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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, July 21, 1878, Morning, Image 4

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l orlig etar sad Cattelc Memnpr.
II  D 1b=T 8UDWAT MORINGS.
arrW iWAAUU EVDAT. JULY st. I8.
8Ja.4 . Jsl 511--it& nundey after Penteeost -
smaiy.... Jauy i.--Et. Ma..Magdata, Pesaieat.
We.ds.iy JIy a,-St. Chr *.
T.'a y ...J_,y 9-1t. J~ea, ApsUol..
I a_ .... J e, --s Ans.. MotL or ofthe Blmeed
oturdy....JaJy t7-at. Veealca et Jtuallaa.
Bocrrr ST. VaMCIsT DE PAUL -The Qear
tsely Communion of the members of this So
elety will take plane this BSnday morning in
Si. Joseph's Churob,: Common street, at the 7
o'clock Mass. The general meeting will be
beld on the grounds of St Vincent's Home,
Bienville street, this evening, immediately
after the cloee of an entertainment and exhi
bition to be given by the boys of that instito
tion. The entertainment will begin at 4
o'olock.
Ben Butler bhe looked over the political
feld in New England, and conoludes that with
700,000 depoeitors of savings banks in Mauss
ohuestte who can't get their money, annd the
great demoralization that rules in Maine,
there will be a general emashing of the old
party maobines next fall in those hitherto Re
publican Gibraltare. He has beard from Cali
fornia, and will run for bovernor of Maeaohn
setteby way of keeping the ball rolling. But
ler isn't a bad gneaser in polities, and his di
verslon toward the Nationals means business.
Last Thursday evening a most happy event
took place at St. Joseph's Church, Common
s treet. This was the marriage of Mr. Geo. W.
Flynn, Seoretary to the Administrator of Im
provemente end the beautiful and acoompliehed
Miss Mary E. O'Donnell. All the preliminary
arrangements as well as the ceremony itself
were conducted very quietly,henoce their many
friends had no opportunity of testifying their
pleasure, or of cngratulating the new couple
upon the happy consummation of long
oherished hopes. May they live long and pros
per.
In the city of Buffalo there are nineteen
Catholio parochial schools, with an enrolled
attendance of 5,613 children and 83 teachers,
costing yearly, for salaries and incidental ex
penses, $27,139 60. There are, on an average,
a little less than 7) children to each teacher;
Including all expenses, each teacher's salary
is nearly $30'J, and the average per capita ex
pense is a fraction less than $4.44. The aver.
age attendance during the past year was, how.
ever, only 5.430, making the number of pupils
to each teacher 63, and the average cost of
education pir capita a small fraction over $6.
The Unitl Cattolic. bes published a petition,
addressed to the Holy Father Leo XIII. by the
Bishops of the tccleselastical province of Venice,
praying that the examination into the virtues
of his venerated predecessor should commence
forthwith. The same journal publishes, under
the reserve fixed by the decrees of Pope Urban
VIII., the details of a miraculous cure of
a case of inveterate and all but fatal
of heart disease, effected, it would appear.
through the intercession of Pies IX. The per
son cured is Mother Abbess of the Monastery
of St. Mary Magdalen of Urbania, and the
miracle is vouched for on reliable authority.
The drmy and Nary Journal is authority for
the statement that the present Indian war in
the Pacific territories, like all our other Indian
ware, is directly traceable to the imbecility
and dishonesty of the Government agents.
These scoundrels steal three-fourths of the
supplies which the Government binds itself to
give the Indians, and when the latter, from
sheer desperation and being driven thereto by
atoual starvation, leave their reservations to
hant for food, these agents raise a great hue
and cry and bring the troops down on them.
One agent, bolder than the rest, lnstead of
selling the supplies intended for the Indians,
to the people in the neighborhood, as other
agentse did, and pocketing the meney, used
systematically to reship them to his own home
in the East.
