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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, July 21, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1911-07-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 37
Business Directory.
HENRY JOHNSON,
Fire, Tornado, Life and Accident
Insurance.
3DGERTON, WISCONSIN.
KP-Offlcein Schmeling Block.
VV. T. POMEROY & CO.,
Dealers in and packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
Edgerton, - Wisconsin.
O. G. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS..
(Successors to O. G. Hansen)
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
3DGERTON* - Wife
GEORGE M. DECKER
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin.
ANDREW JENSON & SONS,
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco,
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
C. E. SWEENEY.
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobaccc,
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN
O. C. LEE.
Dealer i£ and n acKer of
Leaf Tobacco,
STOUGHTON, - WISCONSIN.
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco Market
C. M. HINTZE and
c. w. McCarthy.
Bundle and case samples of tobacco
crops on hand. Growers and dealers
patronage solicited.
In Warehouse No. 1.
Stoughton - - Wisconsin.
HEINRICH NEUBERGER
EXPORTER
Bremen, 145 St.
Germany. New York, N. Y.
L. RAKEMANN
Buyer and Importer of
Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
ANTWERP, BELGIUM.
Correspondence of Commission Business
Solicited.
E- ROSENWALD A BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
E. Rosenwald & Bro. and I. Bijur & Son,
packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
S. C. CHAMBERS,
DEALER IN ARD PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco,
MILTON JUNCTION, WIS.
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
Tobacco Ti&wk,
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN.
Capital Stock ... $50,000.00
Surplus - $30,000.00
9 Undivided Profits $ 5,731.80
Officers and Directors:
ANDREW JENSON W. S. HEDDLES
Pres, and Cashier Vice-President
Wm. BUSSEY, Asst. Cashier D. L. BABCOCK,
W. A. SHELLEY, C, G. BIEDERMAN
ALEX WHITE.
3 Per Cent, paid on Savings Deposits and Certificates
Safety Boxes For Rent at SI.OO, $2.00 and $3.00.
The Imperial Cigar, 10c
Hand Made. Havana Filled.
EDGERTON CIGAR CO., Edgerton, Wis.
CHAS. L. CULTON,
LEAF TOBACCO
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
T. B. EARLE
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
FRAZIER M. DOLBEER. GEORGE F. SECOR. Special.
Original ‘‘LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1864.
F. C. LINDE, HAMILTON & CO.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers m* Warehousemen
Office, 180 Pearl St. New York City. Branches in all of the principal tobacco districts
A. H. CLARKE, Special Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Badger ’Phone No. 71
COLSON C. HAMILTON.
Formerly of C. E. HAMILTON FRANK P. WISEBURN,
F. C. Linde, Hamilton & Cos. LOUIS BUHLE
Formerly with F. C. Linde. Hamilton & Cos.
C. C. HAMILTON & CO.,
Tobacco Inpsectors, Warehousemen, Weighers
MalnOfflce—B4-S5 South Street, New York.
THOS. B. EARLE, Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Telephone No, 23
MaGee’s Improved Tobacco Case.
The best case made for the packing of Leaf Tobacco.
Sampling done with one half the labor and expense.
Write for delivered prices in car load lots.
' MaGEE BROS. - - Janesville, Wis.
Office and Warehouse adjoining C., M. & St. P. Passenger Station.
A. N. JONES
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
LEAF TOBACCO
SS*" Janesville, Wisconsin.
S. B. HEDDLES
DEALER IN
LEAF TOBACCO
No. 5 South Adams St. Janesville, Wis.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
Warehouses at Janesville, Milton and Brooklyn, Wis.
STORAGE CAPACITY, - - - 15,000 CASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
L. B. CARLE & SON,
Packers of and Dealers in £
Wisconsin Leaf!! Tobacco,
Janesville, *• Wisconsin.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1911.
Checks on All Foreign Countries Sold.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
While the parching effects of hot
winds and drouth of the past few weeks
have left an impress upon the growing
tobacco fields, the real injury done to
the crop up to this date is nowhere
near as great as the drouth of other
seasons. Those who recall 25 years
ago this season will remember the
drouth extended all through the plant
ing of the crop and past the middle of
July so that growers were unable to
get scarcely one-third of the intended
acreage into the fields and much of the
land laid vacant or was devoted to oth
er late forage crops. Even on August
Ist the fields had scarcely made any
progress and yet quite a respectable
crop was finally harvested. Again in
1901 a drouth held the fields back until
farmers began to think everything was
lost, but late rains helped bring about
considerable leaf even in that year.
