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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, January 12, 1879, Morning, Image 6

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-.,a Stayr and Catholic Mesuenter.
33w ORLEAWl. aUN&LT. JLAW7*ARY iS 17'9.
MR. O'CONNOR POWER AND MR. BUTT.
The following letter appears in the Dub
lin Nation of December "21 t :
To the executive of the fHtoo R1'e Confederation.
London.
Gentleman :--I beg to return you my
best thanks for the resolution which you
have been pleased to passe in reference to
my recent letter on Mr. Batt and my
speech in the House of Commons on the I
opening night of the sesion.
I have now to request your permission i
to make through you a public statement of i
the reasons which induced me to write of r
Mr. Butt in the terms which I employed in c
the letter to which your resolution refers. I
Since the night on which Mr. Butt rose a
in the House of Commons, and "in the I
name of the Irish nation" denounced Mr. t
Parnell and Mr. Biggar for daring to do c
that which was to them a matter of plain a
and simple duty, I have felt that it was t
incumbent upon me, as a member of the a
Irish party, to observe closely the danger- t
ous course of the policy upon which it b
appeared to me be had then entered. and, d
..accoldinoly, I have watched Mr. Batt's
conduct for a long time with distrust and t
alarm, with pain and humiliation* I
On the occasion to which I refer two of a
the most faithful members of the Irish par t
ty were denounced in the face of a hostile r
assembly, and handed over to the fury of I.
their enemies, by the very man whose po 13
aition required of him that, instead of de- o
nouncing them, lie should have acted the h
part of their champion and defender. At "
that time I wrote a public letter question- n
ing Mr. Butt's right to act thus "in the B
name of the Irish nation;" and I had after- ti
wards ample proof that the Irish nation S
repudiated any such authority in Mr. Bott, b
and condemned his conduct even though tl
regarding it as that offan individual mew- ti
ber of the Irish party. All the recognized I.
organs of national opinion in Ireland ex- B
pressed that condemnation, but this did ti
not prevent him from seizing the very next nu
opportunity to subject those gentlemen to a
another denunciation , in which he declar- a
ed, of course amidst the applause of the p
alien Parliament, that Irish politics as un- 0
derstood by the active section of the Irish
members were nothing better than an E
"Irish brawl." P
When it became necessary last winter re
to summon the friends of Home Rule to a a'
National Con' 'rence, this so called leader P
threw every obstacle in the way. The E
"onference was held, however, in spite of L
him, and he and the whole parliamentary V
party were publicly bound over to a policy o0
of energetic action. He solemnly pledged d
himself to energetic action, and as solemn- ci
ly promised to consult the party on all t
important questions so as to secure unity. fc
!iut hod' did he fullil these obligations? et
lie never appeared in his place in I'arlia- of
iuent during the fol!owing session, until II
the Intermediate Education 1hll was intro- It
duce-d, when het cnime over to appropriate '
t!e credit of thlier mero's labors. This
was the extent of lii: energy. What did hbe a
do to secure nuity I lie was literally IS
bound to consult with his colleagues o1 a
"imperial qu;estionc rof importance.." but i
when the tinal ssuc. upon the 1-isteri d
question arose, he was one of the lith to
sound the note of discord ln a speech which i1
would have b i-n mowl a,tropriate in the i
mouth ofaCastlerengh than in that of aman r
supposed torepresent a country struggling 1
for national indelea dence. Thus did he c
..how how nmuci iith e-timated the unitr of P
.ie Irih party. And thiis is the man who. S
nrites a series of lett-rs containing much L
perverted history of the past and many
d eluscive dreams of the future, but carefully
avoiding the practical work of the present, I
and all for one object-viz., to fasten a
charge of dissension on those who refuse
to sanction every recent folly of I is incon -
sistent Parliamentary career.
it cannot be forgotten that the resolu
tions calculated to promote union have 1
always emanated from the active section
,lf the party, the section whose successful I
'sctivity has excited the jealousy and
wounded the vanity of Mr. Butt. Of this I
character was the resolution which I mov
ed at the National Conoeronce last Janua
ry, by which the council of the League
was bound to convene an annoal confer
snce. This resolution commended itself to
the unanimous approval of the gentlemen
assembled from all parts of the country.
