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The morning star and Catholic messenger. [volume] (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, February 02, 1879, Morning, Image 6

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ertrinir 9 end Catholic Messenger,
WW OBtUL3A 4 esAkT, rltsatLtY 5, 1679.
A FINE EXHIBIT.
CHURCHI OF TrE IMMIACULAT CONCOPTONI, NEW
Dr.
SPlate oll etieone ..............................$ ee) 9
s .e. . ....... .................................... 9.5
Pew ren e ,..................... . . ... &T 4(5
Shebool e oit.lo. t.............. ............ 1., 0 7
Oellureeb D ulso ti .................... . .1.6 0
la 9o0..0 .................................. t 1lo
aethe l lra 510 ltt t. t.............. 17 3
Aiurllter o aetae o .. ...... ..................... 70 i5
oity ere ttibulklit.. ..................... 2bY 00
3eqayt Boeo ad me ..................... e
Total ......... .......... ......... .. ..5. 87 44
Salero. Treaur ........................... I300.
sundry salooost--Qsrmatlone xlpeaseWt. 373 33
lDebt January lt 1t .......................... 1
OClnig uuroh ·ad whoel ................... 33 7I
Col ud wood ................................ 5it 90
team h lns-no t hool................... 143 00
Jnitor andthe ol at ................ ..... 67 0 00
Hbool teather..................... ......... .,10 00
M oir............... ......................... 81JO e.
.... .. ........ . ... ........ 496 0
Ba laAs of c lerg ............................. 9
o he obro ad mon whool boh are .......ored Hear 59
l rit (for, both, e), 1600 Holy..... ..........Name of069 9
lIneest l ...................................... 3,610 00
Alar oety........, Temperance........................... Yon
Shool I oll )a.................. ....... on 5.1
LadiBoes odlity Immte Conption........................... (senior7
Isouhnoe ltl .w)............................. 389 7o
branob), 1; Youn......................... Lades of Immlate
llis payabl sd loam pad ................. 3,59) 9d
Conception hnior............................. branb), 7; Holy Anel
Total.....................................699.167 N
odality (girls 1, 19; y of .........................e an 1
I late Colin (eor bran. ), 1
u of ther olties are maculate Con.................... ep7
n ...............................Fee ool Asso......atio; Im te
Y2300 pupf. Teachrs......................... 437in soboel-eters of
Charity 14; lay t ers, 13; total 27; ......6 ge00
Totl. ...................................... i45 15
emen teacher.v, Trurr.
.l t'aU a,sa.
oThe number of parishioners is 16950, who
There are mannded by rthe faligions societies of thed
to the church. Among which are Sacred Hrear
Sodality (for both seaes), 1600 " Holy Name of
Jess Sodality (for men), 213; kosary society,
Altar Soclety, Temperance Soclety, Young'
Ladies Sodality Immaculate Conception (senioChurch.r
brnThe Co), 12l; Yof the lety for the Preerva
Conception (junior branch), 75; Holy Angels
of dellty (irls), a g; odali met of the ltien
Jesus (for loildre), 0; younthe Men's iodelityf
mmul bte ong the fpton (eesetinor brof tch), co25;
for ug Men's Sodyear lity, Immcannot bute Coneption
(jof gunior brationh), 130; t. lohe members odhen they
(boys), 45.
The other societies are Immaculate Concep
tion, Frer the prehose poltion ; Immaof th e movemen
Concr eption Chupreservationh Debt the Irish layinguage, ation
mmhe grea strdee oneption has, Parochde dl Free chool,
about00 pto cpils. Teacheretrospect school-Siter omany ways
Cherityg, 1for te sociher, 13; totalhas eeded; 6 ge
tlemg an teamo of ntert te hers.preerv
The nmber of prishontivati er is 16950, ho
gre attended by the faithful priees of th
Immacauote Conoeption Church.
IE D UBLINSOCIETY FOR THE PRESE, .
r ATION OF THE IBISH LANG UAGE.
