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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, May 05, 1878, Morning, Image 6

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Moraing Ser and Catholic Messenger.
Iaw Uas.sAse. 5sDis. MAY , . ira.
PATIENCE.
We scannt measur J ye but by theidr los e
When bleesig fade away. we them the ;
Our richeslt loue. a irw around the ros.
And In theo night-use ageia sino to men.
The seed mast iret IIe buried in the earth
Befors he lily opena to the siy
Eo "l'|sbt I sown. and gisdases ha Its birth
In the darkt deoopse wbere we m only cry.
- Life out of leath is hto ba's unwritten law.
Mny. it I written In a myriad for ms;
Tro victor'e plfm growR O Amse of waOr,
And streoatb and beroty are the fruit or storms.
Cew then, moy soul, he brve to do sond ear;
rTh wle ia broed tohat it may he more sweet
es aorolo will ores be lt, the erown warl wear
nay, we wl t she It at oe: Iavour's feet.
and oe emong the raserto- never told,
Swster than maucl of the maarrte eoll,
Our hado will atrihe the vibrant ap of e old
T.o theo lad song. oBe dcth all things wiL"
THE OLD POPS AND THE NEIFF.
A COMPLETE REVgBAL OF THI OLD MODE
OF LIFE AT TIlE VATICAN.
Anne Brewster, the regular correspond
ent of the N. Y. World in Rome, sends
bhat paper the following letter which we
give without further comment than to re
mark that we have found her letters to be,
generally, u reliable as they are interest
hig. Some of the statements contained in
thia letter appear to us rather improbable,
but we leave the reader to judge for him
erel, merely republishing it as giving facts
and opinions, concerning affairs in Rome,
from a nonCatholic point of view :
Boss., Ilaly, April 3.--Yaeterday I was
lreaent at one of the oldin'ary papal
audiences, and was forcibly struck with the
change that was visible everywhere in the
Vatican. There is more bustle, more going
and coming and les ceremony. Common
people stopped and talked in loud voices
tothe soldiers. There were work people
standing about, with dust pans and brushes,
doing the work at mid-day that should
have been done early In the morning.
The great doors on the fine stairway lead
Ing up to the Court of St. Damaso, which
ed to be closed, were ajar; a serving
man stood in one, not in very nice drese
either ; he gazed idly at the crowd, had his
hands in his pockets, talked loudly to some
passer-by whom he knew, and, worse,
ldored his throat and spat on the hand.
some marble steps over which were sweep
lag the rich velvet and faille trains of the
eadies! At the entrance of the Court of
St. Damaso, instead of the quiet Swism
Guards, there was a large, pompous fellow
In a sort of policeman's dress who directed
the people where to go in a loud voice.
The court-yard was filled with carriages ;
celesilatlcs passed hither and thither ; a
bishop entered, with a large suite of per.
sons attending him ; he was saluted re
epsetfully, but some of his suite stopped,
talked familiarly with two or three idlers,
sad laughed audibly. Altogether there
wer a modern laiuea alter reigning that
seemed qu~e out of keeping.
Pins IX. was what may be called in
eommon domestic language a capital house
keeper. There was a decorous discipline,
as order, system and cleanliness visible
daring his time that was very agreeable.
You never heard a loud voice on those
great stairways and lofty passages. You
rarely saw work-people about at mid-day.
Tb. streams of people that poured up and
down, in and out, moved quietly and re
apectfurly. Preatees who met each other
bowed silently with lofty reverence and
'ent on their epanrate ways. There were
Swihr Guards at evely entrance, and num
ors of employees, in suitaeble costumes,
who, if supercilious were silent, and krlet
their places. IBut all thrat sihow and state
seeded more molney than Leo XIII. is
willing to spend. The piesent service at
the Vatican cotsi much lees ; wages are
cut down and there are fewer persons to do
the work. This may account for the
absence ef respect-for the insubordina
lion, indeed--which I noticed.
The audiences ot Pius IX, used to be
bald with a great deal of state. The Pope
entered with a court of cardinals, Mgr.
Partecipante, prelates and Noble Guards.
Be mounted the throne, made a short ad
dres in fluent French with an excellent
aeenta, or in rich, sonorous Italian, and
eeded with the benediction. But there is
oe such elegant royal ceremony now.
There were about two hundred and fifty
ef o yesterday. We were placed In one
ae the loggi on the second floor, the one
feing the east, the decorations of which
were made in the time of Gregory XIII.