It was passed amid great enthusiasm in
presence of Mr. Butt without a dissentient
voice, and everyone seemed to feel that by
providing means for an annual review of
Home Rule operations it would prove a
remedy for the evils arising from apathy
or dissension. This, however, did not suit
the honorable and learned member for
Limerick. He did not want to have the
light of an annual conference thrown upon
his operations. He would render the res
olution null and void at all hazards. Ac
cordingly when it was proposed in the
council of the Home Rale League that the
annual conference should be held, Mr.
Butt strenuously opposed the proposition.
liHe had its consideration adjourned to a
more convenient time for his purpose-the
:11 of last September-when the aseembled
connoil numbered exactly five persons-
Mr. Butt and four others of no particular
weight, as far as I know; but perhaps it
would be only fair to give their names.
They were Mr. Philip Callan, M.P., Mr.
Maurice Brooks, M.P., Dr. O'Leary, M P.,
and Mr. R. B. Butt. The decision of the
National Conference was set aside on the
motion of Mr. Bott, M.P., who proposed
that the Council could make no ar
rangements for the holding of the Confer
ence. After this it appeared to not a few
influential members of the Home Rule
League that further effort looking to co
operation with Mr. Bntt would be futile;
et one more attempt was made to assem
ble t friends of Home Rule, and a requi
eition was signed by thirty-six .members
of the League, including the namesof gen
tlemen who are known throughout the
country for their life-long devotion to the
national causem requesting the honorable
eecretaries to convene a spelcial meeting
of the League. Although this document
was drawn up in strict accordance with
the rule regulating suach meeting, the bon
orable and learned member for Limerick
had his legal doubts about it. He would,
be said, advise the honorable secretariss
not to act upon it; but, having in view
the weight and importance of the requisi
ton, he would consent to have the meet
ing called by the council, but not on the
day fied by the requisitionists, and then
three weeks notice at least should be given
of the reeolations which the requisitionists
intended to propose.
All this obstruetion on the part of Mr.
Butt was patiently submitted to, and the
League meeting was fixed for the 10;b;
but the member for Limerick and his
friends rejo!ced when the unexpected ses
sion of Parliame,'t gave them another
excueo for obstructing the national work
and preventing discussion, and through
their exertions the meeting of the Losgre
has been,: indefinitely postponed.
May I not ask, after all this, who is the
real author of the "policy of obstruction?"
-who of the "policy of dissensiont"-who
of the "policy of exasperation V'-who. in
fnlag, is it that has "brought confusion into
the counsels of the nation ?" Is it not the
very man who has levelled these phrases
at the heads of others, in whose work be
never bad the spirit to share, but the fruits
of which he does not scruple to claim as
his own-Isaac Butt, member for Limerick
and quondam leader of the Irish party T
it is now plain that his aim is to obstruct
the national work, to divide the national
counsels, to exasperate the national party,
and to bring confusion into the counsels of
the only nation which Irishmen recognise
as theirs-the Irish nation-which neither
the apostacy of worthless leaders nor the
brute force of England can conquer or sub
due.
The letter to Dr. Ward, M.P.. marks the
turning point in Mr. Batt's career as a I
Home Rule leader. If Ireland could be t
appreciably influenced by the author of
that production the resent generarinn
might abandon all hope of achievivg legis
lative independence, for in tha' letter Mr. I
Butt publicly surrendered the nationality
of his own country. He proclaims that I
her nationality has been absorbed In the
"United Kingdom," and calls upon Irish
members to stand tamely by while the a
Louse of Commonus approv..s a gross vin'a
tion of the territory of an I:ldt peil,- -nt
State, and the Irish members are thus to I
betray their own principles lest otherwise c
their action should bring confusion iuto e
the counsels of the nation. Here are no
longer two kingdoms, Ireland and Great
Britain, but one united kingdom bound by t
the holy (?) compact or 18It There are t
no longer three nations-Ireland, En gland I
and Scotland-but one nation undivided c
and indivisible forever, thanks to the im- !
