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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, February 23, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1917-02-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 43
Business Directory .
Henry Johnson
“THE SERVICE AGENCY”
is prepared to write
INSURA^f
State His
of every Kind.
Phone 18. Edgerton, Wis.
This Office will Give You the Best
There is in
Insurance Service
c. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
107-109 North Franklin Street
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
Packers of Gigar Leaf Tobacco
IF YOU WANT
The Best and Cheapest Case
made write us for delivered prices in carload
lots in shook. Satisfaction guaranteed. By
using our case sampling can be done with one
half the labor and no damage to case:
MaGEE BROTHERS
Janesville, Wis.
W. T. Pomeroy & Cos.
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
O. G. HANSEN. C. H HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.
(Successors to O. G. Hansen)
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wis*
C„ K. SWEENEY,
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco,
EDOERTON. - WISCONSIN
o 7 cTXeeT
dealer ia and Packer of
Leaf Tobacco,
STOUGHTON, - WISCONSIN.
HEINRICH NEUBERGER
Packer of and Dealer in
Leaf Tobacco
130 Water St., New York, N. Y.
E- ROSENWALD & BRO.
817CCE880R TO
B. Rosenwald & Bro. and I. Bijur & Son
PACKERS OF
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
EDGERTON
Farmers Warehouse Cos.
DEALERS IN
Leaf Tobacco,
And Farm Supplies
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin.
HASKINS & SCHWARTZ
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, Wisconsin
Holton Leaf Tobacco Cos.
PACKERS OF WISCONSIN
Leaf Tobacco
OFFICES AT*
Stoughton and Whitehall, Wis.
♦ v
When you want a good smoke
■ An Imperial
will fill the bill. If you’ve nev
er smoked an Imperial ask your
dealer for one the next time you
For a mighty good 5c Cigar
ask for MAX NO. lO
Edgerton Cigar Cos., Man Edge u rton;wisco n sin
THE EARLE TOBACCO CO.
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
andrewTiensonT son
PACKERS OF AND DEALERS IN
LEAF TOBACCO
Public Storage—3 cents per case per month
EDGERTON, - - WISCONSIN
Original “LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
F. C. UNDE, HAMILTON & CO. Inc.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers Warehousemen
Office, 182 Pearl St.. New York City. Branches In all of the principal tobacco district
A. H. OLARKP. Special Agent Edgerton, Wis. Badger’Phone No. 71
COLSON E HAMILTON FRANK P. WISEBURN,
LOUIS BUHLE
• Formerly with F. C. Linde, Hamilton Sc Cos.
C. C. HAMILTON & CO.,
Tobacco Inpsectors, Warehousemen, Weighers
MalnOfflce—64-85 South Street, New York.
THOS. B. EARLE, Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Telephone No, 23
SANFORD SOVERHILL
DEALER IN AND PACKER OF
LEAF TOBACCO
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
STORAGE OAPAOITY, - 15,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
N. L. CARLE & CO.
Packers of and Dealers in*
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.]
Tobacco Ti&wk,
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN,
r
Capital Stock - $50,000.00
Surplus - - $30,000.00
Undivided Profits - - $20,000.00
3 Per Cent, paid on Savings Deposits and Certificates
Checks on All Foreign Countries Sold.
Safety Boxes For Rent at SI.OO.
Officers and Directors:
ANDREW JENSON W. S. HEDDLES
Pres, and Cashier Vice-President
Wm. BUSSEY, Asst. Cashier D. L. BABCOCK,
W. A. SHELLEY, C. G. BIEDERMAN
ALEX WHITE.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, FEBRUARY 23, 1917
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
We observe that a bill providing for
an appropriation of $6,000 by the state
of Pennsylvania for the purpose of car
rying on tobacco experimental work in
connection with the federal govern
ment has been introduced in the legis
lature of that state. While our own
state is making liberal appropriations
for the beekeepers, cranberry growers,
dairymen, etc., it should not forget
that the tobacco industry of Wisconsin
is growing and the work of scientists
can be of great value to this line of
agriculture.
* ***
The question of what influence the
invasion of the packing and importing
fields by manufacturers of tobacco in
recent years will have upon the gen
eral trade is the subject of a long com
munication published in the N. Y. Leaf.
