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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, August 06, 1920, Image 7

Image and text provided by Wisconsin Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1920-08-06/ed-1/seq-7/

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IDS DM POLES
TO SEIZE MTU;
Russians Extend the Soviet Gov
ernment Into Poland.
WORKERS ASKED TO REVOLT
Prussians Are Joining the Bolshevik
Army—Truce Meeting Delayed as
Reds Force the Poles Back in
Fierce Attacks.
London, Aug. -4. —A provisional sov
iet lias been formed in the parts of
Poland that have been occupied by
soviet troops, according to a wireless
message received here from Moscow.
Julian Marchlewski is chairman of
the newly formed body, adds the
patch.
The new soviet has issued a mani
festo to ilie laborers of Poland', ex
horting them to arise “against Piisud
sky’s bourgeoisie, land owner govern
ment.”
The manifesto declares that a stable
peace between Russia and Poland is
only possible through soviets of the
workers.
“Take Works and Mines.”
“The works and mines must be
wrested from the hands of the capi
talist speculators and money lenders
and become the property of the people
in the persons of the workers’ com
mittee,” continued the manifesto. The
land and forests must be banded over
as the property of the people and be
managed by the people. The land own
ers must be driven away and the prop
erty managed by the poor peasants’
committees. The land of the working
peasants will remain untouched.
“In the towns authority will pass
into the hands of the workers’ depu
ties. In the village temporary soviets
will be formed.
“When throughout Poland the
bloody government which dragged the
country into the criminal war is over
thrown the soviets of workers’ depu
ties of the towns and villages will
form the Polish soviet republic.”
Prussians Join Red Army.
Recruiting for the “red” army is be
ginning to make itself felt in East
Prussia, and membership in one of
the socialist parties is the condition
or admittance, according to an Alien
stein (Prussia) dispatch.
Bolshevik cavalry, which was in
Lornza Sunday, has been driven back,
but there are large bolshevik forces
at Graievo.
The German correspondent describes
the appearance of bolshevik cavalry
on the German frontier, which he says,
was nowhere greatly violated. Offi
cers, he adds, repeatedly assured the
population that the frontier would be
respected and that they had no idea
of violating German territory.
The Russians, according to the cor
respondent, pay for everything with
soviet notes an<J treat the population
well. The bolshevik cavalry is report
ed to he well equipped, with prerevolu
tionary discipline prevailing.
Red Demands Delay Armistice.
Negotiations for an armistice be
tween Poland and soviet Russia have
been delayed, according to a wireless
dispatch received from Moscow. It
says the Polish delegation left Baran
ovitchi for Warsaw on Monday to pre
c*ent to its government the soviet de
mand that the Polish delegates be giv
en mandates for signing, not only an
armistice agreement, but also a pro
tocol setting forth fundamental condi
tions of peace.
“Without this,” the message de
clares, “it will be impossible to con
clude an armistice.”
The Polish delegation on August 1,
at Beranovitchi, presented its creden
tials from the Polish command em
powering it to negotiate an armistice,
the message continues. The Russians,
however, declared that the original Po
lish proposals called not only for an
armistice, but for the opening of peace
negotiations, and informed the Polish
delegates that they must have man
dates for signing the fundamental con
ditions of peace.
The Poles, ad is the dispatch, replied
that they must return to Warsaw to
present this question for the decision
of the Polish government.
FIRE DESTROYS PRAIRIE VIEW
All Buildings Except 800 Line Sta
tion, and One Other Bum—
s6oo,ooo Loss.
Chicago, July 30.—Fire In Prairie
View, a town of 250 Inhabitants In
Lake county, baffled the village fire
department and destroyed all of the
buildings In the town except the Soo
Line station, which was saved by the
passengers and crew of a train that
pulled Into the town while the Are
was at Its worst, and a general store
owned by Albert Mather. The loss Is
placed at about $500,000.
SENTRY SLAYS TEXAS CAPTAIN
National Guardsman Kills Veteran of
World War While on Duty
at Galveston.
• Galveston, Tex., July 31. —Herbert
A. Robertson, veterans of the world
war and captain of the local company
of National Guardsmen, which was
shortly to go on duty here with other
troops under command of Gen. J. F.