The Counpast ear, of the ilst thety for the Pobtainedr
of the Irish Languato everyge, met n Dhoblin, on thin
31erest int. The eoreery rvaiod n report of biobhis native lan
the olwhing apar the from chie feintres: and
"Thi beinolog the , ast messtideced of the council
for the preint yeer it canis henot bt be olare and
of grtificartion to uld the members hedn theby
onidr the preandt poinhertion of the moemgh the
movr thepreer may tio o the Irish langfanyege, end
the grees as tride it h a m ade d uring t he yea
boget to languae. The retrodpecd is in many clway
ofeering, for the society has succeeded ne exd
Thisg en mounct as of iteren t in the preeortv
society and cultivatio of or an of ge which bet
a short time since very few were eanguine
enough to expect. The council feel highly
aed at the poutry aogre of the moement dr-the
Ing the put year, whilst the rmults obtained
mot be hihly sioners of Natory to ll lotiers of olther
patre, nd to every Irishmn coying who tkesromp in
wrest in the presetrvation othe hie ntiveal that then
snage, which, apart from its intrinsic and
tphiologic valve, ne etidenned by the high
esteem in which it is held by scholars and
forelngn rae, should be ocherished ond to Irogrammesh
men e Natio val chooble nd enerd sobe legitiomate
and rmeont abled ihertCommissi. ltonersoosidh the
movement may be said to be in its iunfncy, yet
t is very encouraging to be eble to report sion andh
ear. Indeed, they prelaced Irt te unot only on
Lat vie for which it labored, amountamely, to
et t pai las fornguage he troducernd ito tlae school.
of Irelend has ttran attained.
This oecrs of Ien termediate Educati more
rehave likewise carried outpp the ilotention of the
rociety andtiipaed. The thInks of the spect it
and the considtry ere eminentl due to the
Commissie of the Commisoners of NationalEducation for their
ptriotion, whduct i fomplyinr the g so promptl
with the eigenest of the memori andl that thc
language should be plsoed on toe programme
of the Nti cholaolrs. for d e o leist for the
nd reasonable did the Cowho have foer a lonid
the rtakenet in the interest of ed languagetion and
leerngature of they pcocetryd Irill not only od
the mory the ootlntio Fre the, ermmissioner an
Itand highen, bt oeduca footiong imilr to Greek and
termedtin,ate. for hicht is dto ble bhe amount mt etra
elas psical and moder the modern nguat fors. The
thanomm the ioers of Intwere permedite Edto offer tio
halves for eamwise oerried ot the intention of tainin
f thermed above Edimportanton on mso nner ese
very srtisfarcory to the country. The pro
amtine rel to enthe Irish langu bege iecited inwell
rrthe moved end pramoting Ile thisen repecdingt
glnd be oland, anered preferrble to the proead
of remme o emet iommn Ameroner of N etrona
dnr;on, thousandsh for the svotingd end thir
ythre is considered too dfhavelt, be t re a
suAre thant the gentleme Alto wgetheom the Commion
ioners hervave iutr of oured the mattguer will radaped
it to the exattenooi of thCon time nd the olars.
eiy oI tshed proesore, oin they orlons, Paris, Leipo th
ogt pelt opfentaemen reho havesly studying l
toime tlverity of Bnterestlin lo teloing Irahe to
itera stude nts in that University, arend we
negastory the reesnormed byo onthe of the membmmloer
by edotiag editoo iRh of a retndd. Inew devoed to
rormm eekly loeLd reat aer for Loule prati ie
des i tesnd moderoa inhe Sorbuoe, on othe
Grammer of oeld io bede Irish Language." loe
thValuabln the .and ple re permitted to oufr on-them
gdalge re bet g ho asue d otng the prmees, wht
I,: -
anmereas aewspapers in Ireland and Aderle
are devoting a oonsiderable portion of their
spsae to Irish litersatre in the Irish language
and character, and many of them publslehbg
Irish lessons in their columns. The society will
also endeavor to ublishb ina chbeap practical
form the text books required for the ioterme
diate and other programmes. It will not be
necessary to refer nost now to the society and
Its branch esociations, s a pamphlet eootain
ing list of members, eto, will shortly be pub
lishbed, more than to say that the society nom.
bers over 200 members, nearly 300 associates,
and about 20 ffiliated assooiatioes. Finally,
the counoil believe that good work bas been
done in arresting the decadence of the lan
guage, and drawing the attention of the
country to its present state. It now rests with
the Irish people whether their lagnuage shall
be preserved or not.
"THZ AMERICAAN IRISH."
rtmm the Dublin Nreemsa's Joernal.
