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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, March 03, 1878, Morning, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1878-03-03/ed-1/seq-6/

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Ulirnlre. » '" and (;atholic Mesoenrgel
5 0---- SA , t--l, UII) HI' Lil'I i A ('.
t" I.V'!BM IqlfES'Ji' FIi:,I .iI`
Somue nlolths eo a clnatlit itdof to- 'b,
clergy If tlhe dtecea V'. all5lneld to dle- roel
vise the best nletlild ifl ,stalb ihli g a per- thi .
mslent fund for the tilief and support of tefr
priests of the Dioceae, who because ilca tile I
pacitated for duty through sickuiet, ,icci- Clnomp
dent or old age. The-et reprseontalves of Fran
the clergy aubuii.t'1 the result of thi'r lIas ji
deliberatilons t ttle Must Ileverend Alch- tory
bishop, askinrg Iis approriv of tile rules Illierl
and regulltioin for tlhe annual collet'rtlllll d
and disburelounlit of tIis money. This varie
pproval was obltained on 'Novewiber II , ric'ic
J177. The Most lt.verend Ar.:h:bishop in used
giving his approval, declared it a Ptatute't and I
of the l)ioces'. that a contribution Ior tihe at w
Infirm Priests' Fund should be mlade eivery six nI
year i and this uaeiimllielit aeould bi lmalde Th
at the time and in the nialinelr which t iii pitrnU
rules governilng this fund, an ,ulbruittedl for thni
his aliptro ir.l, iijluitl l"ii . A" .h1 till' inS hlrin
approaching wh-tIi tlhe tirst a- iseltiiniit II to dz iia
be made, ve publiih tIeo rietcl and rg.t' e- c,.
tions of this fund, wl.i:l al e iilw t ire t'i 'ie
in this l)io'ree", hi di'ig ,p bi all who liivu I
the care of souls. -v t,
1. A percenn age of Ihin retlle" i'f-th- I Lic cl
chnrohes shall be lipproliatid ti toe "i-lir:ii iu
l'rieeta' Fund.
. Voluittatry dlnatlosll and It g cii-l frrn ct
the clergy to thia fund will be gi. teluily r -ibot
ceivtd. .. . -,
:;, act Cougiiegal' il t ... .. . .
the soelar or regular ulergy, bahill be taxdt i W i
of one per eent. of its regular revelues, Vi:z
pew rents anld Souda) colectlion; lihe basis giii
ofthls revenue to be the next annuoal report. and
4- This assessment shall oonitinue until the ral
Fond reaches the amount of I$1) 000. and
5. The first assessment shall be paid in cash Artis
on or before March ist, Is- c.ie'
(. For future asseamenuts each congregation mate
may give a promiasory note, payable on roses
demand without nteret. the
7. The sanount of pension to he paid fromt
this fund, to priests totally disabled, shall beu A d
at the riteof 5,i00 psr annum. oa e
Priests disabled hy other csane than to n
in rmity or old age shall be supported in a poini
religious institution, with permission of the se(l
Ordinary.mu
9. The Board of l)irectors of this fuo", shall ull
consist of five priests; two to lle alppoiited by ef
the Ordinary, two to be elected Iy the ulergy, seen
and these four to chese the fifth. Te
It. The loard of Directors shall lie elected garu
at the thast meeting cf the clergy and hereafter loan
at each Pastoral Retreat. silk
cove
IE M.I UCH CUUvK MIRiACL.E. loop
Stflow
TIlE AICIttIInHIIOP MARKS TIlE Si i AI.LEI) Cost
IIItACI.E WITII IlS UINQUALIFIED CON- silk
1ItMNATION. lace
from
tnlladiphis li Tmees i he
The announcement in The Times that Al
non Sunday last Father HLeinan, of Manch vera
Chunk, the priest who performed the so- one
called 'miracle" on Mise (reth, of Read- Burp
lug, a week or so ago, would confess that mid
he had been doped, caused gloat excite- garu,
snent there, and the congregation at early onal
Mass at Father lleinani's church was very and
large. After Mass the priest said that le in tl
bheld in his hand a letter from Archbishop out
Wood, which lie was commanded to read. polo
Without further comment he read as fol- cost
lows: T
The Archbishop, having heard ulld care- toil,
fully considered the cironulatSanes preceding dno
and accompanying what is derisively called The
the"Mauch Chunk Miracle." siidi to have inad
been wrought on the peirso ofa woman, whose ostr
eccentric piety has neither good sense nor som
soond Cathe!li doctrine for its founde.tin, re- T
quires me to instrutet you that, in bis jllgment
It .is a elusion anod a piou1 iralud. Without $51
g irlyg -is in th. e xt.nt t io which others par- '
tlolpated iii this lamentable fully, ha dsires toe
to mnark the whole ,:roceedig and the prinoi- exq
pal actors in it with his distilent and nelqualt- t:at
fled dmsapprobation anrd oondemnat.io,, asd to forr
wy that a repetlition of anythitng If the sort indi
this diocese will be visitid by the severest CiS
censore authorized by the laws of the Church. tf
Father Iellaon read the same letter in toet
the fGerman language, and the services tie
closed without further comment upon tile jrw
subject. ie refused to be interviewed it erau
reference to the matter, but says hlis duty of I
