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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, August 18, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1911-08-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 37
Business Directory.
HENRY JOHNSON.
Fire, Tornado, Life and Accident
Insurance.
BDQERTON, WISCONSIN.
In Schmeling Block.
W. T. POMEROY & CO.,
Dealers in and packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
Edgerton, - Wisconsin.
O. G. Hansen! C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS..
(Successors to O. G. Hansen)
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
- WIS.
GEORGE M. DECKER
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin.
""ANDREW JENSON & SONS,
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco,
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
C. E. SWEENEY.
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobaccc ,
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN
oTc. LEE.
Dealer in and ?acßer of
Leaf Tobacco,
STOUGHTON, - WISCONSIN.
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco Market
C. M. HINTZE and
c. w. McCarthy.
Bundle and case samples of tobacco
crops on hand. Growers and dealers
patronage solicited.
In Warehouse No. 1.
Stoughton - - Wisconsin.
HEINRICH NEUBERGER
EXPORTER
Bremen, 145 Water St.
Germany. New York, N. Y.
L. RAKEMANN
Buyer and Importer of
Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
ANTWERP, BELGIUM.
Correspondence of Commission Business
Solicited.
E ROSENWALD & BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
E. Rosenwald & Bro. and I. Bijur & Soe,
packers or
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
S. C. CHAMBERS,
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco,
MILTON JUNCTION, WIS.
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
Tobacco "Bawk,
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN.
Stock - $50,000.00
Surplus - $30,000.00
Undivided Profits $ 5,731.80
Officers and Directors:
ANDREW JENSON W. S. HEDDLES
Pres, and Cashier Vice-President
Wm. BUSSEY, Asst. Cashier D. D. BABCOCK,
W. A. SHELLEY, C, G. BIEDERMAN
' ALEX WHITE.
3 Per Cent, paid on Savings Deposits and Certificates
Safety Boxes For Rent at SI.OO, $2.00 and $3.00.
The Imperial Cigar, 10c
Hand Made. Havana Filled.
EDGERTON CIGAR CO., Edgerton, Wis.
CHAS. L. CULTON,
LEAF TOBACCO
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
T. B. EARLE
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
EDGERTON, • WISCONSIN.
FRAZIER M. DOLBEER. GEORGE F. SECOR. Special.
Original “LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1864.
F. C. LINDE, HAMILTON & CO.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers Warehousemen
Office, 180 Pearl St. New York City. Branches in all of the principal tobacco districts
A. H. CLARKE, Special Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Badger ’Phone No. 71
COLSON C. HAMILTON.
Formerly of C. E. HAMILTON FRANK P. WISEBURN,
F. C. Linde, Hamilton & Cos. LOUIS BUHLE
Formerly with F. C. Linde. Hamilton & Cos.
C. C. HAMILTON & CO.,
Tobacco Inpsectors, Warehousemen, Weighers
IWalnOff ice—B4-85 South Street, New York
THOS. B. EARLE, Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Telephone No, 23
MaGee’s Improved Tobacco Case.
The best case made for the packing of Deaf Tobacco.
Sampling done with one half the labor and expense.
Write for delivered prices in car load lots.
MaGEE BROS. - - Janesville, Wis.
Office and Warehouse adjoining C., M. & St.P Passenger Station.
A. N. JONES
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
LEAF TOBACCO
and Pease Court Janesville, Wisconsin.
S. B. HEDDLES
DEALER IN
LEAF TOBACCO
No. 5 South Adams St. Janesville, Wis.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
Warehouses at Janesville, Milton and Brooklyn, Wis.
STORAGE CAPACITY, - 15,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
L. B. CARLE & SON,
Packers of and Dealers in g
Wisconsin Leaf! Tobacco,
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1911.
Checks on Ail Foreign Countries Sold.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
The buying movement of the new
crop has developed into a hot and furi
ous chase after any fields that give
promise of yielding binder leaf. In the
northern sections, favored with more
plentiful rains, all the desirable tobac
co has already been secured on con
tract, if the reports reaching us are
reliable. Starting in the Trempeleau
valley, the buying spread rapidly to
Dunn, Chippewa and Eau Claire coun
ties, where limited acreage is grown,
into the Vernon county section and
later to the northern Dane and Rio sec
tions. The United Cigar Manufactur
ers’ Cos. and the American Cigar Cos.
have by far the largest number of buy
ers, in the field, though other large op
erators are by no means idle. It is
estimated that not less than 100 buyers
have been riding the growing districts
since the campaign started, located in
such a manner as to give a buyer for
nearly every four corners of the grow
ing district. Under such strong com
petition prices have been pushed up to
what is considered well nigh the limit
for Wisconsin leaf —close to those of
the not-to-be-forgotten 1906 crop when
everybody who touched it suffered se
vere losses. If these figures continue,
the market need not look for cheap
binder stock for the year to come. The
grower who was fortunate in produc
ing a good crop this season is to be
congratulated.