Lady Wilde has just given to the wor:d
a pampblet under the above title (pub
lished by McGee, of Nassau street), which
we may hail as an opportune contribution
to out national literature. We have been
much more accustomed to hearken to
"8peransa" when her inspiration moved
her lips in measured music rather than in
the accents of colder prose, yet we cannot
help being reminded, as we read her pages,
that we are listing to an eloquence which
often thrilled the souls of our countrymen
at a dark and critical portion of our his
tory, and feeling that the warmth of lancy
and beauty, the force of expression which
so often kindled them into a glow of rash
though generous enthusiasm, still flourish,
rich and inexhaustible, as though no seri
ons call had ever been made upon them
The subject which claims her attention
now is one to which, perhaps, sufficient at.
tention has not been paid of late by those
to whom it should give most cause for
thought. In America a great new Ireland
has grown up since the day when the iim
paesioned eloquence of 'Speranza' first
roused the attention of an oppressed coon -
try ; and we have abundant and striking
proof that the old country is rot forgotten
in the dreams of those sea divided Celts.
That they will be likely to exert a power
ful influence upon the future destines of
Ireland is a proposition which may well
challenge negation; and the statesman who
omits to take this potent ally into account,
when pondering the case of Ireland would
be a greater simpleton than we are inclined
to think exists in the English Cabinet.
Lady Wilde has done good service in
drawing attention to these considerations at
a time when Irish Politics are once more the
subject of anxiety; and though we cannot
agree with many of her deductions, we
think the grounds from which she draws
them worthy of serious attention. In por- I
traying the different results of the influence
of American and English institutions upon
the cfaracter of Irishmen living in either
country, her sketch will be at once recog- I
nized as a felicitous and just one:
"It is slngular that the Irish may live for
years in Englsnd, yet taoy never acquire the
English manner--cali, grave, and self-posses
sed; nor the English habits of order and ron- i
tine; nor even the English accent-while in
Amerioa they rapidly become Amerioen zd,
bold in speech, audacious in enterprise, self
asserting in manner, and, above all, republican
in sentiment. No Irishman returns from
Aimerioa loyal to monarchy. On the contrary,
he laughs to scorn the old bonds of servile
feudalism, with all it, superstitious of class I
worship; and his opinions soon gain many fol- I
lowers. The American flag holds the place of
honor at all popular demonstrations in Ireland, t
and is always greeted with enthusiastic 1
obheers, while the fasg of England is nowhere
seen."
From these circumstances and others,
Lady Wilde gathers the inference that Re- 1
publican sentiment is making large head
way in Ireland-a proposition to which we
are firced to refusae our adhesion. Ode
swallow does not make a summer, and the
return of a few Irish-Americans to Ireland
has exerted, we believe, but little ininflence
upon the general bcdv of the people, who, I
in their aspirations after National freedom,
have been accoutomed to a totally different
ideal. Passing from this topic, however,
we cannot but think that the picture she
draws of the emigraut Irishman of thirty
years ago and the Irish-American citizen of
to-day is suggestive ot whit might be the
diffdrent circumstances here at home had
another line of pol:cy been adopted fowards
ireland by her rulers:
"Year by year Ireland sends forth thousands
of her people in the emigrant ships, like outcast
weeds, to be iflng on the shores of America, a
helpless crowd of ornshed, dispirited, unlettor
ed peasants ; slaves and serfs who have never
even known their rights as freemen, dolled by
want, oppression, and despair; speaking, per
haps, no language save the ancient tongue of
the primitive Celt, through which no new
light of thought has flshed for a thousand
years.
T'he Amerioan Irish are theopposite f all this
They receive a soldier's training, with fall pri
vilege of freemen and oitisons. They are ed-.
oated and organized; important by their num
bers and by that reedy talent and indomitable
spirit which is rapidly gaining for them the
highest positions as statemen, generals, ors
tore, writers, and journalists in tae States '
What might the position of England be
had she had the courage and the generosity
to trust Ireland justly and fearlessly t She
would have a nation of born soldiers at her
back, with whose help she might defy the
world in arms. As itis, we know what she
has-a nation whose sympathies she has no
right to look for, a population whose atti
tude in tirnmes o crisis makes this portion
of the United Kingdom the fatal spot in its
pauopliy. She would have no reason to
dread that "return of the Heraclide" which
Lady Wilde pictures as the great absorbing
dream of the Iriesh in America, and of their
efforts to make a reality of which we have
had in our own day some remarkable in
stances;
"They bare also one aim, which is to create
a new ere in the history of Ireland. This is
the fanatioism of their lives-hbat they bide
their time; the lodividual dies, the nation
lives and waits. The English sneer down the
idea; yet nothinbg will eradicate the splendid
dream from the Celtio imagination that some
day the Irish race will be powerfol enough
to reoroes the Atlantic with ships and arms
and money, overthrow English rule, and an
nex Ireland to the grseat Federal Republio
under the Stars and Stripem. And it most be
confessed that the project is not wholly im
probable or impossible, should there be some
new arrangement of the nationalities of the
world."