3 1noncampagn|, 1572 1585) and Urban
VIII. (Barberinl. 16231644) by those
artists called the Mannerists, Tempesta
Germoneta, etc., Shields, with the winged
dragon, the myth of Try ptolemus, the
reat of Gregory XIII. and BarberinI bees
are over the doors. We were seated on
benches that were placed on either side of
the oyggia, and had to wait from mid-day
until 1 o'clock.
At last Ms Holiness came, but without
any court or Noble Guards-only one
t1cer and two Monsignori Partecipanti
were with him. They walked slowly along
one side of tile logian end returnetd iy tie
tlh-r, Riiving taRie partiy special sttrq.ttlrll
)lay ,' o t ,rs" Afr e'ode drsse d wrlu allolt
to kat-- ; te - ltgrhr atteptle tot klrtl tihe
enol I id, b h tl-dled trint-ili t re stittI trd
One tnI i-ie th e i tbe okctirn tho atimdt
parte ti, eof vc, t helnr, rned read fl.r
unit( e alou(d, i 0l. it'rlllo8 with droll prorlnt
eiatiuis. flitn l'ep! gve his shand to kiss
and sliokr a fr-w wordrl to ericll one. Whetn
he saw a child in a party hIr, patted it on
the heiad and taitpd its chitk tenuderly.
ll manner halsl iore honiely kindurness
than dignity. Thi-ern was no elthlsieasnl as
there nsed to be sat tIle audiences of Pines
I. Indeed, aeil expresions of emotion
were discouraged. Tire Pope spoke in a
]ow tone of voice when he had anything to
say to a person. After he had patsed
down anti up tile logio he stood at the
and, by the door entering tile Swiss Guards'
Bali, and gave the benediction in a mod
onrate tone oeof voice, then turned and left
U Uee Holiness is averse to making
peethee; b; he is tnot so vroluble as Plas
IX. He also dislikes having addressee
Sread to him, and seems to regard audiences
an necessary evils of his iositeioun.
`Paphl apartment on the et-crrntl dlrin, thie
one forrierly occupied by l'rur IX. U-t
has been very exactt about the arranigernent
efit; the btd that was first prepared for
hin did not please him and he oiedered it tri
ie ehanged. Wood floors have been put
down on the bedroo ace -,a-J- ,. -
cordance with his wishes. This is the first
time a wood floor has been seen at the
Vatican, and some of the old inhabitants
of the palace regard it as a streage lnno
vation.- The Pope dosires that all pomp
and ceremony shall be observed in relig
ious matters; for instance, the Consistory
was held with the same forms used before
1870. But be wishes to live as a private
individual. He and his Camerlengo, Car
dinal di Pietro, are alike in this, and each
desires to have the success of religion
rather than politics. When you read Car
dinal di Pietro's reply to the Pope's alloca
tion you see this spirit pervading it: the
great work for the Church is to make
Christians; that is the key-note. Both
the allocuton and pastoral letter annonuc
lug the establishment of the Catholic Ger
archia in Scotland are temperate discourses;
but for all that, you see plainly in the
firm passage alluding to the loss of the
temporal power that the present Pope
stands just where the preceding one did.
Because he is silent and prudent, gives no
reason for any to encourage the hope that
be accepts the present state of Italy as us
fail accampli. It is not certain that His
Holiness will go to Castel Gondolfo this
summer, but It is certain that he will leave
the Vatican and Rome during the hot
months. A good deal of curiosity is felt
as to whither he is going, and a good deal
of speculation is indulged in, for tif the
Pope should take it into his head to leave
Italy bhe might not return, and that would
complicate matters most unopleasantly.
An entertainment was given on Sunday
evening by the Spanish Ambassador de
Cardenas, the one who Is near the Holy
See. It is the first grand official reception
of the Vatican Court that has occurred
since the winter of 1869. The party was
given In honor of King Alphooso's wedding,
and was to have taken place the 14th of
February, but was put off to the 31st of
March. It was a very splendid affair. The
Princess del Drago, the Spanish King's
aunt, received the guests. This lady is
the daughter of Qieen Christina of Spain
and Munoz, her morganatic husband, the
Duke di Rianzares. The Princess del Drago
was dressed superbly, and was dazzling
with jewels. The Princess Massurio, sis
ter to the Count de Chambord, was there,
and the Princesses Orsini, Altieri, Rospig
liosi-in short, all the grande dames of the
Papal Court, who have not enjoyed such a
gaiety for eight long years. And what made
the affair more significant was that there
were Cardinals present in grande tenue, and
several Monsignori and prelates with
crosses and decorations. Not only Cardinal
Howard swept his scarlet train through
the salons, but a much more important
personage-the Cardinal Secretary of State
Franchl. The Cardinals were received
with all the old-time splendor, at the door
of the palace, with torches blazing. This
reception and the presence of Cardinal
Franchi at it is regarded as a conciliatory
sign. It isthe first time since 1870 that a
Cardinal Secretary of State has gone out
into society officially. How strange it will
be to have two courts reigning in Rome,
what a brilliant place it will make of the
old city. But before next winter who
knows what changes may not take place t
The Pope may be far away from Rome, all
Europe in a blaze, and Italy in the middle
of the strife.