perial policy and the patient marceavres t
of our modern Castlereagh. 5
I read this document which was sent to
Dr. Ward two weeks ago (nominally for I
presentation to the Home Rule Party, but s
really for circulation in the English press, i
as proved by the fact that while it has been p
published in the Times and scores of other i
English papers no meeting of the Home I
Hule party has up to this hour been con- a
vened to consider it) with a burning sense t
of shame and indignation, but waited for in
days to see if it would not elicit merited a
condemnation from the more trusted and f
honored members of the Irish party. Alas a
for the decadence of public spirit! I wait- in
ed in vain, and when, on the opening day I
of the trssion, I 'unteied the meeting of o
Irish in-mtbere in KR.g etreer, and s ow p
leas than a dozen men out of a (party corn- I
posed vif sixty-:hle reIpresentatives of a c
satrnn--uet infornially, and as it were by a
acid nfit, no theeve of the greatesst Parli ii
nutntar in uggle within living memo'ry,
,ad at a Vii t crisis in the allttsi of Eng- c
land, withi no policy representing the a
.datllsn- i;nntiratlons of Ireland and no t
thing t.i s.ow to the world that she still a
toiiie all the moral attributes of a distinct J
nationality and an unconquered nation, I q
resolved liat, no matter at what personal f
.i-k to nr3sell, no matter what amount of a
censure and odinm I might incur, I would
publicly denounce the man who was re- I
spousible for the unepeakable disgrace and a
humiliation of my country. Some who
hold that Mr Butt's action is inexcusable a
have expressed a similar opinion of the a
language in which I condemned it, though
they seem to forget the violence with
which the member for Limerick denounced i
his active colleagues, ard, labored to hold t
them up to the scorn, ri-icu e and contempt I
of tiu Itouse ol Comwn ii Whatever may I
be titught of my lan,;uge, there is no
doubt among nine tenths of the Irish peo
ple that the several acts of Mr. Butt which
I have recited amount to a betrayal of the
Irish cause. Though looking at the earlier
of these acts with all the just indignation
which they excited, I yet entertained the
hope that they might be charitably set
down to errors of judgment, and to that
hope I clang until the appearance of the
famona letter to Dr. Ward, which blasted
every hope and confirmed every suspicion.
After this I considered that, with my feel
ings and opinions as an Irish Nationalist,
submission to Mr. Butt would be treason
to the country and silence an unpardonable
crime.
I wish that I could stop here and leave
the settlement of the issues raised by Mr.
Butt entirely in other hands, but I am
bound to point out that he has given
abundant evidence that there is no step
which he is not prepared to take with tie
object of thwarting the national wiil and
blighting the fruit of every heav~ -.sent
opportunity. lie is sh,,ve all things a
constitutional lawyer, aiid he claims to be
a constitutional pt rio:, but in his zeal to
put down Irish activity in Parliament o
tramples upon couestitutional law as ruth
lesly as he would, if the Irish people per
mitted, upon the active members of the Irish
par'y. Let anyone who knows anything
about C:oentitutional law read the follow
log ,passage in Mr. Butt's third letter to the
electors of Limerick. He says: "I must
leave it to every man's conscience to say
how far lie would be justified in obtaining
the power of sharing in the proceedings
of the House of Commons by taking the
oath of allegiance to the Queen, and then
using that power to ba.Re all her measures,
confute all her counsels, anrd disrupt the
citadel of hcr por-er." The italics are mine.
