OCR Interpretation


The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, November 29, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Wisconsin Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1918-11-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Wisconsin Tobacco Reporter
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1918.
Kntered as Second-class Mail Matter at the
Poatofflce in Edgerton. Wisconsin.
CORRESPONDENCE
STOUGHTON
At the Vea Hildebrant Dispersal sale
near Stoughton, all of their grade Hol
stein cattle, to make room for sons and
daughters of Sherlock Veeman Pontiac,
from high record pedigreed dams, the
milch cows sold for an average price of
$144.25.
Section Foreman Ralph Tomlinson,
who on Saturday turned in the overcoat
found near the track and later discov
ered to be the coat of Eric Dahlman of
Edgerton, who committed suicide in the
jail last Wednesday, Monday received
a reward of S4O for having turned over
to the police the money, $1,091.32,
found in the coat.
At the public dedication of the honor
roll and the memorial services which
will be given by the Mothers of Liberty
Dec. 1, J. M. Clancey will make the
dedicatory address and the Rev. M. H.
Hegge the memorial address. Miss
Amanda Drotning and Herman Olson
will give solo numbers. Instrumental
music will be furnished by an orchestra.
Rollin Estes died at the local hospital
Friday morning following a brief illness
with pneumonia. When his condition
became alarming he was removed to
the hospital without any change for the
better resulting from the care he re
ceived. He was a son of John M. Es
tes and was 40 years of age. Besides
his father he is survived by two sisters,
Mrs. Roy Coon and Mrs. J. A. Roberts.
FORT ATKINSON
There are 506 names on Fort Atkin
son's Roll of Honor board.
There is considerable grippe in the
city again. Beware, you people who
are suffering with coughs and colds.
Friday will see the last issue of the
Jefferson County Journal, the German
language newspaper published by the
Banner Printing Cos. of Jefferson since
1905.
Mrs. A. L. Woodard passed away at
her home, 312 Converse St., Wednes
day morning at about 11:45 o’clock.
She had been sick for eight days with
influenza and pneumonia. Mr. Wood
ard died about two years ago, also a
victim of pneumonia. Wednesday night
Mrs. Woodard’s daughter died at Be
loit after a short illness with influenza
which developed into pneumonia. Pneu
monia, within the short space of two
years, has taken the entire Woodard
family.
The sad death of Miss Anna Rusch
occu r red at the family home, 204 Taft
street, on Wednesday morning at 6
o'clock. Deceased was taken ill with
influenza last Thursday and being nat
urally frail in body, she soon developed
pneumonia. The deceased was Dorn in
Germany on the 19th of October, 1895,
coming to America with her parents in
1904. She was of a quiet and refined
disposition and had endeared herself to
many friends.
MILTON JUNCTION
Gottfried Ummel has purchased the
Stevens barber shop in Milton Junction.
The new proprietor has been working
some time in the shop since the death
of Mr. Stevens. v
Mrs. Gordon Clarke has received
word of the death of her husband who
was in training at Camp Hancock, Ga.
He had influenza and pneumonia. The
remains were brought to Milton for
burial and funeral services held at the
Congregational church.
At eight-thirty Wednesday morning,
Nov. 20, 1918, a very pretty wedding
was solemnized at St. Mary’s church,
when the Rev. J. J. McGinnity united
in marriage at High Mass, Clifford F.
Wixom, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. D.
Wixom, and Catherine E. Vickerman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tho3. Vick
erman. The bride was becomingly
attired in a taupe suit and hat and wore
a corsage bouquet of pink roses. Miss
Gertrude Wixom, sister of the groom,
and Leo Vickerman, brother of the
bride, acted as bridesmaid and best
man. After the ceremony at the
church the immediate families of the
bride and groom repaired to the home
of the bride’s parents where a three
course breakfast was served. During
the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Wixom left
for a trip to Nebraska.
DEERFIELD
The sad news reached here last week
of the death of Lydia Jordalen, next
youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. j
Lars Jordalen of Pleasant Springs. 1
Miss Jordalen was a trained nurse and |
was taken sick while on duty on an in
fluenza case, and which developed into
pneumonia and proved fatal.