We cannot, however, see much ground
it the course of American statesmanship or
the drift of American thought for the rea.
son of this supposition whibch Lady Wilde
discovers. America, she says, needs a
standpoint in Europe. and Ireansd would
form a capital tf hili for the restless
masses of her people. We ate rather in
clined to tLnk that the most advanced
Ameri*can/inkers lirit their patriotic
ambition to the ultimte realisation of the
Monroe doctrine, and have no desire to in
trude themselves anywhere upon that Old
World whose claims to intrude upon Amer
iea they indignantly resent.
"Speransa" does not believe in the power
of Home Rule to accomplish the regenera
tion of Ireland. She doubts, indeed, 11
"that hollow fetion" be not dead already.
The late Sir William Walde, one of the
founders of the Home Government Associ
ation, would seareely have characterised
the movement in these terms. Lady Wilde,
however, is entitled, of course, to her opin.
ton, but not to anything more. She cannot
expect to compel our acquiescence. "N.
one," she argues, "ca seriousely believe
that the Irish nobles will ever come bace
to their ancient palaces. or the Queen take
up her residence at Dublin Castle, in a
desolated city and a land of poverty, tor.
por and universal decadence." It is the
contention of Home Rulers, in support of
which they can point to the prosperous
state of Ireland during the seventeen years
of its independence after 1782, that there
would no longer be a deserted city nor a
land of poverty and decadence; and it is
their belief that Irish regeneration must be
accomplishbed from within, not from with
out, as Isdy Wilde thinks it will, unless
at the eleventh hour England sees the error
of her way and averts a catastarophe by a
graceful act of justice. However opinions
may differ on this point, the symptoms
upon which she bases her forecast are vis
ible enough, though they may not to every
one have the same significance; and her
closing words are worth attentive study :
"We can but read the signs of the times, not
strive after vain prophecies. It is important,
however, that t ose who role the nation
should study diligent lr the tendencies of the
age throughout Europe, while to England it
is of special importance to study the influenoes
from America that are now so powerfully
affecting the tone of Irish thought, for Ireland
may yet be the battle ground where the deati
nies of the empire will be decided. The Ameri.
can Irish are prepared for any ffrr.n, any
sacrifice, to obtain the autonomy of Ire)ard
that natural right of self-government whiobh,
as Mr. Gladstone sayes, belongs to all peoples.
Peril and danger may be in the way, but they
aocept and brave all consequences.
" *They wait beneath the furnace blest
Ihe panes of transformation;
Not pailesaly doth God recast
Or muald anew a nation."
SMeanwhile England, all-powerful Eu gland,
may effect a social revolution peacefully, and
without any danger to the integrity of the
e°pire, if wise and just measures are organ.
ized in time for the true advancement and
prosperity of Ireland; and the Irish people, in
return, will stand faithfully by England in
those hours of peril which seem gathering in
olonds of darkness upon the horizon, and
threatening dangers whiob only a united em
pire can meet and overcome."
ARCHDIOCESE OF CINCINNATI.
SEMI OFFICIAL REVIEW OF THIE FINANCIAL
TROUBLES.
Cincimnati Catholic Telegraph.
Ever since the failure of several banks
of this city created a panic among bank
depositors, a large number of those who had
entrusted their savings to the care of the
Vicar General of this diocese became
seized with the contagion. Though the
liocese is fully able to pay all its indebt
edness, to discharge all its pecuniary obli
gations without mortgaging any congrega
tional property, it was impossible to con
vince the excited minds of depositors,'that
their money was perfectly safe and would
be repaid in due time to the last dollar.
The excitement began at a time when it
was impossible to convert property or
notes into cash without incurring heavy
losses. It could not be done without sac
rificing what many years of toil on the part
of Very Rev. Elward Purcell had acquired
in the interests of religion. For forty
Sears be had carried the burden of the
debts of this rapidly growing diocese.