Now, it is distinctly laid down by the
highest constitutiob authorities that the
Queen has no measures in Parliament, and
not a single tittle of responsibility rests
upon her for measures announced in the
speech from the throne. It is a fixed prin
ciple of constitutional law that the meas·
nres which the sovereign orders to be laid
before Parliament are not her measures, but
the measunres of her Minisaters for which
they alone are responsible. The doctrine
that resistance to the Minister means re
bellion against the Crown, is the most out
rageously unconstitutional that ever was
uttered. If Mr. Batt had spoken thus in
the House of Commons he would have been
promptly called to order, and I am forced
to ask what does this language, coming
whence it does, really mean Y It means
that Mr. Butt will use every means in his
power, constitutionul or onconstitutional,
to put down his own countrymen un:osn
they quietly soubumit to the yoke of toe
Minister. It may mean agood deal more
""qF~r~r'i i;'' /'"~~l·jdi La"' /' ':,-*;'e '"''.'*.='w:-
than this. Parliament consists of the
Crown, House of Peers (the lords Spiritual
and Temporal), and [the House of Com
mons, and it has been the constant aim of
Lord Beacoosfield in recent years to eo
large the powers and prerogatives of the
Crown at the expense of the other constito
teat parts of Parllsm-nt. Has a subordinate
part of the unconstltutional work been as
signed to Mr. Butt in that sunbordinate and
most uncoenstitutionally governed country
-Ireland ? If so, I fear the assistant has
far onuttepped the Instructions of his mas
ter. He should have been content to de
stroy our privileges one by one and drag
us down by slow and easy stages to the
last extremity of servitude; but this sud
den demand for a complete surrender of
our rights fails to dazzle by its audacity,
and I tell Mr. Butt and the Ministep that if
a similar doctrine be announced LiO the
House of Commons I shall repudiate-it.,
and if a similar demand be made there I I
shall answer it with defiance. Has it come
to this that our scanty constitutional
rights-which poor as they are, it cost
centuries of heroic effort and sacrifice to
win--shall now be torn from us by an
Irish hand acting as the instrument of an
English Minister, even as the hand of
Castleragh tore away in like manner the
proud privileges of an independent legisla
tore? It may be so; but I for one shall ac
quit myself of all participation in a guilty
silence whilst the guilty deed was being
done.
Parliament is undoubtedly called the
high council' of the sovereign, but the
sovereign's pre,.nce in eit*ler House during:
the debatres is described by Sir T. Erskine
May as a "qgnestiouable practice which
might ,he ut-d to overawe that aseembly
and influence ther t, ,ia'es, and which has
wisely been disco-t rl:oed se;ce the acces
sion of George the First ;" so that the
privilege of being present in Parliament
during itsdeliberariins, which the meanest
of the Queen's s bjec's may pi-saes, can
not now be exerris-d by herseit ; and yet
we are told that to oppose the Minister in
the House of Comm aa is to confu e the
counsels of the Q eer,. I forbear from t
further comment on this absurd position
of Mr. Butt's, and dismiss it with the sin
gle additional observation that it shows
his legal vision, as well as his political, is
sadly clouded by partisan zeal.
The change which has come over the
language and the attitude of Mr. Batt v
within the last few years is one of the
most disedifying spectacles which Irish
politics has presented in our time. I do
not wonder that his personal friends in c
Limerick and elsewhere have "fled the g
unwelcome story." But theirs is a wmi- u
taken kindness, and every encouragement
he receives in his present course can only
serve to separate him farther and farther
from the people iof Ireland and hasten his -
final estrangement from their cause. lie
has prefe.rredthe applause of the Enilish
House of Commons to the gratituldo i.t :i
own countrymen and the homS ag which C
posterity would have plid to i."a na-e.
11a poritian beloaro the Irish p too;-ie ti da}
contrasted with that of Mir. Parl:t aR a'ild
serve as a !eson and it watr: it to terlm ur.
inrng politician..
His p-)licy in the ir.se of Cinumons
could not e-ceed because it was a contra
diction of himself, and his tuone nlid atti
tude t'iere gave no irmpr'.isin oif tithiur
earnestnesa or deo rnminition. Cot I
Joseph de Maistre, on being asked tie.
question "when is a gouial beaten?' re
plied, "a general is beaten wbun le con
siders himself beaten." When Mr. Batt
pleads for Home Rule in Parliament, which
he does most reluctantly, he speaks like
an advocate who considers himself beaten
-lie speaks as if to crave mercy toe Ireland
as the victim of a lost cause rather than to
announce her stern resolve to be free. Wel'
would it have been if the noble sentiments
which the associptions of historic Limerick
inspired had been acted upon in the House
of Commons. I find in the speech whticl:
he delivered to his constituents on the
23rd September, 1875, the following word',
which convey almost emphatic contradic
tion of his Parliamentary policy and his
recent utterances:-"We, yourrepresenta
tives, will be powerless unless English
statesmen and the English Parliament and
the English people are perectly convinced
that we are backed by the determ:ination
of a people earnestly, aye, dtspae,tely, re
solved that the system of goe.narent
which is wasting away and degrading our
country shouide .ee.e. The day is guceby
when great q ieetine were carried by
Parliamentary .bcstes." And later on he
says, "the history of all popular triumphs
-of Emancipation, of the Reform Act, of
the Repeal of the Corn Laws-teaches us
that in the form of the Government under
which we live it 1i diflicult to reeist th6 de
termination of n-.iltitudes who are in
earnest in auy cea;sa-impossible to d) so
when that c;obt, is just." We hear very
different R,'ors from him now; we hear
much of the good and kindly dispositions
of Parliament, but the "determination of
multitudes," which three years ago was
declared to be irresistible, is orc u ineeredl at
and declared to be con:e ipti-e. Why? Be
cause th, roultituden t lunriger assemble
ii :he name of Isaac Hatt, but in that of
Charles Stuart Parnell.