The present crop having got an ex
tremely early start, it has had a chance
to get a deep root so as to withstand
the lack of moisture much better than
any previous one under similar drouthy
conditions, though the crop is losing
ground every day now that the dry
spell continues.
. * *
*
Growers in some sections are begin
ning to take notice of the grasshopper
pest and prepare to forestall their
work on the tobacco fields. One
method -is to apply a solution of paris
green with such an apparatus as is
generally used on potato fields. There
seems to be little danger that the poi
son will remain on the leaves long
enough to prove injurious to the cured
leaf, as a few rains generally remove
all traces of the application. We learn
that in the southern tobacco growing
sections paris green is used quite ex
tensively as against the green worm on
a leaf, too, that goes into chewing to
bacco, and the practice has not been
condemned there. A flock of turkeys,
ducks or chickens turned loose in the
tobacco fields is frequently used to rid
tne field of this pest.
* *

According to the crop reporting board
of the bureau of statistics, United
States department of agriculture, under
date of July 10th, the total tobacco
acreage for 1911 is 72.4 of that of 1910,
and amounts to 893,200 acres. The gen
eral average growing condition on July
Ist was 72.6, or 12.7 inferior to the con
dition prevailing on the corresponding
date last year, or 11.8 less than the
average for the past ten years.
♦a*
*
The Hartford Times in a recent issue
devoted several pages to a write-up of
the shade grown tobacco industry of
that state. The article was illustrated
with pictures of the tents, etc., and
gave a good idea of the various stages
of the industry. According to the ar
ticle there are 2,038 acres in shade
grown tobacco in New England this
year, of which 125 acres are in Massa
chusetts, and the remainder is in Con
necticut.
* *

American Sumatra houses bought, at
the series of inscriptions which have
just come to an end, 27,150 bales of
Sumatra, which is fully 5,000 bales
more than was bought for America
during the whole of last year. When
the high prices which were paid are
taken into consideration, the purchase
of this quantity of tobacco for America
is highly significant. It will be re
membered that our purchases last year
amounted to only about 22,000 bales,
which is a great deal under the aver
age. The smallness of our last year
purchases was due in a large measure
to the faulty character of the tobacco
that was offered in Holland. The stocks
on hand had been used up more closely
than ever before in the history of the
trade, and the result was that when
the spring inscriptions opened every
one was clamoring for tobacco.
* *
*
The Lancaster Leaf Tobacco Board
of Trade, as reported in this issue of
the United States Tobacco Journal, is
up in arms against the House bill,
which if passed would require every
dealer of leaf tobacco to report period
ically not only the quantity of tobacco
on hand, but the quantity of every
type of such tobacco, and which makes
it mandatory on the Internal Revenue
Bureau to publish . such information.
That there is absolutely no necessity
for such inquisitive proceedings and
broadcast publication of strictly private
business affairs is evidenced by the fapt
of the existing official requirment of
annual stock taking by every registered
leaf dealer and of his obligation to
enter his sales and purchases in the so
called government book. Our leaf
trade and cigar industry are already
controlled and harassed more by fed
eral supervision than any other trade
and industry and it is about time to
call a halt to the ever encroaching pa
ternalism of our federal authorities
which is in direct contradiction with
the basic principle on which a free
Democratic government, such as ours
is supposed to be, rests.
WISCONSIN TOBACCO MARKET.
Edgerton, Wis., July 21, 1911.
Another week without rains of any
considerable consequence over the
greater portions of the tobacco grow
ing sections of the state has materially
lessened the prospects of the crop.
Some of the very early fields have been
forced to the bud so that topping is
necessary while the leaf lacks the
usual spread and size. The later set,
however, is holding out better under the
pinching effects of the drouth—simply
holding its own and waiting for rains
that might yet yield a satisfactory
growth. But each day that the dry
weather continues is shortening the
crop and causing much uneasiness to
growers, who face the failure of other
crops as well.
As if to make the conditions worse,
swarms of young grasshoppers are lay
ing in wait for the tobacco fields as
soon as the grain and hay crop is out of
the way and nothing but tender young
grass springing up after rains, will
save much damage to the tobacco crop.
The market for old stock is barren of
any news of importance this week, the
trade being confined to a small order
business.
The shipments out of storage reach
250 cases from this market to all points
for the past week.
Orfordville, Wis., July 12, 1911.
