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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, February 09, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1917-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 43
Business Directory.
Henry Johnson
“THE SERVICE AGENCY”
is prepared to wrr‘ ,>
INSURAMCt"
of every Kind.
Phone 18. Edgerton, Wis.
This Office will Give You the Best
There is in
Insurance Service
City Steam Laundry
H. M. Raymond, Prop.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Telephone No. 37
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
Packers ot Cigar Leaf Tobacco
IF YOU WANT
The Best and Cheapest Case
made write us for delivered prices in carload
lots in shook. Satisfaction guaranteed. By
using our case sampling can be done with one
half the labor and no damage to case:
MaGEE BROTHERS
Janesville, Wis.
IV. T. Pomeroy & Cos.
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
0. G. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.
(Successors to O. G. Hansen)
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wfs.
C. E. SWEENEY,
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco*
EDGERTON, • WISCONSIN
oT cTlee.
Dealer ia and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco,
STOUGHTON, - WISCONSIN.
HEINRICH NEUBERGER
Packer of and Dealer in
Leaf Tobacco
130 Water St., New York, N. Y.
E- ROSENWALD & BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
B. Rosenwald & Bro. and I. Bijur & Bon
PACKERS OF
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
EDGERTON \
Farmers Warehouse Cos.
DEALERS IN
Leaf Tobacco,
And Farm Supplies
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin.
HASKINS & SCHWARTZ
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, Wisconsin
Holton Leaf Tobacco Cos.
PACKERS OF WISCONSIN
Leaf Tobacco
OFFICES AT*
Stoughton and Whitehall, Wis.
A “Comfy” Chair and
l m P er ' a l
10 cent cigar
g° well together. After a day
°f hard work or worry, try this
combination and see how well it
For a mighty good 5c Cigar
ask for MAX NO. lO
Edgerton Cigar Cos., Edgerton, Wisconsin
THE EARLE TOBACCO CO.
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO,
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
* '
ANDREW JENSON & SON
PACKERS OF AND DEALERS IN
LEAF TOBACCO
Public Storage—3 cents per case per month
EDGERTON, - - WISCONSIN
Original “LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1804.
F. C. LINDE, HAMILTON & CO. Inc.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers sss Warehousemen
Office, 182 Pearl St.. New York City. Branches In all of the principal tobacco district
A. H. OLARKE, Special Agent Edgerton, Wis. Badger’Phone No. 71
COLSON E HAMILTON FRANK P. WISEBURN,
LOUIS BUHLE
Formerly with F. C. Linde. Hamilton & 00.
C. C. HAMILTON & CO.,
Tobacco Inpsectors, Warehcnsemen, Weighers
MalnOfflce—34-85 South Street, New York.
THOS. B. EARLE, Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Telephone No, 23
SANFORD SOVERHILL
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
LEAF TOBACCO
Janesville, • Wisconsin.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
STORAGE CAPACITY, - 15,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
N. L. CARLE & CO.
Packers of and Dealers in
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.!
Report of the Examining Board
to the State Bank Examiner, showing the condition of the
Tobacco Exchange Bank
c iet y
at the close of business on the 3rd day of January, 1917.
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts - ... $529,138 35
Overdrafts - 3,655 88
Banking House - - - k • - - 20,000 00
Furniture and Fixtures - .... 3,239 56
Other Real Estate - < 7,583 57
Cash on hand and Due from banks - 164,528 29
Total - - $728,145 65
LJ ABILITIES
Capital Stock paid in - - - $50,000 00
Surplus * - - 30,000 00
Undivided Profits - 23,037 23
Individual Deposits subject to check - 245,959 05
Certificates of deposit - - - 226,425 16
Savings deposits - 1 152,724 16 625,108 37
Total .... ... $728,145 65
Signed: W. S. HEDDLES,
D. L. BABCOCK,
ALEX WHITE,
C. G. BIEDERMAN,
Wm. BUSSEY,
The Examining Committe.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, FEBRUARY 9, 1917
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
Prof. E. G. Beinhart, connected with
the tobacco investigation division of
the Department of Agriculture, was in
the state in conference with Prof.
James Johnson, of the university ex
perimental station, regarding some re
search work that will be tv ken up in
Wisconsin this season. A portion of
the appropriation passed by congress
for scientific investigation on the to
bacco subject has been assigned to this
state. Prof. Beinhart has been desig
nated to the work in Pennsylvania,
Ohio and Wisconsin and the purpose of
his visit was to determine what lines
would be followed. It is possible that
the excess moisture content in tobacco
in relation to black rot may be the sub
ject of one of the experiments con
ducted. For one the writer is glad to
learn that the Wisconsin tobacco inter
ests have been recognized* as a proper
field for governmental exploration and
we are confident that the work of their
scientists will accomplish something of
value to the state. The work of Prof.