as a loyal churchman was never again to ,i
allude to the subject. lace
Father ounce's congregation was also an fire
eunsually large one, and he read the same can
document to his people. On the comple- No
tion of the reading of the letter Father lee
Bunce added, "That is all that the Arch- the
bishop had to say about the matter, and he del
asks that no further comment be made Th
upon it by any one else." Later lie added eta
that it would not be unfair for him to say in
that he did not hold himself responsible for wo
what had happened in East Mauch Chunk : set
that he had no co operation ini It; that hie ab
had known the facts beforehaind and was lil
present when it occurred, and that was all. wt
The Archbishop's terse and not to be stn
msisunderstood letter was a severe blow to t
Father lleinaun, and has brotuglit conster!a- fo
tion to his parishiuers 'rThe Protestants tut
and intelligent Roman Ciathitolic are pilesas
ed at the firm etanid taken Ihv tie Arch
bisth,,, anl believo that Fsther lhIltian's
removal will and should follow, lits nefl- th
iens being ii.nrioiu'ly Ipllailisd. Fi' tlhr i s
MlcMslnus, of lPLiladilllrai, aid a etlidieit
of St. Char|lea' S-imii ntarY, delive redt te el t
A' iholiiliiip' t ntii.itniilt I ti , p rtin I i li- I it
thlrslliit-.l !it d ilunc t lne, stinivg it MI:ucilluh
Chttli ii .i  ittildBi '. I l
Ti t :: tir t:Ao t Iiih .i- i it i IlIK . r tl iit
NeTo i: - at, hi Iv r l f  lt. iil ''nt h,eais r it I II'
Newrait, llh ie falr Wti, g. a.4te 1nuet'r "i h it
greatrit writer of 1ll lilghl i ,l whio i h liver i
lved. hlis noLivertl) a-d pjarocuiual rlullOnli, l;
*EiJ ey on I)oneloliimtiti' Ilia twol storicis, Lose I
and lain' ati d 'aliato,' hli "l.ttnrei onl
Anglios Dl)tloultile,' and his 'Alpio·iJJ lirs
tFi biua ' cootali muI patagses abilittllPu g Itn
grace, pathos, combined fource and tl;rleacy of c
tonoL, alnd 'viLi iroty. thai all the Anghcan
fathere from Jeremy Taylor to T'hirlw~ll ut e
sogether, and probably, if we exclude oldr great
wovelistt, thano any otber wilers of Englishb
rose."'
The enormoou saler of the Iin-ger saewing i
5lli5ti thbrougbout this oouitry and ELiipe prove
beyead dispute that it is by longl odds the a.mos popular
rashiO made. TIta ppallarty lI bamed upon toe feet
that il its coitructloli anI lanaigment It iia simple,.
and la its work most extl.rnt, leITln albslolutely
antsirn t o s dlIrIred. otcovler. Lhe p pr ~et of li
sirger eloures to fhe tol a8d nou tle apraiLTtTtrie
sd !visluai.le assitatiut, se '  tt will  s ndredl I
s dorlirs t ·and mnalsli, I4 ill sot get tlreeld or
-wsr oat in a lI:etlmo f rla;, ase i::bhe slen b th'
adIIV5sement on another page. the t"s'o iiav-o b.eie
sogreatly rediiceit that a good lnger rso L.le cas I t
L)eagIit as the Compat. 's elegant rtore .a\ 5'aal irst ee,
-alles thi masny laleriotr or bogas mhtines.
--- 10e,-@ IAIuuRBE.
A ('A I.I VOINIA BEl' t WnOSK REISFLSV,
.WA i. t., ANIt I.ACNe tIlVAI. THIOSE (O ANY
vl'FEN Ott I'IilNCEM.N.
an E. rnai i. t~ (hronic'i. L
'1The most extensive ard elegant ward
robe ever made or owua d on this side of
the Atlantisi oceani, ,.nd probably never g
before sUit passed in the world oet.ide of
the hmces of the nobility, in extent and I
oumpleteness, is the property of a San a
Francisco lady, young and b.eatiful. She g
has just left for an Eastern city prepara I
tory to making a grand tour of Europe. I
SThere were in the collection between thirty v
e" d forty robes of all kinds and of every n
variety of rate device. Only the finest, the I
rc'ihet, the most del:cate ulate ial hal d been f
used in their crearsion-mlke, satins, velvets ft
alnd hlccr. SInmo of theno came from Worth, a
at whioset shop in i'ar:a they were ordered ft
~ix nmuntlha aigo.
Tle alrtiole wardrotbe, with its attendant n
ptraphernalhb. could I'ot have cost lesas
than ~, lOii,0lIt, not irecluding diamnonds, i
hertatl(or to bo r:,ertitied, with slid gold i
dlzieuil caee atId inuniwerable toilet atti- a
cIhle. A few of the priurlpal dre-ses may d
bte ('e L .tt t 'tdl ati h ilowI :1
A rich p1 arl satin ball di tem, with viln
tIli,ltus Ovetldldce of real black Chantitilly
lc toasp. nded by eleider Iantda across the 1
elhouldera, thf nolatrowness of t!e hands
Iing intt,.(dud to assist in the displiy of a
c.tetly di.un' ii artulets worn far above tle i
eibow. The overdioas is looped with lou- u
qgtets of anutrutu leaves anId crimson buds, 1
me lace. A I
white satin ball dress, with point lace over
garment, tare and delicate, looped,t
and rendered more graceful by a spi- t
ral wreath of ferns. A cardinal velvet a
and coral pink silk robe, the two shades I
artistically intermingled, with handsome i
chenille fringe, also of two shades, to t
match. The tramming is a wreath of tea a
roses running diagonally around the skitt, j
the rusts of corresponding shade of pink.