GREAT DISTBESS IN CALIFORNIA AND
COMlMUNISTIC I UMBLINGS.
Ean Fraecisoo Monitor.
For some time back there has been a se -
rions feeling of insecurity among the
people of this city. We are in a period of
general depresslon, stagnation of business
and dearth of employment, produced in a
great measure by the same causes which
affect the rest of the United States. This
has bet n accompanied here by a season of
unosual drought and a great influx of
Chinese labor. This general depression
has been aggravated also by the conduct of
self -appointed demagogues, who claimed
to show the people how all these evils
could be at once removed, and wmalth and
prosperity le within the reach of all. The
means were communistic and revolution
ary. Organizations of armed men openly
expressed their determination to carry out
their programme by force, if necessary, in
defiance of the constitutional authority of
the United States and the State of Califor
nia. To oppose these, it was said that
other organisations were secretly formed
which, under whatever name, were to be
but a repetition of the famous Vigilance
Committee. Now, we have no absolute
certainty that these statements are facts,
but every one knows that such is the com
mon belief, and any overt act, on the part
of either side, would have been followed
by scenes which we shudder to contem
plate. It was therefore the duty of the
Archbishop to warn his flock from having
anything to do with such organizations, for
by the very fact of belonging to such they
would incur the sentence of excommuni
cation from the Church, pronounced by her
Sovereign Pontiffs against all such secret
and illegal societies, and we believe that
by his thus solemnly warning his people,
he has merited the gratitude of all right
minded persons in the city and State.
11e also admonishee and even requires
them to stay away from all such seditionus,
auti-social and anti christian meetings.
III a mlatter of such gravity, all Catholca
are bound to obey himi under pain of sin,
accordi jg to thle injjunctions of thoe Holy
Scripture, "'oey your prela'tes anrid be
si. , ' ct to thiul, knowi g toy have to give
nii acciultt of your Soule." If by the law
,of C;oil <'hlrll't are obliged to obey their
pate"tIs, ui a:l lawful thlings, so also are we
obliged t, Itztidetr thatt obedience to those
inveet, d with np!ritual authority-"'HI
that will znt hear the Church is to be ac
counted as a heathen."
This prohibition was also necessary, as
the greater number who attended those
meetings went through mere curiosity,
but if not warned of the danger might
perish therein. Megy, the French commu
nist, boasted in New York of the organiza
tion they had in San Francisco, and ex
pressed the hope that ere long the streets
of this city would run red with blood.
Most assuredly those who follow suech
leaders will in the end be shot down in the
streets, pine in dungeons, or perish on the
scatfld :iko the Communists of Paris or
the Mlolly Maguirea of Pennsylvania
tlteen of whom have been already hanged,
and Hleater, one of the last three that were
rxecutetid, as tile hangman's nooase .was
Alipped rtound hisi neck, said to the attend
:g prit.st, "Ah, Father, if Ii had taken my
paaitor's advice, I would not be here to
day."
As to the idea of the Archbiabop and
clergy of the Catholic Church being in
b.l.... 1 OLi. lz..-- - .I Mo many
Iawful mode of agitation an organisation
against this great evil, and the ameliora
tion of the condition of the working
classes, it is too silly to need refutation.
NA TIONAL DB UNEKNES&.
London Tablet.
Once fix, by habitual repetition, a stig
ma, whether on a nation or an individa
al, and, however unmerited, it may take
ages to remove the calumny, Numerous
are the criminal and had habits imputed
to the Irish, and confidently believed by
those ignorant of their true character or
prejudiced against them. Amongst their
other failings, the Irish are reputed to be
steeped lower in the degrading vice of
drunkenness than their fellow subjects in
England and Scotland, which is frequently
set forth as one of the causes of the greater
poverty, discontent and crime of that
country, and of its relative inferiority in
industrial and material progress. A Par
liamentary Return just issued affords the
latest refutation to this calumny.