* *
* *
The long waited for rains have at
last come, putting at rest the fear of a
complete crop failure, but even at the
eleventh hour are bound to do an im
mense amount of good to the tobacco
crop. The medium and later set fields
are of course most to be benefited, for
the warm weather succeeding the soak
ing rains will find an immediate re
sponse in a quickly matured leaf, es
pecially desirable for binder purposes.
Unless history fails us, the next two
weeks will witness a most remarkable
recovery of the tobacco field not yet
ready for the harvest. It is not im
possible to yet harvest a fairly good
crop where the drouth had not carried
the plants too far towards the bud.
What is most needed now is sufficient
warm weather to properly mature,
ripen and cure the later portion of the
crop and some intervention to hold
back the work of the grasshoppers.
Fully half the acreage of the state will
be determined by these conditions.
*:*
*
The work of the Porto Rican Agri
cultural Experiment Station, conducted
by the United States Department of
Agriculture, in 1910, is the subject of a
report issued recently, in which inves
tigations into the tobacco industry are
treated. Tobacco is the third in value
of the crops of Porto Rico. With the
added value through manufacture, the
exports aggregated $5,763,214. The
report says there has been a notable
increase of local manufactures. This
is about the only line in which manu
facturers have taken advantage of the
large supply of labor. It is said that
the industry is likely to show a great
increase, as the supply of labor is
large, and is of a class singularly adept
in the making of cigars and cigarettes.
The imports in 1910 of tobacco for the
manufacture of leaf tobacco were val
ued at $370,645, and the exports of leaf
were valued at $1,140,904. Cigar to
baccos solely are grown in Porto Rico.
Cigar wrappers are grown under cheese
cloth and is carried on by companies
with considerable capital, the report
continues. The large part of the filler
is grown in the open by small planters.
The tobacco companies largely manu
facture their product, and the small
grower sells for what he can get in an
open and rather restricted market.
Having no organization, the prices he
receives are low. The report says that
there has been a trend toward lower
prices for several years, and people
who have come to Porto Rico to grow
tobacco to sell in the leaf have lost
considerable money. With but a few
buyers on one side and an unorganized
lot of producers on the other, and with
new and unknown pests to contend
with, the tobacco grower is described
as having “a hard time.” Greater
skill is required to grow tobacco in the
tropics than in the north. The soil
presents more problems and the sea
sons are more variable. The insect
pests are more numerous and formid
able. Losses in Porto Rico, the report
adds, have been especially heavy in the
seed bed. “Some method mnst be de
vised for disinfecting the seed bed be
fore planting,” the report continues.
“Burning the ground before sowing the
seed, as practiced in the United States,
would doubtless prove of value.”
* *
*
The change of policy in the purchas
ing methods of the American Tobacco
Cos. has just become known in Ky. It is
announced that the big corporation will
hereafter buy no tobacco in the field or
in the country warehouses. It will buy
in the open market, chiefly in the loose
leaf warehouses. This information is
announced by M. A. Forman, a mem
ber of the State Board of Agriculture,
who states that he has been notified of
this action by an agent of the Ameri
can Tobacco Cos.
WISCONSIN TOBACCO MARKET.
Edgerton, Wis., Aug. 18, 1911.
The fast and furious race inaugurat
ed by the large operators to secure
contracts on choice selections of the
new crop is making it one of the liveli
est campaigns ever witnessed in this
state. A hundred or so buyers chasing
oyer the growing districts have served
only to frighten the growers so they
scarcely know what price to fix on
their holdings and makes trading far
from easy. The simple fact of the
matter is that most farmers do not
care to sell at this stage of the season,
fearing contingencies that might arise
later. Under the strain of the warm
est competition prices too have been
crowded up until many of the buyers
are backing out of the field and with
drawing their men. The report reaches
us that 14 cents has been freely paid in
the Vernon county section, and our
best guess is that possibly 1,000 acres
have been contracted for. Some buy
ing has been done in the lower portion
of the state at from 10 to 13 cents.
Copious rains have fallen during the
week and the later fields are making
such phenomenal recovery as to indi
cate there is yet a chance for a good
deal of binder leaf, even in the drouth
sections, to be harvested. Topping is
well under way and some of the early
crops going into the sheds. The mar
ket for old leaf brings no news of im
portance for the week.
The shipments out of storage reach
but about 300 cases from this market
to all points since last report.
Viroqua, Wis., Aug. 9, 1911.