Those savages are not immaculate, but as
compared with the majority of the agents of
our Government, they are saints. And yet we
are astonished that every summer a new In.
dian war breaks out and another Indian tribe
has to be exterminated in order to secure
peace.
From California comes news interesting to
thousands. Vast tracts of fertile land in that
State are held by capitalists who do not care
to cultivate it themselves, and have been non
willing to sell to those who would. This con
dition of affairs has caused much discontent
and bitterness, and to remedy it was one of
the avowed oljcts of the Kearney party.
Although that party has not carried the State,
its partial nsucess arpears to have prompted
one great landed proprietor to offer hae estate
for sale. The Hon. J. MoI8hefter is having his
land surveyed preparatory to selling it in lote
for farms. The San Francisco Call thinks
"there is but little doubt that most of the
large tracts of land controlled by private indi
widuals in California will soon be brought into
market."
The San Francisco Chronicle says:
"J. MoM. Bhafter, one of the greatest land
absorbers in California, ba si gnified his inten
tion to dispoeeof his immense tracts In Marion
county in small sections. The benefits result
ing from each b course cannot be overeetimated,
and if other landowners would follow Shatter's
example, the general welfare of California
would materially Improve. lie evidently reeds
the signs of the times aright, and thinks that
it is not unlikely that a constitution will be
framed which will impose the burden of taxa
tion equally upon the rich landowners. In
auenob an event millions of scres of land at pree
eat held in large treoats would be forced into
the market and oanee a shrinkage. Mr. Shaf
S ter want- to get into the market ahead of the
other heavy landowneres,"
It would be of great benefit to Louislana in
encoouraging small farmers to come here and
settle, If the Citizens' Bank and other large
S holders of land throughout the State, were to
divide up their properties into medium-alsed
S farms and offer them for sale at moderate
Price.
.Religicus Liberty in Germany.
Several days ago thb following dispatch
appeared in one of our eity dailies:
PusAC Barwsmw OGRMAnu AaD THr VAT:
cAx.-Losdos July 17.-A disaatch from a
well-informed souroe at the Vatican, states
that negotiations betwesen the Pope and the
German government bave been aganl resumed
The basis of them appears to be a proposition
on the part of Germany, that without a for
mal repeal, the alk laws shall be allowed to
become a dead letter, the publlo prosecutor
being directed not to 4ake steps for their en
foreement but to let them lame into forgetful
nes, as was the neas in England with the
eeelssiastieal titles bill, which wasdaily viola
lated for tweanty ysars without a single pros
eetion being instituted under it.
This looks a little improbable, consid
erlong the insolent tone of the latest an
hentie news on the subject, which was to
the. effect that the German government
hoped the Pope would use his inflaence to
make the Catholic population submimsive
to the very Falk laws alluded to in the
above dispatch. Still, stranger things have
happened. The Emperor seems to be a
good-bearted old man and very paternally
inelined towards all his subjects. It was
probably with great reluctance that he
was drawn into Bismarck's anti Catholic
schemes, and with great pain that he has
observed the bitter fruits of their operation.
He has seen nearly half the German people
partially estranged from his government,
and that too at the very time when So
cialism, Revolution and Anarchy are
rearing their serpent heads defiantly over
the land. The foundations of the state are
being shaken by the spirit of revolt;
contempt for God carries along with it a
still greater contempt for all lesser author
Ity; assassination aims its blow at the
very throne.
This is the ripening fruit of Bismarck
lanlsm; this is the frightful condition in
which the present Emperor's reign seems
likely to leave his country. What a
gloomy ending to so glorious a career of
success and cor quest ! How bitterly the
heart of the old sovereign must feel the
iegrace of such a failure I It may be,
then, that he is pressing Bismarck to aban -
don the fatal policy of irreligion, so certain
to bring down the speedy curse of God
on any country. The old man has not
much longer to live, and perhaps, as the
ambitious dreams of life lose their power
over him, he may be able to see more
clearly the folly-of defying God.