A telegram from Washington relat- i
ing the fact of the death of Private
Richard W. Zechner in France reached
his wife Tuesday morning. He sue- j
cumbed to pneumonia Oct. 12, 1918, a !
month preceeding the cessation of hos- j
tilities. He is the second Deerfield i
boy to thus give his life in the cause of j
liberty.
Mrs. Oscar Johnson died of blood ;
poisoning at her home, on the Torger
Thompson farm three miles south-east
of Deerfield, on Friday morning, Nov.- j
15, 1918. She leaves a baby two weeks
old, a son about 2 years old, a husband
and an aged father. Mr. and Mrs.
Johnson lived in Deerfield when first
married, Mr. Johnson being a proprie
tor of a restaurant at that time.
EVANSVILLE
One butter company at Evansville is
making ole and selling an average of
30,000 pounds per day.
News was received by his relatives
in this city the last of the week of the
death of Wade Van Wart, only remain
ing son of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Van
Wart, formerly of this city, and who a
• few years ago on account of their son’s
failing health moved to California, and
right recently for the same reason
went to the higher altitude of New
Mexico with the hope of prolonging his
life, but to no avail, as he died Novem
ber 14, at Carlsbad, New Mexico.
MEAT PRODUCERS
DID FULL DUTY
increase in American Hogs Will
Help to Meet World Fat
Shortage.
FARMERS SAVE SITUATION.
Government Justified in Stimulation
of Pork Production—Sevenfold
increase Over Pre-
War Exports.
Through increased production and
conservation we will be able this year
to export seven times our pre-war
average exports of pork products.
With the heavy demands added in car
ing for the millions who have been
freed from German oppression, the
Department of Agriculture and the
Food Administration are justified to
day in our every action of stimulation
of hog production. In the coming year
the greatest world shortage will be in
fats, and pork will Iflslp to save this
situation. The efficacy of the policy
of stimulated production has built up
in this country supplies which will en
able us to supply a very large part of
the fat deficiency of the world. In
beef there must be a shortage in Eu
rope, due largely to limited refrigera
tor ship capacity. All freezer ships
available, however, will be filled by
America, Argentine and Australia.
The contribution made by the pro
ducers of this country to the war pro
gram as applying particularly to ani
mal food products is illustrated by the
following:
Reports compiled by the U. S. De
partment of Agriculture indicate an
increase in cattle of 10,238,000 head
and 12,441,000 hogs. These figures
were compiled to January 1 last.
In this period there was a decrease
in sheep of 819,000 head. The indica
tions are that this decrease will show
an increase, according to recent re
ports.
Since January 1 unofficial informa
tion indicates an increase in hogs of
not less than 8 per cent, and not
more than 15 per cent, as compared
with one year ago, with an increase in
the average weight.
Following the request of the U. S.
Food Administration for an increase
in h*>g production for marketing in the
fall of 1918 and the spring of 1919 the
increase may yield not less than 1,600,-
000,000 pounds more of pork products
than were available last year. With
out this increase the shipping program
arranged by Mr. Hoover regarding an
imal food products would have been
impossible.
The dressed hog products during the
three months ending September 30,
1917, amounted to 903,172,000 pounds,
while for the corresponding months of
1918 the dressed hog products totaled
1,277,589(000, an increase of over 374,-
000,000 pounds for the quarter.
During the same period for 1917 the
records of inspected slaughter of
dressed beef showed 1,263,000,000
pounds as against 1,454,000,000 pounds
for the three month period ending
September 1, this year.
Our food Gospel
eai less*
serve less
waste nothing
America’s Pledge of Food
Gave Heart to the Allies
In Their Darkest Hour
Whatever is necessary America will
send. That was America’s pledge to
the interallied food council. And be
cause the American food army had
hitherto made good they took heart
and went forward.
Farm enterprise and much soft com
increased pork supplies, food conser
vation increased exports —total ship
ments doubled.
FAITH JUSTIFIED
BY EVENTS.
