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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, June 13, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1919-06-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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r OLUME 45
Henry Johnson
‘THE SERVICE AGENCY”
is prepared to write
INSURANCE
of every Kind.
Phone 18. Edgerton, Wis.
This Office will Give You the Best
There is in
Insurance Service
9 G. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - • Wis.
Mabbett Leaf Tobacco Cos.
Dealer in Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin.
W. T. Pomeroy A Cos.
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - - - Wisconsin
C. E. SWEENEY.
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobaecc
€DGER TOI*, 'VISCONSII*
EDGERTON
Farmers Warehouse Cos.
DEALERS IN
Leaf Tobacco,
And Farm Supplies
Edgerton, • - Wisconsin.
C. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
107-109 North Franklin Street
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
SANFORD SOVERHILL
DEALER IN AND
PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
E- ROSENWALD & BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
&. Kosenwald & Bro. and 1. Bijur & Son.
packers or
Leaf Tobacco,
145 Water Street,
New York City.
BASKINS & SCHWARTZ
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, Wisconsin
Holton Leaf Tobacco Cos.
PACKERS OF WISCONSIN
Leaf Tobacco
OFFICES AT
Stoughton and Whitehall, Wis.
JOHN SOULMAN
Packer and Dealer of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville and Orfordville, Wis.
ANDREW JENSON & SON
% a
Packers of Tobacco
Public Storage—3 cents per case per month.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
Repr esentin g
THE GRIFFIN TOBACCO CO.
Growers, Packers, Importers and Exporters of
LEAF TOBACCO
Hartford and New York
THE EARLE TOBACCO CO.
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
PUBLIC STORAGE
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN*
*
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
STORAGE CAPACITY, - 15,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
Original “LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Toßacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1884.
F. C. LINDE. HAMILTON & CO. INC.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers as Warehousemen
Office, 182 Pearl St.. New York City. Branches in all of theprlncipal tobacco district
A. H. CLARKE. Special Agent Edgerton, Wia. Badger’Phone No. 71
The Thrift Club Way is Best
We believe that the plan of saving a fixed amount
with weekly or monthly regularity and with some definite
purpose in mind for its use later on, is the surest and safest
road to success and prosperity.
,at ° 1 L \o uiluuWe those who wish to follow such a practice,
and make it both easy and attractive for them to do so, we
offer the Thrift Savings Club.
These plans provide the best methods for saving that
we know of because they are so safe, easy and sure of re
sults. Besides that, there is a plan suited to every need
and desire—therefore, one for you.
Come In and Find Out Today
Tobacco Exchange Bank
W. S. Heddles Wm. Bussey L. J. Dickinson A. H. Jenson
President Vice Pres. Vice Pres. Cashier
Good to the Very End
%
Qma Imperial Cigar
A pleasing smoke that’s win
\j ygdHHrf ning a higher standing every.
day among men who appre
date the better things of
Edgerton Cigar Cos.,
N. L. CARLE & CO.
(Packers of and Dealers in
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, • - Wisconsin.
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, JUNE 13, 1919.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
It is generally conceded that better
than 90 per cent of the 1918 Wisconsin
tobacco crop, the largest ever produced
in'the state, has now passed out of the
hands of the farmers. The task of re
ceiving such an enormous quantity of
tobacco while the market was contin
ually falling is considered somewhat of
a remarkable undertaking. Nearly all
the packing concerns in the trade have
taken a hand in the lifting of the crop,
the big fellows adding in proportion to
their holdings, and nearly every local
packer has been able to take a hand in
it, too.
After the early buying of a consid
erable part of the crop had ceased at
pre-war figures, and the armistice had
been signed, causing a slump in tobac
co prices, many indignation meetings
were held by growers at which the to
bacco buyers were accused of bringing
about the reaction, of robbing the
farmer of war-time profits and held up
to scorn in general. When the early
purchases began to be received the
farmers were subject to more deduc
tions and adjustments than in any oth
er year. This also helped to put the
buying fraternity in bad repute, so
that when buying was resumed later on
a lower basis there was anything but a
friendly spirit existing to promote the
movement. And yet, despite all these
distracting influences, the buying has
steadily continued until the crop has
practically been moved.
