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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, December 14, 1917, Image 6

Image and text provided by Wisconsin Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1917-12-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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SEVERAL ARRESTS
i MADE AT HALIFAX;
4 f DOO_LOST LIVES
Survivors of Steamer Imo Held
by Authorities.
1,000 BODIES RECOVERED
Most of Dead Still Buried Under Two
Feet of Snow—Premier Announces
Appropriation of $1,000,000 for
Immediate Relief Work.
Halifax, N. S., Dec. 10—All the sur
vivors of the Norwegian steamer Iffio,
which collided with the French muni
tion ship Mont Blanc, were made pris
oners by the British naval authorities.
The Imo survivors were removed to
a British cruiser in the harbor and held
for the admiralty investigation of the
collision, which begins tomorrow. The
number in custody was not revealed.
Captain Lamedec of the Mont Blanc
and Pilot Mackay, who was handling
the vessel when it was rammed by the
Imo, are to be placed under arrest,
Acting Chief of Police Hanralian an
nounced.
Premier Robert L. Borden announced
here that a preliminary appropriation
'of $1,000,000 had been made by the
Canadian government for immediate
relief in Halifax. This fund wil be
placed at once in the hands of the citi
zens’ finance committee.
4,000 Persons Killed.
Four thousand persons were killed
in the burning and destruction of
buildings resulting from the explosion
on a munitions ship in the harbor, ac
cording to estimates by officials. This
estimate, higher than any official one
heretofore, was made after a survey
of the devastated district of Richmond,
where acres of debris, now covered by
from two to three feet of snow and
ice as the result of the blizzard, prob
ably will not be cleared for a month.
A multitude of dead are buried un
der two or more feet of snow. When
the physically exhausted searchers
suspended for a brief period their sick
ening task 1,000 bodies had been re
covered. Four hundred of these
bodies have been Identified. And the
end is not in si£ht.
ITALIANS HALT FOE’S DRIVE
Battle of Asiago Virtually Suspended
With Teutons Checked—Allies'
Airmen Drop 2,000 Bombs.
Italian Army Headquarters in North
Italy, Dec. 10. —The battle of Asiago is
virtually suspended, with the enemy
checked, if not defeated, in liis main
design of breaking through to the
Brenta valley and the plain a few
miles below.
He succeeded in advancing his lines
a short distance when the Italians fell
back to new positions.
These positions, guarding the Fren
zela and Gadena passes, have success
fully resisted all enemy efforts.
An exceptionally large air raid was
carried out with a fleet of 150 air
planes, including Italian light and
heavy squadrons. The huge fleet flew
low, scattering more than 2,000 bombs,
which caused extensive damage in the
northern sector, where the enemy is
assembling forces and Supplies.
Troop trains were scattered, rail
way depots destroyed and munition
supplies blown up. Large fires marked
the route of the raiders, indicating the
extent of the destruction. •
Vienna. Dec. 10.—Following is the
official report Issued by the war office:
“In the Italian theater our brave
troops to the east of Asiago stormed
strong vantage points of Stenfle and
maintained them against violent at
tacks.
IDAHO “DRY” STATUTE LEGAL
United States Supreme Court Rules
Against Fundamental Per
sonal “Right."
Washington, Dec. 11.—With a deci
sion upholding the Idaho prohibition
law the Supreme court gave an opin
ion which may be one of the most far
reaching victories for “bone-dry” pro
hibition yet recorded.
It was held that a citizen has no
constitutional right to possess liquors
for his personal use if a state wishes
to forbid it.
Justice Mcßeynolds, who gave the
court’s opinion, held that a state “has
power absolutely to prohibit manufac
ture, gift, purchase, sale or transporta
tion of intoxicating liquors within its
borders without violating the Consti
tution.”
*
TEST FOR ALL ARMY OFFICERS
Baker Orders Regulars and National
Guard Commanders to Take
Efficiency Examinations.
Washington, Dec. 12.—A1l regular
and Natioanal Guard officers must un
dergo medical as well as efficiency ex
aminations, Secretary Baker said, be
cause of severe conditions of warfare
abroad.
Nat Wills, Actor, Dead.
Union Hill, N. J., Dec. 10.—Nat
Wills, who bore a nation-wide repu
tation as a comedian, was killedjby pe
tromorites in the garage oft his e&taffl
here.
GEN. YENG-CHANG
wi'x-
When the army of 300,000 men that
China intends to send to the western
front in France, starts on its way to
the battle lines, General Yeng-Chaug
is almost certain to go as its com
mander. At present lie is command
ing the troops around Pekin, and is
one of the most prominent men in
China. General Yeng is chief general
adjutant to the president of China.
