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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, June 02, 1878, Morning, Image 3

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lemlnng Star and Catholic Messenger.
NW itLuAN UlN T. JUFE ., is8.
ODE TO, LIBERTY.
BY THOMAS A BADEAUX. .
'Mid crumbling thrones and shattered erowns,
"2be mournful wrecks of mighty States,
Sits Fatber Time, .~osae blightig frowns
Are cerlatin a titnyielding Fates.
What It th Ratio. Whuoee radtiance bright
The ohet s clouds of woe has driven
As Darkueda' shadowy veil is rlven
By Mornain' golden oilb of light t
Tie Liberty's.
Hers wa the torch tat loeg bad burned
'Mid elssio shadesd of Orre or ome.
But wm eshe saw its resd:aeeopate.
Theitsoe proud patriot ardo fail.
Degeeera4e sink. till f their mind
Her voles no answeling impulse finds.
In grief she aoed the torch and turned
To seek more oongenall home.
The deot's heel had sore oeprst
A nat. noble, grat and brave,
Tuil V inen nerved each valiaent breast
etr home and oonntrvd ' rlshts to save.
The Bruce the Bflower of chivalry,
Inspired by radiant Liberty.
Swore, anhe waved his sword on high,
To free hia country, or to die,
HaL glorions day of Pannockbi .
That we!comed Freedom's gidel'un I
Helvetla next received the flame.
And on her glowing shrlne it blazed ;
While veor' manly voice wst rained
To break the tyrant's bonds of shane.
'Mid rocy helghts, and hill aid dale,
The welcome clarion notes resound,
And speedlng swift along the vale.
Intrepid hearts responeive hound.
Thine was the arm, Immdrtal Tell,
That rang Oppreslon's funeral knoll I
Heroin Poland rushed to arms,
Allured by Hope's delusive hobearm,
And as the radiant Queen of night
Beams on this nether world,
Sweet Liberty smiled on the Right.
Hov'ring awbi e with wings onutnrled,
But Victory's waning star grew pale
_ Heath hostile gleams of Cosack steel,,
tnd tn'hnl ca.dnonr awii peaal
Smothered the patriot's mournful wall,
Ye Kings of earth, of Fieeiom's name
The boasted fsiend oh blush for shanme!
One voice alone wae raised to eave
SaPratin from her destined grave
That lule whose accents sweet but firm,
Are hreard above the racing storm,
Was thfhe O Booly Pontiff io
Of wrong, and virtue'n friend in woe.
Then fair Columbia, radian, q daeen
Inthroned upon the Wee e.n wave,
Received the torch that Freedom gare
Which wrapped her faun in glurious bheen.
And it, in other lards. its gle. in
Wan as the last expiring ray
t out by the sun at c oe of dav.
It here sbone with a steadier beam.
At Dut's call the patriot hests
Were marshaled by he bravest son,
And liberty no champion bout e
rt obler than peerless Washington.
Bv murm'ring streams and woodlan rovo,
'Where dwelt the Muses tuneful ch1ir,
And Pth bts swept her golden lyre,
Once more the farm of freedom mrves.
Ye. Greece has risen in her power
To free her fair but fettered arm;
And Islam feels that now the hour
Has come, yet sound its i vain alarmt:
For, hearken to that piercingory
That rends th' afrightedl mldnight sky !
'Tie from the tented Turkish foe
Faling beneath the freeman's blow.
That noble and anijetie form,
That voce heard loud above the storm,
Is Ionzrrls', who in Victory
expired, the friend of Liberty. -
And may not Memory's wand recall
The truggle of a sunny land
In which a brave. heroic band
T Fo Liberty were doomed to fill !
Where wave the fields of golden grain,
Where bloom the violet and thesrnoe,
Where mocking birds their witching strain
Pour forth, they lpeacefully epose
O Liberty, who didst inspire
Our heres with thy sacred fle :
Thou whose name wil e'er be uong
sv poet's hearp and patriot's tongue.
Whose home is e'er among the brave
Do thouen our country bhie and savo !
THE PROPAdGATIO OF 2OIE FAITH.
Brooklyn Catholic Review.