The grower has now had opportunity
to balance his books and to determine
whether it showed a profit or loss, and if
he has carefully scrutinized the figureß
we believe that he will find the highest
average price ever paid for Wisconsin
tobacco has been given the farmer this
year. An average price of 20c a pound
is not a bad price, everything consid
ered, and it goes to show that the to
bacco farmers of Wisconsin have
caped from a peculiar situatic#n in fa*
better shape than any of the cigar
leaf growing states. This will be
proven when the December annual re
port of the U. S. Department of Agri
culture is issued. We have often won
dered whether the farmer holds the same
opinion of the buyers as he did when
mass meetings were held everywhere
to determine a minimum price on the
crop. The actual returns of the sea
son might soften the farmers’ opinion
of the buyers materially.
The Wisconsin packer who goes over
the cost sheet of his holdings in tobac
co finds that the packing expenses for
the present year far exceed tnose of
any previous season. To commence
with, an average of about 15 per cent
has gone out in the warehouse handl
ing that must be sold for cuttings,
which adds materially to the original
cost of the tobacco. Another 50 per
cent advance in labor, eases and freight
must be tacked on, so that he is lucky
if he finds the cost of packing this sea
son has not Exceeded 5 cents per pound.
This is before anything is laid aside to
cover the cost of damage in curing.
We have in mind a few packers who
are not particularly proud of their
holdings and would like to have some
one guarantee them as good an aver
age profit as the grower has received
on his 1918 tobacco crop.
Rock county has added 15,771 acres
in leading crops since the census of
1919. There are 1,763 silos and the
number of all cattle is 58,916-4,466
more than when the census was taken.
Here are the figures:
1910 Acres 1918 Acres
Corn 88,518 76,915
Oats 41,501 59,409
Barley 34,359 43,889
Wheat 553 9,676
Buckwheat 294 151
Rye : 5,498 7,514
Dry peas 32 15
Dry beans 166 112
Timothy & clover 60,778 47,433
Alfalfa 649 2,002
Potatoes 3,745 3,227
Tobacco 6,490 8,198
Sugar beets 694 * 677
Total 243,457 259,228
* *
*
It is recognized that we are in a
state of transition from war to peace.
It is being recognized more and more
that 1914 prices are not to be thought
of; that we are upon an entirely differ
ent basis now from then. There are a
great many cross currents of influence
at work in the general economic situa
tion, and no one man has the answer.
As an illustration, for weeks we have
bad a railway stock market, side by
side with general lassitude in business.
Taken far and wide, the average leaf
tobacco merchant believes that tobac
co at present prices ie good property.
He will require a lot of showing to
make him feel differently.
Wisconsin Tobacco Market
Edgerton. Wis.. June 13, 1919.
Weather conditions are forcing the
planting of the 1919 tobacco crop be
yond expectations, the plant beds mak
ing such phenomenal growth as to
crowd into the fields considerable to
bacco the past week, and the coming
week transplanting will be general
over the state. While the grower was
waiting for plant beds to catch up a
couple of weeks ago, had he been
mindful of the part he had to play, he
would have been much farther along in
preparation of the field. Instead of a
late planting season that has been pre
dicted all along, the Affiances are that
the new crop this year will go into the
fields far earlier than usual.
The buyers are still at it, picking
away at the remnants of the 1918 crop
and a fair amount of business has been
accomplished.
Eastern manufacturers and jobbers
have commenced to invade the state to
see what local packers have to offer.
The shipments out of storage reach
3 cars of bundes, while 7 cars of bun
dles were received since last report.
New England.
Hartford, Ct., May 28, 1919.
Transplanting of the 1919 tobacco,
shade and sun-grown, is now well under
way in Massachusetts and Connecticut,
and setting out will be at its height in
the next week or ten days. The to
bacco set out during the past week has
taken a good start. Asa preventative
against cut worms, many growers are
using a solution of paris green mixed
with bran and sprinkled automatically
from a little carriage that has been
fastened to the tail end of the setter.
Growers who use this preparation de
clare that they have less resetting to
do and a more even crop usually re
sults. Plants appear to be in good con
dition and have thrived remarkably
well.