There are but two main modes by which
a fair opinion can be formed as to the
relative use or abuse of intoxicating drinks
by two or more countries--namely, by the
amount of those drinks entered for home
consumption, and by the number of con
victions for drunkenness. But, even with
reliable returns, under both heads, there
are important modifying circumstances
that most accompany them; in order to
draw just conclusions. Convictions for
drunkenness woold appear to be conclusive
as a means of determining relative guilt;
yet, nothing could be more misleading, as
may be readily shown. In the first place
there is a Police Force of 12.081 men scat
tered in fixed barracks over Ireland, and
who attend all fairs, markets, and popular
gatherings; while in Scotland the force
amounts to only 3,356 men, mainly sta
tioned in cities and towns; and only
29,689 policemen in England and Wales.
The Police Force in proportion to popula
tion, is far larger and much more efficient
in Ireland than in England or Scotland,
hence the higher probability of the detec
tion of drunkards. But another element
powerfully stimulates the vigilance of the
police, with whom for some time past, the
fuines inflitted for drunkenness are divided,
and who thus enjoy the premium set on
detection. Nor is national character a fac
tor that can be omitted in the comparison.
More social and gregarious, more volatile
and less taciturn, not quite as well fed as tl e
Scotchman or the lEnglisbman, the Irish
man, whose national beverage is whiskey,
slight indulgence in which stimulates him
to noise and rowdyism, exposes himself
and tempts his capture by the police, while
the prudent Scot and the taciturn Saxon
manage to reach home without their ine
briety being detected by the police. Thus,
upon all these grounds, the number of ar
rests or convictions for drunkenness, in the
three kingdoms, fails to indicate the rela
tive intemperance of the countries illustra
ted by the corrected adage :-"There are
not more motes in the sunbeam than in the
shade; but the light reveals their presence."
And so as regards the amount of intoxi
cating drink consumed. 'The ardent spir
its must be supplemented by ale and por
ter, which are English beverages, or by
their equivalent alcoholic element, in order
to have a fair return of the consumption
for each country. While another and an
important consideration is the different
distribution of populatioi, civic and rural,
in the three kingdoms, with its conse
quences. Save in the larger cities and
towns, which are few and sparse, restau
rants, comfortable eating houses, and coffee
shops are very rare in the generality of
market towns in Ireland, and almost un
known at rural fairs, so that the agricultu
ral classes, who often travel long distances
in broken weather, are drivel into the
public house; whereas such accommodation
is familiar, attractive and cheap in all
towns of any importance throughout Eug
land and Scotland.
With these explanations we may now
sunmmarise tl:e Return (;Io. 437-1878),
moved for by Mr. Henley last Session, of
the number of persons taken into custody
for drunkenness and disorderly conduct,
in each city and town in the United King
dom, for each of the years 1851, 1861, and
1876. Several difficulties crop up in the
returns, but we shall notice one only,
namely, that the cffcial departments were
not able to estimate the population of the
cities and towns in England and Wales in
1876. We propose to supply it, by as
suming that the increase in population in
the cities and towns in question between
1871 and 1876, in England, was about
equal to that in the general population of
the whole country. Supplying this omis
aion the return stands thus :
Istimated Committed in 1876 for
Cities and Population, Drunkennes and One to
Towns in 1876. Disorderly Conduct Persons.
ngllnd...O.0.000oo000 104,174 96
ecotland.... 1.264 402 58.630 it.
Iretand..... 79.437 8.78i 90.1
Total.... 12,062,839 171,585 70.3
These figures show, no doubt, the con
trast of the distribution of population,
civic and rural, in the three kingdoms, the
above referring to little short of half the
inhabitants oft England, more than one
third of the population of Scotland, and
only one-eighth of thoee of Ireland; hence
deductione drawn from the table most be
aftlcted w;ithl the weaknjes, of ouch inequal
ity. Making, however, due allowance for
thie, it is wholly irinuflcient to explain the
vast cor tl:ct between tihe reinieo for Ire
land notd SNutland, les than 2 of the civic
polpulatien of Niet tand onl piyrng to the
magistrates one person charged with drink
and disorderly conduct, while it takee 9l,
or nuore than four times as many, to supply
one from a like population in Ireland. The
difference between the results in England
and Ireland is trilling, but the number
affected in E:gland is more than twelve
times greater. No doubt it may, oand will
be said that a large, perhape the largest
portion of the drunkards in Scotland are
Irish ; but the same apology has been made
for the prevalence of other northern vices
and successfully refuted.