There is an immense difference between
false religion and irreligion. A false
religion may be wrong only as to its
organization. It may deny the authority
of the Church as organized by divine
power, and yet hold firmly to all the other
great doctrines of revelation. Its venera
tion for God may be most profound at d the
moral working of its faith may be effica
ciour. Its votaries may be sufficiently
under the influence of supernatural truth
to find their passions curbed and their wills
somewhat controlled. Eventually it will
lose this vitality for it is separated from
the source of life, stil', while it lasts its
efficacy is considerable.
But how different with irreligion ! Ven
eration for God does not exist, the control
ling influence of a future responsibility is
not felt, passion is emancipated from those
checks which alone can curb its selfishness,
and men literally do as they please. They
have no other law than their own inclina
tion, except the fragile law which, impos
ed on them as it is by other men, they
resent as an impertinence and hate as a
burthen. No society can exist without a
strong sentiment of religion among the
people, for society is impossible without
law, and law is impotent without the
moral support which it draws from a pop
ular religions conscience.
But it is in vain for governments to at
tempt the creation of a religious senti
ment among their citizens. Men inevitably
feel that religion is divine and supernatu
ral; that it is not of the state nor through
it, but above it and totally distinct from
it. It is direct from God or it is nothing.
Therefore they must be allowed to follow
their own prophets. False or true their
priesthood is their link with God, and if
they are not permitted to hear that priest
hood they will hear no other.
So, if the German government desires
the active, strenonus co-operation of its
Catholic popunlation in its.great issue with
Infidel Revolution, it must not imprison
all the Catholic c!ergy and banish all the
Religions Orders. It must give zeligion
freedom to grow after its own instincts
and be watered with the dew of heaven.
Then, to the extent of that growth, it may
rely on a firm, persistent, courageous sup
port. in all that is right.
Educators' Convention.
Mr. Losher has kindly favored us with
the programme of proceedings proposed to
be had at a convention of Southern educa
tors to be held at Chattanooga on the 6tb,
7Lth and 8Lh of next month. Contributions
in the way of addressees and essays by
geotlemen and ladies highly distinguished
in the field of education have been provi
ded for in advance, and the indications are
qnuite favorable to success so far as assem
bling the Convention goes.
A number of topics for discussion are
named, such as "The Educational Sitou
tion," "School Supervisrion," "Elementary
Schools," "Industrial Education," "Text
Books," "Methods of Instruction," "Intel
lectual Development," etc., but there is no
-1 -
referenee among them to Moral Develop
ment. We do not know whether or not this
omiseon is intentional, but fear it ia. At the
present day pablic opinion In this and
some other countries eeaumes that "edo
cation" is an exclusively intellectual oper
ation, that there is absolutely no necessary
connection whatever between it and moral
development.
This is an unfortunate error which we
regret to see adopted even negatively by
so intelligent end influential a body as that
about to assemble. Our reason for saying
it is an error is this: 7he field of Aeman
temptation is enlarged is proporftie to the
development of the humas intelligence. If
this I. so, then it follows that it is a crime
to educate the intellect without a corree
ponding enlightenment of the moral facul
ties.
Do our good, moral, zealous friends who
are getting up this Convention dream for a
moment that they are doing wrong in de
veloping the intellectual faculties of the
young under their control They never
thought of such a thing,'those of them who
are not Cathulice, because the age is now
mad on the subject of "education" and
they have accepted the madness for wis
dom. Still it is so; they are doing to these
young people a grievous wrong, unless they
carefully try at the same time to stimulate
the moral sense to a corresponding growth.
But why do we say that the field of temp
tation is enlarged with the growth of intel
ligence Because intelligence brings
opportunities of its own unseen in
darkness. We need cite but one or two
instances of this truth. The first is an op
portunity or occasion of pride. The ex
panding intellect looks upon itself and its
achievements with admiration, and upon
its old associations with corresponding con
tempt. The self satisfied victim becomes
cynical and haughty. Old truths, once
fondly cherished, are met with newly born
doubts, which no one is at hand to dispel,
and the most sacred convictions of an inno
cent heart are in danger of giving way to
skepticism.