When institutions of charity were needed
te furnisthed the means gathered by his
iloancial ability to baild them. When re
ligious communuites sought help to open
echools and academies the same hand gen
erously extended to them material support.
Some of them have gratefully remembered
this liberal aid in the day of diocesan dis
trees. Wheu church treasuries were empty,
and creditors grew clamorous, again and
again, during the forty years of the floan
cial administration of this remardable
priest, pastors and trustees applied to him
for relief and were never refused, when it
was possible to grant their request. To
day, as far as we know, there is not a
mortgage on a single parish church of this
diocese. Debts there are, but they are
comparatively small-a mere clothing,
when we consider the wealth, the number
and the unfailing generosity of the Catbo
lics of this diocese. If this healthy condi
tion of our many congregations is due in
part to the exhaustless charity of the chil
dren of the faith, it is doe also in a large
part to the able, sagacious and hard- work
ing financial agent of the venerable Arch
bishop. Nor is this all. It is the proper
time to refresh the memories of thousands
on another point connected with the great,
ceaseless work of our venerable superior.
Forty years ago, when the tide of emigra
tion began to bring Catholic settlers to this
city and State, extreme poverty was asso
ciasted with the name of Catholic. These
emigrants brought with them hopeful
hearts and strong arms. 3it th..y br.oght
with them no money to enable them to
complete in business with non-Catholics
who had mniney or a circle of moneyed
friends willing to assist them. To-day
thoueands of those Catholio emigrants or
their children are living in most comfort
able circumstances. In the city they have
purchased homesteads; in the country
they are the owners of rich farms. Hund
reds of them are to-day ranked among the
wealthy citizens of the State.
If the records of most of these families
were read, it would be found, that the
foundation of this widely-distributed
w alth among the Catholics of this diocese
a laid by the hands of the Vicar-Gene
ral. When bhunodreds could offer no secur
ity and would have vainly looked for so
sistance in any other direction, he loaned
them to provides a home for themselves
and their children. Some have repaid this
generosity with ingratitude; others have
indeed felt the pressure of its claim in the
day of distress, and have given in the same
measure in which they received.
During forty years the Vicar-General of
this diocese, slaboring solely for the inter.
iets of religion, never had the slightest
fnoane:a trouble. All obligations were
tpromptly met-all debts incarred by the
dtceee were liquidated. This condition oe
things would have continued, ifdepositors,
alarmed by the failure of banks, had no1
been carried away with senseless fear.
LJs1aWO5 a qvLr.a RUZ,.
mnot believe Badlellism will be permit
to renew its eharacteristic results of
sareby.
The army stake played for by politi.
cians on both sides, is more of a myth
than sanything else. The day is past when
a French army was a mere machine to be
set in motion according to the eaprice of
a General-in-chief. Individual opinion has
taken the place of unthinking obedience,
not only with the private soldier but with
fioers of every grade, and In case of a
break up, three armies would be found as
he result, corresponding with the three
t factions of civil politics.
But the Bourse, as we have said, indi
tee most unhesitatingly that there will
nation of the liabilities of the diocese
shows that they cannot exceed $500,000,
and most probably will fall below this
amount. Upon the assets transferred to
these Ave trustees have been placed by
disinterested parties the lowest valuation,
and yet they are more than double the sum
of the liabilities. There is not the slight
eat doubt that this plan devised to meet
the indebtedness of the diocese will meet
with universal approval. The most fear
ful now know beyond a doubt that every
dollar' will be paid.
DEATH OF THE BISHOP O0 BAPHOE.
We announce with deep and most sin
cere regret the death of the Most Rev.