Formerly he was minister of war, and
at one time was minister to Germany.
U. S. DESTROYER TORPEDOED;
FORTY-FOUR OF CREW SAVED
Jacob Jones Attacked by Submarine
Near European Coast—Seaman
Taken Prisoner by Germans.
Washington, Dec. 10. —Two known
dead, one a prisoner in the hands of
the enemy, and 65 missing was the
toll of American seamen at latest re
ports in the destruction by a German
submarine of the destroyer Jacob
Jones.
News that one of the Jones’ crew
had been picked up and taken pris
oner aboard the U-boat was also
cabled by Admiral Sims. It is the
first occurrence of the kind since
war was declared.
The complement of the Jacob Jones
at the time of the torpedoing was
111 instead of 107, as was first an
nounced, it was stated.
Admiral Sims reported the follow
ing known dead:
Ensign S. E. Kalk, died of exposure;
next of kin, mother, Mrs. Flora S.
Kalk, Omaha, Neb.
Gunner Henry Hood, killed by ex
plosion of the torpedo; next of kin,
mothelir. Belle Hood, Atlanta, Ga.
The list of 27 additional saved, mak
ing, with the 16 saved reported Sat
urday, a total of 43 survivors, was
made public. The list in part follows:
Clifford Vernon De Forest, chief
electrician; wife, Buelah De Forest,
Chicago.
Lawrence Hanson, apprentice sea
man ; Chicago.
Chester B. Lanen, seaman; emer
gency address not available.
Edward Meier, water tender; fa
ther, John F. Meier, 2058 Monroe
street, Bay City, Mich.
Lieutenant Commander David
Worth Bagley and Lieut. Norman
Scott were among the survivors res
cued after the sinking of the Ameri
can destroyer Jacob Jones by a Ger
man submarine in the war zone. The
navy department was so advised by
Vice Admiral Sims.
It is now established that the five
line officers on the destroyer were
rescued. Gunner Harry R. Hood is
missing.
Dispatches from Vice Admiral Sims
say that “the Jones was not far from
the European coast when attacked.
BAKER TO FACE SENATE QUIZ
Investigation Expected to Silence
Many False Rumors and Fore
stall Criticism of Congress.
Washington. Dee. 12. —A comprehen
sive investigation into the entire Na
tional military situation, including the
progress being made by the war de
partment in organizing training and
equipping the new army, was ordered
by the senate military affairs com-'
mittee.
The investigation will begin within
a few days. It is the intention of the
committee to call Secretary of War
Baker and other high officials.
After discussing the situation, the
committee decided to make an inquiry
into the whole military situation. Such
an investigation will silence many
false rumors, forestall criticism in
congress and force lagging depart
ments to speed up. In the opinion of
members of the committee. _
JOIN RED CROSS—WILSON
“Christmas Spirit in Terms of Ac
tion/- Asserts President in
Proclamation.
Washington, Dr. 12. —President
Wilson has issued a proclamation in
which lie urged every one not already
a member to .loin the Red Cross during
the membership campaign starting
next Sunday and “continuing until
hristnms eve. In his proclamation the
president declares membership In the
Red Cross to be a universal patriotic
duty at this time and charatyterizea
such membership RSK.“thr Chris'mns
spirit in terms of action.” j
The Christmas Fire
By HARRIET PRESCOTT SPOFFORD
rHE tree grew green in the forest,
Grew green in the sun and the
deio;
His "branches reached for the shadows,
v He feathered his tops in the blue,
And happy the air about him
Wherever his balsams flew.
Drenched with the rains of the sum
mer,
Fine from his stems spun the show
ers,
Soft dropped the snow on his mantle.
Dream work of silver and flowers,
And over him white light trailing -
The stars swam through darkling
hours.
Groping where great rock pillars
Stand shouldering rank on rank.
His roots at the cold sweet sources
The ancient juices drank,
And he swept with the earth compare
ion
As the vast skies rose and sank.
His boughs brushed low on your fore ■
head
Asa passing w-ing might brush,
When night winds made shrill music
In the heavens , and hush, oh, hush!
For deep in his depest covert
He hid the hermit thrush.
Low have they laid the giant,
And they hale him home with mirth,
And they fan the fires that twinkle ,
And sing round his mossy girth,
And make with a mighty magic
The life of the Christmas hearth.
For his flames give the spicy fragrance
Of the summer atmosphere,
While the breath of the woody hoi
lows,
The luster and light of the year,
The blossom, the bird song, the
breezes,
He sheds through the Christmas
cheer.
And the message of peace and bless •
ing
In the great fire's glow they mark ,
With the lad from the war and the
sailor
Home from his tossing bark
Ere the Christmas bells come chiming
Like the touch of the frost on the
dark.