Again. Another occasion wrought out
by an increased intelligence is human re
spect. The youth of twenty, who as a
finished "prentice" would whistle gaily
along the street in a patched blouse, as a
high-school graduate would blush with
mortification unless genteelly clad. Where
shall he get the means necessary to his
new found dignity including all its
eocial exigencies This is surely a tempt
ation due to his superior "education."
Every man, to resist temptation, must be
educated in the school of temptation. It
would not do for a boy of seven to have
all the fully developed instincts and pas
sions of manhood concurrently with the
mental and moral immaturity of infancy.
He would necessarily be a monster. But
according to the course of nature his pas
sions will develop only in the same ratio
with his judgement and his will. He will be
educated in the school of experience, in
other woids, ofathe temptations peculiar to
his state of life, and it will thus become
possible for him to control his conduct.
In the same way, the temptations pecu
liar to a highly developed intelligence
would almost as surely produce a monster
of one whose moral faculties had retained
the dwarfed proportions of infancy. To
be prepared to resist the temptation of a
broad intelligence, be ought to have been
educated in the school of temptation pecu
liar to such intelligence. All the sugges
tions against faith should have been met
and explained away and the dangers' of
poverty made familiar to him, so that, at
least, he would not walk over the precipice
with his eyes closed
A Change of Tune.
It is said that Mr. Wendell Philips in his
late pronunciamento has come out a strong
secessionist; he wants the State of Maine,
perhaps the whole of New England, to
secede from the Union and join Canada.
Of course, this is only prospectively, that
is, if his prophetic ken should not deceive
him. He sees an impending political alli
ance offensive and defensive between the
West and South, which will forever take
away from the barren hills of New England
every vestige of control and almost every
shred of influence in national affairs. Now
Wendell is an ardent lover of the Union
just so far as the Union is subservient to
New England interests. Beyond that it
may go to-well, to any uncanny extremity
whatever, so far as Wendell and Wendell's
school of untamed patriots care.
The singular thing, however, is that so
wise a man as Mr. Philips ashould fail to
appreciate a principle so elementary as
that "a rule ought to work both ways." If
a New England State when disgusted may
secede at will, why could not a Southern
State have done the same thing ? But far
be it from as to attempt bulldozing Mr.
Phillips on this point. Not for the world
would we run the risk of checking his
longings for Canadian company, and we
say anreservedly right here that we do
most unequivocally believe in the absolute,
unqualified right of every and any State to
secede from this glorious Union whenever
it chooses so to do, and without any as
signable reason whatever. We do not
understand that war can settle questions
of logic, nor can a principle be destroyeod
though all its. adherents should abandon
it. Truth must live fbrever. Like Mil
ton's Angels, all the wounds of war cannot
kill it, and, even though appareantl
stricken unto death, the ambrosial elixir of
immortality aball soon All its veins agala
with the Are of life and imperishable youth.
No I Let no man make Wendell afraid.
Let him go in peace and take Maine along
with him. With the exception of Connec
tieut, we feel equally generonus regarding
the other c ifaboots from Plymouth Rook.
Let 'em all go, and if necessary, pay their
pusage for them For our part, as grievous
ly as we deplore the evil of a heavy public
debt, we should favor a liberal policy in this
respect. Always xceepting Connecticut,
we should be in favor of marrying off the
New England States to Canada with the
aid of hbandome dowries. Canada would,
of course, make a wry face at the proposi
tion, for the Puritan New Englanders are
considered a very cantankerous race, but a
hundred millions of dollars with each State
would probably get them through. And
surely the United States would be cheaply
rid ast that rate of the leading spirits wlo
make that region a permanent incubus on
the rest of the country.