In each of the countries there is, unfor
tunately, gigantic work to be done in di
minishing the horrible vice of drunkenness;
our duty is not to cast reproach on any,
but to vindicate a race and a nation upon
whom an unmerited amount of obloquy is
cast, and to set the triiu facts before the
world.
- -.--,a -- -
If you had sone dear frtend living loisc
by, ou would itt , go to Mee ImII, and tihe
dt al r lie as to 3 iu, the oftener you
would vcit I:i ni, Colr dear Lord is always
in the B!esred Sacrament expecting yon.
Try then to visit him, if possible, every
day.
STATE OF LOUISIANA,
DIOCESE OF NEW ORLEANS.
LOAN OF $250,000
Issued by the Board of Administrators of the
Roman Catholio Church of the Diocese of
New Orleans, at their meeting of the
11th of January, 1878, 1878with the
authorization and approval of
the Holy See, hearing date
November 8tb, 1877.
SAID LOAN COISISTS IN AN ISSUs OF
2940 MORTGAGE BONDS,
DIVIDED INTO FOUB SERIES. AS FOLIOWSs
Series A, 40 Bonds of $I000 Each.
Series B, 100 " of 200 "
Series C, 1000 " of 100 "
Series D, 1800 " of 50 "
These Bends, dated January slet, 1878, are signed by
the President, the Treasurer and the Secretary of said
Boardof Administrators, with the seal of the Soclety
aared to each, and are paraphed "~N Vafslr"' by
Octave de Arms, a Notary Public in this city. They
bear an annual tnterest of 5 per cent met from the data
of issue to maturity, which interest is payable semi
annually as per Coupons attached, via: On the lot of
July and on the let of Janua-y of each succeeding
year.
The capital ia payable at par in twenty years from
datas, by drawlngs to be effc:ed annually, commencing
January let, 1884.
The interest and curtallment are payable in New
Orleans, New York. Rome, Paris, and in several other
cities of the United States and Eunrope, which will be
hereafter dealgnat d.
The Subsorlption Is Opened:
-IN NEW ORLEANS
At the Archbishop's Residence, Secretary's
Offie ;
At A. Carriers & Sons, Commission Merchants;
At the Hibernia Insuranoe Company's Office
At the People's Bank.
OPJECT OF THE LOAN.
During the criais which followed the war of secession,
and which weighed so heavily on the State of Louisiana.
the Administrators of the Diocese of New Orleans
assumed liabilities which they have determined to
I quidate. In the past year a better state of affairs
loomed up in the fnancial situation of the Diocese.
That improvement will increase as the rate of interest
claimed by its creditors Is lessened.
The conventional rate, in Louisiana, is too high for a
religious sooiety, the revenues of which, though entirely
secure, are nevertheless limited, for such a society
cannot look for eventual profits in contingent under
takings or in speculations altogether inconsistent with
its mission of benevolence and coarl'y.
Therefore it isa not with a view of creating a new debt
that this loan is negotiated, but in order to unify and
consolidate anteriorliabilities. and obtain thelrgradual
and regular extinction by means of the ord nary
revenues of the Diocese, and without endangering the
Church property, although affecting it Such is the
plan posaltively approved by His Holiness, Pins IX,
and unanimously adopted by the Board of Administra
tors of the Roman Catholic Church of the Diocese of
New Orleans.
SEIURITIES.
The Diocese of New Orlears, a corporation consti
toted under the laws of the State of Louisiana, by the
name and style ef "'iHE ROMAN CATHOLIC
CHURCH OF THE DIOCESE OF NEW ORLEANS,'
afl rds to its cre,'it'o s-ecuritiee that areboth material
and moral.
As a corporation legally iostitutod it enjoys all the
rights an d privrlegrs of a civil body. It cen contract
debts, acquire, borrow, alienate and mortgage its pro.
perties, whether movable or immovable, under the
prescription of its Charter. At their meeting of
January Ilth, 1878, the Council of said Society unani. I
monsl determnoed. for the reasons above stated, to
issue at the rate of 5 per cent, a single loan of $30 OC0,
secured by a special mortgage on all the mor'gagable
real estate of the Diocsee; and therefore, by a deed
dated January i6th, 1870, passed before 0. de Armes,
Notary Public in New Orleans, the above resolution
was carried into effeet, by the granting of a special
mortgage on all the mortgsgable real estate of the
Diocese to secure the Bonds thus issued, whlah said
mortgsge was duly recorded, as will appear by certid
cates of the Recorder of Mortgages annexed to said
act in the office of said Notary.