I do not believe that drastic
force need be applied to maim
tain economic distribution and
sane use of supplies by the
great majority of American peo
ple, and I have learned a deep
and abiding faith in the intelli
gence of the average American
business man, whose aid we an
ticipate and depend on to reme
dy the evils developed by the
war.—Herbert Hoover, August
10, 1917.
Patriot’s Plenty
Buy less - Serve less
Eat on|y 3 meals a day
Waste nothing
\bur guests Will cheer
fully simple fere
Be Proud to be
a food saver
MAY MEAN MUCH TO WORLD
Aviators Believe That Flying Is Bound
to Have Great Influence on the
Minds of Men.
Flying, in the opinion of British
aviators, is going to change the char
acter of the world’s thought. It will
have a broadening influence and it
will bring a fresher, cleaner flow of
ideas into the brains of men.
A man, the flyers argue, who has
seen before him at the same time the
cliffs of England, the long flat fields of
Holland and the smiling countryside
of Belgium and France is bound to
think in a different way than a man
whose horizon has always been bound
ed by bricks and mortar, or even by
hill and dale.
Traveling may have made him think
nationally, but flying will make him
think far more largely. He will see
England and France lying close to
each other, separated only by a shin
ing strip of water. He will see the
green and brown mosaic of Belgium,
which in its turn merges into the dis
tant shadow of Holland, wdiile, still
farther on, across the wide Scheldt
he will see the distant lowlands sweep
on over the rim of the world.
How will he regard petty spites be
tween individuals and cliques then?
the birdman asks. He can cover with
his thumb from the heights a fever
ish city swarming with a million peo
ple. What will he think of those W'ho
live next to each other and will not
speak? How mean and petty their
quarrels and jealousies and hates will
seem.
The true meaning of human inter
course and friendship will come home
to him. He will gain an almost divine
outlook upon the world. Dishonesty,
civil strife, all will seem to him
contemptible. Perhaps, say the avia
tors, this is the new view which will
bring the millennium.
NOTHING DOING FOR JOSEPH
Might Be the Engineer, but Found He
Had Little Control Over
Steam Powers.
Meekly made up his mind that he
wasn’t going to be bossed any longer
by his wife, so when he went home
at noon he called out, imperiously:
“Laura! Laura!”
Mrs. Meekly came out of the kitchen
with perspiration on her face, her
hands covered with war flour, and a
rolling-pin in her hand.
“What do you want with Laura?”
she asked.
Meekly staggered, but braced him
self up. “I want you to understand,
madam” —and he tapped his breast
dramatically—“that I am the engineer
of this establishment, that Iam —■”
“Oh, you are, are you? Well, Jo
seph, I want you to understand that
I” —here she looked dangerous—“l am
the boiler that might blow up and
sling the engineer over into the 1 next
street. Do you hear the steam escap
ing, Joseph?”
Joseph heard, and prayed that he
might be passed Grade 1 when he
went before the medical board. —Lon-
don Tit-Bits.
Locating Ore Beds.
Beds of ore are stated to have been
located at a distance of two and a
half miles by the electrical method
patented in the United States by Pro
fessor R. A. Fessenden. In the locality
where the existence of valuable ores
is suspected, a number of holes sev
eral miles apart are bored, then filled
with water, and a Fessenden sound os
cillator is immersed in one as a trans
mitting apparatus, the receiver sub
merged in each of the other holes be
ing an Einthoven recording oscillo
graph. The holes may be five miles
or more apart over the area being in
vestigated. In the study of the oscil
lograph records, special attention is
given to the relation between sounds
received direct and those from echoes,
and it is found possible to get a fair
idea of the character of intervening
masses of rock and of the position and
distance of neighboring deposits of ore.
World's Greatest Soldier.
Physically, Foch is a little man, his
inches are about those of Napoleon,
and he has Grant’s fondness for the
cigar. Like Joffre, a southerner, he
has frankness of speech which his old
commander has never displayed. Un
like Petain his words are rarely caus
tic and he has made friends among all
his allies. An old man, close to sev
enty, yet younger than Clemenceau, he
was still handsome when the war be
gan, but the strain has marked his
face and only his eyes reveal an un
shaken spirit.—Frank H. Simonds in
Metropolitan.