We are able to lay before our readers to-day
the offinlal report of the receipts of tbhe Soclerty
for the Propagation of the Faith daring 1877,
and a oomparason of these receipts with those
of the preceding year, 1876. For the last year
6.142926 francs 46 oCeontmrs are reported,
showing an increase of 211 976 francs and five
bentimes. Tiis inrcrease te due entirely to the
omore abundant alsr contributed to relieve the
terrible distrere in the East. The following is
Fe. C Fn. c.
France ....:..... .......4 1:724 9I 4 3 1.7153 t18
AlsacLor in aioe............ 20,3 67 02(, 5 itm 70
Germany . .. . 312 o l 64 374 365 99
Belgium ....... ..... 52,937 79 384 430 6ui
Spain ..... .. . 7: 729 81 4.546 95
vilvntg.................... . 19 209 40 14.l67r
oll en d ..................... 110 :i 77 18 92 67
Portugal ..................... 58414730 1.1775P.
Poland nd huo' .....n..... i 3 d 1,4t 50
Switzerland ....... 52.9 6 02 53,203 52
'orthern Europe............ 401 00 455 60
Asia .......... ............ 1.51,5. 16 10,43 81 I
Afrld a........t............ I5 i s0 o5.64 0 i
North America ............. 122,G67J t10i,615 21
Central America ............ 12 90
South America .............. 41 855 03 53 493 60
Cceanica ................. 10,343 tO 4.203 70
Total ..................5 930,93041 6,142.926 41
Increase for 1l7 ............. ... 211,976 fr. 0c.
France, as usual, leads the van in this noble
work. Seven dioceses have each given more
than 100,000 francs, or $20000. Alsace and
Lorraine pr ve themselves French still, and
Catholio all1e time, by raising their subscrip
tion every year from 1i;9 356 francs in 1874, to
222.00 francs in 1877. T'he diminution in the
case of Spain is nut due to a decline of popular
interest, but solely to a non-renewael of a spe
cial subscription. England has not done muoch,
giving only 43 631 francs, while, to quote from
the report, "Ireland, always generous, has a
found in her poverty 102 547 francs. The dio- t
ce of Dublin gave 32,161 francs." t
The report closes with a reproach to Ameri
cans for their neglect of a work "which con.
ributed to the creation end susteu.noe of the
now flouriahing chrrches of that vast and°
opulent country. Of sixtyeight dioceese or
opootolie vicariates of the United States, t
twenty-seven have given notbing to the
work of the Propgortion of tle Faith,:
and forty-one have given a tots! contribntion I
of57,294 franc... Tie archdiot s ofNew York
is pat down for 16 Al1 francs, bat tiSis sem
repreeents the receiptl of the two last years "
GCEN .EADE AdND THE 8ENTINEL.
Camp News.
The following incident, which illustrates the
etiquette of the camp and the careful regard I
for it which Gen. Meadn not only exacted of
others but also held himself to, has never ap.
peared in print. It is worthy of record:
Riding along the line of the camp of-the B
Seventh Pennsylvania Reserve Regiment, one
day in 1861. Abe General suddenly reined up 1
hia horae in front of a sentinel, and exclaimed: :'
"Why did you not salute me, sir!"
"Because," replied the soldier, "I made up I
my mind long since that when a gentleman or II
an officer did not return a salute the first time I
I would not repeat it,"r
" What do you mean? Did I ever fail to ii
r ekuowledge a salute Id,
" Yea, sir. A few days nioce, asyon rode by,
saluted yen, and yoe did not notice me."
"'I beg your pardon, cir," said the General.
"I mast have been absorbod in thought, or I
shonid have returned it. It is es mach an
cfficer'e dnty to acknowledge thea inte as it is ,
the soldier's to live it." U
iThanrk you, air," answered the soldier; " I
shall always onluie ou bere.hfir." Aid bring- tl
lug his moeket to a ' prrsent. arm'," the salore
was acknowle'grd by the GOC. ril io his most c
giraoeful way; aid is be rode oil, tb'th officer
and man felt better for "a ·utoal explana
lion." '.
DE VOTON TO THE 8ACRED HEABT 15
8CBOOL8.
Children can Ulndersta'3 all that is Essential.