A dinner dress of pink satin, with brocaded t
overdress of ecrrt and brown, with fringe c
I to match. A sea green satin, with real
point d'Alencon, tine as a cowe, b, a floune
ar.d a Mlatie Antoinette of the same costiy 1
Inlatuial. The lace overgarment is of seach
full ,pattern that the wearer of the robe I
seems like Venus rising from the waves.
The green skirt shines through the over
Sgarmoent like the bhe of the sea through its I
rloamn A ball costumo of cream-colored
silk and black Chantilly, the lace entitely I
covering the dress from neck to hem, and
looped back with bouquets of cardinal red
flowers. A magnificent dinner or evening
Ii costume of black velvet, embroidered in
silk and jet beads; 11unuce of Chanitilly
lace. A carriage costume of violet velvet i
from Worth's, richly embroidered with
chenilloe of the same shade and steel beads.
A green and gold carriage costume of
very heavy corduroy velvet from Worth's,
one of the richest of the collection and of
surpassing beauty. A cardinal satin trim- .
re med with point applique lace, the over
garment crossing the front and back diag
Y onally, ornamented with knife plaitings,
Y and looped with tea roses. It is cut Square
a in the neck, has a square train, and with
P out aromlets. There is a point lace and
point applique jacket to be worn with this
costume.
The handkerchiefs to go with these rich
toilets are of point duchess and vahn- the
ciennes lace, costing from $30 to $500. ViC
The fans match the costumes. They are re
B made of all the costly laces, or of real ed
e ostrich feal hers, with richly- carved handles, WB
rsoue of thenm plendidly gold.monnted. of
T Their aggregate value in not less than wa
t $5 (MII. 5.
The aasgniticent diamonds Lhat go with bu
nll . cf Ve
exquisite purity, and combined wit'h tine
t:tast in an infinite variety of beautiful ho
° for.n, Other wealthy ladies of San Fran- "I
n cisco may be the poseessors of collections pal
of brilliants whose aggregate value is equal agi
to that of these, but none have them so
n tstetlflly arranged. They have employed ph
e the most talented of our finest resident set
0 jewelly mainfacturers, and have been eev- tel
n eral teasl arrlving at their present degree so
Sof perfection. th
S T'here are live full sets, comprising neck- the
lact, armlets, bracelets, and earrings. 'The lo
n first is made of solitaire diamonds, the
centre one a regal stone of immense value, ti
None of these individual st:tes is worth Mi
r less than $5,000, and the entire value of th
1 the piece is about $75,000. Diamond stars to
depend from the solitaires of the necklace. ch
The armlets are of solitaires to match, with ge
id stars depending. The bracelets correspond Pt
iy in style. The chatelaine, which can be fe
worn with any of the sets, is made of a Si
series of diamond-studded rings, passing bi
le about the waist and falling over the left
as hip, where it is confined by a crescent, hi
11. which is a mass of diamonds, with diamond I
be stars depending. The set is rendered a:
to complete by solitaire earrings, a diamond a
A for the hair, and a feather set with dia- 51
its uonds to loop the skirt. ThL second set le
la isof hardly lessbeauty though thodiamonds P
l- ain smaller. eMaltese crosses hang from 0'
aU the solitaires of the necklace and from n
e1- those of the arinlits, as do the stars in ilie
ir set destribed. ThIl bracelets match. Tle a
ft iart lit; are ciirosse exqullisitely nade. The t
le t oleStca ea' be iispl qiced froim the a ttinig e
Sit deiited and worn separately. The third 1
: I niot in Ia:tle os f lTerald, and dlitlntildLo . T1,e
ineklal., it l iie lt of large t iSrailds, with
two or .thiri, fistitllnds. diniinishlon, in size,
1-S' i. 1, il,'; Iroi each. T'he bhiacelets,
y" at mitts, aod ntuings arti made to match,
Atlan there' is ant t leliild baetle set with
.1,. itin' aliis to ila-tel the hair.
li t l'lir , i uli i a set of coral and daitaoinds
lie iitadllu i a1 etylo siuLitewhat simlilar, tii i
vor dllallunl. btiulueuiitd irol the coial; lnodl
-a i pca I and diamond set, with eairiings of
'a largo pearls, with two or three diamonds
Oe suspended from each pearl.
pro Besides these are numerous rings, both
y of cluster and solitaire.
can The entire value of the collection far
put exceeds $100,000.
reast The lady who carries this fortune about
dlieh her person will visit England and pass
somue time on the continent, returning to
King San Francisco about the inrst of January,
prove l - .
puler -  -
. fa.t
mple, Plants sleep at night, as is well known, bnt
lateol their s i.pi ng hours are a matter of habit, and
of s can easily he disturbed. A French chem.ist re
steuer ly..UiLit._ sensiitive plant to a bright
iedr e IIl t r it i'tt t 0nil place I ina -
ed .i ,luri.,g thodai. The plant, at first, appeared
ei o cli ,huz:led It opened and closed its leaves
iv Ihi irrr~ " 'ig Iv, iu spito of the artificial sun beaui
tbeii i-ig upon it ait gih atd., in the daytime, it
!a I~ onelmesn aswoke. It finally submitted to the
ilet, chinge ounfoldng itself regularly at night,
and closing In the morning.
