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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, August 25, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1911-08-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 37
Business Directory .
HENRY JOHNSON,
Rre, Tornado, Life and Accident
Insurance.
3DGBETON, WISCONSIN.
iHP”Office in Schineling Bloch.
W. T. POMEROY & CO.,
Dealers in and packers of*
Leaf Tobacco,
Edgerton, - Wisconsin.
). G. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.,
(Successors to O. G. Hansen)
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
EDGERTON' - WIS.
GEORGE M. DECKER
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin.
ANDREW JENSON & SONS,
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
EDGERT ON, - WISCONSIN.
C. E. SWEENEY,
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobaccc
EDGERTON, - WiSCONSIf*
o. c. L£L.
Dealer iix and ~aclier of
Leaf Tobacco,
STOUGHTON, - WISCONSIN.
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco Market
C. M. HINTZE and
c. w. McCarthy.
Bundle and case samples of tobacco
crops on hand. Growers and dealers
patronage solicited.
In Warehouse No. 1.
Stoughton - - Wisconsin.
HEINRICH NEUBERGER
EXPORTER
Bremen, 145 Water St.
Germany. New York, N. Y.
L. RAKEMANN
Buyer and Importer of
Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
ANTWERP, BELGIUM.
Correspondence of Commission Business
Solicited.
E- ROSENWALD & BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
E. Rosenwald & Bro. and I. Bijur & Son,
packers or
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
S. C. CHAMBERS,
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco,
MILTON JUNCTION, WIS.
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
Tobacco "Bawk,
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN.
Capital Stock ... $50,000.00
Surplus - $30,000.00
Undivided Profits $ 5,731.80
Checks on Ail Foreign Countries Sold.
icq
S ° Cj 'e t Officers and Directors:
ANDREW JEfyaON • W. S. HEDDLES
Pres, and Cashier Vice-President
Wm. BUSSEY, Asst. Cashier D. L. BABCOCK,
W. A. SHELLEY, C. G. BIEDERMAN
ALEX WHITE.
3 Per Cent, paid on Savings Deposits and Certificates
Safety Boxes For Rent at SI.OO, $2.00 and $3.00.
The Imperial Cigar, 10c
Hand Made. Havana Filled.
EDGERTON CIGAR CO., Edgerton, Wis.
CHAS. L. CULTON,
LEAF TOBACCO
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
T. B. EARLE
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
FRAZIER M. DOLBEER. GEORGE F. SECOR, Special.
Original “UNDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1864.
F. C. LINDE, HAMILTON & CO.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers sas Warehousemen
Office, 180 Pearl St. New York City. Branches in all of the principal tobacco districts
A. H. CLARKE, Special Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Badger ’Phone No. 71
COLSON C. HAMILTON,
Formerly of C. E. HAMILTON FRANK P. WISEBURN,
F. C. Linde, Hamilton & Cos. LOUIS BUHLE
Formerly with F. C. Linde. Hamilton & Cos.
C. C. HAMILTON & CO.,
Tobacco Inpsectors, Warehousemen, Weighers
MalnOff Ice— B4-85 South Street, New York.
THOS. 3. EARLE, Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Telephone No, 23
MaGee’s Improved Tobacco Case.
The best case made for the packing of Leaf Tobacco.
Sampling done with one half the labor and expense.
Write for delivered prices in car load lots.
MaGEE BROS. - - Janesville, Wis.
Office and Warehouse adjoining C., M. & St. P. Passenger Station.
A. N. JONES
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
LEAF TOBACCO
and Pease Court Janesville, Wisconsin.
S. B. HEDDLES
DEALER IN
LEAF TOBACCO
No. 5 South Adams St. Janesville, Wis.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
Warehouses at Janesville, Milton and Brooklyn. Wis.
STORAGE CAPACITY, ... 15,000 CASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
L. B. CARLE & SON,
Packers of and Dealers in f
Wisconsin Leaf!| Tobacco,
i! ?
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1911.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
Based upon reports that reach us of
the buying movement, the independent
tobacco dealers are up against a fierce
game that is being played in the grow
ing districts this year. The large op
erators have so many buyers placed in
the field and bidding up prices to the
very limit that the small operator is
practically forced out of the deal.
