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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, December 31, 1915, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1915-12-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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Complexion is Largely a
Matter of Care
and any woman knows that complexion is a most
important factor in charm and beauty.
Monarch
CREAM
25 cents
Consistently used will give any woman an attractive complexion.
It is a protection against wind and weather and an efficient skin
cleanser.
Best for Tan and Sunburn
Wisconsin Tobacco Reporter
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1915
CORRESPONDENCE
Stoughton
Rev. J. J. Lee, pastor of the Savior
Lutheran church, performed the mar
riage ceremony Thursday for Olean
Erickson of Cottage Grove and Miss
Clara Melaas of Pleasant Springs.
Dr. F. C. Henderson left Thursday
evening for Rice Lake where his wife
and baby son proceded him a week ago,
and where he will spend the coming
week at the home of his parents-in-law,
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Bjoin.
Miss Hilda Bjoin, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Halvor Bjoin, and Geo. Wha
ley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cal Whaley,
both of this city, were married in Mad
ison Tuesday evening, at eight o’clock
at St. Patrick’s parsonage, Father B.
P. Knox performing the ceremony.
Benedict Grane reports that the
rooms that he occupies in his house on
E. Jefferson street were entered re
cently and more than SIOO had been
stolen from him. The theft took place
within the past few days, but as far as
we can learn, there is as yet no clue to
the identity of the thief.
Dr. F. B. Hyland passed away Sun
day morning at his home on the corner
of Main and Page streets. His sudden
death comes as a surprise and shock to
all. He had been in his usual good
health, had greatly enjoyed on Christ
mas day the gathering of the entire
family of children and grandchildren,
had played Santa Claus for the little
ones and entered into all their good
cheer, and retired at night apparently
about as well as usual. Sunday morn
ing he arose about half past 6 o’clock,
and after attending to the furnace, sat
in his easy chair in the living room,
and in a little while appeared to be
asleep; but soon after 7 o’clock, as
they spoke to him and received no re
sponse, they discovered he had quietly
passed away. Medical attendance was
summoned at once, but he was gone.
Dr. Hyland was born in Mannsville,
Jefferson county, N. Y., in 1845. Two
years later, in 1847, he was brought by
his parents to Janesville, Wis., and
about a year later they moved to Ful
ton, Wis., where the doctor’s boyhood
was passed. In early manhood Dr.
Hyland found himself possessed of a
remarkable healing power which he de
veloped by use until finally he gave his
whole time to the practice of this gift
for the good of humanity. And in the
going of Dr. Hyland the family and
community and a very wide circle of
friends have met with a great loss;
many will mourn for him; many will
realize deeply their need of him and
miss him sorely. The funeral was held
Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock
from thp.Universalist church.
Fort AtKluon.
Lillie Blanchard Royce, wife of R. D.
Royce, died of pneumonia at her home
on Sherman Ave. at 7:30 p. m., Thurs
day, Dec. 16, after an illness of only
three days’ duration. The last ser
vices were conducted by Rev. D. Q.
Grabill on Sunday at 2 p. m.
Think of $22,000 being sent out to
the people of Fort Atkinson in a single
day! That’s what the Citizens State
bank did recently. People all over the
city were mailed checks ranging from
$12.75 to $65 from the Christmas sav
ings department of the bank.
The walks have been unusually slip
pery during the past few days. Rain
followed by sleet and snow makes
walking a hazardous venture and nu
merous falls have resulted disastrously.
Mrs. George Heuchel, Jefferson street,
sustained the fracture of several ribs,
and is confined to her bed from the ef
fects of a severe fall.
The Northwestern Mfg. Cos. has had
a brisk demand for its sleighs and cut
ters the past week in consequence of
the snow storm in lowa and Nebraska.
Evantvlli*
Gilbert Norura, a single man, who
has lived at Cooksville, seven miles
south of the city, died Saturday at the
local hospital. He was 71 years old.
The funeral took place at Cooksville
Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Hegge of
Stoughton officiating.
George W. Hall returned Tuesday
from a very pleasant trip to New York
city and Chester and Philadelphia, Pa.
On Dec. 5 Mr. Hall was 78 years old,
so he planned the eastern trip as a cel
ebration of the event, leaving here the
following day. He visited Central
Park, in New York, where he purchas
ed four baby lions.
Milton
G. D. Wixom and family spent
Christmas day with Mr. and Mrs. James
Conway in Edgerton.
Messrs, and Mesdames George Ogden
and Clyde Ogden and Goldie Ogden of
Edgerton were guests of Charles Og
den Sunday.
Frank Albright has traded his farm
west of town to W. C. Wall for the old
Morgan block and his business block.
Mr. Albright will take possession on
March Ist.
James Bond had a rather severe fall
on the icy walk which hurt his hip in
such a way as to render him unable to
get around much without the assistance
of a cane.