In saying this we would not for. a mo
ment like to be suspected of considering the
people of one section of this country bet
ter or worse in a general sense than those of
any other section. We have a hearty feeling
of friendliness for the good Democrats of
New England and should be sorry to part
with them; we greatly admire the energy
and intelligence ofeven the bigoted Puritans
of that community, but it is the sectional
ism of such men as Philips and Blaine
impressing itself upon the whole policy of
the States which they control, and making
those States a curse to the country at large,
of which it would be well to get rid
even at a heavy expense.
Death of Rev. E. J. Foltler, Pastor of St Vincent
do Paul's Church.
The Catholics of this city were pained and
shocked upon reading in last Wednesday
morning's papers the announcement of the
death of this mest zealous and estimable o!ergy
man. Bnt a few dals before be was apparently
ejoying b his usual robust health and was able to
attend to the onerous dutlis of his large parishb.
Sunday morning last he said Mass as usual and
preached in English and French. Monday he
felt unwell and remained in his room all day,
but Tuesday, about mid-day, be was well
enough to come down stairs. He soon retired
to his room again, however, and at 2 o'olock,
when his housekeeper called to see if he de
sired anything, she diswovered that he had a
burning fever and could not speak. The doo
tor and hie fliende were at once summoned to
his bedside, bat it was too late; be gradually
sank into a state'of unconsciousness and died
at half past seven o'clock Tuesday evening.
Etienne J Foltier was born on the 28th of
June, 1814. at Mon trenil-Belley, in the Province
of La Vendee, France. He pursued hise studies
finrst at Beau Preaux, where he was a pupil of
His Grace, Most Rev. N. J. Perche, Archbishop
of New Orleans, and subsequently at Combree,
where he afterwards occup:ed the chair of
Belles Lettrees. Oa Trinity Sunday, 1810, he
was ordained, and at once appointed assistant
priest at the Church of St. Lo d'Angers. In
1843 he first came to America, and for three
years remained in the Diocese of Albany, of
which the present Archbishop of New York,
Cardinal MoCloakey, was then Bishop. Daring
this time he built a substantial church in
Oswego, where he was stationed for some time.
In 1851 he returned to France and in December,
1852, came to the Diocese of New Orleans. He
was at once appointed by Archbishop Blanc
pastor at Abbeville, where he had a fine church
edifice ereoted and where he remained till 1856
when he was transfered to Vermillionville.
In 1864 he casm to New Orleans and for six
months, daring the absence of Rev. A. Darier,
in France, administered the affsirse f the
Churoh of the Annunciation. Upon Father
Durier's return Father Foltier was appointed
pastor of the parish of St. Vincent de Paul, in
which he was destined to spend the last years
of hie life and to the welfare of whose people
he brought treasures of indefatigable zeal
and rare experience. He at once began pre
parations to replsoa the wooden structure
which had served as a church with an edifloe
that would be worthy of Him in whose service
it was to be used. He made two tours through
the North to collect fonds and was untiring in
his exertions in this city and State. On the
24th of April 1864, Archbishop Odin laid the
corner stone of the new Church, and, through
Father Foltier's exertions alone, in a short time
the people of the parish had the happiness of
seeing the beautiful temple which is now so
so great an ornament to the neighborhood,
completed.
The remains of the venerable deceased,
clothed in his priestly vestments, were exposed
in St. Vincent's chorch on Wednesday and
were visited by large numbers of people
throughout the day. In the evening, at 5
o'clock, the funeral ceremonies took place in
the presence of a large congregation, the
crowds of sympathiselng friends filling not
only the churchb and sanctuary but also the
street in front and the grounds around. The
Very Rev. Vicar General, Father Millet, ofi.
elated in the absence of His Grace, the Most
Rev. Archbishop, who is at present in the
country. Some thirty-five prieste were present,
among whom we remember the names of the
following: Very Rev. Fathers Moynihsn,
Rouxeland Allen, Rev. Fathers Doarier, Kenny,
8ubileau, Thevris, Bogaserts, Keegerl, HBrslin,
Lamy and Grimm of the Redemptorists, Dnffo
and MoElligott of the Jesults, Doyle of the
Lasarist., Constarot Bicklmayer, Kennedy,
Plotin, Blanogarin, Piperni. Rev. Father
Chrasse acted as Master of Ceremonies. At
the conoluasion of the services the body, in an
uoncovered cofa and with a chalios fixed be
tweu the two bnd., was bose i asolsan
processlon around the square on whbih the
ohureb is situated. In the procession the Rev.