WHAT HAS BEENs ACCOMPLIsID IN ON COL
(From the Messenger of the Sared Heart for Jonua
* ` . That ohildren can understand all that
is essenties for devotion to the Sacred Heart,
and that they will eagerly practice it when
once it bas been explained to them, is proved
by every day facts. In numerous oonvesteand
colleges all over the world, the confraternity
has been successfully established. We find, in
all these institutions, yonag boys and girls
between the ages of eight and fourteen, per
forming not only the ordinary practices in
honor of the Sacred Heart, but, besides thee.,
cnumerons other sote of piety and mortification
of which many of their older assooiates do not
even dream. In many places it is onetomary
to suspend near the door of the chapel a box
into whiobh, at the end of the week, eachs one
drops a slip of paper, giving the number of
good actions performed for the intentions of
the Apostlship of Prayer. The list of Com
munions, penances, prayers, ante of charity
and self-denial, found in one of these boxes at
the close of a month, would snrprise many
who imagine that obhildren are incapable of
anything but play and forced application to
study. We can call to mind at the present
moment, at least three such schools in which a
large proportion of the pupils are weekly com
municants. We have often seen some of these
same pupils-merry, fun-loving, quick -temper
ed beings-stealing away from the play ground
to the chapel, to pray for a moment or two be
fore the Blessed Saorament. We have seen
them tolerating without a murmur the rude
ness and petty perseoutions of their compan
ions, or even submitting to punishment
imposed on them, by mistake, for faults whioh
hey had not oommitted And llh the
did in oeder to have something to offer the
Heart of Our Lord.
Toank God I there are many such schools in
the United States; and the proficiency, piety,
and good conduct of their pupils show that Our
Divine Redeemer has kept His promise of be
stowing epecial graces on all those whoebould
encourage the devotion to His Sacred Heart.
We hope that the day is not long distant when
this devotion will be practiced as it should be,
in all our institutions of learning. Let up
instil an earnest practical love of the lieacts
of Jesus and Mary, into all the membl8s of our
younger generation, and we need have little
fear of shipwreck for their faith or morality.
The writer has seen colleges thoroughly re
formed and made sohools of sanctity as well as
of science, by the t fforts of one energetic man
who introduced and fostered this devotion
amongst the students.
Some years ego a friend of ours was in charge
of a large class of young men in a well-known
educational institution. In theopening lecture
of the session, after insisting on the necessity
of labor for suooess, he dwelt at some length
on the still greater necessity of prayer. This
gave him an occasion of mentioning the pro
mises which Our Lord made to Blessed Marga
ret Mary in favor of those who should honor
His Sacred Heart. From this be very naturally
passed to a brief explanation of the devotion
itself, and finally suggested that it might be
well if the students were to enroll themselves
in the Arob-confraternity, and form bands of
nine for the officer. The next morning a list
containing all their names was handed to the
profeseor, with a request that he should have
it transcribed in the Register of the Apostle
ship. Several of the young men were Protest
ants, and, upon being asked by one of their
companions for their motives in joininog, ans
wered : "Well, of oourse we oan's go to Com
mntonu like the other boys, but we can surely
love the Heart of Jesus which loves us sc
muhob, and we can try to behave ourselves bet
ter, and to do something in atonement for the
insults offered to Our Lord."
By means of a little dexterous management,
and a few words of exhortation spoken from
time to time, the fervor of the class was easily
kept up. At the end of the school year, the
result was as follows: Most of the students
had become weekly communicants ; thePro
testants referred to abwve had been reesived
into the Church; the custom had been adopted
of making a general novena before every seri
ons undertaking-each as examinations, com
petitions, eto; the admirable conduct of the
class excited particular notice, even in s col
ingly rare; the diligence of the young men was
snob that the professor bad rather to restrain
themr, than to urge them on in their applica
tion to study. And these were ordinary college
boys, fall of life and fan, and foud of play.
There was not a single "mope" among them
tither before or after their adopting the de-vo
tion to the Sacred Heart ; on the contrary the
more fervent of them were the very ones who
were continually in demand on theplay.ground
to take a leading part in some game or other.
Eae of them. whose long and frequent visits to
the Blessed Sacrament were a soirce of con
tinual edification to his professors, was as
ucob envied by the younger students for his
ikill in base ball and gymnastics as he was
tdmired by his classmates for his ease in uora
velling knotty passages of Taoitas and St.
Basil. Thets facts will not seem steange to
hose who have had much dealing with youth.
ions, straightforward lads who can be trusted
n all oironmstanoes, are always oheerfol.
O0ST OF THE ARMY BEFORE AND SINCE
THE WAR.