Dr. G. W. Post and family are mov
ing this week into their fine new house
just completed on High street. Their
car of household furniture arrived from
Chicago last week.
When Harry D. Smith of Harmony
and a friend were hunting Monday, the
charge of small shot from one of the
guns struck a tree, and glancing, em
bedded itself in the arm and upper part
of the body of Mr. Smith. The ammu
nition was extracted by a surgeon and
no serious results are anticipated.
About fo) ty of the relatives and
friends of Mr. and Mrs. John Ashley
helped them celebrate their golden
wedding anniversary in a very fitting
manner at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
George Finney Saturday evening. A
delicious two-course luncheon was serv
ed. Pastor Gordon, in behalf of the
guests, presented Mr. and Mrs. Ashley
with a ten dollar gold piece.
Cambridge
Nels Hanson, one of our oldest, if
not the oldest citizen, died of pneu
monia last Sunday.
The Prairie Queen creamery is sold
to Mr. G. H. Kothlow of Newville, who
expects to move his household goods at
once and will occupy the residence
where Mr. and Mrs. F. Kutz now re
side. Mr. Kothlow is an energetic
buisness man and we predict that his
taking hold of the creamery will mean
much to the village.
Mr. Louis Kump, retired farmer liv
ing in Cambridge the last 17 years, died
Sunday evening, Dec. 19th, aged 80
years. He was born in Ohio, April 10,
1834, of parents David and Barbara
Kump. In 1846 they moved to Wiscon
sin and settled on land in Jefferson
county, three miles southwest of Rock
dale. He was an industrious and peace
able citizen, until the troubles of ad
vancing age made him retire from the
farm to Cambridge. Although compli
cated troubles made him unable to walk
about of late years, death came rather
suddenly. A wife, four children, thir
teen grandchildren and nine great
grandchildren, besides a brother and
numerous nephews and nieces mourn
his departure.
♦ m *.
Sioo Reward SIOO.
The readers of this paper will be
pleased to learn that there is at least one
dreaded oisease that science has been
able to cure in all its stages, and that is
catarrh. Hall’s Catarrh Cure is the only
positive cure known* to the medical fra
ternity. Catarrh being a constitutional
disease, requires a constitutional treat
ment. Hall’s Catarrh Cure is taken in
ternally, acting directly upon the blood
and mucous surface of the system, there
by destroying the foundation of the dis
ease, and giving the patient strength by
building up the constitution and assist
ing nature in doing its work The pro
prietors have so much faith n its cura
itve powers, that offer One Hundred
Dollars for any case that it fails to cure.
Send for lists of testimonials. Address,
F. J. Cheney, & Cos., Toledo, O.
Sold by all druggists 75c.
Tax Notice.
Notice is hereby given that the tax
roll of the town of Fulton is now in my
hands for collection. I will receive
taxes in Tobacco Exchange bank, Ed
gerton, Jan. 3rd, 1916, First National
bank Jan. Bth, O. P. Murwin’s store
Jan. 15th, Bert Cox’s, Indian Ford,
Jan. 22nd; balance of time at home.
Taxes must be paid before Feb. 1.
Wm. Wille, Treas.
4>H>
Notice
Having rented my restaurant for a
term of years and being obliged to va
cate by Jan. 1, we will close out our
stock of cigars, tobaccos, canned goods,
some bedroom furniture and restrurant
fixtures, cigar cases, candy cases, wall
cases, cash register, etc., regardless of
cost. Henry Houfe.
After Jan. 1 Houfe’s restaurant will
be open for business on the second floor
under the management of W. H. Houfe.
♦♦♦
For Rent —Seven-room house. In
quire of Atwell & Blanchard. 2
WISCONSIN NEWS
ITEMSJN BRIEF
Paragraphs of Interest to Read
ers of Badger State.
News of All Kinds Gathered From
Various Points in the State and So
Reduced Ir. Size That It Will Appeal
to All Classes of Readers.
An examination will be held on
Jan. 22 for postmaster at Wayside.
E. H. Debert, French instructor in
the university, has resigned to enter
the French ranks.
W. T. Irvine, La Crosse jeweler for
thirty-two years, is dead. Mr. Irvine
was fifty-seven years old.
At Glenbeulah, Wis., Mrs. Isabella
T. Van Alstyne, a pioneer teacher of
Sheboygan county, is dead.
The C. A. Straubel Cos., wholesale
buyers and distributers of cheese, has
made arrangements to establish an
agency at Antigo.
Henry SeCoy, supposed dead for
fifty-one years, surprised his uncles,
Jerome and George Adams, of near Al
mond, by a social call.
Porter Ingream got 30 days in jail
for shooting through a school! 1 , ouse
door. The bullet passed two feet over
the heads of the audience.