Besides this solid guarantee, said Corporation pledges
its honor and good faith for the faithful diseharge of
the above obligations.
REAL ESTATE OFFERED AS SECURITY.
Prom the official report recently made to the Holy
See, the Church property of this Dioceae is divided as
follows .
Independent or unmortgagable properties,
valued at about............. ..............,t,,000
Morteagable properties valued at Its mini
mom rate ............................... 1,080,000
This latter, the only real estate affected by the mart
gageaforesaid, and worth double the amount of the
loan, include many bui!dings lots, fle:ds and other
productive properties not dedic tied to the worship of
God.
PAYIMENT OF INTEREST-R-EODEMPTION OF
CAlI'i £.L.
At thir nreting of Janii, :ry Ilth. :i87e, the Council
of tI:c Corporation opcerta~ t ed that, oulaido of the
tiouul and Irrertlar trce' , tihe salnual secured
revnuer of thle 1,c ,c.. fo. r dctduction of the costs of
Admilitraltioa. lravOe a 0ur0 00 of :t,' CO ' that can be
dispoedl of semiat.uual'y; I nd it asnr.o.lced that
lot. hor the poncttual paymtnc' of the interoels on the
loan t sum of 12t,5I; nball, fromt the le t of January,
1ie, and thenceforlh yearly, be reserved, appropriated
and depe sited in Bank to nmoet those interests.
21. A similar sum of $*2 5 0 oshall alto annually, from
the ist of January. 1&t, be reserved eppropriated and
deposited in Pank for the gradual curtailment of the
capital, and so on every 3oar until itaentire extinction.
3d. That in no case and under no prrte whatsoever
these sums, reserved. appropriated and deposited, shall
bhe used for any other purpose thas those above ex
pressed.
SUMMARY.
From what precedes, it rfo;lows
That the loan is negociated with the sole object of
liquildating all former debts;
That It represents the liabilities of the "Society of
the Roman Catholic Church," which are thereby unified
and consolidated with a rodced interest;
That it is secured by a epecial mortgage on proper
tics worth fire times as much as the amoount borrowed
atd tl.ereforo amily sEuflc ent to guaralee both the
pay n cnt of intcro s:' and the rcdemptlon of the capital.
t'o::c equenl: y th hlortgailo Lolnds of the Diocese of
Now Orloeans c h:.a':e a a rs. alas inveatment, with
trural and matetial seenr.tles but soldom offered to
capltaltt t
t N. J. PERCHE, Archbishop.
MILLIT, V. G., Adminlatrator of Finances.
moUsI FURfISfHIN GOODS
EABLMIEEDn M157.
G. PITARD,
PoalTao AND DBAL5A Is
HARDWARE, GRATBB,
PAINTS OILS, VARNISH. WINDOW GLASS
WALL PAPER, ETO..
221 and 223 ...... Canal tret ...... 221 and
Betwee Rampart and Basin streets
apae ly rW oLmAnuS.
The Cheapest House
IN THE CITY.
THE MOST STYLISH AND DUIABLE
:W E'WR. X wm. * .
OF ALL KINDS.
Parlor. Bedroom and Dlnlolroonm Sts at vary low
igurcea. and all warranted to be of the beet material
end workmanship.
Call and see. You will save money by dolng so
before buying.
Special atention paid to Country Customers.
W.,B. RINGROSE,
apSI 78 ly 17t Camp street.
V. BIRI,
Importer, Manufacturer and Dealer In
WILLOW WARE. WAGONS, CRADLES,
MARKET BASKETS.
Work Baskets, Chairs, Clothes Baskets. German and
French fancy Biake.s, etc.
120, 283 and 253 Chartres Streets,
Jao0 78 ty Msrw OLEAers.
House Furnishing Goods
AND
KITCHEN WARE.
In order to do a PLUMBING and GAB FITTING
businees BXCLUSIVELY, I offer my entire stook of
the above named goods
AT COST PRICES.
Ladi.a who want BARGAINS in STOVES, COOK
ING UTENSILS, etc., should call and examine at
THOMAS McKENDRICK,
Practical Plumber and Gas Fitter,
625 ........... Magazine Street....... 665
Above Josephine. Jal3 78 ly
NEW CHINA MATTINGS.
ELKIN & CO.