$36 6255Z.1 EQo AciDERD IN TEN YEARS
Since 18i1 there has been no acquisition of a
erritory except far-off Alaska, where no troops
ore now maintained. In theseeseventeen years fe
he Indians have largely diminished in num- a
oers, and many of thew have become civilized
Ls civilization pushes westward they grads- a
11ly disappear, and under fair treatment they f
sould, with rare exceptions, not be a hostile it
,bstacle to its advancement. Moreover, the
'acitio Railroads and the almost universal ex- ti
ension of settlements have b:oken the Indian
naesooe into fragments and have brought
trong communities into their neighborhood, a
endering defence against them in case of b
ouble comparatively easy. As for the border a
roubles on the Rio Oranude, they have been n
omenated from this side for selfish objects, and
ith einister designs on Mexican territory; h
nd they afford no reason for maintaining a d
arge army. o
it is useful to compare the expenditures of 14
he War Department, as set forth in the last' t
euprt of the Treasury, for the ten years of ,
eace immediately preceding the war, and the h
en years of peace since its oloee, allowing a *
nargin of two fisoal years after the surrender tI
it Appomattox for a starting point. The 6
igures are instrooctive and astoonding. Here u
hey are in the official form:
5-__.......... s.i 5 s to 19 I - 1.........2$1348 64 Es4 I f ti
3 -... 9 31.498 15 s -ts ...... 85015.,990 ai
24-.......... 1.70,52."87 1ie0 .......... 7 .655 d75 4
5 -t.......... 14,178,-f7 3o 1871....... 35795 291 82
ca.......... 1i st159 0 er I7.......... 436,. 13t51 5
85 -.......... 85679,1I e3 I874-.......... 4".2 13 90721
80 -.......... It. 47" 2 7"9 7 il7-.......... .070 88 t4
- -eL.......... -23,t2l530 67 1877-.......... 37,083o.759 sI
*59 232,248 5 6735.480.75570 0 7
Deduct Iu yesre of psoe to 1et ...... Ii t231.24855 o5
Excess in the last 10 yearS.......... .133.tSS,255, s5
These figures prove that it Las cost one
mnrth of the national debt to keep up the le
my during the last ten years of peace, and 9
ore than toreo times as mouch as during the t
3 years precsding the civil war. What is
ere to show for this enormous outlay t
Vhere has the money gone, and what was rt i
lended for __ tl
The pawobrokir's is not the proper place to ti
he the pledge.
ITH FAMINE IN CHIlAd.
FITIlTEE MI.IJONe P5ERSO.R STARVING IN A
COUNTRY WHEREL THlRE IS PLENTY OP FOOD.
Minister Seward sends to the State Depart
ment, Washington, sacoonts of the Chinese
famine up to the middle of March last. The
distrees opoasioned by the famine of last year
t is spreading over a muoh wider area, owing to
, renewed drought. The distriot now affeo:ed
t comprises parts of or the wnole of the pro.
I winces of Shansi, Chibli, Shantung, Shensi,
I Honan, E8zbsen and Kansu. Actual famine is
pressing upon 1'.000,000 people, while fully
60,000,000 are suffering more or lees distress
I The Chinese Journals teem wiI scoountse f
the suffering. One of the most pitiable fea
tnrsof the famine is that there Is ad buon
dance of food in the country, and it is only the
lack of transportatiou -which causes so much
misery and loss of life. The crops have been
good immediately around the stricken die
triots, but as food on be transported only on
wagons or pack animals, it cannot be taken
thither in suffiolent quantities to save the
lives of the people Toe Coinese offloers have
done all that ie posesible, and toe missionaries
are distributing relief as beet they may.
The Chinese have osually olassed opiom and
missionaries as amIong the chief evils due to
foaeIge interoonree, but the latter are now
winning favor through the practical help they
afford. There are numerous refugees from the
famine district in Peking and Tientsin. In
the latter city a bonne made of mats for the
accommodation of the suffering women and
children was reogutly burned and 150 lives
lost. These recurring famines may lead the
Chinese to enoooraging adequate means of
internal communication. s
THE PEGAN TRIEE.
(Our Home Journal)
T-his-tr4e flou sbhe- -tbe-aef-Statee-aend, if
properly cultivated, can be made a source of
considerable revenue. We know of several
pecan orchards not far from thbe city which
yield their fortunate posessors handsome re
turns for a little time and labor devoted to
their care.