La grippe so crippled attendance at
Beloit college the school closed at
noon Tuesday instead of Thursday, as
scheduled, for the winter vacation.
Neillsville’s white way was ready
and lighted for the first time Tuesday
night. The system embraces the busi
ness section of the city.
Democrats have arranged a meeting
at the Hotel Martin Thursday to dis
cuss plans for a Democratic massmeet
ing or dinner to be held in Milwaukee
Jan. 10.
The city bank of Dodgeville filed
articles of incorporation with the state
commissioner of banking increasing
its capital stock from SIO,OOO to $25,-
000. The commissioner approved the
amendment.
Oconomowoc gets a public skating
rink, this having been decided at a
meeting of the park commission. Mil
ler’s bay on Fowler lake will be illum
inated by electricity and kept in good
condition. ,
Dr. R. Buckingham, former head of
the New York board of school esti
mates, was chosen to take charge of
the statistical department of the Wis
consin board of education. The posi
tion pays about $4,000 a year.
Steps to form labor unions in Anti
go were taken when a temporary or
ganization was effected. August Kunz
was elected temporary president and
Henry Berner temporary secretary.
The object is to promote sale of union
made products.
Washington news says the supreme
court appointed William C. Kimball,
Oshkosh, Wis., to hear testimony in
the original suit of the state of Wis
consin against Secretary of the Inter
ior Lane, involving an Indian land dis
pute.
At Waukesha, Wis., Mrs. Charles
E. Nelson announces the engagement
of her daughter, Miss Marie, to the
Rev. Frederick D. Butler, rector of
Gracd Episcopal church of Freeport,
111.
With his horse, William Hansen,
a rural carrier, was killed south of
Racine by a train at the Johnson
Crossing. Christmas mail, with which
his wagon was loaded, was scattered
broadcast.
Seven hundred pounds of butter of
the Zillisch & Kennedy creamery com
panies of Madison were seized by Rev
enue Inspector Harry Billings on the
ground that it contained a larger per
centage of moisture than allowed by
law.
Reports cay insanity is on the
increase in Racine county in an alarm
ing degree, as no less than thirty-two
patients were sent to the state hospi
tals the past year and six youths were
committed to institutions for feeble
minded.
During the week Kenosha fathers
and mothers are sneezing and the boys
and girls are wheezing as the result of
an epidemic of old fashioned la grippe,
which is proving an unwelcome Christ
mas visitor in the city. It is estimated
that there are no less than 5,000 cases,
of the epidemic in Kenosha.
Citizens declare Marinette and
Menominee city officials and Commer
cial clubs will join in with Milwaukee
in protesting the proposed canal from
Chicago to the Mississippi river,
through which 10,000 cubic feet of wa
ter per second will be diverted.
Arthur Maloney, a brakeman, was
seriously injured at Ellis Junction
when a box car toppled over, pinning
him underneath. Conductor Riley also
was struck by the car and suffered a
severe injury to his knee. Maloney
was brought to this city and it is be
lieved he suffered internal injuries.
His left leg w r as fractured in three
places.
. Carl H. Miller, sentenced to ten
years at the federal penitentiary at
Leavenworth on forgery charges, says
that though he was separated from the
federal officers two years he never
made an attempt to escape. He says
the officers on the train escaped from
him and that though he has since been
looking for someone to arrest him, he
has just located the right man.
Louis Zalm of Underliill shot three
bears, two of them young ones.
Grand Rapids saloon keepers or
ganized and elected officers.
A. S. Saylor, Muffalo, Minn., ac
quires ownership of the Delavan En
terprise.
Mrs. Helen Besack, 75, of Racine,
who was burned two weeks ago, when
her clothes caught lire, is dead.
The junior class of the University of
Wisconsin to held its annual prom in
the new state capitol on Feb. 11.
Felker Brothers Manufacturing com
pany of Marshfield, recently de
stroyed by fire, will be started to be
rebuilt immediately.
U. S. reports show Milwaukee
leads the state, by a wide margin, in
the per capita expenditures for the
conservation of health and sanitation.
C. H. Cobine had 44,000 volts of
electricity shot through his body when
he came in contact with a high ten
sion wire, physicians at La Crosse be
lieve he will recover.
John J. Roberts, 74 years old, for
mer warden of the state prison and
president of the State Bank of Wau
pun, is dead. Mr. Roberts was a mem
ber of the Masonic order.
When William Lory, in the vil
lage of Union Grove, arose in the
morning he found his wife dead in
bed, due to heart trouble. She was
sixty-nine years old.
At Tomahawk Hall L.. Brook
was appointed secretary of trade and
commerce and sealer of weights and
measures by the city council, his term
to begin on Jan. 1.
James Bradley, a Racine grocer
has been paying out a considerable
sum by redeeming trading stamps
which he had previously dumped into
the waste pile and sold to a junk deal
er.