In noticing my speech delivered at the
Rotondo meeting on the 23rd October last,
Mr Butt took good care to avoid a'l refer
ence to my quotation from his letter on tihe
county Corik election in 186"7, when he
said: "Just measures for Ireland will not
be passed by the British Parliament unles
under the pressure of external danger. or
the influeoce of som~e greatL organisatiun
combining the Irish people." External
danger hias arisen. The Opportunity con
templated by Mr. Butt, has come, and, so
far from using it to obtain joust measuree
for Ireland, he abandons his party on the
morning of battle, and serreoders to the
enemy without striking a blow. No won
der that an American critic should pass
sentence of condemnation upon us, and say
that the race of Irish stateemeon Is extinct
and that our Parliamentary party is only
a rack of politicians.
But the member for Limerick says that
just measures may be won by the influence
of some great organisation combining the
Irish people. And yet it is uotorious that
he is now the implacable foe of every
attempt at organisation subject to his fatal
influence. He has stifled discussion, re
slated investigation, and sheltered political
dishonesty. He has deferred the dearest
and most cherished hopes of our race for
the convenience of those who have sconted
our repeated demands for justice, and who
still continue to outrage the national feel
ing of our country, wherefore I protest
that he no longer speak for me, and I
raise my voice and Icall upon my country
men everywhere to shake off the rags of
that tattered and diaeredited "leadership"
whieb can only lead to vational infamy and
national rain.
I am convinced that the Irish people
will afford the active section of their repre
eentatives ample facilities for vindicating
their parliamentary action from the mis
representations and aspersions of Mr. Bott
and the English press, and I need not
therefore enter upon any vindication of
that action here; but I think it right to
state that we ahat not suffer ourselves to
be either driven or taunted into any posi
tion from which we should be compelled to
retire by craft, or canning, or superior
force.
Those who constantly charge as with
violating the laws of Parliament are un
able to find in our action the materials for
an indiecment, even with the asaistance of
a Select Committee specially appointed for
the purpose and the cheerfully rendered
legal services of Mr. Batt. We despise the
artifcial fears which they have excited, and
shall not be deterred from pursuing our
policy of sustained resistance while one
sacred right of the charter of Irish freedom
remains to be won.-I remain, gentlemen.
your faithful servant.
JoaHN O'CONNOR POWER.
16:h Dacember, 1878.
REMARKABLE MORTALITY OF FIsI.-The
extraordinary phenomenon displayed on
the Florida coast, by which not only the
coast waters, but as far ont as 1J50 miles
into the Gulf, have been rendered so poi
sonocna as to kill the fish and create a peea
tilentia. stench in bays and barbhra where
the floating carcassees collect, should receive
a thorough invest.gation. We have even
no other explanation of the poisoning than
that it comes from inland watere2-the
everglades promiienrtl-and penetrates
the golf in strata of dark reddibh water,
which kills all the surface fish as soon as
ithreachee them, and even far beyond any
apparent contact. This poisonous outflow
is stated to have been nearly fatal to the
fish trade between Florida and Havana-
the smacks finding it almost impossible to
select a ronte in which the fisah in their
wells are not destroyed by the poison.
The Key West Key says: "The smack
George Storra, Capt. Zeb Alien, attempted
to run to the westward in hopes of escap
ling the deadly waters, and when fifty miles
west of Tortugas, in 25 fathoms of water,
lost its wholelfare of fish in a very abort
time. He describes the poisoned water to
the south and west of him as far as be
could see." Fifty miles west of the Torta
gas would make the locality indicated 150
miles west of Cape Florida, and not very
far from mid-gulf.