These large operators, such as the
American Tobacco Cos., the United Ci
gar Manufacturers’ Cos., Eisenlohr &
Bros., and others, are manufacturers
who have utgent need for a supply of
binder leaf, possibly exceeding 50,000
cases, and a few cents a pound more or
less will not stand in the way of secur
ing it at whatever cost. It is a sort of
trust combination that the little fellows
cannot meet without the danger of suf
fering severe losses at the other end of
the line, and none care to repeat the
experience of the 1906 crop. Another
reason for the unusual figures being
paid in the northern growing sections
is the drouth and grasshopper affec
tion in the southern counties, making
it uncertain up to that time what the
outcome of the crop might be. While
their fears in this direction were in a
measure groundless, a price has been
set that ensures the growers a fine
profit on the 1911 crop. It is no secret,
however, among the growers that they
are obtaining from 2 to 5 cents more
for their tobacco than they really ex
pected or glad to have taken had not
the conditions been precipitated by
early field buying.
A most unfortunate feature of this
early field buying lies in the danger of
cutting unripe and immature tobacco.
The grower who has sold for big money
can hardly be blamed if he does not
take many chances on the weather that
might bring heavy storms, hail or
frost. He is pretty sure to see his crop
safely in the shed at the earliest possi
ble moment rather than trust the ele-
We learn of instances where
the sale is made one day and the har
vest is commenced the next, even
though the crop had been topped but a
few days. And herein lies trouble, all
packers well understand. The damage
sustained in the ’O6 and ’O7 packings
can well be traced to this source and
they bring it upon themselves again by
forcing the buying against the protest
of growers who would much prefer to
wait until the harvest is over before
entering into contracts for their to
bacco. All such dangers might be ob
viated by delaying the movement a few
weeks and none would have suffered
thereby.
* *
*
The question has been raised whether
the American Cigar Cos., whose buyers
are among those who are pushing hard
est to secure a large percenter of the
desirable portions of the present crop,
are not violating the court decision in
the tobacco cases by this action. Es
pecially that portio i of the judge’s
holding that says: ‘‘Pending the disso
lution of the combination and the re
creation from the elements now com
posing it of anew condition honestly in
harmony with the law under the direc
tion of this court, all the defendants,
their agents and servants, are hereby
restrained and enjoined from doing any
act which might further enlarge or ex
tend the power of the combination by
any means or device whatever.”
* *
*
From New York comes the report
that the American Tobacco Cos. has
been in consultation with James Mac-
Reynolds, the government prosecutor,
the past week, and gone over with him
in detail the dissolution plan which was
recently submitted to the United States
circuit court. The plan, when sub
mitted, was an oral one, and it receiv
ed at that time the commendation and
approval of the government prosecutor
and also of Attorney General Wicker
sham. The plan has since been par
tially put in writing, although said to
be still far from complete, and there
will be several more conferences be
tween the Tobacco Cos. and Mr. Mac-
Reynolds before the plan is submitted
again to the court. An officer of the
American Tobacco Cos. says that the
final plan will not be ready for submis
sion for several weeks.
***
The present season has been unusu
ally dry, and in all probability the
growing crop of Zimmer’s Spanish ci
gar leaf in the Miami valley, Ohio, is
likely to be equally as short. For this
reason experienced growers of this kind
of tobacco are topping low and keeping
the suckers out, thereby producing
longer leaves of greater weight than
would otherwise be possible. Thus a
crop of more uniform length with few
er leaves to handle is ensured, and the
yield per acre will be fully as great as
if high topping had been practiced. The
trade is now demanding a longer leaf
than has of late years been produced
upon the old tobacco lands of the Mi
ami valley, and packers have been
obliged to seek the desirable length in
the more fertile or newer soils of the
outlying tobacco districts.
WISCONSIN TOBACCO MARKET.
Edgerton, Wis., Aug. 25, 1911.
The buying movement- is being push
ed pretty hard, especially in the Ver
non county sections where agents are
placed at nearly every cross road and
in the aggregate probably more than
half the crop is already under contract.
It is not so much the matter of price
that makes the grower hesitate for the
limit is well nigh reached for Wisconsin
tobacco, but the natural disposition to
wait until the crop is harvested at least
before selling it. Buying has also
spread to the Orford, Rio and northern
Dane county sections during the week,
and in fact riding is done everywhere
tobacco is grown. The prevailing
prices seem to range from 13 to 15c in
the Vernon county sections, where the
leaf is reported to be remarkably sound,
to 10 to 124 c in the lower portion of the
state. The rush of field buying seems
likely to continue until the big manu
facturers have their orders filled, which
means half or more of the crop.
The late tobacco is making good pro
gress, developing some fine leaf, and
the harvest is well under way, but
next week will witness the heavy work
of securing the crop, which will be
crowded along as rapidly as the help
situation will warrant. Hail covered a
small section about Orfordville during
the week, damaging a couple hundred
acres of growing tobacco, while a more
serious storm is reported from the
Conn, valley.
There is but little change to note in
condition of the cured leaf market.
The only transaction of importance
coming to notice is a 275 cs lot sold by
Joe Donahoe of Janesville. E. D.