James MeDevitt, the well-beloved Bishop
of the ancient See of Rsphoe. The mourc
fal intelligence will come upon many as it
came upon us with appalling suddenness,
for it seems but a short time ago since his
lordship was giving evidences of his accus
tomed zeal and more than ordinarypromiso
of a long, a prosperous and a fruitful epis
copate. Rich as the roll of the Irish pre
lacy has been, and as it is, in men of great
heart and willing mind, it never could
boast of one with a larger spirit of kindli
ness, and a readier will to do all that his
lofty office required, than the gentle, gen
erous and unassnuming Bishop who has just
passed to his reward from amongst a people
and aepot that were dear tohis soul as the
very apple of his eye. Donegal-classic,
historic and picturesque Donegal-the
cloister land of the Four Masters, and the
nestling place of memories that are sacred
to the Catholic heart of Ireland-has never
given to the Irish Church a truer, a more -
loyal, or a more devoted son than that
latest of its bishops who closed his too ]
brief career on Sunday night. Dr. Mc
Devitt bad barely attained his fiftieth year
and had reached to only his seventh year
in the Irish prelacy. He was born in Don
egal, and spent in it the best years of his
life. He was educated in the Diocesan
Seminary of Raphoe, and passed from that
to the College of Ma.vnootb, which he
entered in the year 1850. His college
course, if not a very brilliant one, was a
marked by diligence, and by considerable
successes, and was so satisfactory t.at at
its close he received, if we mistake not,
the reward of an appointment to the Dan
boyne Establishment. As a student he
was held in the highest estimation by his
superiors and professors, and won. without
an effort, the trust, esteem and affection of
all his comrades He was the very soul of
honor and geniality, and his word was a
law in the little councils of his follow-stu
dents. From Maynooth he passed to the
College of All Hollows, at Drumcondra, and
there devoted his fine abilities and his great
knowledge to the holy work of training
Irish priests for preaching the Gospel to
the nations that still sit in darkness and in
the shades of death. His work in All Hal
lows is one of the blessed memories of the
place, and it will be long before the tradi
tions of the life and labors of Father l1'De
vitt fade away from out its records. He
was peacefully pursuing his teaching in All
Hallows when in Ji71 be was sammoned E
by the Holy See to take into his hands the L
pastoral staff at St. Eunan of Raphoe. The 11
old See had been just vacated by the trans- A
ference from it to the primatial See of
Armagh of one whose heart had been bound
up in bonds of golden i:)ve with Donegal ct
and all its belongicg- from the moment of ti
his birth, and who must have felt the part
ing as bitterly as though it had been the
very rending of his life. A congenial suc
cessor to the Most Rev Daniel M'Gettigan
was found in the holy but humble profee
sor of All Hallows, and in the Most Rev.
James M'Devitt the people of Donegal re- j
ceived a prelate whose coming made them
almorst forget the prelate they had lost. For a
the eight years of his episcopate Dr. M'De
vitt has labored for his flock with a truly c
splendid devotedness, and has participated n
with the leart of an Irish bishop in every a
joy and in every sorrow that, from his con
secration to his death, has fallen on the
county and on the people to which he was
so warmly attached. There is wailing for
him to-day in the wilds and on the hills of
holy and historic Donegal, and there is not
a spot of this land of ours where his name
and his worth were known that the mourn
ing of his children will not meet with a
sympathetic echo. A great bishop, a gen
aine Irishman, a constant and a large
hearted friend has passed away; and in
the person of Dr. James M'Devitt our poor
old country has lost a son whom, at this
juncture, stle can badly epare.-Driblin
Freeman.
Ad BBEAD AND WATER BANO U GET.
Bialtimore Spec.al.
The Crispin Society of this city held a
bread and water' banquet" this evening, at
Rechabite Hall, as a burlesque of the en
tertainment oe the Shoe and Leather Board
of Trade on Monday evening last at the
Carrollton. The bill of fare was printed,
and read as follows:
MuN.-I. Bread and good water.
i2 Water and good bread.
. Water and bread.
Under this was the following extract
from Henry Ward Beecher's sermon : "Is
not a dollar a day enough to buy bread
Water costs nothing; and a man who can
not live on bread is not fit to live. A fam
ily may live, laugh, love and be happy that
oats bread in the morning, with good water,
and water and good bread st noon and
water and bread at night." Copies of the
Chicago S'oeiolist were distribnted tlhrough
the room. The cloth was removed from a
table near tihe the president's desk, and
there was dmcplayed a huge pile of bread
a-rd a pitcher of water, with tin mugs.
The presierdent wanted allthose present to
.'p iemeelve.. which was promptly re
sin'.cded to.
TRAORDINARY REDUOTIONS IN THE PRIOES
OF
MATTRESSES!
- AT THE -
Donohoe Cord-Bound Mattress Factory,
4........... ...... ....... CHARTRES STREET..-......- ................44
] OOxeSGNx NTs OF GOOD. o.ALUA MOSS SOLTCITRD
J. J. DONOHOE,
Jai, A79 ly PATUBTUW AND PROPBILTOL.
