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The Wisconsin tobacco reporter. (Edgerton, Wis.) 1877-1950, March 10, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086586/1922-03-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 48
Henry Johnson
‘THE- SERVICE AGENCY"'
is prepared to write
INSURANCE
of every Kind.
Phone 18. Edgertoir, Wis
This Office will Give You the Bent
is in
Insurance Service
W. DICKINSON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin
Mclntosh bros.
Packers of Choice Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Always In the market, for old goods.
Edgerton, Wisconsin
-> Q. HANSEN. C. H. HANSEN
HANSEN BROS.
Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton • • Wis.
W. T. Pomeroy & Cos.
Dealers in and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
C. E. SWEENEY & SONS
Packers of Wisconsin
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton, Wisconsin
EDGERTON
farmers Warehouse Cos.
DEALERS IN
Leaf Tobacco
licensed under U.S. Warehouse Act
Edgerton, - - Wisconsin.
c. J. JONES & SON
Packers of and Dealers in
Leaf Tobacco
107-109 North Franklin Street
(anesville, - Wisconsin.
2- ROSENWALD & 6RO
.SOOCEftBOK TO
Kosenwald A Bro. and 1. Bijur Jfc Son
PACKERS OK
Leaf Tobacco,
146 Water Street.
New York City.
IASKINS & SCHWARTZ
Packers of Wisconsin
_eaf Tobacco,
PUBLIC STORAGE
Janesville, Wisconsin
Holton Leaf Tobacco Cos.
PACKERS OF WISCONSIN
Leaf Tobacco
OFFICES AT
Stoughton and Whitehall, Wis.
JOHN SOULMAN & SON
Packers and Dealers of
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
The Jefferson Leaf Tobacco Co*
Dealers In and Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
SPARTA, WISCONSIN.
Tobacco Exchange Bank
Edgerton, Wisconsin
Capital and Surplus . . . $100,000.00
OFFICERS and DIRECTORS
W. S. Heddles, President Wm. Bussey, Vice Pres.
L. J. Dickinson, Vice Pres. Adolph. H. Jenson, Cash.
D. L. Babcock C. G. Biederman
W. A. Shelley
We want to serve you in a way which will
meet with your unqualified approval
THE WAR IS OVER
The Imperial
(CAPITAL SIZE)
CIGAR
Is now on the market and sells at
10 cents
Edgerton Cigar Cos. y Edgerton, Wisconsin
THE LINAAS CIGAR COMPANY
Manufactnrers of the
All Wisconsin, Country Club and High Dome Cigars
Edgerton, Wisconsin
ANDREW JENSON & SON
Packers of Leaf Tobacco
Public Storage—s cents per case per month.
EDGERTON - - WISCONSIN
THE EARLE TOBACCO CO.
Packer of and Dealer in
LEAF TOBACCO.
PUBLIC STORAGE
EDGERTON, - WISCONSIN.
GREENS’ TOBACCO CO.,
Dealers in Leaf Tobacco,
STORAGE CAPACITY, - 16,000 OASES
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
%
N. L. CARLE & CO.
{Packers of and Dealers in;
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco,
Janesville, - - Wisconsin.
Original "LINDE” New York Seed Leaf Tobacco Inspection
ESTABLISHED IN 1864.
F. C. LINDE. HAMILTON &. CO. Inc.
Tobacco Inspectors, Weighers as Warehousemen
/ ,
omce, 182 Pearl St.. New York City. Branches In all of theprlncipal tobacco district
T. W. Dickinson, Special Agent, Edgerton, Wis. Phone 94 and 173.
MABBETT-HARPER TOBACCO CO.
PACKERS OF
<r
Northern Wisconsin Tobacco
Choice Northern Binders Stemmed and Booked B’s
TOMAH, - WISCONSIN
EDGERTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN, MARCH 10, 1922.
NOTE BOOK SKETCHES
}
The Round Tip developed in Connec
ticut, and during the last season grown
oh a commercial scale, keeps on im
pressing itself upon the attention of
the grower and manufacturer alike.
Some prominent eastern packers of this
leaf go so far as to predict that this
particular leaf will be the coming wrap
per tobacco, and there are packers and
manufacturers in the west who have
kept watch of the Round Tip and claim
fqr it an abundance of virtues. Among
these are members of the Mehl Tobacco
Cos., Peoria, 111. A member of the firm
wjrote recently to the Wisconsin Tobac
co Reporter offering free seed to grow
ers who would like to experiment with
thp growing of it during the coming
season. It was tried in a small way by
the horticultural department of the U.