Clergy preceded the efmn and the sealeties of
males and femal s of the church with a number
of little orphans followed it. Returning to
the churoh, the last blesing was gives
and the body of the venerable pastor of St.
Vincent de Paul's obhreh was burled some six
feet under the Sooring at the head of the
centre aisle immediately in front of the High
Altar.
Jefesera College, Parish of It James.
The annual exhibition was held t the above
institution on the 18th and l7sh inst. On no
former occasIon did the students deserve or
receive warmer oongratulatione; never had
they more eneoraging testimony or unmie
takable evidence of the success which crowned
their efforts than from the numerous friends,
both lay and olerical, who assembled in the
College Hall to grace, by their presence, the
closing scene of a year's hard study.
Among the visitors present we noticed Very
Rev. F. Martin, of Natohitoohee, who is now on
his way to Europe; Very Rev. Father Dela
oroix, of Baton Rouge; Father Bouobet, of As
sumption; Father Heran, of St. James; Father
Viollier, of Napoleonville ; Father Ozanne, of
St. Philip's, St. Jam es Parish; Father Dubourg,
of La Vaoherie, St. James Parish; Father
Damas, of St. Patrick's; Father Jobard, of St.
Charles, and Father Chapuls, lately of St. Vin
cent de Peal's, now assisting Father Massar
dier at St. Theresa's.
The exhibition room was tastefolly decorated
for the occasion with paintings, drawings and
specimens of plain and ornamental penman
ship. Among the most remarkable drawings
were those of Masters L. Gronewald, O. and
Alph. Miller, Joe. Lonque and Theo. Lanaux.
Masters Allain and S. Story's speelmeus of pen.
manship likewise attracted much attention.
The exercises opened Tuesday.evenlng with
a play entitled " The Hero of Peru, or Uclaw
fol Ambition Thwarted," an adaptation from
Kotzebse's " Pizarro." The elocution of the
young actors was marked throughout by-a
singular smoothness and finish of delivery,
particularly in the rendering of the part of
Rolla, by Master O. Roman. Master Joseph
Roman also represented very well Pizarro.
His role was rather an ungrateful one, and
therefore we cannot but admire the courage
with which this young gentleman assumed the
garb of a irked ambition and died unhappily
to point a moral. Master A. Allain asm Alberto,
attracted universal admiration. The distinct
ness of his enunciation and the natural yet
spirited manner in which he endeavored to
win over Pizarro to more humane sentiments
elicited the applause of all present. Such
proficiency in a boy of Master Allain's years
gives promise of great snuoces at no very dis
tant period. Master F. Choppin, in the char
soter of the gentle but intrepid Alonro, more
than realized the most sanguine expectations
of his friends. Nor should we pass over Mas
ter A. Brand, who, as Las Casas, folly sus
tained the priestly character by his stern ad
vooaoy of right and justice in presence of the
most imminent danger. Masters A. Leblanc,
Jas. Forester, E. Castillo, John Peytavin, Joe.
Leblano and Ad. Ancoin came in for a large
and well-merited share ef approbation. The
intervals were filled up by a choice selection
of music, which seemed to be highly appre
oisted by the audience. But this was only
the first part of the programme.
Early on Wednesday morning the College
Hall was again densely crowded by a numer
ous and refined audience come to witness the
distribution of premiums to the succesaful
competitors. The entertainment began by a
fantasia "Belfort" which was executed in fine
style by the College band. However, the musi
cal treat of the day was the overture to Han.
dell's "Messiah," which showed to advaotsge
the degree of profiolendy attained by the
orchestra under the careful training of Prof.