Sing Sing Jail Short of Labor.
The labor shortage has hit even
Sing Sing, which has a stationary sup
ply of 1,500 men. The officials are
puzzled because they are unwilling
to employ women. Although Warden
Moyer has an allowance for a maid,
he never has hired one. The only
woman ever employed within the pris
on ■. walls, a telephone operator, left
after a few days, saying that there
were too many men.
Enterprising Alaskan Village.
Noorvick, a native village near Nome,
Alaska, is said to be the only Eski
mo village In northern Alaska possess
ing electric lights and a wireless plant.
The light plant and wireless station
were installed by Delbert Replogle,
teacher at the Noorvick government
school. Mr. Replogle, who was in
Nome recently on his way to the
States, said he left natives in charge
of the improvements.
Catarrh Cannot Be Cured
with L*cal Applications, as they cannot
reach the seat of the disease. Catarrh
is a blood or constitutional disease, and
in order to cure it you must take inter
nal remedies. Hall’s Catarrh Cure is
taken internally and acie directly ou the
blood and mucous surfaces. Hall's Ca
tarrh Cur* is not a quack medicine. It
was prescribed by one of the best physi
cians in this country for years, and isa
regular prescription. It is composedof
the best tonics known, combined with
the beet, blood purifiers, acing directly
on the mncon* surfaces. The perfect
uomojnation of the two ingredients is
what produces such wonderful results in
curing Catarrh. Send for testimonials
free. F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Props.
Toledo. Ohio.
S<’ld by all druggists, price 75 cents.
Another Theory Shattered.
Fat people don’t really laugh louder
than thin ones. It just shakes ’em up
more.
(First Publication Nov. 22, 1918)
Notice to Creditors.
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
County Court for Rock County. —In
Probate.
Notice is hereby given that at a reg
ular term of the County Court to be
held in and for said County, at the
Court House, in the City of Janesville,
in said County, on the first Tuesday of
April, A. D. 1919, being April
Ist, 1919, at 9 o’clock a. m., the fol
lowing matters will be heard, consid
ered and adjusted:
All claims against George Murwin,
late of the Town of Fulton, in said
County, deceased.
All claims must be presented for al
lowance to said Court, at the Court
House, in the City of Janesville, in said
County, on or before the 6th day of
March, A. D. 1919, or be barred.
Dated November 6, 1918.
By the Court:
Charles L. Fifield,
County Judge.
G. W. Blanchard, Atty., Edgerton,
Wis.
[First publication Nov. 22, 1918[
Notice to Creditors. ,
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
County Court for Rock County.—ln
Probate.
Notice is hereby given th?*t at a reg
ular term of the County Court to be
held in and for said County, at the
Court House, in the City of Janesville,
in said County, on the first Tuesday of
April, A. D. 1919, being April Ist,
1919, at 9 o’clock a. m., the following
matters will be heard, considered and
adjusted:
All claims against Clyde S. Horton,
late of the City of Edgerton, in said
County, deceased. <
All claims must be presented for al
lowance to said Court, at the Court
House, in the City of Janesville, in said
County, on or before the 6th day of
March, A. D. 1919, or be barred.
Dated Nov. 6, 1918.
By the Court:
Charles L. Fifield,
County Judge.
Geo. W. Blanchard, Atty., Edgerton,
Wis.
[First publication Nov. 8, 1918]
Notice of Hearing.
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
County Court for Rock County. —ln
Probate.
Notice is hereby given that at a regu
lar term of the County Court to be held
in and for said County, at the Court
House, in the City of Janesville, in said
County, on the first Tuesday, being
the 3rd day of December, 1918, at 9
o’clock a. m., the following matter will
be heard and considered:
The application of W. F. Ely to
admit to probate the last will and
testament of Alex White, late of
the Town of Porter, in said County,
Dated November 1, 1918.
By the Court:
Oscar N. Nelson,
Register in Probate.
Grubb & Towne, Attorneys for Peti
tioner.
[First publication Nov. 8, 1918]
Notice of Final Settlement and Deter
mination of Inheritance Tax.