Wolters, was shot and killed by a sen
fr- **< t'->o National Guard camp.
MAKES THE SAPPHIRE BLUSH
Radium Treatment Turns the Cheaper
Stones to Rubies Which Com*
mand the Highest Prices.
Modem science has not brought us
very much nearer the magic stone of
the old philosophers, but it has enabled
later experts to play some surprising
tricks with the existing materials of
the jeweler and lapidary. The old
alchemists set out to discover the phi
losopher’s stone, and achieved gunpow
der and other adjuncts to civilization
as the accidental by-product of their
original inquiry. Their less Credulous
descendants reverse the process; the
Invention is made first and its applica
tion to magic is discovered afterward.
The existence of the electric furnace
makes it possible to create diamonds
that are the veritable stone, and to
fuse chippings and fragments of ruby
into one complete jewel. Now arrives
a report that with the aid of radium
successful transformations have been
made in the appearance, if not in the
nature, of certain precious stones. A
sapphire, it is said, has been turned
into a glorious ruby by long exposure
to the effect of radium. Chemically
considered, this is not very surprising,
for the two stones are both examples
of corundum, and the mysterious acci
dent of color is the principal difference
between them. If a sapphire can be
made to blush hard enough for its
mistake in not being a ruby, pre
sumably it could blush itself into a
most accomplished example of the
more valuable stone.
TAKE IT EASY IN THEATER
Japanese Customs That Seem Odd to
Those Accustomed to the For
malities of the West.
Japan must be a happy land for
theatergoers, because in that land
seats are not paid for —in fact there
are no seats. The Japanese much pre
fers to squat, feeling, no doubt, much
more at home in th*ts comfortable at
titude. Seats, however, are usually
brought for the use of any foreigners
who may be present. There are no
hard and fast laws of convention. The
Japanese playgoer may do as he
pleases; he may eat, drink, smoke
and criticize to his heart’s content.
Conversations are carried on, and, if
tlfey merit it, the actors are met by a
storm of criticism and chaff. When a
man enters the auditorium he removes
Ms hoots, and if the weather is hot,
any clothing that appears to him to
be superfluous. The naive frankness
of the actors’ prompter is rather de
lightful, for if an actor forgets his
lines the prompter comes on the stage
and, quite openly, points out to the
aetor where he is wrong. A boy is
kept for the express purpose of walk
ing on the stage and wiping the per
spiration off the actors’ faces; this
duty he carries out without disturbing
the even tenor of the play.
Beetle Cultivator.
Ants are not the only bisects that
practice the cultivation of mushrooms,
although for a long time it was thought
that they were the only creatures of
a lower order than man that possessed
the intelligence to follow such an agri
cultural pursuit. Bouverie, the ento
mologist, had found that a certain
wood-boring beetle, known as the bos
trychide, is as familiar with mushroom
cultivation as is the species of ant of
which so much has been written. Pro
fessor Bouverie discovered that the
beetles in question bore holes in wood
and half fill them with a prepared
fungus which makes an ideal mush
room bed. The garden is carefully
spawned and in course of time the
mushrooms appear. In this way the
beetle provides itself with a food suf
ficiently tender for its feeble jaws.
Shall We Discard Hyphens?
In the struggle for the conservation
of energy and material we are urged
to cut out the hyphens from our books
and writings, says the Chicago Jour
nal. Their use causes 11s to waste an
enormous amount of time, ink and
physical force. Some nations build
tip compound words without any hy
phen to break them, but the English
find one necessary for a simple word
of five letters, like “to-day.” It may
be roughly estimated that each of the
2.000.000.000 people who write Eng
lish write “today,” “tomorrow” or
“tonight” three times a day. Half an
ounce of force is required to make
a hyphen with a pen or a pencil, so
this superfluous symbol entails a to
tal waste of 18,500,000 pounds daily, or
enough to draw a passenger train
round the world.
Humming Bird's Nest.
Burroughs, in his charming little
book. “Wake Robin,” says it is an
event in one’s life to find a humming
bird’s nest. The event happened to
me without any effort on my part.