FATlER JIURBNE'S .5LE5r)bN 1wJ'LiS ON
t'URSIN(;.
r Thero is tiotbing to htf.vyn, not .irgr no
earth, for w.!icij the Almightv God I as so
great a regard as His own Name. Wher
He speaks of tho people of Israel, He ase ;:
"I1 will be tlheir God; I will be in the
f midst of them. 1 wilt give them every
r grace and every gift," and He tells as that
He will crown His graces by putting His
I Name upon them-"and My Name aslall be
Samongst them." When the inspired Evan
s gelist wants to describe to us the glory of
heaven and the brightoess of God's saints,
he tells us that the highest glory in heaven
will be to have the name of God written
r upon our foreheads. "For I beheld a:,
o hundred and forty-four thousand, and they
u followed the Lamb, for they were the first
a fruits of the Lamb, ald they had His Name
and ilis Father's Name written upon their
J foreheads." And this is the Name that the
Ilebr' ws of old were not permitted to
t mention, evi in prayir; yet this is the
p Name that tic- hnlf drunkeu wretch, the
man who is ni~ther drunk nor s.hler-the
I man whose tlueiIhed race and bloosdhlbt ,3e
and L:aking btrd easily show hi.t to he a
y drunkard though he is nor drnk--will !tcke
nnon every otittasion. It is nothing but
*'God" here aetd *'f ..d" there; and perhare
l that awful habit of clusing to wlicht the
u Almighty (;od is called upon to exLcute
a vengeance, as, I',i insttlLCee, wlh' a, nltr
f saj, "Danmn 3 )u !" '"I:lat you !" or when
Sa man tells anoti.rer in i.uger t'. "go to hell"
or any :f thlus' thllts. Cosliderthlinsult
that mar. oth-re to A:ruighty God. Listen :
S1I will put it bhori ou in three wrds as
I, that a man ca:: <tf.r to lGad is to pass sert
tence upon Its fotlow man and then. call
t upon God to exe:ute it. According to tile
@ laws of tie land. it a lian is found guilty-
e if hl is tried for any crime and brcught
o before a judge and jury-when his trial ia
a over, and tihe jury tind him guilty, then the
t, judge ee..tences him. For inetatce, after
,. a ttial for imurder, the judge p'asesa sen
d tenco upon Illon, anti it is that "on such a
e day, la such ans hour, you are to eu put to
it death." Who executes the senennc.' ,
e Will the judge do itl Alh, no, he is nto
y high and dattttied a persnnage. Will tilhe
I sheriff do It t No. Will the iotibl, tt
o pease.nt di, itt N.; but when the day o.
e. execution conles, a wretched crtoture who
r. v'a never Heein before, who arriv's :t the
to night time, and hasa seask upon l; f~ce, ii
d order that no mat may know wiuO lte is
y the common hangman comes with "- mask
d upon his face, and pu:t the re r iound the
,d man's r'ck, and latnc.hes t:lu into ett ualty.
g Now tho'man who curses hisa fellow-mao.
n and says to him, "Damn 3ou," 'BIlet j oin,"
y "To hell with you," that man pate God
at into the position of the common htangman.
; Hlie says, "You have cf'i-nded me; I am
s. not able to damn you; I caanou send you
af to hell; but I ask Almighty God to do it
8, to carry out my sacteuce." Actually, th':
af man puts himself in the position of tite
1. judge of his fellow-man, and then, with
r- imput'ence and audacity pa-t all helievi:,g,
he calls upon the Eternal and Omnip oteCt
a, God to execute his sentence, and damn hIis
re fellow-creature! The greatest ineo!t that
_. can be off'sleed to our Lord atd our (JGd.
. "T' I . PLr&' Tt:.i'4 'Ir
The Cork Farmers' Club have b eeno
thanking Mrs. 1)ouny Lrne for her very g
vigorous, though unpretenLtioIs, eff,rt to t
relieve the immediate misery tf thbe wretch- te
ed tenantry of theoGaltees. In a letter by Ca
way of acknowledgenect, Mrs Laine seaks t
of "the insignincunt fraction of heln" she d.
was able to collect in a semi private way !
amongst a few acqucintances and fteuinds, e
but quotes a few hlles at a letter fromn the aih
Very Rev. D)r. lIelauy, P. P , Ballyporeen, Th
how" welcome the smaliest allevi;tion. lot
11 gave the brown dress," writes t!he geood I,
pastor, "to Mrs. C- , who claseped it mt
again and again to her breaet ; also 1 g taee
her 6i. to redeem her cloak, which c.h haild a
pledged to pay the rent. Bt it y on had
seen the men-gigantic fellows-burit into sil
tears like little children' They had been an
so long neglected, they could not believe mi
that any decent person took an interest in ha
them. I gavea coat to--, who alsmost .
lost his with through joy. The same with St
--and--. They had nothing to cover gr
them, and consequently never came to af
Mass. While I write, Widow--stands at
the table imploring me in every mood and Ti
tense to hold a collection for her at the Al
chapel door on Sunday, so that she might
get a few shillings to pay her debts and "
purchase food for lher starving children. A tr
few months ago I was called up late on a he
Saturday night to the deathbed of her hbus
band, wano dwelt far up on the mountain.