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ntd wish to rec'uu -r II..' stuuuu'- d -rru- oi
ht.ti: 0h. strentrth, a.,i e nergry :.a oxp-rl'lttin"t
itls. i.rl iitr years? tlo ail-r the ll lloweingl
ys-tluutttust or cit- of ."I'tll i11n, met, tg-,ouart
(i1" is-i uouditiul ? Are- yu suffering frohlI
Ill h,.:-Ith i ntlly of its masny and multifarl-3
uis1, t+rrnis. (cOtls.1eiu t tilsOit it ltugi ,-cr , nertv-.
tui. chrouic or lunttioilll dlist.a:is:lae? o you
i.le nervoutl. deilitated, l fre-tttll, ti'uld r. Ildi
]:,;i: the Ilute-r 1I will i lltatl itOi ? Are vol1
rutl jt-tt to Io.-s of tnlmory, hii\'t. spells of falnt
tlnI flutllllthess of bloo itl the hi'ltl.fel listl.'I
ilipl. uig, lntit for bultsineS t (,r Il:tr I, lanIt
.utiuject to ftll of luelallcholly ? Are your kid
Itvs., ;stiotlch, or blood, li ai dibordelrtid el C
dtlon? IMo ytu sutlfer from rhetunltati,u
iri-uralglia or aches atnd pains? Have yot.
fi-en indlscreet In early years and find your
is-Itf haratusedl with as multttude of gloomy
symptoms? Are you timid, nervous, and
lorgetful, and your lltllld continually dlwell
lng on the subject? Have you lost mntldenco
inl yourself and energy for buslness pursuits?
A r you subject to any of the followingt Symnp
trmti: Itlestes nihtts, brokii step.l) night
otare. dreams, palpitation of the heart, basht
fluiess, confusion of ideas, aversion to G soel.ty,
dlizzilles In the head, dimness of sight. pim
plets atid blotches on tle Iface atid back, and
oither despondent ym-nlitms? TlAousnnttiof
yiulltg tetn, the mniddlle-agor d, and even the
tld, suffetr from nervous and pllysical dbil
ity. Thousands of femrales, roo. are broknta
dliwn in health iand spirits Inim iisorldnrn
pieuliar to their sex, indi who. frllt falrtso
muid1.ity or iu-glect prolotlg thelir rutllirinis.
lVhy,. thlen. furtlher tneglect a subject so pro
ducttivt tf heitalth iatnd hangpiniet when ther
is at hand a means of restoratiun ?
PULVERMACHER'S
ELECTRIC BELTS AND BANDS
clre these various. dic-atu od eiotltons. afntr
:tll luter rlnt-ln fail, snd wt( olltr the mustl
tili'l thelnBst-lvtes t who Iltnvdi hivilt r stoict.d to
HEALTH, STRENGTH, AND ENERGY,
afelr druglin for nn hgintil fir in nt ll yer:ars
TlOF: P1t.1 ItitIi( QCAI.\rTEnntv. :1 Bl:-if'e llli -
trattld i Jo all t ntl lilllie frll Ibirtietll:arn
lit. Itttitlt,-i frie- Aidtuti -is,
PULVERMACHER GALVANIC CO.,
Cor. Eighth and Vine St:,, CINCINITATI, O.
F Anoid boqus anpl nrces ?t;n:ing n :lcr
t'ic qulitieis. fI). ltnmplhli:t cp l:tinl5 )rowu tUr
distinguish the gerluine from the spurious.
apl4 "I lycw
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE SOUTHERN
PEOPLE ANID SUTFFERdING 2UMANITY.
7 new re.pe-fnt7 .announce rose.If as the Sole
Ah:-"' of tih to. en r Stated exi-pit M orylamd and
Vli-lai. fi.r itIo .iote"r cf Piovldenes, Eotreal,
tnatta. and Wilnoskt. VermontO, for the sale of their
original and gnnitne preparationa.