Ninth Season.
Our this aeseus caotch now ready. Is the da we haey ever produed. Year of trial sve prved their
undo ubtod upenortlty, Panritly and Icon, my. and belm unezooleird e a resrrerd Nuh,
they are cow a eocnsd fvolavorite in Ihe world's msrkes
Their unparalleled eccesu In
former .eo dned the SHADINES
-eokln of' IMITATION
0 0 D S by otherr-parties,
which wero bougEby some ad in brmel
dealer. through ignorance or.ke hereal
for their cheepners. Suoh pur. sa tin asm.alleyBOi
chases were attended with the L.SIT. in S ild, -pleaing
suaa results. reIoG uC.,
The elerity with which a
luncheon or mel o be obtain- PLTABL TO L,
ed (requiring no cooking or p!e e. fe fwa the lroprter o
poration. being alwae ready)
reader them yei t- cto aBelino. rtaslntna only the
abl to trvoelue, plonto end . TUEN . BIOndra OF
ex.curlon parties or for su TI table at all rad forthdinner
eral une. Their DELIOIOUS t.ble ct or eme--og dmear,
PIQUANT FL&VOR eatloedee lu orh eening mel by
the palate of the most ,fae.dl merely opening the box.
one, while their We the ONL PACH=B
CHEAPNESS ~ o the
(beinZ now about ONF-HALF GENUINE SHIADINES.
OF THE ORIGINAL PRICE)
oeet the requmrements of the They are our trade urk,
coonomical.
HOWE & ODELL, 147 Reade Street, New York,
SOLD BY ALL WHOLtESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS.
General Depot South..-....cGRATH & CIWMPTON, 103 Poydras Street, New Orleans,
.I, dm. .
GROCERS--COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
PETER ELIZARDI,
DEraLE IN
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS
TEAS. WINES AND LIQUORS,
Corner Burgundy and Mandeville Streets.
NEW ORLEANS.
Counrrv orders promptly filled. and all goods delivered
d.e&J o ly free of charge.
W. CONERT. E. CONE01T, JE
E. CONERY & SON,
(Established in 1846.,
WHOLESALE GROCE "
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
Dealers in Western Produoe.
CORNER OF CANAL AN:) DELTA STRBZTI
do"' 8 ly saw onELANm
pREPARE FOR WINTER
BUTY YOUR FUEL IN TIME OF
THOMAS MANGAN,
Family Grocer,
AND DEALER IN
ALL KINDS OF COAL AND FIRE WOOD,
Corner Polymnia and St. Charles Streets,
NEW OXLanaL.
Wood and Coal Yard, No. 458 St. Charles street.
se1578 ly PRICES MODERATE.
INSURANCE.
HIBERNIA INSURANCE COMPANY,
Office, No. 37 Camp Streot.
JORN HENDERSON. President.
JOHN H. HANNA, Vice President.
THOS. F. lIRAGG, Secretary.
Earnings...............................$910,078
LoemeProd....... ....... ...... 95,058
Net Profits .......................... 428
Assets...... ............. ............. 522 898
At an election held on Monday, the 6th Inst., the
following named gentlemen were chosen Directors of
this Company to serve for the ensuing year:
John Henderson. John H. Ranna,
Thomas Klng. Thomas Smith,
Theeos. Gilore. W. J. Castel.
John T. Gihbous, William Hart.
Emile Gauche. David Jackson
F. J. Gasquet. Mh. k. Garvey,
George McCloskey.
And at a meeting of the Board, held May 13th,
JOHN HENDERSON was elected President, JOHN
H. HANNA, Vice-President, and THOS. F. BRAGG,
Secretary.
The Board declared out of the net profits of the
Company for the past twelve months ten (In) per cent
nterest on the paid up capital and five (5) per cent
dividend on premiums paid by stookholders, (making
with the rebate, 20 per cent on premiums). Said
interest and dividend to be placed to the orpdit of the
stock notes.
Interest and dividends on full paid stock payable in
cash at the offce of the Company on and afterJune 15th
THOS. t. BRAGG, Secretary.
I rw rleans Juneo. 1910. mlg7 yt
s WESTER4N PRODUCE, LIQUORS, ITC.