Looking up from a seat in the grove,
I saw the ruby-throat drop down on
its nest, like a shining emerald from
the clouds; it did not pause upon tl*e
edge of the nest, but dropped imme
diately upon. it. The nest was situ
ated upon an oak twig, and was
about the size of a black-walnut, aud
from where I sat it looked more like
an excrescence than a nest. It was sit
uated in the fork of two twigs, and
firmly glued at the base to the lower,
but was not fastened to the upper
twig.—Mary Treat in “Home Studies
in Nature.”
One Thing at a Time, Boys.
When a fellow is trying to mobilize
enough courage to kiss a girl he isn’t
nble to think of germs.—Toledo Blade.
HOUSEHOLD CARES.
Tax the Women of Edgerton the
Same as Elsewhere.
Hard to attend to houaehold duties
With a constantly aching back.
A woman should not have a bad back
And she seldom would if the kidneys
were well.
Doan’s Kidney Pills are endorsed by
thousands.
Have been used in kidney trouble for
over 50 years. Ask your neighbors.
Read what this Edgerton woman
says:
Mrs. O. Nelson, 104 Cliff St., Ed
gerton, says: “I had been overtaxing
my strength housecleaning and was
feeling run down generally. My back
suddenly began to ache so I could hard
ly get about to do my household duties.
It couldn’t stoop or move my body
without being in misery and I had vio
lent headaches. At times I was dizzy
too. Reading about Doan’s Kidney
Pills being so good is what led me to
try them and I was more than surpris
ed at how quickly they helped me. Two
boxes of Doan’s rid me of the trouble
entirely and of late I have been free of
kidney complaint.”
j Price 60c, at all dealers. Don’t sim
ply ask for a kidney remedy—get
I Doan’s Kidney PiJ’ he same that
Mrs. Nelson had. FoSver-Milburn Cos.
Mfgrs., Buffalo, N. Y.
§IOO Reward SIOO,
The readers of this paper will be
j pleased t.o learn that there is at least one
dreaded disease that science has been
able to cure in all its stages, and that is
catarrh. Hall’s Catarrh Cure is the only
positive cure known to the medical fra
ternity. Catarrh being a constitutional
disease, requires a constitutional treat
ment. Hall’s Catprrh Cure is taken in
ternally, acting directly upon the blood
and mucous surface of the system, there
by destroying the foundation of the dis
ease, and giving the patient strength by
building up the constitution and assist
ing nature in doing its work The pro
prietors have so much faith n its cura
itve powers, that they offer One Hundred
Dollars for any case that it fails to cure.
Send for lists of testimonials. Address,
F. J. Cheney, k Cos,, Toledo, O.
Sold by all druggists 75c.
[First Publication June 25, 1920]
Summons
STATE OF WISCONSIN, In Circuit
Court for Rock County.
Ole Anderson, Plaintiff,
vs.
Jabez Toynton and Toynton, his
wife, B. Bussey, Thomas Abbott,
Oliver C. Grosvenor and Gros
venor, his wife, Alfred Somers and
Somers, his wife, Alfred Sum
mers and Summers, his wife,
and the unknown heirs, devisees and
assigns of said defendants and all
persons whom it may concern,
Defendants.
The State of Wisconsin to the Said De
fendants;
You are hereby summoned to appear
within twenty (20) days after service
of this summons, exclusive of the day
of service, and defend the above enti
tled action in the court aforesaid; and
in case of your failure so to do, judg
ment will be rendered against you ac
cording to the demand of the complaint,
which is on file in the office of the clerk
aforesaid.
The property affected in this action
is described as follows: Lot twelve
(12) of Kurtz Addition to the City of
Edgerton, Rock County, Wisconsin, as
per the recorded plat thereof on file in
the office of the Register of Deeds for
Rock County.
Grubb & Towne, Plaintiff’s Attor
neys, P. O. Address: First National
Bank Bldg., Edgerton, Rock County,
Wisconsin. , 32t6
our Motto Cleanliness
Nowhere on earth does Clean
liness count more than in a
market. Realizing this we
maintain a perfectly Sanitary
Condition.