Tobacco has had another week of
fairly favorable growing weather, but
experienced growers are apprehensive
that this hot weather will have to mod
erate and more frequent rains will have
to come if the crop makes its best
showing. There are a lot of grasshop
pers about and these too are the cause
of some worry. The fields are looking
very well indeed and the growers are
devoting considerable time in them with
the hoe, keeping the weeds down.
New York.
New York, July 15, 1911.
With the temperature soaring in the
nineties and under a humidity provid
ing gratuitously a steam bath, the mar
ket naturally took a siesta responding
only to the most urgent calls, and of
these there were not many. If the
minds of the market were concentrated
on anything these dog days they were
chiefly on the wrapper question, but
they did not get agitated on account of
the publication of certain figures pre
tending to give the quantity of the new
Sumatra imported thus far. The fig
ures were evidently compiled from the
report of purchases by Americans at
each inscription which are anything
but strictly accurate.—Journal.
New Tork, July 12, 1911.
The Water Street dealers are taking
much encouragement from the fact
that while not much buying is going
on, wherever sales are made they are
for immediate shipment, which means
immediate consumption. The leaf deal
ers infer from this that the stock of
raw material in the hands of the manu
facturers is very low. Prices remain
firm, and as the season advances they
are more likely to advance than recede,
in the opinion of the leaf dealers.
The binder shortage, which for a long
time has been evident to any one well
posted in the leaf situation, is being
more widely recognized, and the manu
facturing trade realizes by this time
that binder tobacco at last year’s prices
is not to be had. The extremely hot
weather of the past week or so has had
an injurious effect upon the newly
planted crops in Pennsylvania, Wiscon
sin and other cigar leaf growing states.
The hail storms that visited the New
England tobacco fields last week did
more damage to the tents of the shade
growing corporations than to the to
bacco plants.—Leaf.
New England.
Springfield, Mass., July 11, 1911.
Hail, wind and rain have visited the
Connecticut valley the past week. A
heavy hail storm fell in the eastern
part of Westfield, Mass., last Wednes
day. In most instances the plants were
so small that the damage was slight.
Hail was reported in various parts of
the valley on Thursday, but, by some
strange chance, instead of spending its
force in the tobacco fields, as is usually
the case, the tobacco crop was not only
spared, but the plants derived untold
benefit from the rain, which covered a
wider area than the hail.
Raisers of shaded tobacco are esti
mated to be SIO,OOO out of pocket as a
result of the gale which accompanied
the electric storm Thursday. Accord
ing to Hartford dispatches, the cloth
covering 100 acres of tobacco in Gran
by, Conn., owned by the Connecticut
Tobacco Corporation, was torn off. The
corporation hopes to replace the cloth.
The plants were not injured.
Pennsylvania.
Lancaster, Pa., July 12, 1911.
On account of unfavorable weather,
Lancaster county’s new tobacco crop is
now just where it was a week ago. The
drought and intensely hot weather since
then have actually shriveled up the
plants, so that now many fields look
lifeless. It may be doubted whether a
good deal of tobacco has not already
been ljrurned up by the fierce heat which
has baked the ground hard. Replant
ing is out of the question. Last week
the heat ranged all the way from 100
to 102 degrees for the better part of
the week, and during the same time no
rain fell. Some of the growers fear
that a lot of tobacco will not, under
any circumstances, recover from this
back-set.
3 per
cent
on
Savings
Deposits.
Your Patronage Re
spectfully Solicited.
First National Bank,
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
Capital - $50,000.00
Surplus $8,000.00
Officers and Directors
Geo. W. Doty - President
E. G. Bussey - Vice Pres.
L. A. Anderson - Cashier
U. G. Miller John Mawhinney
C. H. Babcock Wm. Mclntosh
C. W. Birkenmeyer
Open Saturday Nights
from 7 to 8:30 p. m.
H. T. SWEENEY,
PACK-EB OF
Leaf Tobacco
Tobacco Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
Campbell-Peterson Tobacco Co*,
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
Orfordville, Wisconsin.
HcINTOSK BROS.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
E. M. HUBBELL
Dealer and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wisconsin
c. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
All Kinds of
Leaf Tobacco
614-16-18 South Main St,,
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
SANFORD SOVERHILL
Dealer in and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
J. F. REICUARD
Packer and Dealer in
Leaf Tobacco
York, - Pa.
Cures That Awful Cough.
H. W. Barker’s Cough Remedy made
in Sparta, Wis. Write for valuable in
formation. For sale by W. G. Atwell.
NUMBER 84

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