And widely on pane and ceiling
Sparkles a fiery foam,
And the children dance with theii
shadows
Like the forest sprite with the
gnome,
While the great log roars and blazes.
The heart of the joy of home.
And the cheek that has long been witfu
ered
With an old. rose blooms once more
As memories glow like the embers
Whose flashes sink and soar
With the Christmas fire's warm glory
Where the log burns red at the core.
— Woman's Home Companion.
The Christmas Spirit.
However it may be, when Christmas
comes it finds us all to a greater or
less degree ready to cry “A merry
Christmas to all” and to the best of
our ability keep it with good cheer.
Deep down in our hearts every one of
us cherishes what may be called the
Christmas sentiment. Even if we go,
as so many have done of past years,
outside of the walls of our own home
we still observe our Yuletide in a more
or less conventional manner. We may
escape our relatives, save ourselves the
bother of home preparationsr'pretend
that we have cut adrift from the old
fashioned methods, but It all amounts
in reality to the same thing. We are
animated, after all, by the same spirit,
whether we are in"a country house,a
flat, a restaurant or hotel.
A Joyful Yule.
Then drink to the holly berry ,
With hey down, hey down derry;
The mistletoe we'll pledge also.
And at Christmas all be merry.
Christmas Joys-
UnderthetMetoe
j^fc, — ■ = -
THINK
FORD PRICE
# •• ■ V - . ••' \
1917 1914
Touring Car $360 $490
Runabout 345 * 440
Coupelet 5*60 750
Sedan 695 975
Can you think of any other article that has been reduced
in price since the war began? You can’t get a greater
value for a dollar anywhere on earth today.
BUY NOW! TODAY!
TELLEFSON’S GARAGE
EDGERTON Phone 175 WISCONSIN
m, jA I gravelYs Mil
lit- l^ ea l Chewing Plug if
Mada SlrUdltf /or Us Chawtnq Qualify Lp* -
REAL h GR A Ly" UcTTOBAC CO. jl
A Little Chew of Gravely is Enough |pßjt
iand Lasts^ Longer than big chew JjSE
Hll IMmi I ALWAYS TAKE MY HAT OFF I /jf | i
Hl'/Mul T 0 A BEABIHE L,KES eooD si? ?. ? -
Wmmim CANT read that billboard ! \ ~
SUPPQSE HE P "~ KS °^ ME! r |
LOOK FOR THE PROTECTION SEAL-IT IS NOT REAL GRAVELY WITHOUT THIS SEAL
Luxurious Sample Coats.
Prices are Most Attractive
You cannot afford to Let a day pass without providing your
self a coat suited to this more wintry weather. By purchasing
these Sample Coats we have so bounteously provided all manner
of coat styles and fabrics as to warrant our saying we are in a po
sition to fill any call that is made upon us. The collection of fur
trimmed coats is unusually large.
Those Interested in Furs
SHOULD CALL ON US.
Simpson Garment Store
JANESVILLE, WISCONSIN.
Tobacco City Meat Market
Lyon & Biessman, Prop’s.
(Successors to G. W. Nichols)
Dealers in all Kinds of
Fresh and Salted Meats
OYSTERS AND FiSH
Butchering on Reasonable Terms
DR. S. F. SMITH
Practice Limited To
Diseases of thelEye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, and Fitting of Glasses
office over
Shelley, Anderson & Farman Store
r th L :'v t L.’c \ k
DR. MEYERS
Dentist
Mclntosh-Thompson Block
Phnnpq l office ' 371 * 2 rin £ s
Phones J Residencej 219 Blue
DR. J. L. HOLTON,
DENTIST.
Office in the Ladd and Holton Block
Edgerton, Wisconsin
Ml V TFFTH We pay up to sl2
\ nLOL ILLIII f or old or broken
sets. Send Parcel Post or write for
particulars. Domestic Supply Cos.,
Dept. 14, Binghamton, N. Y. 52t4
H. E. PETERS & SON
DEALERS IN
Fresh and Salted Meats,
Fißh, Game and Poultry.
Butchering Done for Farmers
at t ne following rates:
Beeves, per head -50 c
Swine, per head ... 500
Sheep, per head - - lOc
Calves per head - 100
City Steam Laundry
H. M. Raymond, Prop.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Telephone No. 37
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
Dr. H. T. TRELEAVEN
Osteopathic Physician
A trial will convince you that
Osteopathy is the real cure.
Phone 158 Edgerton, Wis
Office over Doty's store
L. D. HYLAND
DENTIST
New Pringle Building
Telephone No. 186 ,
GEO. W. BLANCHARD
Attorney - at-Law
Mclntosh-Thompson Block
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin

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