“If the farmer does not raise tobacco,
there will be no tobacco to pack and no
tobacco to make cigars from. If the
manufacturer does not make cigars,
there will be no market for the farm
er’s tobacco. In between the two are
the operations of the middleman, which
is the usual term for the packers and
the jobbers. Apparently it is in this
part of the machine hat the trouble
has come. The local packers, in almost
every instance, are speculators. In
this function they perform a distinct
service. They give the farmer a con
tinuous market for his tobacco. The
fact that in his immediate vicinity is to
be found a man who will take his crop
off his hands relieves the farmer of
much of the risk involved in starting a
crop. It relieves him of the necessity
of holding his crop until the next year,
and it gives him money to start his new
crop and gives him the use of his barns,
etc. Where he was unable to make a
profit he would almost certainly get
what it cost him to raise the tobacco,
and in any event he gets the market
value of the tobacco at the time he sold
it. Whatever risk goes with holding
the tobacco has been transferred to
the local packer, and the farmer gets
his decks cleared for action. And fur
thermore, the local packer is most in
evidence at timss when, without him,
the farmer would have no market —
that is in times of over-production and
low prices. This local packer, in his
speculative capacity, furnishes the
iWmer with a market in times when
his market has gone away from him,
and, ats[ the farmer always has the op
tion of selling to the highest bidder, he
has no just grievance against the spec
ulator whose opportunities, of course,
are most abundant when prices are
low. The local packer performs a use
ful function, not only to the farmer
but to the industry in general, and as a
matter of fact, needs no defense. The
notion that they serve no purpose save
as collectors and distributors of tobac
co is erroneous. The tobacco that they
turn over to the manufacturers has
undergone considerable handling and
manipulation since it was delivered by
the farmer at the packing houses. It
has been sorted, graded and bundled
and put into cases. It has undergone
the sweat and the curing process under
the eyes of capable and trained work
ers. It straggled into the warehouse,
the good with the bad, the sound with
the unsound, of every conceivable sort
and description. It has been put into
such shape that the manufacturer can
know what he is getting. The unsound
tobacco has been removed from the
sound. In fact, it has undergone a
manufacturing process. The packer is,
in fact, a manufacturer. And it is just
here that possibly his most
useful function. He is more than a
distributer. He is more than a specu
lator. He is more than a merchant,
except where that word is used in its
broadest sense. Just as any manufac
turer—who takes a raw material and
by skilful manipulation gives it an
additional value—is a producer, so is
the packer # of leaf tobacco a producer.
It is conceded that the practice of di
rect buying has brought no benefit to
the trade at large, and it would be hard
to prove that the manufacturers who
do the direct buying have benefited
themselves from the practice. Their
participation in the buying has set up
a higher degree of competition than
would obtain if they were not present
and if the buying were done only by
£he packers and importers.”
A prominent tobacco buyer of Owens
boro, Ky,, contracted with the tobacco
growers of Spencer and Warrick coun
ties, Indiana, early in the season for
about 2,000,000 pounds of leaf at ap
groximately $7.00 per hundred pounds.
hortly afterward the prices of tobacco
began to soar and other buyers were
soon offering greatly increased prices
to the farmers who had already sold
their crops. The result was that the
former buyer from Owensboro institut
ed suit at Booneville, Ind., against
William Esque and Dedman, Brown &
Cos., seeking damages and asking an
injunction restraining them from inter
fering with his contracts. The cases
were heard at Booneville and Rock
port, argument being made at Rock
port. In rendering a decision the past
week the court held, in effect, that the
defendants were not liable in damages
for the acts of the farmers in breach
ing their contracts. It held further
that the action of the defendants in in
ducing the farmers to disregard their
obligations was not actionable and
could not constitute a ground for dam
ages for the reason that intimidation,
duress or coercion on the part of the
defendants toward the farmers had not
been shown.—Western Tobacco Journal.
WISCONSIN TOBACCO MARKET.
Edgerton, Wis., Feb. 23, 1917.
Spring is not so far away now and
yet from a third to a half of the 1916
tobacco crop is still hanging in the cur
ing sheds with the growers powerless
to prepare it for market. There has
been a few days of near casing weath
er during the week but temperatures
were too low to bring the hanging leaf
into pliable condition. The northern
growing sections have been not been
able to get any of their tobacco down
since early fall and packing operations
there are at a complete standstill. In
the lower counties the warehouses have
been able to secure enough of their
purchases to keep their forces at work
most of the time so far, but the handl
ing of the crop is bound to be carried
along well into the summer.
Business in the local leaf markets is
confined largely to the supply packers
have on hand, who are carrying the
lightest stocks ever known. About the
only sales of importance noted are a
a 256 cs lot of ’l4 by the Greene To
bacco Cos., Janesville, to Spitzner, a
200 cs lot of ’l4 by A. Jenson & Sons
and a car load of ’l4 B’s by Carrier &
Pepper.
There have been some very fair de
livery days during the week and even
parts of crops are now being received.
There is still very little chance for
shipments out of storage to eastern
points on account of freight conges
tion.
Stoughton, Wis., Feb. 15, 1917.