A peaosn tree is as hardy as an oak and can
be grown where any "bard wcod growth I
abounds. Select for planting, the largest ob
tainable nuts from the thin shelled variety, as
these are more valuable, in any market, than
the thick, hard shelled kind. At two or three
years of age transplant to the place where the
tree is to grow and prune so as to obtain a
lateral spread of branches rather than extreme
height, which is always an objectionable feat
ure in the tree. To aooomplish this purpose,
the trees should be planted forty or fifty feet
apart, each way, cultivating between the rows
with garden track or by growing peach, fig or
pear trees till the entire space is needed for
the pecan, when they can be cutout.
A pecan tree, under favorableo irncumstancer,
will begin bearing at ten years from the s-ed.
At fifteen I ears it will pay its'owner consider
able annual profit. At twenty years it may be
considered in fall bearing. It will continue to
do so for generations, there being no known
limit to its capacities in this direction. It lives
to a very great age.
The pecan is valuable for it wood and tim- I
ber as well as its fruit. It is equal in value to I
hickory for farm use, and can ao used for the
same purposes. It le an ornamental tree and a
grove upon a plantation adds large'.y to its
pecuniary value. Its culture should be ex.
tended, especially in localities where timber
for agricultural uses is noteasily obtained.
Steamers to Pass Christian and Bay It. Louis.
(Passagot BStar, May 17th.)
Judging from the preparations being made 1
along the coest numerous visitors are expected
and a bright eeason anticipated. Owing.to-the a
healthy season in our large Southern cities,
few visitors, have, as yet, made their appear
ance.
The low pressure side wheel steamer New -
Camelia, running from New Orleans to Pass
Christian, touhobing at Bar St. Lonis, makes I
two trips a week. Leaves Pase Christian every
Wednesday and Saturday at 5 a. m. A restau- r
rant, nicely kept up, is open at all hours for *
the accommodation of pa, seogers, and fare at
New Orleans prices. At these two places two '
lengthly wharves have been made, which adds
greatly to the appearance to the ' Q seen of the a
Coast." "Hearsay" has it that in a few weeks
this s'eam line will p,lace a second steamer,
Aiabama, plying between New Orleans and
Mobile, making all o ,ast stoppages. Capt. J. o
Poitevent, an enterprising citizen of Ocean a.
Springs, will, so it is said, start a through
boat, making all coast stoppages All that is
necessary to make these enterprises a success
is a little exertion ou the part of the public
The New Camelia carr;,e passengers from New T
Orleans to Pass CurietIan for f5 cents, and
frieget t eq rally low rates.
T'e factory for the manufaoture of woollen
goods, at Bey .St. Louis, will in the course of T
ten days begio operation. It is paying for
wool the highest cash prices, and none could T
do better than see the proprietor or Robt.
Lewis, the agent, are slipping elsewhere. Our
people feel tosat we have already depended too T
long on strangers for the manufacture of the
comforts and necessities of life. Factories are
institutions which every true and sensible man
will acknowledge to be necessary for the pros
perity of our country. Knowing this and feel- m
eog confident of the support of our Southern at
markets, Mr. Ulman has erected this factory-
not with an only view of making money, but H
with a view of giving a helping band to raise
our S.uth from that low position she has been -
placed in by the last " curse placed upon the F
seat."
In toe interior we find many beautiful little
farms now in the beauty of May. Prospects
are very premising, and the jovial old tiller
will prously hold up his head and tell you M
what he will do next season, taking pains to in
form you that owing to financial circumstances
it could not be done this. Nothing butadro, ght
will tend to blight these pleasant anticipa
Lions. 10
When a boy throws a stone his arm moves in Al
a plane paralled with the plane of his wamit
band. When a girl undertakes a like feat, her
erm is first held upright in a line with her
mnjir axis and then moved rapidly in a down
ward direction. The stone thrown by the boy
has an enormonus range, and strikes the win
low, the cat, the old gentleman or any other
)bject at which it is aimed, at a surprisingly
long distance. The stone which the girl at
tempts to throw deseribes a brief aro and
'escends te tl~p ground a few yards in front of
her. What isthe aonseof thedifierence in the co
ieses is a mystery Dr. Watts took the ground
that nature had withheld from girls the power
t throw stones, in order that the human race
night have some little chance of perpetuity. E
Ele argued that if girls oould throw saoues,
hey would oonstantly hit the wrong objects,
cud so great would be the fatality trom acci
lents of this kind that in a comparatively
hort time the world would become depopu
ated.
