLUC cZt, Mobile. Proprietor. m1377lly
FOR THE BENEFIT
Southern People and suffering Humanity
I now rerspectfuly announce mselefae the Sole Agen
of the Southern States, except Maryland and Virginia
for the
SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE,
Montreal, Canada, and Winookie, Vermont, for the sat
of their original ad genuine preparations, the SoRUI
OF SPRUCE G UM, for Pulmonary Consumption
Coughe, Colds. Hoarseness and other affections of thc
Chest. I am also the Agent for the ul e of tbs SYR
FOR HOOPIDbO COUGH and COSIPOND LINI.
kIENT. which is useful especlially for Inflammasor
Rheumatism. Sciatica and Paine in the Loins. The.n
invasluntl remeoirs are well known and in genersl se
In the Nort h and East. and are now offered to thebs people
of the South. All that is asked for from the commu
nity is a test of their curative properties and a rseaoom.
niendation according to the effect; Ccnvente, Colleges
Boarding Irhools and all charitable institultions should
never be without a supply of those salutary mlxtrse.
Depots for the sale of the above will be estabhilsbd
in the followiEg States: Louisiana Alabama. Misin
sippt, Texra. Plorida, Georgia. Tennessee, South and
ortnh Carolina (IP'olelgn Mxicol].
All order. for the above wili be promptly filled t
Manufacturers' prices by the Oeneral Agent,
P. F. GOGAETY,
Bookeellerand Stationer, 151 Camp street,
New Orleans, La
PRICE of the Syrup of Spruce Gum, Sie; Hoopins
Couph Syrup, 50acr.; Compound Liniment. 75e.
B. B.-Be careful and examilne the trade mark.
ehld 77 lv
CARRIAGE MAKERS.
JOSEPH SCHWARTZ,
IMFORIREAND SIALEA IM
Carriage, Wagon and Cart Materials,
Springsa Axles, Bolts. Ready-Made Wheels, Buggi
bldies. Wood Work. Trimmings.
PAINTS AND VARNISHES
SARVEN PATENT WHEEL,
Carriage and Wagon Maker and Repairer
- Salesrooms and Factory -
Nos. 43, 45 and 47 Perdido Street,
Opposite Carroll Street.
del7 TC ly NEW ORhLANsi.
J THOMSON & BROS.,
Carriage and Spring Wagon Makers,
GS and 70...... Rampart Street ......tS and 7I
Between Common and Grader,
Received Highest Premiums at State Fairs of 1871, 1h
1 73 and 1076 for bee~ Family l'La:on, Victoria. Open
and Top Buggies. Beer Wagon, Grocer's
Wagon, Express Wagon, etc.
Being practical workmen, rtd employing none bal
the beet mechanic,, Owe are prepared to make toordeO
or repair Carriages. Bufgges. Spring Wagons, etm. Coo
rre'r to many businee mUcl in the city using vehicles of
our maunntct'tire. All work guarneated.' fe 771i
W. F. CLARK,
134 and 136.._.. Rampart Street ...134 and 131
Between Toulouse and St. Peter,
NEW ORLE as.
- Manufacturer of all kinds of -
Carriages, Barouches, Buggies,
Express Wagons, Platform and Elliptic Sprill
Wagons,
SEWING MACHINE WAGONS, ETO.
Agent for Jas. Cunningham & Son's celebrated -it'
riages and Hearses.
Country orders promptly attendsd to. spill 1717
LADIES' DEPARTMENT.
MADAME FOY'S
Corset Skirt Supporter,
INCREASES IN POPOL&RITY
EVERY YEAR,
I And for HEALTH. COMFORT and
STYLE is aoknowledged the BXST
ARTICLE of the kind ever made.
For sale by all leading obbers and re
taller. Beware of imitations and in
Icingements.
Manufactured solely by
FOY & HARMON,
mb4 6m eow" New Haven, Conn.
LADIES' HAIR STORE
AND
Fancy Goods Bazaar.
G. T. SCHILLING,
159 ..............Canal Street....... ...... 1
M ANL FACwULRFR OF
HUMAN HAIR GOODS
AT WROLESALE AND RETAIL.
IMPORlTER O
PERFUMERIES, JEWELLY AND FANCY GOODI
of all deacript ions.
t - Just received. a new invoice of -
Cellolold Coral Sets. Combs, Neoklaces,
lPinus, Comeaos, eto
Real Ivory and Shell Combe, Sets. etc.
American Ivory CoImbs,.
English Black Garnet Sote and Ornaments.
Fans for the Theatre and Ball,
Steel Beta and Ornaments.
Rcbare Aareoaine or Golden Hair DyP*
Coantry Orders promptly attended to. 4d14 7611

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