COUNTY COURT ROCK COUNTY,
Wisconsin—ln Probate.
In the matter of the will of Lois M.
Jack, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that at a reg
ular term of the County Court, to be
held in and for said County, at the
Court House in the City of Janesville,
in said County, on the first Tuesday,
being the 3rd day of Dec., A. D. 1918,
at the opening of court on that day,
the following matter will be heard and
considered:
The application of Charles W. Birk
enmeyer, executor of the will of Lois
M. Jack, deceased, late of Edgerton, in
said County, for the examination and
allowance of his final account, and for
the assignment of the residue of the
estate of said deceased to such persons
as are by law entitled thereto; and for
the determination and adjudication of
the inheritance tax, if any, payable in
said estate.
Dated November 6, A. D. 1918.
By the Court:
Charles L. Fifield,
County Judge.
Grubb & Towne, Attorneys & Coun
selors, Edgerton, Wis.
# [First publication Nov. 15, 1918]
Notice of Hearing.
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
County Court for Rock County.—ln
Probate.
Notice is hereby given that at a reg
ular term of the County Court to be
held in and for said County, at the
Court House, in the City of Janesville,
in said County, on the first Tuesday,
being the third day of December, 1918,
at 9 o’clock a. m., the following matter
will be heard and considered:
The application of Andrew Mclntosh
to admit to probate the last will and
testament of Margaret Mclntosh, late
of the City of Edgerton, in said County,
deceased, and for the appointment of
an executor or administrator of said
6St&t6*
Dated November 7th, 1918.
By the Court:
Oscar N. Nelson,
Register in Probate.
Whitehead & Matheson, Attorneys,
Janesville, Wisconsin.
D. W. North, Edgerton, Wisconsin.
To y land
WELCOMES |THE
Little Folks Once More
Come and see the Dolls, Dollies and
Dollykins. Now, there are so many we can’t begin to
tell you about each one; so, just drop in, we know
you will be pleased to see our store all dressed up for
Santa Claus’ Visit
BORGNIS - Edgerton
T O Y Li A N D
SAY YOUR
Thanksgiving Greeting
of Welcome with Flowers
An Excellent Assortment of Blooming Plants
Cyclamen - Chrysanthemums • Geraniums
Ferns of All Sizes
Cut Flowers are scarce bus if your order
is placed early we can furnish any kind
of blossom.
PHONE NO. SO
Willson's Flower Shop
, 4
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
Implement Sheds Increase Farm Profits
THERE are two ways to increase farm profits—one is to in
crease production—the other to decrease cost
An Implement Shed helps to do both.
Many farmers lose time every year in repairing neglected farm
machinery—special trips to town for new parts to replace the
rusted ones —time out in the middle of the day because of a
broken machine, that rusted in last year’s wreather. Steel parts
are getting more expensive and harder to get.
An Implement Shed is cheap protection
White Pine for the outside of any farm building means
minimizing building repair bills. It means cutting cost again,
because it endures all kinds of wather without warping or
twisting or rotting. Every board stays where you put it. You
can work it with less time and expense than any other wood.
It is economy to build well. Our service will help you.
Practical working plans, specificatsons and bill of materials
for Implement Shed or other types of buildings may be had on
request.
Schaller-Young Lumber Cos.
Phone No. 6
Don’t Fail to see our Complete Line
Winter Coats and Suits
You are missing a treat if you do not see our display of New
Fall and Winter Coats. It is undeniably one of the best we have
offered in years.
No matter how critical you may be, you will find here a Coat
that becomes you admirably and that satisfies your ideas of Style,
Quality and Fit. Some Fur Trimmed Models are included. Prices
run from S2O. to $75.00.
Our display of New Fall and Winter Suits, appealingly alike to
your tastes and to your purse, is by all odds one of the most inter
esting we have yet offered. The most charming of the season’s
accepted styles are to be found here. The best materials w’ere
used in their making, and they were made by expert tailors. Suits
like these are sure to be popular, especially when their prices are
so affordable. Prices range from $18.75 to $65.00.
Simpson Garment Store
JANESVILLE, WISCONSIN.

xml | txt