I have witnessed many scenes of misery, bi
but such misery as this I often pray to God
I may never be called upon to witness d
again." Mrs. Lane winds np ler letter by ds
a very timely suggestion to the farmers to
send to herself or to the Very Rev Dr. De
lany such donations as their Christian sy-n - i
pathy with cruelly sugfering peasants may it
suggest. Mr. Farrel truly said the beat
answer the club could give to t!.. letter
was that every niember sheould out down his
subscription, and we are glad to knew that
then and the.re every farmiee in tle, room
endorsed his elopiien out of bhis ilre.- I
 reel in. .
THiE iil'-: , "II)LICi( L;."
I:lo:" l i Cathi lic ieveew.
I-',r it true Canltiolic, life is a long bettle
-ii tea'tle with hlii rltf. and a batlhle with
the world, with the old oneuly of C( d niad
manskinlld in the beckgronnd, directing the
movemlents and ordering the tight. It is
I true that by all mee, Catholics or not, the
f same battle has to be fought and the. same
a main inters its are at stake. IThe reIl dif
ference consists in the knowledaeemle Atan
le has of the nature of the tight, the cause for
which he is fighting, and of the enemies he
it has to encounter. On these ponl;t all
Catholics who know their religion are
it agreed. Men of other denominatious, or
is of none, are apt to slip through life more
to easily, to take things as they come, to be
as their neighbors are, or as they cioui:dcr
their neighbors would have them to be, and
to let the hereafter take care of itsedl. They
live tin and think life made for the present
nt chiefly ; and they rule their lives so as to
ud make the present pass as pleasantly as it
re ma'y.
ht Catholics cannot take- this easy view of
. , w h a t -ife i s = ni e n m 'nn
cd and its value, for what and b} whimn it was
e given, and to what and ti i whn it must
n itend. They know that they are redeemed
he children of God, whose mn'aion it i., each
&, one in his degree, to spread the kingdom
of God on earth, and the kingdom of God
is still very far from being spread on earth.
The earth, as represent-d by the govern
monts of the world and the religions of the
world, rejects the kingdom of God, refuses
fealty to it, and i-, a great measure denies
God alto.ether. Who are to change this
condition of manu's minds unless Castholics
And how can Catholics bring about so sto
pendous a change, unless they are zealous,
good in their lives, devoted to God's set
vice, and posseesed with the love, the fear
and the knowledge of God.
In tbhe world to-day,- the nations that
once composed the Christian family role;
and in those nations Catholics, though
oppressed by various governments and
thwarted in every way, are still very
strong-strong in numbers, strong in worth
and invincibly strong in faith and right
principles. Before the kingdom of God
can be spread over the earth, the powers
that rule tihe earth must be won back to
their old allegience. We-e what was
Christendom one to day-one in faith and
doctrine, and even moderately trune to that
faith and doctrine-who can doubt but
that the Gospel, whose progtreFs is now so
tardy and difficult, would, with t'te in
cteased means of iateorcomnitunieatiVn be
twreio men at`d nations, tahti the wings of
the eagle and fly to the utterma'st parts of
tho earth1
Nor does the hard battle that a trn
Catholic mnst undergo, at all imply that
tle must necessarily be hard, harsh, and
oriovely. Quite the contrary. The man,
srnd the wan alone, who lives a true Chris
tian life has a quiet conscience; and a
-quiet conscience alone can .,ring cot-fidence
and peace, "that peace which the world
annot eave, which passeth all human un
man nuderstar dig," and whlch was
"Chri-t's last legacy to them that believe in
Himn.
Loe,*.fillou. in his "Psalm of life," sogc
of "the rapture of the strife." Mecauley
wakes an olJ Roman ask:
" How oa. a man die brtter
1Ltha b; iaing fearfrl odds
Far the a-sbes olr his fathers
And the temples or his gods 1'"
The epectacle of a brave man strugg!ing
under adversity, was thought by the old
pagans to be the spectacle most pleasing
to the gods. Indeed, through all nature
and all timc.s and all peoples, rune the
thought that life without struggle is inglo
rior', vat', and not worth living. The
gloater the stake, the heavier the odds, the
nobler the cause, t'he more sublime and
more inspiriting the strugglc.
Even unobservant men cannot help notic
ing the change going ou to day in the
midst of civilized people. The d fl'rrences
that split up the Christian ca:.p three cen
tunrle ag,, have almost run their course.
They have exhausted themselves, wolt
theotselves cut, and there remaies ncothing
for men of saith or an inclination to faith,
to fall back upon but the old faith from
which t'aeir fathers parted and which has
st,,od one, 'wholly untouclhed, unchanged
and unchtngueable throughout. But men
do not change cherished convictions easily,
evuti if those ctnvi'bona nue r.3ug. iuey
mua, have the strongest of miotives to urge
them to do sn. 'Yon prettee to prteach and I
practice a higher form of religion than
ours," an can we.L imagine a reasoning
non-Catholic to say, "well let us see it.