TidI SYRUP OF SPRUCE GL'kt,
for Palmcnary CllIenmptton, Coghe, r llds. Hoars.
aDe. tad Oahei -t(ffetiiDns of the t ost; the
bYr.UP FOlt H-oT)IG, COnOII AND ATHMPA
THiE ' oMPOUND LINIMENT.
hlich '. r+. tl c'.-retstly for Ioiummotnry Rhenma
ltiu, :ots " as. it PYne in the Loiss. Abls,
:IVA '0 PANCREA tIN
a -n'n r...- itl ' -Psia and Dtreea-t of the bhest.
r' ,- s. "rl1-b ( itmedies ara well known end in
tll «-,i nc- u i ta norti and Rlua and are now offered
w- 1rie I' o'eS ,I ir,.b. All that I asked for from
5- r ti...ll.tti S, It v1 tau-t of their eirative properties
'.h crlollnel u--tlon accordlng to the effet. Every
rr.st', .'t -nin i ue snpplled with the above prepare
I ". "; otiii+,t . it aimleer or better for family ene.
ail .rtre ,, .-i- the above will he promptly llUed at
I.&u tacturers' prlees by the General Agent,
P. F. GOGARTY,
CATHOLIC BDOKSELLgER AND STATIIONzRt.
..... Camp Street ..........«.151
Prlcees--Brup of Sprnuce Gum. 5Oo. Hooping Cough
BSyrup, 5c ; Compoand Liniment. 0; Oyano tPan.
ereatmne, $i. N. B -Be careful and examine the
trade marksh mh3l 78 ly
MALAKOFF BITTERS.
The Best Stomachic and Tonic,
SOVEREIGN REMEDY FOR DYSPEPSIA
Excellent for an Anti-Malarial Morning Beverage.
LOW PRICE. PURE AND RELIABLE.
For sate in all quantities by
ALF. WALZ,
26.x...-... ..Co-ti Street........... .- _96
1e3 78 ly Sole Manufacturer.
HOLIDAYS' GOODS.
SCHILLING'S
MILLINERY EMPORIUM, HAIR WORK
FANCY GOODS BAZ&ABR,
The assortment now ready for exhibition cumprisne
the very latest styles in
Millinery Materials, Hats and Bonnets,
HAIR GOODS of eve-y description, and the molt
rencerohe ecleclions In Jewelry Fne, Comth. Brrahee,
Dreulsng Cases, Itticle Purees, Card Cases, Vienna
Gilt Ornmments and Porte-hionnale. etc.
Yonr attention I psetionuarly dlreoted to my
8PEOIALTIES
in fine 8halt, Ivory and Pearl JET GOODS.
MIllinery ArtIcles and Hair Work.
All In fall and complete oollectlon, at once oholoe and
beautiful.
0. T. SCHILLING,
159.a..a.......CanI 8free .......... 159
degI 77 iy lm5p
PHOTOGRAPHY
AS A FINE ART,
MAGNXFICENCE OF BHADE AiD COLORIRO,
W, W, WASHBURN'S,
109...........-Canal Street..........109
All Picturre taken at this oGllsry are ftllv guaranteed
for accuracy and artlItlc lleth.
CHARGES MODELRATE. myh1 7 ly
bOUSI FURWIHIMG GOODS
FURNITURE.
JOHN BOI8,
152 and 154......Camp Street......152 and 154
RBesectfnlly informs his friends and the publio in
general that he will sell FUANITURE of every
description at very low prices. '
Country orders solicited and pomptly filled.
Please call and examine for yourselve before pur.
chasing elsewhere.
moe7 78 ly JORN BOIS.
Bargains in Farniture
AT
NOVEL'S!
PARLOR, BEDROOM and DINITEGROOM SUITS
the Cheapest in Town.
We are offering VICTORIA BEDROOM SUITS,
comprising 10 pieces, forj40;
PARLOR SUIT, as low as 60 ; the best suit in town
for that money;
And a very arge assortment of Furniturp at very low
rates.
GOods delivered free of oharge.
FURNITURE TAKEN ON STORAGE AT VERY
LOW RATES.
WM. F. NOVEL,
171 and 173.... Poydras Street ....171 and 173
oct7 78 y Near Carond'le t
A. BROUSSEAU & SON,
.-...........Chartree Street........ .17
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
Carpetings,
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHBS,
CHINA AND COOOA MATTING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVERS,
WINDOW SHADES,.