Mary A. Cronk, 92 years, and one
of the oldest pioneers of Fond du Lac
county, is dead at the family home in
the town of Eldorado. Mrs. Cronk has
resided to this county sixty-seven
years.
The first Sunday lid attempt
in La Crosse in thirty-eight years met
failure when Frank J. McWilliams,
proprietor of the Strand and Casino
theaters was acquitted on the first bal
lot in one minute.
After a vigorous search the body of
H. A. Grote of the Grote Ice and Cart
age company, one of the wealthiest
residents of South Milwaukee, was
found under the ice in a mill pond
near his home.
Chief Justice John B. Winslow
of the Wisconsin supreme court was
elected president of the Wisconsin
University Alumni association of Mad
ison when it meets for permanent or
ganization on Dec. 22.
At Waukesha it is reported chemical
tests of water flowing from a sprficg
that gives 200,000 gallons a day at a
well known local resort have shown
it contains the same medicinal pro
perties as the mud used at the baths.
Patrick Conway of Janesville, a
farmer, was asphyxiated in the kitchen
of a vacant house where he was pick
ing Christmas turkeys, when he turn
ed on two ga s jets of a gas stove with
out lighting them.
With unimpaired mind, Mrs. Jane P.
Williams, known for her wonderful
memory and even of late years, it is
said, proving her boast that she knew
the bible by heart, is dead at Racine,
aged eighty-two years.
Mrs. W. Sutherland, mother of Presi
dent W. J. Sutherland of the state nor
mal school, was sent to Fairdale, 111.,
for burial. Apoplexy and the shock
caused by the death of her son a week
ago was the cause of Mrs. Sutherland’s
death.
Near New London Nich Swetal
la and his seventeen year old son of
the town of Lanark, Portage county,
shot a large lynx with a 22-caliber
rifle. The skin measured five feet in
length. The bounty is $6 and the skin
is valued at $25.
At Depere a child of William
Manders of the west side fell into a
tub of water while its mother was
washing and drowned. About a year
ago the Manders lost another infant
when the mother accidentally smother
ed it while asleep in bed.
A Madison report says three states
—Kansas, Utah, and Minnesota —of
the territory embraced in the regis
tration area, had a lower death rate in
1914 than Wisconsin. This is shown in
new census figures on mortality made
public by the department of com
merce.
A headon collision between two
ty-ains on the Santa Fe railroad near
Stockton, Cal., in which William Wing
and his son, William Wing, Jr., the
two engineers, were instantly killed,
robbed Mrs. Andred Brown of New
Richmond, grandmother of the son, of
a joy she had been looking forward to
for months.
Dr. N. Hoffman, former superinten
dent of the state tuberculosis sana
torium at Wales, has no statement to
make regarding the action taken by
the board of control. He declines, too,
to discuss what moves were contem
plated by Alyward & Olbrich, the Mad
ison attorneys who have been retained
to represent him.
The state of Wisconsin leads the
states in value of mineral water sold
in 1913, and was second only to New
York in quantity of output, accord ng
to a report of the department of the in
terior received here. The total sales
were 6,326,533 gallons, valued at $872,-
518, and nine-tenths of the output was
sold for table use. The 1913 output
represented an increase of 5 per cent
in quantity and of less" than 1 per cent
in value. The average price decreased
about one-half cent a gallon.
Almost out of Candy
Fresh shipment for your
\
New Year’s Needs
GET IT HERE
Chocolates, the highest quality, 20c lb.
All the new ones and many old time
favorites at 10c per lb.
BORGNIS, Edgerton.
“The Store With a Conscience "
Did you Notice the Snow
Storm the Other Day?
Better be prepared for the next one
by ordering
Storm Sash
and Doors
Now!
Heddles Lumber Cos.
Have Respect
For Your Car
Get it overhauled now during the
winter months when you are not us
ing it, and have it in perfect working
order for spring. We can do the
work and do it right on any kind of
a car and our prices are the lowest.
THEO. TELLEFSON & SON
Formerly The Culton Garage, Albion St., Edgerton
December Investments
Municipal Bonds and
Special Assessment Bonds
Offer you Safety of Principal, Simplicity of Investment, Prompt
Payment of Interest, Convertible Into Cash in Case of Necessity.
We offer subject to prior sale
fiflfl City of Sparta, 111., Waterworks Improvement, Dis
sdO;UUU trict No. 1, to net investors percent interest.
ccn nnn Duval Texas, Road and Bridge, to net investor 5 per
OUUjUUU cent interest.
$5,600 Herrin, Illinois, to neet 5 per cent.
Denowlnation: SIOO, SSOO.
Call for particulars and place orders promptly.
L. A. ANDERSON
Investment and Insurance
Phone 370 Edgerton
“Have Anderson Write It.”

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