At the trial of a criminal case in the
faine Supreme Court, recently, the pris
her entered a plea of "not guilty," whten co
ue of the jurymen put on his hat and
tarted for the door. Thejudge called him
ack and informed him that he could not T
eave notil the case was tried. "Tried 7"
aeried tihe juror, "why, he acknowledged
hat he is not guilty."
Those who are In high positions should
Ionsider themselves as stewards rather
han masters of the wealth or power in
rosted4o them for the bouneSt of the poor
md weak.,
Nope Revived Threghoet easuisina.
N. O. Price Carrnt.
It is carious to notice how rapidly th
humano mind will jump from deepondency
to hope, and hope once having found a safe
resting place, how almost spontaneously
the full life tide of energy is evolved from
what a short time before appeared buot
abject misery. This tendency of the human
mind to revert to its normal state, when.
eves the least chance occurs, was probably
never better illustrated than since the early
completion of the New Orleans Pacific
Railroad has become a recognised fact
f throughout the State.* Not alone is every
one satiifled that the 8tate aid co ld not
have been better bestowed, but Private
individuals who, but a few montha ago,
could see nothing but greater ruin in the
future, are now energetically pushing
ahead, so as not to be left behind in the
race; others who would not subscribe a
dollar to the stock, now eagerly inquire
for shares, finding that after all they have
a few hundreds available for this laudable
purpose. So in the country parishes,-from
almost every point waere' the road will
pass in only tolerable proximity, wd hear
of meetings of citioens (property h'olders,
merchants, capitalists and mechanics) de.
vising means to build tap roads so,, as to
ensure connection with the life giving
stream of trade, destined to fl ,w along the
rail; no one stands back, the capitalist is
wil'ng to give a portion of his wealth for
a prospective greater gain, the property
holder has learned that increased trade
will raise the value and ebance the rents
of his real estate, the merchant naturally
pats his shoulder to 'the heel, he -being
t-e eteierint, and the mechanic and la
boring man are willing to throw In their
skill and muscle in getting out crossties,
making the roadbi d and placing the rails.
A new spirit of hopeful ehterprise lls thus
dispersed the dark clouds whico obscured
the brilliant future ti Louisiaqoa, never
agsin, let us hope, to descend upon our
beloved State.
There is usually either something wrong or
mean about people who are always poking into
other people's basiness.
MIS'ELLANEOUS ADVERTISEMENTS.
NOW READY. JUNE NUMBER.
THE GULF CITIZEN,
A MONTHLY MASAZINE,
DLVOTF TO
Literature. Popular Science, Novelties, General
Reading, and especially to the Ma:erial
Progress of the South.
CONDUCTED BY Z. 0. DeLEON.
THE GULF CITIZEN will be published at Mobile
Alas, on the 15th of eaobh month containing varied sad
interesting Oigsnal Reading Matter, and collations
from the very best eooroes, among whom we may name
Hon. Henry Watterson, editor of the Louisvile Oourier
Panl H. taynes. the Sonthren Sonneteer.
Mme. A. de V. Chaudron. Translator of "Joseph II."
etc. esa.
J. Dioean Bruaes. M. D.. of New Orleans. La.
Hon. Lewuse . Brooks. President of the Mobile Board
of Trade.
Mrs. Millie W Carpenter, Poet and Etory Writer.
-on. Edwin DeLeon author of "Askaoen Ksas,".
"'Khedive's Egypt." etoe.
James R. RaBndall. author of " My Maryland," etc.
ary Werner Hay. in Sterles as. Sketches.
W aili m Winter Poet and Critic of New York TeilN.
Hon. A. W. Dillard. long Chancellor of the Westeon
Disetiot of Alabama.
Mrs. G. L. Henry. "Jendwle'" of tbe Southern Proe.
John Hampden Chamberlayne, E ditor of the Richmond
Wm. Alden (" F. Emeral "), the Famed Comic
Writer
Innes Randolph. "The Oocd Old Rebel."
"Patrick Henry," Vigorous and 'Popular Pol tical
Writer.
Prof. Thos. R. Plloe. of the nliversite of Virginia,
Mrs Mel. . Colquit, so pleasantly known Worth and
Sooth.
Henry L. Flash, the Confederate Poet.