Show it to as in your lives, in your works,
in your intelligence, I ackn;;wledge there
are very good U3atholice; out are there no
good Proteetots? Perhaps, if apro rata
eoumeratiuu were taken, thoe fatholice
woc:d make a better sbow than the Pro
tes:a.t4. lint is th:is enough ? I meet
Cathulics in bod;ness asn I find very little
d.lfereoce on the whole betwetn thee- and
on-Cathollice. They drive just as hard a
bargain ; they are joat as eager f.r gain;
some of them rto just na masciupulous
about mite means of attaining their end.
They love mousy as much as we do; they
love themselves ; they love pleasure.
Take them as a body, are they so very
manch hbtter than otherse Why, then,
should I change foy religion for one that
would leave me much as before 7"
We are here, of course, giving the pos
sible views of a fair minded Protestant,
and it is a very natural way of looking at
mattera. He goun on the theory, apnd he
has the beat authority for doing so, that
"by their fruits ye shall know them."
Still, it must not be forgotten, that even
granting his position, he is regarding,
after all, only what is really a side issue,
even though it be a very important one.
The question is what is the true religion 1
All other questions must yield to that in
primary importance. Even though all the
world, professing to hold and to follow
truth, were wrong, the man who in his
heart and soul, and after using all the
means that God has given him to find truth,
is convinced that he has found it, must em
brace it, let the world wag as it will ; must
preach it, at least in his own life and con
duct. To faith Christ promised that it
should move mountains; but faith means
much more than a mere intellectual assent.
The man who says in his heart: "I believe
in God," and says it every day, and feels
ita deep meafting, will live constantly in
the presence of God, nor feel his life dark
r ened, nor his faculties chilled, nor his every
day work less practical or real, for living
l ..i ,a .l-;no in th a-t nrem ene. iBrit h11
faith wll shine through him ard comrnin
ricato' itiiif to thoe uamon.i whom ihe
II'OVei, aUe preach to them a !eeaon that in
t' e, liog run will not fail to reach thelir
healrta a:ia: thtir Itas .ni. This is the mniH
sion of i(!atholli'., andt by thia the~y wi!l
coc:t; tho w.irld.
O' the day of his vlsctior to oc.upy the lobir
of St. P'etr, the late Pope wrote the follow:ig
letter to his brothers at inaigaglia:
"Jus 16, ir46.
Most Dearly Ino'oved Ilrothers:
God, the blessed one, who hLmbleth and ex
altoth, has been p!eaaed to raise me, who am so
b:se', to the highest dignity on earth. His
most holy will be evermore done. I know in
same measure the a'most bonadlesa weight of
such a charge, and know equally my poverty,
unot to speak of the itter cotbingness of my
spirit. Cuone prayers to be offered up, and
pray for me yourselves. The Conclave has last
ed 44 hours. If the city of Banigaglia should
like to go to some expenao in the way of demon
Strations, on this occasion. I request that you
will take measnres-indeed I desire that te
sim to be expended be all laid oat in things
nseful for the city, in the judgment of the
mayor and the council. As to ya2, n.y dea
tirotheit, I embrace you both heartily in Jesus
Christ. Far from exulting. rather compassion
!atet yonr brother, who gives toe apostoin bless
ilng to all Pits IX."
"That dgC. of youras fls a' m" this mornia
and bit mew on the leg, anUt I notify you that
irteuud tol ehoat it the ftirt time I soa it." rVh
dog is not mad I" Mad ! I know he's ot mad
I What has he got to be madt about 7 It's mi
I that's mad !"
LADIES' DEPARTMENT.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
LADIES' BAIR STORE
AD
Fancy Goods Bazaar.
HUMAN HAIR GOODS
AT WHOLESALE AND UETAIL
PERFUMZRIES, JEWELRT AND ANCl Y GOODS
of all deseriptione.
Having received a large strok, which ba been seloet
ed with great osoe on my receel trip North. I am now
prepred .o offer one of the most complete as. rtaoata
bht can be sound In theuoath. and ait prices unequalled
by any as the stoek was puEmbaed fur oash.
My stoak consists of.a ftll line of HUMAN ILlAI
in all shades and colorn.
Jewelry, Fancy Goods and Perfumery,
LADIES' COMBS, DHAI ONAMENTS
G. T. SCHILLING,
159 ..............Canal Street.._........159
Between Bourbon and Dauphine,
WOW ORLSANS. LA.
All Country Ordere promptlv attended to, and In
aneo where goodt do not provo to bes represrted.,
they m.cy he returned, and I will refundL the money
LAIE:', MISSES' AND OENL'LEMEN'S
UNDERVWEAR.
The Sisters of the Good Shepherd
have established, for the convenlence of Ladies and
Gentlemen. a depot for the ea:e of Ladie3'. Misse and
Gentlemen's Underwear, In rants' Robes and Children's
Dreases, t the Esablishment of Mrs. K. C. LOGAN,
14 Baroone street, -,hero a tall line of their goods wit
be kept and sold at the most reasonable prioes
Orders s'eo received. oo777 ly
(Formerly Mis. MoAnley),
Of ICI Canal street. and last of the corner of Jackson
and Magazino streets,
13............. . Canal rStreet.. ---... ......132
Between St. Charles and Carondelet.
near Leveols and Jamison's.
