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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, May 13, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by Wisconsin Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1921-05-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 47
Henry Johnson
•‘THE SERVICE AGENCY”
is prepared to write
INSURANCE
of every Kind.
Phone 18. Edgerton, Wis.
This Office will Give You the Best
There is in
Insurance Service
W. DICKINSON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin
Mclntosh bros.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always in the market, for old goods
Edgerton, Wisconsin
T G. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - • Wis.
W. T. Pomeroy & Cos.
*
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
C. E. SWEENEY & SONS
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin
EDGERTON
Farmers Warehouse Cos.
DEALERS IN
Leaf Tobacco
■idgerton, - - Wisconsin
C. J. JONES St SON
Packers of and Dealers ip
Leaf Tobacco
107-109 North Franklin Street
Janesville, - Wisconsin.
E- ROSENWALD & BRO.
SUCCESSOR TO
sii. rtosenwald <fc Bro. and 1. Bijur <fe Son
PACKERS or
Leaf Tobacco,
f
145 Water Street,
ISfew York City.
HASKINS & SCHWARTZ
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco,
PUBLIC STORAGE
Janesville, Wisconsin
Holton Leaf Tobacco Cos.
PACKERS OF WISCONSIN
Leaf Tobacco
OFFICES AT
Stoughton and Whitehall, Wis.
JOHN SOULMAN & SON
Packers and Dealers of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPAHTA,
Condensed Report to the Commissioner of Banking
Showing the condition of the
Tobacco Exchange Bank
■’' ata Ms. Saejjuz Wisconsin
' __ \
At the close of business April 28, 1921
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts - - - - $ 1,010,995 15
Overdrafts ------- 2,877 74
Bonds - - - - - - 31,516 01
U. S. War Saving Stamps ----- 2,496 00
Real Estate Furniture and Fixtures ' 28,795 13
Cash on hand and Due from banks - - - 126,420 63
Total ... - $1,203,100 66
LIABILITIES
Capital Stock paid in - - 0 - $50,000 00
Surplus - * - ■ - - * 50,000 00
Undivided Profits - 16,009 01
Deposits " - - - - - - * 1,087,091 65
Total $1,203,100 66
x - /
They Fight to Bet In
Make your store “IMPERIAL”
headquarters. - Then the every
day “smoke” sale will bring in crowds
that will make a fire sale look like a
pile of wet cinders.
Edgerton Cigar Cos., Man 'eSSEE Wisconsin
ANDREW JENSON & SON
Packers of Tobacco
Public Storage—s cents per case per month.
Edgerton, < Wisconsin
THE EARLE TOBACCO CO.
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
PUBLIC STORAGE
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
* 7
STORAGE CAPACITY, - 16,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
N. L. CARLE & CO.
•Packers of and Dealers in'
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
Original “LINDE” New York Seed Leaf. Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1864
F. C. LINDE. HAMILTON & CO. INC.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers Warehousemen
Office, 182 Pearl St.. New York City. Branches in all of the principal tobacco district
T. W. Dickinson, Special Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Phone 94 and 173.
MABBETT-HARPER TOBACCO CO.
PACKERS OF
Northern Wisconsin Tobacco
Choice Northern Binders Stemmed and Booked B’s
TOMAH, - WISCONSIN
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, MAY 13, 1921.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
The U. S. Depardment of AgricuH
ture has sent out a bulletin of wanning
to all tobacco growers and warehouse
men, but especially to the growers, to
be on guard against a malignant new
disease which has appeared in this
country. On March 29, 1921, this dis
ease was first detected in seed bqds in
Gadsden "county, Florida. Of the beds
where the trouble was located some
had been steam sterilized. The disease
generally made its appearance in one
corner of the 9eed bed, and then spread
rapidly. It seems exceedingly contag
ious. By April 5, thi9 year, the pest
had spread to 26 beds, and a week later
it had run also into the adjoining
county, attacking beds there. By the
first of May practically all the Florida-
Georgia wrapper tobacco areas had be
come infected, causing almost a panic
among tobacco planters, because they
did not have enough healthy plants to
transplant into their fields. This is the
oldest wrapper field in the U. S. and
millions of dollars worth of tobacco is
endangered. The forbidding scientific
name'of the spore, or bacteria, causing
this disease is Personospora hyoscyami.
It has been known in Europe, though
the damage caused there is not as great
as in New South Wales, Australia,
where it is known as “tobacco blue
mold.” On wild tobacco it was first
discovered in this country by Dr. W. G.