The situation among the farmers for
lack of case weather is becoming seri
ous, as the chances are that consider
able bundling of tobacco must be done
in the spring when other work needs
attention. . The warehouse crews are
still kept busy. The Holtan Bros, re
port enough leaf on hand to last sev
eral weeks. Possibly half of the 1916
crop is still hanging on the pole.
New York.
% New York, Feb. 17, 1917.
Some trouble of some kinds seems
to periodically strike the leaf market.
While still under the ban of the post
ponement of the Sumatra inscriptions
it is stirred by the news of the insur
rection of the Remedios district, which,
if not quelched at once, is likely to re
sult in destruction of tobacco ware
houses and consequent loss to packers
and also causing a shortage in what is
considered the best Remedios crop in
recent years. American Havana im
porters who own large packings of to
bacco in the Santiago and Santa Clara
districts are naturally in a most anx
ious mood about the fate of their pos
sessions. So one thing or another turns
to plague the leaf market in its most
prosperous zenith. As for the Suma
tra situation, it was planned to start
the inscriptions in May but whether
there will be a rush of American buy
ers to attend them is rather doubtful
in the prasent perplexing condition of
the blockade ban. In the meanwhile
whatever stocks are in the hands of
importers or packers are not only con
siderably appreciating in value but are
being sought for by most eager pur
chasers. The Sumatra situation in par
ticular has caused a big forward move
ment in our domestic Shadegrown leaf.
Prices for the best types are ruling
now at $3 and $3.25 per pound, the
equivalent of $2 Sumatra in bond.—
Journal.
New England.
Springfield, Mass., Feb. 12, 1917.
Connecticut Valley warehouses are
straining every nerve to- meet the de
mand for 1916 Connecticut Shaded to
bacco and also to hasten operations on
the sun-grown crop.
Not only has that part of the crop
which has reached the sorting tables
proved better than expected in most
cases, but prices for all grades have
bounded upward at a rate which has
caused growers to wonder why they
didn't hold on to their crops a while
longer. The grower, however, has no
kick coming. For a series of years has
sold his tobacco at prices which have
caused gray hairs to multiply in the
camp of the packers. Moreover, it has
almost invariably happened that early
prices have been the highest.
Pennsylvania.
Lancaster, Pa., Feb. 14, 1917.
That the 1916 tobacco of Lancaster
county is regarded as a desirable com
modity is clearly evinced by the de
mand for it, coming from all sides. It
is impossible to get a line on the quan
tity purchased by local packers for
their own business, as the majority of
those who bought were after it for
other parties. However much some of
them may have desired to conceal this,
the very fact that they were buying at
prices, it was certain, they could not
afford to pay, made it zy parent that
they were in the market as agents, and
not as individual buyers. It was pretty
generally known who could afford to
buy, and when the prices went abovt
14 cents it was regarded as certain that
the local dealers, with but few excep
tions, who were buying, were repre
senting some big concern. Therefore,
the tobacco the local packers got for
themselves did not represent the out
side prices received by the growers
during the active selling season. A
number of local men who had crops
have sold them, some, as stated last
week, never even having touched their
purchases. What they received, there
fore, was clean gain, a gain of four to
five cents or more a pound, for they
got for their goods 19 and 20 cents.
This is Your
8ANK.....
?[ We want you to feel that we are
here to render service to the pub
lic, to you personally.
Whether it is safeguarding your
money or advising you in business
matters, we shall treat you as we
do all of our patrons—with the best
service and impartiality.
There is no middle ground in
dealing with our customers. The
small depositors will receive just
as careful attention as the large.
Your business invited. SERVICE,
SECRECY and SAFETY and 3 per
cent INTEREST
First National
BANK
Edgerton, Wisconsin
"The Bank of the People."
Geo. W. Doty, - President
E. G. Bussey, - Vice President
Oscar L. Olson - Cashier
J. F. Hruska - Asst. Cashier
E. M. HUBBELL
JOBBER IN
Cigars and Tobaccos
ALL SHAPES OF
Don DIGO 10c CIGARS.
Hubbell’s Big Havana Ta-Ho-Mo
5 cent brands.
Also a Puil Line of Scotten-Dillon’s
Plug, Fine Cuts, Smoking Tobaccos
Carried in Stock.
Write for Wholesale Price Lists.
Edgerton - Wisconsin
H. T. SWEENEY.
PACKER OP
Leaf Tobacco
Tobacco Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
Mabbett Leaf Tobacco Cos.
Dealer in Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
Mclntosh bros.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
E. M. HUBBELL
Dealer aad Packer of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - Wisconsin
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co.J
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
EUGENE SORENSON
Packer of Northern Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Whitehall, Wis.
NUMBER 14

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