DRESSM AKINC
IN ALL ITS BRANOI ES.
Her skill is well known. ooi4 Om
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS
V BIRI,
Importer. Mannufacturer and Dealer In
WILLOW WARE. WAGONS, CRADLES,
MARKET BASKETS, A
Work Basiet., Chairs. Clotths Baskets. German and H
F:eoch fancy Bakeet. ee. and
120, "83 and 253 Chartres Street., re
jas0 78 ly NEW OsLsANs.
CARPETS. CARPETS. com
tore
ELKIN & CO. "l
1Md.............. Canal Street.........--.168 min
Are receiving new and elegant styles of
AXMINITK R. VELVET.
BRIUSELS,. THREE-PLY and 0.
INGRAIN CARPIETS, pFe
ONIC E MATTINGB.
WINDOW SIHADE[ and CORNICESR O
(:UWIti'AINS and UPHOLSTER" GOODS, -
OIT. CLOTIIS, rom sti to eighteen feet wide.
otl 771y AT THR LOWBST PRIOFB. J.
A. BROUSSEAU & SON, BE
17 ........... Chartres Street............ ..17 A
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN Mm.
Carpetings, a
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHS.
CHINA AND COCOA TTAJING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVES,
WINDOW SHADES.
CRUMB CLOTHS, RUS. MATS.
CARRIAGE TABLE AND ENOAMELOI.-CLOTH&.
WIOLESALR AND RETAIL.
CURTAIN MATERIAdLS-latce, Reps, Damaska
Cornices. Bands, Pine, Giaps, Loops and Taaels,
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and Springs, Sp
BURLAPS, by the Bale and Piece.
Prices as low as those or any one lse in the trade.
t oct1 71 ii - _
FURNITURE AT
HUGH FLYNN'S, ca
167 at.e 1J.....r -y-as -..167..1G9 -
SYou can find the d
CHEAPEBT BEDROOM SETS.
THE CHEAPEST DINING ROOM SETS, J
AND
THE LOWEST PRICE PARLOR FURNITURE
IN THE CITY.
A large stock. and anxions to sell. oe4 77 ly
e STEWART -
IMPROVED NEW FAMILY
thi
Singer Sewing Machines,
I Twenty-Five Dollars and Upwards. ,
e Makes lees nnls, runa lighter, and Is the best and 13
W cheapest lnger Machine in the market.
8s Sold on weekly or monthly ayments, at a small
advance over cah prices.
AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE. and libera
Indnoements offered.
Call on or address E
J. BOOTH,
it Q: NERAL AQENT, A
t. 611t....- .....Magazine Street............614
saW OaLUANIB, LA.
sit Agent for lmo D.moret's Patterns, ad Dealer in all
in kinds of SowEng Machine suopplies.
Send for catal.gne and price L:et. myG 77 ly
k- - ----
- Respectfully infot me hle f-ien': and tbo pnblic that at
he hi ietw store,
in 144...C......--. C tup Street ..............144
I 1 ot has a frcsh and wall-soiectcd anaortment of
ti BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpenters' Tools, ureter. Mtoves and House Furnish
tfg t" tdo or all kinds.
iHe is better prepared thin over before to do Copper,
Tin and Sheet Iron Work, ani will furnish estimates
Dg to rtlluel. and others, and guarantees sat.istiwtion
to all. jo7I77 Il
r ESTAiBLISHED 157.
ex- G. PITARD,
S80 IMiPORTEt AND LtAL5 IN
Lia HARD WARE, GRATES,
Sof PAINTB, OILS. VARNISH, WINDOW GLASS
rt. WALL PAPER, ETO.,
and i21 and 223......Canal Street..... 221 and
nld Between tampart and Basin streets,
nOD- ap* ly waw ost.ARis.
-on - - --e
tug ATTENTION!
d Families, Individuals, Everybody.
lion. D) ANY OF YOU WANT FURNITURE AT A
ale. G ENUINE BIARl AINI
If so, :ill at my etablltshment, 172 Camp street, an t
i k ot s my stek-..s". t -t n " pr ow I ce l 1
h-t ] car satiefy and s(il to yoU. If you wish to buy and will
lhe taltl. There is nothing In the Farntture line that I do
od. nt have, and of the very best quality.
a me W. B. RINGROSE,
aspl 77 ly 172 Camp street.
MISTELLAUE0US ADVERTSISE ENTS~
OFFICE F01 THE
AMERICAN COTTON TIE CO.,
LIMITED,
4..-.e .... rondelet O tre..... .
xrr oa ,luo
eMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTICZ.
The AMERICAN COTTON TIE COMPAI Y
(LIMITED) having fixed the price of the oelebrate :r
ARROW COTTON TIE
at Sd 10 per bundle, le1 9t pler cent discount for mash.
the General Agents hereby antborlee their Sub-Agents
in this oit.v (dealers in Baeing Stuffe) to sell to snd
coatrOct wthb Pactor eand Country MerObant. hr
future delivery on the aborevnamed price nd t
in quantlties. fro- time to time. as may be reule .-r
eerttenents being made on delivery.
The Company having a arge atock nowon b)nd, at A
having contracted foren abundUt, supply to moat the
elttire demane fur Cotton Tire thronhout the Cote -
States. the celebrated ARROW TIE wllt be pille ,
upen the utartet generally, and sold by their anmrse
Agent" at the price and terms above statetd. i being
the obJert and purpoee of the Company to merit th
oontinued patronagel of tee planting community.