CRUMB CLOTHS. RUGS, MATS,
OARRIAGE. TABLE AND ENAMEL OIL.OLOTH
WHOLESALE AND REBAIL.
CURTAIN MATERIALS - Lace, Repe, Damasks,
Cornices, Bands. Pins, Gimpe. Loops adn Tassels
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and Springs,
BURLAPS. by the Bale and Piece.
Prices as low as those of sany one else in the trade.
oo 97Is ly
REMOVAL! REMOVAL
ELKIN & CO.
HAVE REMOVED THEIR
Carpet and Oil-Cloth Warehouse
10
100............ Canal Street...... ..100
Between Camp and St. Charles stree ts.
A foll line of CARPETS. OIL CLOTHS, MATTINGS,
WINDOW bEHADE4, ert , at lowest prices.
oc?7 78 Iy
FIVE IIUNDRED
Ready-Made Cord-Bound Ticks,
OF ALL SIZES AND GRADES.
Also, a large assortment of
MATTRESSES
on hand, and for xa!o to suit a~I buyers, as cheap as the
ordinary kinds in use, at the
DONAHOE
Patent Cord-Bound Mattress Factory,
ccl7m NO 44 CSIARTRES STREET.
E STABLISHED 1857.
G. PITARD,
IMPORR]a AEB DREALlr 1
HARDWARE, GRATESB,
PAINTS OILS. VARNISH. WINDOW GLASS
WALL PAPER, ETC..
221 and 223...... Canal Street...... 23land 2
Between Rampart and Basin streets
apOS ly NIeW ORIraS.
The Cheapest House
IN THE CITY.
THE MOST STYLISH AND DURABLE
V wl , 3'n t um 0`e 4
OF ALL KINDS.
Parlor, Bedroom and Tlningreom Sets at very low
ftgures, and all warranted to he of the bet material
and workmanship.
Call and see. Yon will save money by doing so
before buylEg.
Special ateatilon paid to Cootry Onstomers.
W. B. HINGROSE,
apSl 78 ly 175 OCamp street.
v., BIRI,
Importer, Manufacturer and Dealer in
WILLOW WARE, WAGONS, CRADLES,
MARKET BASKETS.
Work Baskets, Chairs. Clothes Baskets, German and
French ancy Baskets, etae.
120, 288 and 253 Chartres Streets,
Ja0 78 ly NEw ORLAns.
THOS. McKENDRICK,
Plumber, Gas Fitter,
AND DEALER I
COOKING RANGES AND BOILERS,
BATH-TUBS, WATER-OLOSETS.
WASH-STANDS, KITCHBEn-S~!K,
LIFT AND FORCE-PUMPS
ALE PUMPS,
SHEET LE lD AND LEAD PIPE, BRASS AND
PLATED COCKS OF ALL PATTERNS.
625...........Magazine Street.. ..........
Above Josephine.
REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. jal3 78 ty
FURNITURE ! FURNITURE!
FLYNN'S FURNITURE WAREROOMS,
167 and 169 Poydrae Street,
Between Et. Charles and Clrondelet streetis
SAlarge stook of FI.NE FUBNITURE, selected with
great care from the leoading manuasotories North.
East and Weslt, coostlating of
VICTORIA BEDROOM SUITB, with GIls 5D
Wardrobes, French Dressers, bFressing Oases
Commodes.
PARLOR SUITS. covered in BSilk, Coteline, Terry,
Repe and Hair Cloth.
d DINING ROOM SUITS of the latest styles andbh
patterns.
CHEAP FURNITURE for the ooontry, in Isr
9 variety and at the lowest prices
Neat and Strong VICTORIA BEDROOM SUIT, t
40 00.
Mose, Hair and Spring MATTRESSES a epeclaltY.
A large stock of LIVE GOOSE FEATHERS lw~'
on hand.
HUGH FLYNN,
, 167 and 169....Poydras Street.-.- 167 nd l6,
JOhN O. ROCHE,
250 and 252 ....Magazine treet....200 and 29
UTNDERTAKEEB AND EMBAL~"S5
SAll buoianas eatratedtomy are rwill receive p.oDpt
and re atteten at moderates rte. e
OIlEFArROIA TO HIs. y"

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