JOHN T. GIBBONS & CO.,
DEALEJ. tr,
GRAIN, CORNMEAL ANIT 'iAY
57,59,61,63...New Levee Street...57,59, 61,
B aul8 78 ly Corner Poydras, Yew Orleans.
JOHN McCAFFREY,
DEALER IN
1, HAY, GRAIN, CORNMEAL, FLOUR,
ALL lNDS o0
Western Produce Constantly on Hand.
28 and 30....... Poydra Street ..,.28 and 30
af18e ty Oorner of Fulton,
a~18 7b WSW OILIARS.
MALAKOFF BITTERS.
The Best Stomachic and Tonic.
SOVEREIGN REMEDY FOR DYSPEPSIA
a Excellent for an Anti-Malarial Morning Beverage.
d LOW PRICE. PURE AND RELIABLE.
j For sale in all quantitiee by
0 ALF. WALZ,
† †††..............Co..ti Street...........«26
1e3 7' ly `Lo Mat fattaror.
MISCELLANEOUS.
JOHN G. ROCHE,
2'50 ad 22.....Maggzine Street.-250 and 252
A eor Delord.
UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMBR.
All business entrutd to my core will reoelve prompt
and carefl attentionaet moderate rates.
CARRIAGES TO HIRE. Jte6 '9 ly
WILLIA't JOYCE,
188.......... St. Andrew Street .....~.....13S
Corner Constanoe Street.
PR 4TRR BOOKS. BEADS. SCAPULARS, BTATUES
WAX CANDLES and DEVOTIONAL ARTICL.S
tn great variety and at etremely low prices.
Eagravingl and Phbotoraphe of emoient and r'l.
known Bishops ent Pritesr notably of Father Barke,
Archbishop NoHalo, Father Lavalle, and of the late
Father Dtfly. Reiemptorie.. and Father Doyle, of St.
Joeeph'. Father Murphy. C.SS.R, Father Becher end
other well-known eooleesisetlre. Thee piotree are
Silo in size, and will be sold, framed or unframe, at
esuoh low prices no to make it a matter of Teat import.
ance to the admlrere of these dlotinguished men to eall
and secunre opLee at onces before all are dispoeed of.
Plcturee of Deceaed friends and Relative copied
and enlarged.
A foe lot of Chromos rereentiengPcenes in Ireland.
.t.. and Picttrce suitable for Preeents, always on
hand. del 3m
j H. KELLER.
MUANPACrURa oP
ALL KINDS OF LAUNDRY AND TOILET SOAP
KELLER'S FAMOUS OARBOLIC SOAP
Je30 ly Fur Cleansing and Dia.nfeoting Purposes.
Stewart's New Family
SEWING MACHINES,
$23 and upwards. Rues lighter, makes lees noise, is
the cheapest and most bandeome (Singer etyle)
machine in the market.
J. BOOTH, GENERAL AGENT,
614..... ..... agazine Street,....... -.614
aEw OPLKAnte, LA.
AGENTS WANTED. my178 ly
PHOTOGRAPHY
AS A FINE ART,
IN ALL OF ITS
MAG(NIFICENCE OF SHADE A:fD COLORING,
AT
W. W. WASHBURN'S,
1009............. Canal Street.............10t
All Pictures t.ken at this Gallery are fully guaranteed
for accuracy and artisetic inish.
CHARGES MODERATE. mYl928 ly
p. A. MURRAY,
ISBTERN MAKER,
No. 191 Magazine Street.
ALL WORK WARRANTED.
A lot of Cypress OISTERNS.fro
1000 to 20,000 gallons capacity. mad
the beet material and workmaanbp.
kept oonstantl, on bad. and for sat
at PRICES CHEAPER T AN TE
CHEAPEST.
Highest Premiums awarded at the
two last Louisana State Fears, and a
the Southern Statee AricltUreAl and
Industrial Expoesition of 18t6.
All kinds of Cisterns made std re
paired.
SEND FOR PRICE LISTS. apT 70 1y
mBUCEyE BELL. FO *DET.
cra.WcO ud o 7, 17.
ainor7 s hllefCoyeý an jT,
i ountedrtbth tee r at r)eU an8"
ugs for CAurctu . SFoh-. rF.o
odor/,, Caon M a. P 4-.
*rn. C.ra. COms, .,. t. FUfly
Warranted.
lilsed Ca~sigos sort Fr*. 1
VARDKWE Q TIFF.
A

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