R. W. RLYNE & CO.,
aui9 77 iy GENERAL AtIGENTS.
HIBENIA INSURANCIE COMPA1Y,
Office, No. 37 Camp Street.
JOHN HENDERSON, Preedent.
TH8O. F. BRAGG, Secretary.
Earnings....
Lores Paid... . ....
Net retire...........................i1uis
At an election held on Monday, the 7th teat. the
folloewing named gtentlemen were chosen Diretem elof
thinCompany to serve for the ensuintyear:
P. Irwin, di John Hendersen,
Thomae King. Thomas Smith,
Thee. Gilmore. W. o. eCatoel,
Jchn Z. Oibbone, Jas. A. Glrdeer.
William Hart. Emile Gauche.
Irl etd ladae len John H. Hanna,
P. J. Ga-qsuet.
a fd at m eeting of the Board.held May 14th, JMl t
HZDEEJCN. Presildent. P. IRWIN. VioePreaidmt,
uand ECS. F. BRAGG, Secretary, were nuanimroaly
re-elorted.
The Beard declared out of the net profits of the
Oompemyf or the past twelve monthe Id per oat in.
terct; aleso s per cent dividend on the peid dup c dtl
end 90 per cent dividend on premiums paid by ltock
holders (making. with the rebate, 35 per cent on ps
miums). Said tntereet end dividends to be plaeood tote
credit of the etock notes.
Interest and dividends on full paid stock payable in
cah at the office of the Company on and ·afterinne 18
prom THOS. r. BRAGG, Seiretay.
New Orleans. May 18. 1877. mylO 771
. L Z11OL D
REMOVES ALL KINDS OF BUILDINGS,
Office, 119 Robin atet.
All ommuniiations eshould be .ddreesd to Ben 11 .
Meohanic' and Tradire' Exchange, nader St. Ohr
Hotel. New C.rleean.
Coontry ordere nromptlvattuaded to. al71,
CARRIAGE MAKERS.
JOSEPH SCHWARTZ,
MLOBnThU AND DZALEZ IN
Carriage, Wagon and Cart Materials,
Springs Axles, Bolts, Ready.Made Wheels, Bug
Bodies, Wood Work, Trimiags.
PAINTS AND VARII'SHES.
SABVEN PATENT WU ..
Agent for the Celebrated
BLAOKSMITH'S FAN BLOWER.
Carriage and Wagon Maker and Repairer,
- Salesrooms and Factory -
Nos. 4:. 4., ann ei ?erd[iOdu B &,
Near Carondelet Street.
deO3 T ly saw oLtAsa.
J THOMSON & BROS.,
Carriage and Spring Wagon Makers,
68 and 70...... Rampart Street......68 and .
Between Common and Gravir.
Esoelved Higheat Premiums at State lairs of imn, iS
1873 and 1867 for bet FamiPly Phteeon. Victoria l
ad Ta Buges. Ber Wagon, Grocers
Wagon, rpres Wagon. oet.
Binag praetioal workmen, a demploeyilag aesb
the bet meeanic , we are prepared alo e _
or repair Carriages, Buggrie. Spring Wagnes
refer to many business men In the aty unaingd e
our maaufaeUre. All work guaranteed. h ! i •
W. F. CLARK,
134and136..... Rampart Street ...134 end 1
Between Toulouse and St. Peter,
- Manufactureor of all kindeof -
Carriages, Barouohes, Buggies,
Express Wagons, Platform and Elliptio Spring
Wagons,
SEWINo MACHINE WAGONB, ETO.
Agent for Jas. uannlngham & Son's oelebrated Oar
riatee and Heorsee.
Country orders promptly attended to. apl 7 17
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
VM. . B. KLEINPETER,
NOTARY PUBLIO
AND
COMMISSIONER OF DEEDS,
61.............. Camp Street...........61
a2; 77 ly Corner of Commercial P1a*0.
5ARROLL'S
Landlorda' Merchatas' and Business Men's
COLLEOTINO BUREAU.
P. P. CARROLL, Lawyer,
SOLICITOR IN RANKIUI'CY,.
U. S. CLAIM AND I'ATIDNT ATTORNEY.
............. Carondelet Street....--.........
N.W ORLEANS.
Prao.icen in all the r'tate and United States Conrt.,
and glvea prompt attention to all boatne6 eod In
hMi h.ilda. _ _ n _ _ _ y
DEST-- ........------ -..............DENTIST
JAB. B. K IAPP, D. D. B.,
15...... ....... Baronne Street....... ...
jel0 77 ly New Orleans.
G. J. FMRIEDtICHB,
DENTAL SURGEON,
155.......... St. Charlees Stut.......
ml0 77 ly l
W. B. LASNCITER.
ATIORNEB AT LAW,
40.............Camp Street. ........-...40
Between Grarter and Commeon:
. (&RDNN VASES.
u Oraumo Int Ingils Crystal tar 1
IPrnobs pattieSy, Ware. Gold Wishes, Irh Wiebs, aU
.s.,r o, ,.d.a ret te,, and ,tn - a
3V13V CRING i1B THE GANDU.
1tO1am By B. MhLTI5,  e UMn*

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