" Wilght O'Btique, the Practical Humorist.
Ana many others of equal cesoblebrity, with new
writers of ability and-promise from tinme to tirmo.
Tolus.-The Gulf Citeen will be furnishoed to Sub
scribers, in city or country, by mail, postpaid, at
One ear.. .
1 1mon 8............................ ....... 1 5
Agents in 'ny section given very liberal commission
on snb'criptiuos.
ipecimen colies aud ft.l1 information furnished on
application as alove.
READ T'llS OFIFER.
Ladies and Gontlemen Wanted as Agents.
WE WILL GIVE
To the person s-nding us the largest list of cash
subscribelrs for one year, between this date
and the let day of July. 1e7d a lest improved
Singer Sowing Machine, cash market value. 050 (10
To the person sending the second largest list, as
above, one complletest Shakespeare's Works.
bsmautifully bound, cash value................ o40 O
To the person sending the third largess list, as
above, one year's subscription to both the
"Louisville Courler.Jonrnal" and any New
York daily newspaper, cost of both.......... 22 03
To the person sending I fonrth largest list. as
above. one Jear's sbsription to both ths
"Daily Register" and the "'New England
Farmer," co,t of both........................ 14 50
SPECIAL NOTE.-No list will be entitled to above
wards onless reaching 100 names; but liberal com
missuion will be paid. in cash, for all lhate of subscribers
sent by friends an)rwhsro.
Send for specimen copy of THE GULF CITIZEN.
Head Prospectus and List of Contributors above.
Address, T. U. it)LtJON,
) a~ 8t Postoffiee Box 0886. Mobile, Ala.
PHOTOGRAPHY
AS A FINE ARr,
IN ALL CF ITS
rIAGNIFIIENCE OF SHIADE AND COLORING.
AT
W. W, WASHBURN'S,
03.......... .Canal Street..........103
1t Plic':uestaken at thsl Gaillry are fu:Iv guaranteed
for acrnrar:v and artistic iniah.
ClitAltoEs MoDI~iaTE. cvii 7 iv)l
GROCERS--COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
PETER ELIZARDI,
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS
TEAS, WINES AND LIQUORS,
Corner Burgundy and Mandeville Streeta,
NEW OPLlE,.
Ooontrv orders promtly filled, and all goods delver,
de'olo 77 Iv  of churms
E. COwIer. a. coarMlT, dr
E. CONERY & SON,
Elstablished In 1846.)
WHOLESALE GROCER!
COMMI88ION MEJRCH4T8,
Dealers in Western Produce.
CORNEL OF CANAL AND DELTA STRaETS
d23 77 ly IEWORLEAUe.
TUOHAS MANGAN,
CHOICE GROCEBIEB,
AN)D IN ALL KINDS OF COAL AND FIRE WOOD
No. 446 St. Charles St., corner of Pulymnia,
NOW o LuAa.
Wood and Coal Yard. No. 4"8 St Charles street.
All orders promptly attnded to, and goods de S
free Of charge. 017 G1 I
R1. M. & B. J. MONTGOMERY,
I FURNITURE EMPORIUM,
CORNER CAMP AND POYDRAL 8TREETS, NEW Ols.EANl.
-s r-,
I ae W= so 1- o l- ABuw s
DIN BILK, SATIN. COTOLIND, REPS AND HAIR CLOTH.
FINE BEDROOM SUITS 'iL JILNZL I Armotrsa d D11|". D (
f Fine Dining Room. Hall and Library Nl, P any biet, stands. Deks, Tabloe and Ohsire.
aLsortment of FLRNCH PLAI' MRTIWRo. alt il inof Odli Furnituroe A largeetookof emle,~ tt
O nCom ron Farniture, suitable far the cuntry o r.de, oods dellWr e.l frhee of iarge se ai ly
AT
NOVEL'S .
IN
:331 and :n1:37 Poydras, near Carondelet Street,
AND UNDER ST. PATRICK S HbLL,
THE OH APEST PLA CR iN TOIYT TO BUY .FURNIZ URE.
I am offering big induemento, e ma y agent has bought ry extensivlely from the beat Northern, DS.w
and Western FatolE se t VIRY LOW PRIIESI.