Farlow in 1885 in southern California,
and named Nicotiana Glauca. In 1906
it was detected in Texas, and it is
thought that it is identical with the
parasite now working havoc with the
seed beds in the South. It is not known
how it came into Florida. It is thought
that it may, perhaps, have been intro
duced through the mats brought from
Sumatra and used in the South for
baling tobacco, but this is pure sur
mise; it may as well have come from
California or Texas, if it can be proven
that the Nicotiana Glauca is identical
with the Personospora. The spread of
the disease in Florida and Georgia is
explained by the rapidity of the growth
of "the fungus spores, the fact that
they are powdery dry and light, and
that the weather has been dry down
there during bed seeding time. The
wind, insects and even .nan can carry
it. Under all circumstances it is up to
the grower also in Wisconsin to take
the most rigid precautions. The U. S.
deparment advises not only to see to it
that all seed beds are thoroughly steril
ized, but that different seed beds be
sown and located far apart, and it adds:
“Visitors should be rigidly excluded,”
—like a warning against smallpox or
diphtheria. If the disease is of a na
ture to cause any immediate alarm to
tobacco growers in Wisconsin, The Re
porter is not in position to 9tate.
Climatic and soil conditions here may
not be as subject to the disease as are
the southern tobacco areas. Where
the disease has appeared it has caused
the tobacco growers a lot of anxiety.
But our own tobacco department of the
agricultural experiment station at Mad
ison will be on the lookout. If anyone
should have trouble With his seed beds,
it is safe as a general principle to con
sult the department and hear the ad
vice of its experts. The U. S. bulletin
closes by saying “Tobacco planters
throughout the southern states and in
Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Connecti
cut should be on their guard against
the introduction of this disease into
their fields. It belongs to a group of
very destructive parasites, hard to con
trol when once introduced.”
The Reporter has time and again
called attention to the desirability of
opening up trade with Germany in or
der to put new life into American to
bacco export trade, and meet the ur
gent demand of the Central powers for
good American tobacco. The Leaf of
April 28 underscores this view by say
ing: “Germany promises to be a for
midable factor in the market this year,
as well as other European buyers.”
And a correspondent from Berlin under
date of April 5 says that the tobacco
interests of Germany are demanding
free trade, and that if it was left to
the German people they would quickly
let down the bars for the free admit
tance of American tobacco. Our own
government, it must be hoped, will re
ciprocate the efforts of our European
customers to remove as many as possi
ble of the hindrances for the easy and
rapid exchange of our mutual wants.
There is a more hopeful note in the
news from Washington to the effect
that the proposed increase in the im
port duty of foreign tobacco may not
be advanced nearly as much as the high
tariff advocates have demanded.
Wisconsin Tobacco Market
Edgerton, Wis.. May 13, 1921.
The latest government reports cover
ing the amount of tobacco in storage in
the U. S. April 1, 1921, bear out the
opinion advanced by the tobacco press
that the present poundage of leaf held
in the warehouses throughout the coun
try is 25 per cent larger than last
year’s. In Wisconsin the heavy buyers
hold an enormous amount of 1920 leaf.
The Lorillard company alone is putting
up a packing which represents the con
trolling end of one-half of the entire
lohr and American Sumatra Tobacco
Cos. are also large holders, as are also
the interests represented by Bekkedal
& Son in the northern field. It is,
therefore, easy to credit the accuracy
of the report sent out by the federal
government.
There is no general activity in the
movement of unsold 1920, though the
Thos. Earle Tobacco company of Ed
gerton continues to buy whatever offer
ings of leaf at 8 cents coming their
way. The policy of the stemmers to
sit tight and take what is offered them
at the pi;ice they are willing to pay, is
working. They are not making a cam
paign to get the grower to sell at the
8 cent or 8 and 5 figure; they simply
consent to take the offerings on that
basis. They even let it be known that
if the grower who has 1920 tobacco to
dispose of can get any buyer to take
the crop at a better figure, he should
take the best he can get. From week
to week some tobacco is moving on this
basis.
It is reported that other buyers are
picking crops with the hope of realiz
ing some binders out of them, but the
general aspect of the market is its
quietness,
The associations continue to handle
tobacco turned in to them, and the
campaign for the proposed sales organ
ization is going forward persistently,
though more quietly than in the begin
ning. The hope of seeing federal stand
ards of grades of tobacco as an outcome
of the investigation into the feasibility
of it, is backing the pool idea, though
few look for any definite results of this
investigation of a nature to effect the
movement of the 1921 crop. It takes
time to gather the data, compile and
classify them, and more time to adjust
the principles deducted to actual grad
ing of the leaf.