16 ..........Canal Stret.......--168
Are receiving new
CANTON MATTING,
WHITE. CHECK AND FANCY P&TTERNS, in
- various qualities and at very LOW PRIDES.
We have a large stock of
OARPETS.
BRUSSELS, THREE PLY and INGRAIN.
Also. OIL (LOTHS. in all widths
NEW PATTRE S OF WINDOW SHADES.
oct3 77 ly
A. BROUSSEAU & SON,
17.-._.......Chartres Street .. ._.... 17
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
Carpetings,
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHS,
CHINA AND COCOA MATTING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVERS,
WINDOW SHADES.
CRUMB CLOTHS, RUGS MATS,
CARRIAGE. TABLE AND eNAMEL OILA-CND RA
WHOL.BALN AND ENTAKL.
CURTAIN MITERIALS - Lae. Reps, Damask,
Cornices, Bands, Pins, Gimps. Loops and Tassels,
Hair. Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and Springs,
BURLAPS, by the Bale and Piece.
Prices as low as those of any one else in the trade.
o01 77 Iv
FURNITURE
AT
HUGH FLYNN'S,
167 and 169...Poydras Street.....167 nd 169
You can find the
CHEAPEST BEDROOM SETS,
THE CHEAPEST DINING ROOM SETS,
AN D
THE LOWEST PRICE PARLOR FURNITURE
IN THE CITY.
A large stock, and anxious to sell. oel477 ly
STEWART
IMPROVED NEW FAMILY
SEWING MACHINES,
Twenty-Five Dollars and Upwards.
Makes less noise, runs lighter, and is acknowledged
by all ,t be the beet (Singer style)
Maohlne in the market.
Bold on weekly or monthly payments. at a small
advance over cash prices.
AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE, and liberal
inducements offered.
Call on or address
J. BOOTH,
GENERAL ACENT,
614...........Magazine Street....-........614
NNW OnLbAIs, LA.
Agent for Mme. Demorest's Patterns, and Dealer in all
kinds of Sewing Machine supplies.
Send for catalogue and pries ihst. my6 77 ly
Respectfully informs his friends and the public that at
his new store,
144............ Camp Street ..........144
He has a fresh and well.selected assortment of
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpenters' Tools Grates. ttoven and House Furnish
ing (tods of all kicdr.
He Is bettor preparod thun ever bhfore to do Copaer,
Tin and berst Iron \ork, and will furuiseb estimate
to jiuilders snd others and guaraentees stiefa*tioc
CARRIAGE MAKERS.
J, THOMPSON & BROS.,
Importers and Dealers in
Carriage and Wagon Makers' Materia
And Manufacturers of
LIGHT CARRIAGES & SPRING WAGONS,
ALL AT REASONABLE PRICES,
68 and 70...South Rampart Street...-8 and 70
fe24 78 ly Between Common and Gravier.
JOSEPH SCHWARTZ,
IMFOReTR AND DISALER IN
Carriage, Wagon and Cart Materials,
Springs, Axles, Bolts, Ready-Made Wheels, Buggl
Bodies, Wood Work. Trimmings,
PAINTS AND VARNISHES.
SARVEN PATENT WHEEL,
Agent for the Celebrated
BLACKSMITH'S FAN BLOWER.
Carriage and Wagon Maker and Repairer,
- Salesrooms and Factory -
Noe. 43 45 and 47 Perdido Street,
sear Carondelet Street
doe93 77 ly Wr oAlaNa.
O veson o , --s;
Q FF103 01 THE
AMERICAN COTTON TIE CO,
. ..... . ..*. ndelet reet ..
135W ORLE£AM--E.le 
IMPOBTANT 8PECIAL NO2ICzS ,y
The AMERICAN COTTON TICOOpA
(LIMITED) having fiexd the prices the eelelt'
ARROW COTTON TIE
at fslo per busi dle, n 2t pet nent diaessat far 401h
heGemeral Aggenbt herebyl asthrle the ym
e. Wo. eAN - t ty-a
HIERI INSRAC COMng T
oreec wt iasen a Scunse ps Utebdhi ;`
future delivery on theR aevsONsead
t .ateite Icf I tVme to time. asiab re ,
N"tomonts heine madeon delivery.
upon themarket genea-y. dand saod by ther annmemy
Agentsat t~ojproeo and4 t~erm e bovo smearc isbemhmm,
the bj:tan purpose of the Copn .mt e
continued patronaglo of the planting emmunity.