Rains of the week have made devel
opment rapid and promising. The late
fields have commenced to strengthen
and with sufficient warmth and moist
ure a big and good crop is certain for
this section. "Many have completed
topping, while a fair portion of the
weed has not developed sufficiently to
permit of that. There is here and there
a field of as handsome and fine growth
as one could wish to see, and there will
be cutting and housing of such in a
very few days. Asa whole, however,
harvest must be uneven.
Nearly every firm that has usually
made purchases in this territory has its
representatives in the country districts
looking up futures, but so far as one
can ascertain there has been no buying
attempted. Apparently there is un
derstanding on the subject among buy
ers. We doubt much if growers are
anxious to contract their crops. —Cen-
sor. __
Gays Mills, Wis., Aug. 9, 1911.
Buyers are driving about the tobacco
district freely the past several days
and there are some indications that
buying has already commenced. We
are told that at least one crop has been
purchased at 12£c. A start in buying
a good figure usually excites both the
growers and buyers so that it will not
be unexpected if many crops are not
sold very soon.—lndependent.
New York.
New York, Aug. 12, 1911.
The Western buyers are still pros
pecting in our leaf market. Very few
actual sales have taken place so far,
due to the fact that very little of the
New England crops has yet been sam
pled out to the big price that is being
asked for light wrappers and seconds.
The average price for broadleaf seconds
is held at 35c and for the finer grades
at 40c anS over. Light, thin broadleaf
wrappers soar very nigh to the dollar
mark* while fair to middling wrappers
seem to command on an average 75c.
As for Havana seed seconds, 26c is be
ing asked for primes, while the general
run commands 22£c. Under these con
ditions it is hardly surprising that trade
in Sumatra continues brisk and that
even the kicks have stopped against the
high prices of that commodity. Nor is
it surprising that in view of the present
binder shortage the large cigar manu
facturing concerns are starting to con
tract already for this year’s Wisconsin
binder crop, overbidding each other in
their anxious run for a binder supply.
Market conditions are therefore any
thing but encouraging for a drop in
prices. On the contrary, the prospects
are for a steady advance in all types as
has been repeatedly forecast in this
place for months.—Journal.
New England.
Springfield, Mass., Aug. 8, 1911.
The Connecticut valley tobacco har
vest is under full headway, but the
height of activity will not be reached
before the middle of the month. Every
woman or girl who seeks employment
is quickly set at work by the planta
tion managers or by growers who are
priming crops raised in the open. There
are more men than jobs so far. The
recent rains have worked miracles in
the appearance of late-set tobacco.
Pennsylvania.
Lancaster, Pa., Aug. 9, 1911.
Very grave concern has been created
in tobacco circles over the exceedingly
backward conditions of Lancaster coun
ty’s 1911 crop. It can hardly be called
the “growing crop,” because it is not
growing, and the long, fiercely hot
spell that prevailed about the middle of
July is blamed for the present back
ward state of the plants. Many of
these look as though they had hardly
begun growing yet, and in consequence
the crop is a most uneven one. It is
true, beyond a doubt, that if the hot
spell had not broken just when it did
and been succeeded by a period of fre
quent rains, the crop of this county
Frugality is the one and only
foundation for a FORTUNE.
If 'ateh your expenses.
Ways to
Save
If you are working on a salary
your first thought each pay day
should be to save a part of the
earnings to provide for future use.
You can save one months pay
during the year and with small
economy. This is our suggestion:
Have a savings account with
this bank. Each month , de
posit one-twelfth of your sal
ary. Do not spend it.
At the end of the year you will
have saved one month’s salary
and 3 per cent. We pay you the
interest twice a year.
Begin this month to save some
certain amount every pay day.
waummmmmmmmmmmmm
First National Bank,
Capital $50,000. Surplus SB,OOO.
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
Geo. W. Doty - President
E. G. Bussey - Vice Pres.
L. A. Anderson - Cashier
———— ——a
Bank open Saturday nights
from 7 to 8:30.
H. T. SWEENEY,
PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco
Tobacco Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Edgerton, - * Wisconsin
Campbell-Peterson Tobacco Co*,
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
Orfordville, Wisconsin.
HcINTOSH BROS.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
E. M. HUBBELL
Dealer and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wisconsin
c. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
All Kinds of
Leaf Tobacco
614-16-18 South Main St.,
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
SANFORD SOVERHILL
Dealer in and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
J. F. REICHARD
Packer and Dexler in
Leaf Tobacco
York, Pa.
would have bei n literally burned up.
The generous rains revived them, but
they had lost much that could not be
recovered, and the result is a backward
crop. Many plants show ground leaves
that were actually burned by contact
with the scorching earth during the hot
spell. Recently we have not had the
weather conditions cl' p ; red. There is
still time for the crop to mature be
fore frost.
NUMBER 38

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