Beinhart late years has been confined
to the Connecticut Valley where the
culture of shade-grown tobacco has
reached large proportions.
* *
There seems to be some sort of con
firmation of the truth of the question
raised in this column several months
ago if there was not concerted ef
fort among the first-hand manufactur
ers and larger operators to control the
1916 cigar tobacco crop at whatever
price had to be paid for it, in the pres
ent condition of the Pennsylvania mar
ket below described: “Is an attempt
being made to effect a ‘corner’ in Penn
sylvania goods?” is a question which
many packers are discussing these
days. They realize that the big out
side concerns have purchased at least
75,per cent of the 1916 crop which, of
course, will not be available for the de
mands of the trade. It is in the re
mainder that the interest lies. This
probably amounts to fifteen thousand
cases. Julius Marqusee and the Spitz
ners have been heavy buyers and prob
ably between them have the greater
portion of the crop which the big man
ufacturing: concerns did not pick up,
and it will be to* them that the small
manufacturer will of necessity look for
their supplies of tobacco. Like buying
a pig in a bag is the action of the pack
ers who have been going around pick
ing up ail the- packings they could se
cure. Even the original buyer in many
cases has not had the goods delivered
to him yet. In other years it has been
the custom of the second buyer to go
from farm to farm to see the goods
which the first man purchased before
buying his contract, but that policy did
not prevail this year, the second buyer
basing his judgment on the basis of
other years. This is the first time in
the history of the tobacco business here
that any departure was made from the
old policy and well illustrates how anx
ious are some people to obtain the 1916
goods.
Pretty nearly everybody in Water
street is tremendously interested in the
international developments of the last
few days, no matter whether he has
any tobacco entering the Port or not.
The importers, particularly the Suma
tra contingent, are in suspense, even
the Havana people, whose goods come
by coastwise steamer, wondering
whether or not the alleged flock of
submarines hovering about the Hook
will have enough discretion to distin
guish a neutral coaster from a muni
tion-laden trans-Atlantic vessel. f The
domestic traders are pondering upon a
possible stoppage of all importations
for a few months, which will put do
mestic types of leaf into even greater
demand than they are now. Generally
speaking, the trade which deals in the
basic element of the entire cigar indus
try, leaf tobacco, is vitally concerned
with the impending crisis. The situa
tion that promises to prevail when the
time comes for American importers to
go abroad is similarly shrouded in
doubt. Germany has said that one
vessel a week, under neutral guaran
ties, may go from New York to Fal
mouth henceforward but nobody in Su
matra importing circles wants to go to
Falmouth just for the sake of being
that much nearer the prospective April
inscriptions in Amsterdam. The ab
sence of American importers, more
over, will assuredly bring about com
plete postponement of the Dutch sales
until such time as America can be rep
resented, it is pointed out further. So
far as the actual severance of our dip
lomatic relations with the Teutonic
powers is concerned— Stocks of Su
matra, as well as other types of leaf,
now in this country are exceedingly
low and the sentiment in Water street
is that they should be conserved uni
formly until the danger is past, so that
they may be made to last as long as
possible for the cigar manufacturers.
On the other hand, the cigar manufac
turers see no prospect of a special
Providence appearing to divide existing
stocks share-and-share-alike for them,
and many are exerting every effort to
grab whatever they can get, on the
“safety first” principle. —N. Y. Tob.
Journal.
WISCONSIN TOBACCO MARKET.
I Edgerton, Wis., Feb. 9, 1917.
Winter still holds its grasp on the
country while the tobacco growers are
anxiously awaiting for mild tempera
tures that might bring casing weather.
Nothing further can be done toward
preparing the balance of the crop for
1 market until soft weather comes. In
the meantime packing operations are
being handicapped more or less. Some
; concerns have closed down, others are
' working short handed and all are fast
approaching a time when they must
suspend, for part crops are being re
ceived to keep the warehouses running.
The amount of the ’l6 crop remaining
i unsold in growers’ hands is the small-
I est ever known at this time of year,
i Contracts cover practically everything
! produced.
I Except there is an active demand for
I old tobacco of all descriptions the local
j markets have developed no news of im
i portance.
j A few shipments out of storage have
! been put under way but conditions are
i still congested in the east.
New York.
New York, Feb. 3, 1917.
A nevr sensation struck the leaf mar
ket this week, the submarine blockade
announced by Germany. The extent
and ruthlessness intended to carry out
thi3 blockade would result in tying up
almost completely any pruchase or im
port of the Sumatra crop that was to
be put up at the inscriptions this year.