Blanoby. Master A. Claverie deserves special
mention for the able manner in which be pre
sided at the piano. The vocal selections bore
testimony to the fact that no branch of music
is neglected at Jefferson Colleg-. But to come
to the literary part, Master P. Choppin's ren
dering of Shylock, in Shakespeare's "Merchant
of Venice," could hardly have been surpassed
by any amateur, whilst Masters H. Brand and
O. Roman materially contributed to his success.
In a scene from " L'avocat Patelin," Master A.
Claverie, as Patelin, had the house in roars of
laughter at the manner in which he doped
Master W. Waguespack, as Guillaume.
Then followed a piece of declamation, "The
Orphan," by Master A. Allain, which drew
tears from many an eye. The recitlation in
Latin and Greek, by Masters W. Waguespack
and Ad. Auooin, were given with such evi
dent appreciatien of what they were saying as
to be quite enough to convince the most in
oredulous that they wore thoroughly acquaint
ed with the language they were nusing. Not
the least interesting part of the proceedings
was the debate, the subject being "Whether
the Crusades were benefscial or baneful in their
results upon society." And we must confess
that we have rarely seen more eloquence dis
played by amateur speakers. Every discourse
was delivered with an esrnestness and tone of
oonviction which showed that each speaker
had taken his subJuct to heart, whilst the
arguments brought forward on either side be
trayed great depth of research. Master
Brand's valedictory moved more than one to
tears.
The exhibition was followed by the conferr
ing of degrees and distribution of premiums.
The degree of A. B was ponferred on Master
F. Tircuit. Certificates of merit were deliver
ed to Masters A. Brand, O. RHman, W. Hart,
and F. Hebert. Among those who received
most premiums or nominations, we notioed
Masters A. Allain, P. F. Choppin, John Peyta
vin, Joe. Roman, Joe. Leblauo, Thee. Kramme,
Joe. Donner, H. Ricker, P. Bourgeois, W.
Wagaeepank, Jas. Sovier, Ad. Anooio, D.
Fa jo, M. Seniat, etc.
During the present year over 100 pupils have
attended the college, which is now in a most
lourishing oondition. Every one knows the
seal and devoteduaes of the
athars for the work of dueatioe. A
Jeferson College young men are
pared for every honorable pefmelia
and trained in snob a manner that they OW
afterwards diseharge their repective duties
with eredit as well to themelvee as to thbir
Alma Mater.
sumsrlptlm to Defeat the Doel Prism
The following letter and eubeription lid
have been forwarded to Donegal from thie
oity:
Con Aaa .u a. AD Tcaourrror.s Bra
3Nw OLmUans, LA., Jaly l6, 1878.
Rev J. O'`e,.la, P. , Tanae. Doesgal.
Zev'ered Bie-Enolosed you will And theaie
of one hundred and eighty-one dollars, a
seribed by a few Irishmen and their frieag
employed on the coal fleet at Jeferson, . 0.,
who give the amount set oppoelte their nmnes,
for the purpose of assisting in procusing able
oouneel to defend the prisonsrs obhrged with
oomplioity in the killing of Lord Leltrim, ad
who have suoh a large amount of blood money
put up against them to prooure perjured ei.
denee. In following the example set by thoee
landlords of a like oalibre with the late Earl,
who desire a conviction of theee men, not that
they balieve them guilty, or to further the
Intereets of joustice, but the necessity of seae.
fining somebody to the Moloch of their revenge,
providlg.he be an Irisabhman, t most not be
understood that we approve of asseesination
as the means of ridding llaond of the brood
of transplanted land robbers who infest it;
but a day may come when a loug-sffering and
patient people, acting on the precedents estab.
liehed in the past, and under the aeoepted
rules of legalized warfare In the future, the
whole monstrono Incubus may be lifted from
the fair face of our motherland at once and
foever. TLis we believe in, and are ready to
asrist. In the meantime we trust our little
mite will help in preventing the sacrifice of
innocent men
We would be pleased to bear from you on
the reception of this, and any information
which you could impart in relation to the
prisoners will be duly appreciated.