B. W. RAYNE & CO.,
anl9 77 ly GENERAL AGENTS.
HIBEmNIA INSURANCE COMPANT,
Office, No. 37 Camp Street,
JOHN HENDERSON, Preeident.
P. IRWIN, Vine President.
THOS. T. BRAGG, Secretary.
Earnings.. ........... ...............18S,o
eames Paid..................... ... .1,3ge
Net Prosfits............................ 6,Wl
At an election held on Monday, the 7th lans., s
following named gentlemen were chosen Directors ue
this Company to serve for the ensuing years
P. Irwin, John Henderson,
Thomas King. Thomas Smith,
Thee. Gilmore. W. J. Castell,
John T. Gibbone. Jas. A. Girdner,
Willam Hart. Emile Gauche.
David Jaokson John H. Hasna.
F. J. Gaequet.
And am eeting of the Board,held May 14th, 0JH
HUNDIRSCN, President, P. IRWIN, Vice.Prsideat,
and 2T08. 1. BRAGG, Secretary, were unaalmoesly
reelected.
The Beard declared out of the net profits eof So
Oompeay er the past twelve months 10 per eat Ias
trestl also 2 per cent dividend on the paid up eqtal
and So per cent dividend on premiums paid by sdook
holders (making, with the rebate, 35 per cent oa pe
minrums). Said interest and divtdends to be placed tehe
credit of the stook notes.
Interest and dividends on full paid stook pyable ia
cash at the ofce of theCompanyon and afterJane1 IS
STHOS. N0 . BRAGG,
New Orleans, May18. 1877. mygS "i 1y
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
W M. B. KLEINPETER,
NOTARY PUBLIO
AND
COMMISSIONEB OF DEEDS,
61........ ... Camp Street..... 4.
suE6 77 ly Corner of Commrelnl Plaea.
CARROLL'S
Landlords' Merchanti' and Busianm en's
OOLLEOTINQ BUREAU.
P. P. CARROLL, Lawyer,
SOLICITOR IN BANKRUPTCY.
U. S. CLAIM AND PATEST ATTORNEY,
2............Crondelet Street ............
egw oRLEANS.
Practices in all the State and United States Coarte,
and ghves prompt attention to alt busine, plied ia
lis hbend,. jy2LYtT
DENTIST........................DENTIST
JAB. B. K2APP, D. D. 8.,
15...... .......Baronue Street........ ....l
jel 77 ly New Orleans.
G. .. TBRIEDRCHS,
DENTAL SURGEON,
155..-...... t. Charles Street.......1J
m20O i7 ly CornerereM.
W. B. LANCASTER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
40...............Camp Street........... 40
Between Graler and Common:
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
PLANTER3' AND MBRCSANTS' LINE.
Through to Laurel Valley, Bayou Lafearohe.
SemliWeekly Passenger Placke
Mlteammaer .s rva
In place of W. J. Poiter ent.
U. D. TERREBONNE, Master. TOM xm , Clerk.
Leaves every MONDAY at 5 o'clock and THURBDAY
at 5 o'clock p im.
Returning, leaves Thibodaux :'cry Tuesday Evening
aud taturday Morning.
For freight or pasnsge apply on board. A Clerk will
bo at the anoding every day to receive freight. Pays
particular attentlon to way business. hpl4 Im
For Liverpool.
The Al Br;tish steamabip
CO LOM BO,
(195') tonc.1
W. . OUNG, Commander,
will sail for the abve pJrt on or abtut the -th Inst.
Hao superior acC)mmllodstone for a limited number of
saloon pausen grs
Bloun Pasa. ge ....... ........ ................ 5.
For plaeoage apply to
I'tENC'C & CO, Agents,
28 IHnuo streets
or Z REG A & CO.. Ship Brokers.
The rewstearmer EIUPHIAI ES, 2r20 tous, and other
flret.-cars stramers, will follow. apl4 3m
INMAN LINE OF STEAMSHIPS.
From New York to Liverpool and Queens
land,
The great object of tourists going t
uroe to procure the safest, qulckest and 0e06
comfortable accommodations. The Steamers of thi
Line, built in WATER-TIGHT COMPARTME1.
are among the STRONGEST, LARGEST and lAST
EST on the Atlantic. Luxurioesly faralehed, well
lighted and ventilated, replete with every comfort and
all the modern improvements.
For passage andother infor omr ion, cill at the Passen'
ger Agency of
P. F. GOGARTY,
161. ..........Oamp Street......-...151
SWO =,AA

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