New York
New York, April 28, 1921.
The Tobacco Leaf, usually well in
formed, strikes the following cheerful
note: Water Street seems to be recov
ering nicely, thank you, from its long
drawn spell of melancholy, and in spite
of the fact that the movement of cigar
leaf tobaccos of all types is still decid
edly slow, the tone of the market
grows stronger with each passing week.
The reports from the various cigar pro
ducing centers are encouraging and
leaf merchants are again receiving
many inquiries for all types, which in
dicates a wholesome interest in avail
able leaf stocks. All signs seem to
point toward an early change for the
better in cigar leaf activity and a sat
isfactory, if gradual, return to some
thing approaching normal business.
That this confidence expressed by ieaf
merchants in the future of the market
is something more substantial and con
vincing than “mere talk,” is shown by
the steady and substantial inroads
which the independent packers have
made in both the filler and binder
states. The purchase, during the past
two weeks, of a large quantity of Con
necticut Broadleaf of the 1920 crop, by
a well-known Water Street firm, is, but
one conspicuous instance which proves
that leaf merchants are by no means
gloomy over the market outlook.
Pennsylvania
Lancaster, Pa., April 27, 1921
The campaign recently opened to in
duce growers to form co-operative
packing associations came pretty late
in the season, in fact not until over 80
per cent of the crop had been sold,
with comparatively little A1 tobacco
among the crops unsold. Apparently
not many of the owners of the 20 per
cent remaining considered it worth
while to pack tobacco that the packers
were not falling over one another to
get. A few growers who still have
good tobacco are holding out for 20
cents. They may get it if after a
while the crop still holds its apparent
excellent condition. But not every
grower who thinks he has good tobac
co really has it.
Just how much of the 1920 crop of
this county remains unsold cannot def
initely be stated, as estimates run all
the way from 10 to 20 per cent, but it
would be a pretty safe guess to say
that less than 15 per cent of it remains
in growers’ hands. The larger number
of sales of cheap tobacco reported are
at 10 cents or below. At the rate the
tobacco is being taken up. it will dis
appear before it is realized that no
more remains unsold.—Slade in Leaf.
New England
Hartford, Ct., April 27, 1921.
There have been a few sales of to
bacco in this locality lately. Several
producers who have been holding the
1920 crop in the hope of receiving fancy
prices have let the crop go at a sacri
fice, it is said, rather than to take the
chances of casing it. Some Broadleaf
was lifted at prices ranging from 40 to
70 cents per pound.
Within the next week or ten days
some of the first 1921 production will
be transplanted. Plants are doing
nicely in the seed beds. Most of the
preliminary work is completed.
WHAT
would an ACCIDENT
or SICKNESS mean
To get the best Protection, coupled
with “Good Service, ” all you have
to do is to make applicatirn to the
nearest hankers Agent, stating
your age, occupation, etc.
Your Time
has a money value
—INSURE IT
Anderson & Hruska
AGENTS
New Pringle Bldg. Phone 370
FULTON LODGE NO. 69
A. F. AND A. M.
Meeting 2d and 4th Thursdays of
Each Month.
Edgerton Chapter R. A. IVL
Meeting Ist and 3rd Thursdays of
Each Month.
Visiting Brethren Welcome.
E. M. HUBBELL
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
NELS E. NELSON
Leaf Tobacco
Choice Northern Leaf
WAREHOUSES
Ferryville - Edgerton
ROCK COUNTY
Tobacco Growers Association
Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
202 Riverside St., Janesville, Wis.
CARROLL & DEMBO
Packers and Dealers in Fine
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
New York Office—l 47 Water Street
C. W. BACON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco,
Packer of Wisconsin
New Binders Now Ready
Madison - Wisconsin
MARGARET L. MOONEY
t
Life Insurance
Office Henry Johnson's Agency
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
PAUL N. GRUBB
Attorney-at-Law
TELEPHONE NO. 286
First National Bank Building
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
GEO. W. BLANCHARD
Attorney - at- Law
Mclntosh-Thompson Block
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin
DR. S. F. SMITH
Practice Limited To "
Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, and Fitting of Glasses
OFFICE OVER
Shelley, Anderson & Farman Store
Edgerton, Wisconsin
E M. LADD,
Attorney and counsellor-at-Law,
REAL ESTATE
FIRE INSURANCE
Edgerton, Wisconsin
NUMBER 26

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