On behalf of the subsoribers, accept the as
sorance of our regard, and believe us frater
nally yours, JAMES SwazEnY,
EDWARD MCGOWAN,
MICHAEL COONEY,
Committee.
James Sweeney................................{e 00
The.. Sweeney .................................. 10 00
Ed. Emmet Bweeney............................. 500
Edward S. Dore.................................. 5 00
Daniel McBride.................................. 5 00
John Colwell.................................. 5 00
James Terry..................................... 500
Hugh Campbell............................... 5 10
Manne Curran ................................... 500
Michael Denny. ............................... 5 00
Ed. McGinly................................... 5 0o
Hugh Martin.............................. 5 00
Ed. McGowan. Br................................ 00
Ed. McGowan. Jr.......... ...................5 00
Terrence O'Brien............................... 5
Michael Irwin ................................... 5 CO
Lauke O'Malley ................................... S 00
John Sheridan................................... 00
Ed. Moore......................................... 00
Owen MoManeman ............................ 5( 0
Arehy Stewart................................... 5 00
James MoCann ................................ 300
Michael MoAssey................... ... 50
John Lee .................................. . 2150
Myles Boslan.................................... 50
Thomas Kennedy................................ St
Hugh Mulhern ...................................
Thomas Fox.................................. 9 C
William Murphy........................... 1 00
Frank Catteman....................... ........ 00
William Lee..................................... 00
Joseph O'Connor................................. 1 50
H. L Robinson................................ 1 50
James Griffin, r .............................. 1 CO0
Japes Griffin, Jr.............................. 1 00
John Elwood............................... . 1 00
James Roche................................ I (0
Patrick Murphy ................................ 1 C(
John SBonlan ................................... I(
John DOly....................................... (0
Bernard Keenan............................... 100
William Connelly................................ 1 00
Robert Crofton ............................... 1 0
John Parker................ 1 C
M. Cooney..................................... 0
John J. Cooney................................... 1 00
Patrick Sheehy .................................. 1 00
Thomas Heaney.............................. .... 1 00
John O'Dowd...................*".............. I 00
Hugh McCabe .................... .... ... 1 CO
Edgar Schaffer ................................... 1 00
Patrick Burk .................................. I 00
Patrick O'Dowd........................1..... 00
J. P. Gallagher ............................-- . 1 C0
Peter McClokey.............................. 1 0o
Robert Quinn.................................... I 0
John Cline...................................... 00
Michael Hughee............. .............. 1 00
James Wilson.. . . . . .......................... I 00
Patrick Powers .................................. 1 00
Henry MoLonahlin ............................. (0
Alex Linx....................................... CO
Michael Slivert ......... .........................
A Bociallst ..................................... 50
P. Folger.......... . ....................... 50
The Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Zimes gives a very
fla ttering notice of the closing exeroises at the
Ursoline Academy in that city. Right Rev.
John Quinlan, Bishop of Mobile, and several
priests of the Dioecse honored the osoeeion
with their presenoe, the Bishop briefly addrrs
ing the large audience immediately after the
prizes had been distributed and the various
musioal and other performsnces had been con*
oluded. "The number of pupils at the Urso
line Academy" says the imes, "'has inoreuased
sice last year and we bespeak for the good
Sieters a still more liberal patronage both from
our own citizens and from those of other parts
olf the State."
The land sales to immigrants to the State of
Kanses from January to May amonuted tO
$4,000,000-nearly ten times as moeh as the
sales for the corresponding time in 1877. It is
estimated by Kansea journals that the new
owners of lands have brought inoto the Sate
folly $25.000,000 in addition to the amount
paid for lands. And yet there are thousands
of oacree of land in Loofuisiana, Alabama, Mis
siesippi, and other Southern State, whlcb,
location and price onsidered, present far
greeter advantoages to emigrasta seeking
hopes.
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