May 6.—Nearly the whole of the 1918
tobacco crop in this district has been
purchased from the growers. Some of
the farmers are still holding out for
higher prices, although the majority of
them have disposed of their output at
a fairly good figure. There is some
packing to do yet in the warehouses,
but the greater part of the work is
over for the season. A few farmers
have already packed their crops, but
do not intend to sell until they get the
exact price that they demand.
The tobacco growers of Simsbury
have disposed of practically all their
1918 crop. The average price received
from the buyers was 50 cents a pound
in the bundle. The greater part of the
product was purchased early, and a
large part of it was in the field. Later,
the price was reduced to 36 cents, be
cause of slight damage to the crop.
The Shadegrown brought an average
price of sl.lO a pound.
Pennsylvania.
Lancaster, Pa., June 7, 1919.
Packers were given a surprise during
the past week when it became known
that Otto Eisenlohr & Bros, purchased
more than 3,000 cases of 1917 Lancas
ter county tobacco at a price said to
have ranged from 35 to 38 cents per
pound. This crop, which is said to be
one of the finest produced in the county,
has found ready sale, and there remain
about 4,000 cases in local warehouses
yet unsold. The buying movement of
the remainder of the stock now on
hand is early anticipated.
Local dealers who have sold their
1917 tobacco to the Eisenlohr firm are
Siegler Bros., 700 cases; Emanuel
Schreiner of East Petersburg, 500 cases;
Harry Landis, 500 cases; Phares Baker
of Salunga, 700 cases, and Elmer H.
Martin, 300 cases.
The 1918 crop is now practically all
sold, there remaining unsold about 10
per cent. A buying movement to clean
this up has been started at 10 and 12
cents through. Plenty of this crop has
been bulk sweated and put in cases.
When it is properly cured, it is said
that it will be of excellent quality. But
little black rot has been found thus far.
San Juan, P. R., May 22, 1919.
Probably the largest individual to
bacco deal ever transacted in the island
was reported last week when William
B. Shaw purchased'all of the choice to
bacco in the Cayey district, which this
year is reported to have produced the
finest crop in the island.
By an arrangement with a pool of
growers in the Cayey district, Mr.
Shaw obtained the right to select and
purchase any portion of approximately
15,000 hundredweights of early tobacco
grown in the district. Judging from
the way the tobacco grades as it is de
livered to his receivers, it is expected
that more than half of this amount will
be purchased by him.
The transaction amounts to more
than $300,000, and it is said that this is
the first time that a single individual
buyer has purchased outright the choice
grades from such a large producing dis
trict as Cayey.
The most dangerous time in a man's
career is when the sun has .just passed
the mid-day of his life—this time may
come anywhere between 30 and 60. It's
the time when he gets careless about
the way he eats and dresses, and when
because of this, his growing children
begin to lose their respect for him. It's
the time when he stops reading books
and poetry, and when music no longer
interests him, and he becomes com
monplace in his thinking and speaking.
He feels that he’s getting old —and
that he can’t help it. So he drifts into
a “what’s the use” attitude toward
new things.
WHAT
would an ACCIDENT
or SICKNESS mean
To get the best Protection, coupled
with “Good Service," all you have
to do is to make applicatirn to the
nearest Bankers Agent, stating
your age, occupation, etc.
Your Time
has a money value
—INSURE IT
Anderson & Hruska
AGENTS
New Pringle Bldg. Phone 370
E. M. HUBBELL
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
H. T. SWEENEY,
PACKER OF
Leaf Tobacco
Tobaooo Bought and Sold
on Oommission.
Edgertoc, - - Wisconsin
McINTOSH BROS.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market for old goods.
Edgerton, - Wisconsin
W.* DICKINSON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
C. W. BACON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco,
Packer of Wisconsin
New Binders Now Ready
Madison - Wisconsin
ROCK COUNTY
Tobacco Growers Association
Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
202 Riverside St., Janesville, Wis.
Paul N. Grubb L. H. Towne
GRUBB & TOWNE
Attorneys-at-Law
TELEPHONE NIO. 286
First National Bank Building
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
GEO. W. BLANCHARD
Attorney - at- Law
Mclntosh-Thompson Block
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
City Steam Laundry
Glen Price, Prop.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Telephone No. 37
Edgerton, - ‘Wisconsin
NUMBER 30

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