QUALITY, ONLY
THE FINEST
If a clean market, clean mar
ket products, choicest of qual
ity and right prices appeal to
you, then buy your meats at
H. E. PETERS
DR. S. F. SMITH
Practice Limited To
a
Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, and Fitting of Glasses
OFFICE OVER
Shelley, Anderson & Farman Store
Edgerton, Wisconsin
GHICHESTER S PILLS
OIAMOND BRAND
LADIES f —**r
Ask your Druggist for CHI-CHBS-TER’S A
OIAMOND BRAND PILLS in Red and /j\
Gold metallic boxes, sealed with BluevC#)
Ribbon. Takb no OTHER. Bay of your \/
Druggist and ask for CHI-CHES-TOR 8 V
DIAMOND BRAND PILLS, for twenty-fivo
years regarded as Best, Safest, Always Reliable.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS
TIME CUCRYU/UPPP WORTH
TRIgD bicn ITT lILnC. TESTED
PARKER'S
Hair balsam
Jfslsill^^^BßemoTesDandruff-SlopsHßirFalliDg
Restores Color and
to Gray and Faded Hair
60c. and SI.OO at druggists.
Chem.JWbs^atchogue^yjf.
HINDERCORNS Removes Corns, Cal
louses, etc., etop9 all pain, ensures comfort to the
feet, makes walking easy. 16c. by mail or at Drug
gists. Hiscox Chemical Works, Patchogue, N. Y.
£or farm engines, tractors , and
TpHERE’S a fresh snap and go— A Single Dry Battery of
* a swifter, more vigorous kick to 3 to 12 Cellpower
th J piston—rhe instant you hook a Packed with power; crammed with vital-
, J - o cu n U 4-* + ii;y; chock full of zip— a dry battery lra-
Colum-a Hot Shot Dry Battery to in energy and long \ik that,
your gasoline engine. you never believed was possible.
COLUMBIA DRY CELL & HOT SHOT CUSTOMERS
Edgerton, Wisconsin, Rock County.
Tall & Keher, Props. Auto Inn Edgertdii Motor Company
Henry Ebbott & Sons, Fulton and Main Sts. J. B. Shaw Estate
Hain, Livick & Arthur Cos.
Fahnestock Spring Clip Binding Posts on Columbia Cell No. 6, No Rxtra Charge
CGfrimts'i Multiple Dry Batteries
|||ppp | tr<7^ JM am Wafa fofc surprising
experiment in our store
The Test of -the Two\iolins
#
Violins differ subtly in tone! Test the
New Edison Realism by that fact.
We have an “Ave Maria” Re-Crration
by Albert Spalding with his
GoarneiTas. This famous violin has a
jyjffiwit, singing tone. We have a
second “Awe Maria” Re-Creation
played by Car! Flesch with his genuine
AMmsl Spskflng himwtf recently
tpok ovt in a test of Qw New Bdi
■RfrawflßnwsllierYak C&ty. He
playerl m dmeetetmnpadmm wHb the
RmCammcm a f fab perforaonce by
dnNe<rß&o(k Hr. Henry Hadley,
one of the jury of tbe three distfo
guwhed mnwrisarwhofistened from
2&NEW EDISON
“The Phonograph with a Sou!”
WILL BARDEEN
Phone 111
Stradivarixis. This violin has a rich, •
mellow tone.
Come in and compare these two Re-Crea
tions — tone for tone. If the New Edison
makes clear the distinction between the
singing Guarnerms and the mellow
Stradiv&rius, you know it has perfect
realism for you.
behind a screen, said: "The Re-
Guano* matched Mr. Spalding*;
performance tone for tone. ”
The Now Edison is the only phono
| graph which has given this con
clusive proof of its perfect realism.
It has triumphed in 4,000 such com
parison-tesU.
/ PRICES! HALTIV
Since UK the total price
increase in the New
has been leas than 16%. Mr.
Edison has, penouaWy, ab
sorbed more than one half
ofthe increased eostaofman
afhcture. He may not be
able to do this much longer.
Bny now — if you want to
day's prices. Our Budget
Plan win help you. M dis
tributes the payment over
the moothe to come.
\ /

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