Lerch sold 24cs of ’OB to A. S. Flagg.
The shipments out of storage reach
500 cases from this market to all points
since last report.
Viroqua, Wis., Aug. 16, 1911.
There has been a fresh outbreak
among interested tobacco representa
tives and local buyers. Their campaign
of “looking” was too simple and tame
and the fine prospects too inyiting to
permit of delay in getting into the
game in earnest. Every livery team
and private conveyance in the city that
can be secured is being used by buyers
who are traveling every section of the
county w'here tobacco is produced.
Some, too, are making the rounds in
automobiles. Conditions the past fort
night have been so extremely favor
able to short crops that a fine growth
is assured unless hail or some other
disturbing weather element intervenes.
The good rains and warm weather are
making tobacco body as never before.
Some are still plowing and hoeing,
others topping and suckering, while
in rare cases cutting and housing have
commenced.
The ruling prices are higher as a
whole than since 1906, when every deal
er put his head into a financial poke.
Ten to 13 cents is said to be the aver
age price, while 14c and 15c have been
offered in some cases for exceptionally
fine crops. We are certainly the vine
yard this season.—Censor.
New York.
New York, Aug. 19, 1911.
Our cigar industry is at least forging
ahead, if not with the gigantic strides
of the cigarette industry, but steadily
e cen if slowly. The leaf market must
ha r e anticipated a favorable record of
the fiscal year’s output inasmuch as ac
tivi y is beginning to manifest itself
aga n. The numerous Western buyers
in t >wn had to pick up some supply in
spbe of the advanced figures of every
th;ng they were after. There was no
boom, and booms are not wanted, nor
could there be any boom on account of
the insufficiency of the desirable sup
ply. There is nothing in the New Eng
land crops this year to instigate or
warrant a boom. The Westerners buy
the seconds and some wrapper grades
which they must have for their cus
tomers, but they bought them sparing
ly in small lots not anywhere in the
quantities they used to bi y them. And
then they picked a little Florida and
some Havana and said good-buy to re
turn later on when there will be a
chance to invest in Wisconsin and the
different filler crops. In the meanwhile
manufacturers are busy laying in a
goodly supply of Sumatra and old Ha
vanas.— Journal.
New England.
Springfield, Mass., Aug. 15, 1911.
The Connecticut \ alley tobacco har
vest is being pushed to the limit. The
second picking is well under way in the
tents, and growers who are priming to
bacco grown in the open are finishing
the first picking. Cutting has also be
gun. Farmers who will cut their crops
are hoping for rain to wash the dust
and gum from the leaves.
A wonderful yield of leaf is being
harvested under cloth, and unless the
cure goes wrong, manufacturers will
have something like 1,500,000 pounds of
choice shaded Connecticut tobacco from
which to make selection within a few
months. The final yield will be even
larger than this estimate, which is con
servative, and makes liberal allowance
for tobacco which cannot be classed as
“firsts.”
Buyers are on their mettle and the
banner crops in any representative Con
nectict valley tobacco town are as well
known to wide-awake buyers as they
are to the townspeople. Some sales of
standing tobacco and a few of green
tobacco hanging in the sheds are re
ported. Growers claim to have receiv
ed 28 and 30 cents per pound for such
tobacco.
Depository
For U. S.
Postal
Savings
All
Business
Confidential.
This bank has been desig
nated a depository for POS
TAL SAVINGS by the treas
urer of the United States.
Moneys deposited with the
postmaster are redeposited
here by the government. If
this bank is safe for UNCLE
SAM it is safe for you. We
pay 3 per cent interest.
Small
Accounts
Welcome.
First National Bank,
Capital $50,000. Surplus SB,OOO.
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
Geo. W. Doty - President
E. G. Bussey - Vice Pres.
L. A. Anderson - Cashier
Bank open Saturday nights
from 7 to 8:30.
H. T. SWEENEY.,
packer op
Leaf Tobacco
Tobacco Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
Campbell-Peterson Tobacco Co*,
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco,
Orfordville, Wisconsin.
HcINTOSH BROS.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
E. M. HUBBELL
Dealer and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wisconsin
c. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
All Kinds of
Leaf Tobacco
614-16-18 South Main St.,
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
SANFORD SOVERHILL
Deader in and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
J. F. REICHARD
Packer and Dealer in
Leaf Tc bacco
York, - Pa.
The fact that our forefathers lived
to an advanced age and didn’t bother
about the roller towel, the drinking cup
or stop to swat the fly, is no sign that
those things were all right. Some say
we’re getting too particular about lit*
tie things these days, hilt fair m’nded
men are willing to lea\ e the doubt on
the side of the regulations.
NUMBER 39

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