None of our Sumatra importers will
risk his life under the strenuous con
ditions laid down to attend the coming
inscriptions if these inscriptions should
take place, which is very doubtful now
anyhow. Nor would there be any pos
sibility of shipping the Sumatra from
Holland to this country. In fact, the
new blockade announcement forbodes a
complete stoppage of intercourse be
tween this country and Europe. Some
manufacturers who have already real
ized the serious situation have swooped
down on the market and secured of the
old stock of Sumatra whatever they
could. Quite a boom was therefore
sweeping the market in search for Su
matra. Prices were no object only if
the desirable stock could be acquired.
And as it is reliably estimated that
there are no more than 2,500 to 3,000
bales of Sumatra on hand, it will not
take many weeks to clean it out and
the Sumatra using cigar industry will
be facing a Sumatra famine. That this
prospect will also have its effect on the
domestic wrapper leaf market in an
other price boost is but natural. Next
to Sumatra there is a scramble going
on for the new Remedios. One import
ing house disposed of 5,000 bales of its
packings this week, and other Havana
importers are likewise disposing of
their new importations in considerable
quantities.—Journal.
New York, Jan. 31, 1917.
Never in the history of the tobacco
trade have old stocks been so low, the
demand for both filler and binder so
great and prices so high, particularly
with regard to an early supply of fill
ers. Outside of a few large manufac
turing concerns, which have covered
their needs through timely purchases,
the daily increasing shortage is assum
ing a serious aspect to many of our
medium sized factories, and to most of
the smaller factories the situation is
alarming. Stocks in the hands of the
tobacco dealers and jobbers have been
reduced to a minimum and cannot be
replenished until the 1916 crop is ready
for work. The causes producing this
grave state of affairs have been slowly
developing during the past few years
and huve been accentuated the past
year by the exceedingly small yield of
the 1915 crop, the comparatively great
er amount demanded for export pur
poses, the increasing inroads upon the
cigar leaf supply by the manufacturers
cf smoking and chewing tobacco and
the growing consumption of our cigar
industry. In short, the demand has far
outrun the supply. The natural result
is the highest prices ever paid to the
farmers for our domestic output in the
1916 crop, which, as regards yield, is,
with few exceptions, anything but
abundant and a distinct disappointment
to our packers. A logical and safe
conclusion to draw is that there is ev
ery guarantee for a continuation of the
present high level of prices in the cost
of the raw material for the next few
seasons. An increasing acreage with
favored crops is absolutely essential to
re-establish the proper equilibrium and
restore standard values, which at best
can only be a slow process.—Leaf.
Pennsylvania.
Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 31, 1917.
The top-notch price in the 1916 crop
of this county was reached last week
when P. E. Slayi_.aker, president of
the Peoples* Trust Cos., Lancaster, sold
from his farm in Paradise township
four acres at 20J and 10, or approxi
mately S4OO an acre. The purchaser
was Aaron Hoober. The general un
derstanding has been that very little of
the new crop remains in the hands of
the growers, but from reports received
last week it is apparent that there is
considerable unsold tobacco, though it
is so scattered about the county that it
would not pay the representatives of
big concerns to go hunting after it.
And as a matter of course local pack
ers will not hunt for it because they
don’t want it. Tobacco for which the
owners are now demanding 19 and 20
cents has no attraction for buyers who
balked at 15£ and 16 cents. The only
way the unsold crops can be sold now is
for the holders to notify the represent
atives of big concerns as to their hold
ings, and they will find a buyer if the
(Concluued on Page 4)
This is Your
BANK
We want you to feel that we are
here to render service to the pub
lic, to you personally.
Whether it is safeguarding your
money or advising you in business
matters, we shall treat you as we
do all of our patrons—with the best
service and impartiality.
9 There is no middle ground in
dealing with our customers. The
small depositors will receive just
as careful attention as the large.
Your business invited. SERVICE,
SECRECY and SAFETY and 3 per
cent INTEREST
First National
BANK
Edgerton, Wisconsin
“The Bank of the People,”
Geo. W. Doty, - President
E. G. Bussey, Vice President
Oscar L. Olson - Cashier
J. F. Hruska - Asst. Cashier
H. TANARUS, SWEENEY.
PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco
Tobacco Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
C. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
107-109 North Franklin Street
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
C. F. MABBETT Est.
Dealer in Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
Mclntosh bros.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
E. M. HUBBELL
Dealer and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wisconsin
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co.}
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
EUGENE SORENSON
Packer of Northern Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Whitehall, Wis.
R. H. HOLTAN
Dealer in and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Whitehall, Wis.
NUMBER 12

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