1 am offering Victoria Bedroom Sults. comprising ten pilece; foeC 45. the oheapest Suit ever offere4 In It
town. I am also offering Walnut Victoria Desalng (leo sulite. comprieng eleven plae., for l40, the beas
town for that money and in the laIsot styles I am offerling Parlor Butte in the ltatet styl ee er low. eoagme
ICg ten piece Walnut. In heir cloth frame, 165 and upwsar . e
And a VERY LAG ASUSORTTRINT of alP kinds of FUEIITURE, too numeroes to antlie. poaely
as oneap.
Ptrt to n need of FURNITURE w do well to cll ande examine my stock and prltm, for ey are the
lowest in the city.
All Goode packed end shipped free of charge. and Furniture taken on Storage very low.
Thanking ,py friends and the publlo for their past patronagoe, I soliit a oontlaaaoe of the same ia Io
ore
WM. F. NOVEL,
Noe. 171 and 173 Poydraa Street. ner Carondelet,
ooNt4 ty and under St. Patrick's Hall, New Or blea
THE
888888 III n NNN NN 000G O0 RRDIg EE3 Eau
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Th Si r Wil L t a Liet ·1
S I I N N N M G O a N
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-68888888 ILt NM N NNN 00O00G R RIIIIERRRm 3* 11
GREAT REDUCTION IN THE PRICER
OF THR
WORLD-RENOWNED
SEWING MACHINEI
THE SINGER MANUFACTURINO COMPANY, over awake to the Itterest of the vphll hee
determined to PUT TiE PRICE OF THEIR MACOHINE8 within the reach of every mar, we.. maL
hlild In the land.
THE GENUINE SINGER SEWING MACHINE
IN NOW OFFERED
A7 PRIlEOS BELOW TILE BOO US ONES, OR ANY 02(DRE.
The fact that the only Sewing Machlne wLlch unscropolouns men have ever attempted to Wt 5a l IS
BINGER. is sufficient evidence of It superiorlity over all othere. There Is no onger any ealonwe bey
any of the CHEAP MACHINES hawked about the country, with no claim for patronage but thhetohebag
BEIWARE OF IVOR TIL ESB IL A TIONY MACO I NiB
The Singer Will Last a Lifetime!
SEND [FOR CIRCULAR AND CAS! [PRICES!
TIL I NGER MAN'U.FACTRINGNO COMPA I k.
.-5 ..1..5 um....'.. cANaL STEET..
mr" iV a l* lt I:lILAI1
TH,
CHURCH ORGANS
BI LT BT
JOIINSON & SON,
OF WEBTFIELD, MABSS.,
ARE BUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS.
Unezoelled in beqaty and purity of tone sad power.
Constructed ino tfn most thorough and scbuautlatl
manner. and warranttd to stand in perfect condition
ID any cima'o T'ls firm ptal no fees to middie
men5" therefore the Rev. Clergy are respectfrlly re
qlnestd to apply directly to teem for aprc tcatlall
and all leform.tion relating to their art, no4 77 ly
BLADON SPRINGS.
Thi% famous Watering Place opens Mae let.
U. 1 mail stemno.- Iare hob:le EVERY TUEtS
DAY and A I UI¢IbAY VEnINU. Ttckets for Lte
round trip $17 good until ncal.
Fore:rttcatee and a Olyy-1. applr to
J. CONErla & CO.. Proprietors.
atdon t'prlg.. Choctaw County, Ala. ,
Or ti I. L LOUNS, Agent, corner Camp and iravtaer
streets, Sea Orleans. mys ,n
POPE LEO XIII.
AOENTS WANTED to sell our epmedld pheto*
sraphbof POPE PIUS Ix and Pan bIIL Ia ome
depratloe of the bard inLes. we have pt tlhe p e atC
the foll long lw ptol, saet pa paid, Ti s O0 per
lA'. ti per RJ 0,. 75 per 0000. r&rtlwe orerle aM
" oll be 'ren exloueive aenoy. They ell eery f a
S 0or lu cnleah O e mn mold 730 in one day wit
very little ffor. Pmpte 10 cent pot paid. Hand.
ome lnofse wlth sI.w and ring, all reny to herl Ip,
rsuitable for abve. 13 per laJ. rrsmeacnm be sent only
by esprese Order at octs. and senre the first chance
in )our town. Mentlon tls paper.
Address, XLNDALL & CO'. 71 Klby at..
p2it Im Ploton. Mim.
$1200 U . PfR 4. .. ridl ,
$2500 _ AN. Iuei-

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