W. agricultural school last season; and
the old seed man, W. T. Pomeroy of
Edgerton, will try a patch in one of the
best sections of the southern tobacco
ar6a during the coming season. It
would not be a bad idea for growers in
different sections of the state to try it
out. A few patches in each of the
northern counties might be tried.
Growers who would care to make an
honest experiment may communicate
with The Reporter and state how much
seed they need. The plant is grown in
the open, is very tall, has from 20 to 30
leaves to the stalk, and is cultivated
very much like other open field types.
It is primed. Thia is one of the serious
objections to any extensive growing in
this state, at least for a time, as the
construction of the barn for Wisconsin
leaf would have to be much altered for
the curing of the Round Tip. How
ever, the Wisconsin grower should have
an open mind in the matter and give it
a trial in the different localities, as the
U. W. experiment station undoubtedly
will go on with its experiments to as
certain what this leaf will do under
climatic, soil and fertility conditions
presented by this state. It is but fair
to add that not all tobacco men are
equally well impressed by the excel
lence of this leaf.
4 ***
Tobacco Reporter is
not urging a sudden stampede for any
new type of leaf to be grown in this
state. There is so much room for im
provement in the best types cultivated
that intelligent and conscientious seed
men and growers can be busy for a few
years to come in developing better
qualities in the Spanish strains which
have been planted in the state for
years. The growers naturally are in
tensely interested in the profit side of
any field crop that they put in. They
want as quick and as good returns as
possible for the least possible outlay in
money and time. They grow tobacco
to sell and to make money on it. Any
scientific effort to secure a type of to
bacco that by excellence of quality,
size of leaf and body to go through the
fermentation process safely, take 9
somebody's time and somebody’s money
before it can reach a high state of ex
cellence This, however, is the only
road to take for the tobacco grower in
this state, if he it to 9tay in the game
and make it pay. There is every rea
son to believe that by sticking to the
best types of cigar leaf hitherto devel
oped in the state, and through selec
tion and soil improvement this leaf can
be trained in the habits which are most
desired, and on its merit as a cigar leaf
hold its own in competition with other
leaf for the purposes for which it is
best adapted, a binder leaf. The eco
nomic results of such a campaign can
not be guaranteed, but the probabili
ties are that they would not be disap
pointing. The last two years have
seemed exceedingly dark to the tobacco
grower who had to sell for less than it
cost to produce the crop. One of the
reasons for this feeling of despondency
is the fact that 1918 and 1919 and the
first bloom of 1920 brought prices so
inflated that a 7 cent or even a 15 cent
price seems like nothing. The last two
years’ crops taken together will hardly
bring the state an income equal to the
income of one previous high priced
crop. The reality becomes more dark
because it stands against the blazing
background of the boom years, now re
membered as a wonderful dream, but
from which so many awoke with the
sensation that we awake from the
most beautiful dreams. Another
reason for the loss of courage on the
part of many is that the shrinkage in
the income of the “money crop” came
on top of the collapse of prices for ev
erything that the farmer had to sell.
Tobacco was the last peg the farmer
pinned his financial hope to; when that
also failed to hold, things went into a
heap. The prospects are for a gradual
recovery of values in other farm pro
ducts. With this anew courage will
again enter the heart of the tobacco
farmer. But it is at this very point
that he should take stock of his meth
ods and swing into anew and better
gait in his production of the weed.
Wisconsin Tobacco Market
Edgerton, Wis., March 10, 1922.
The situation offers some peculiar
phases of the tobacco market locally
that ore causing some bewilderment in
the minds of those growers who made a
thorough clean-out of their last crop
in order to get a correspondingly better
price because they had exercised such
conscientious care in the handling of
the crop. And what is the result?
They have sold the filler and ragged
end, between 25 and 35 per cent of the
crop, for the very satisfactory price of
from 5 to 6 cents, while the good end
today faces a market which feebly of
fers 7 cents. It is not forgotten, how
ever, that the sales at from 10 to 15
cents for southern goods brought only
3 cents for the short end. Yet, the
grower who has not sold the assorting
end of his 1921 tobacco is bewildered
when he hears that the portion which
he considered the money-producing one
is not going to bring him over 7 cents.
Several parties have let go at
price. They need the money to pay
taxes, help, and to swing the outlay of
the approaching planting season. The
grower who can hold out against the
pressure of need for cash, is going to
sit tight, reasoning that if the future
does not make things better, it surely
can not make it any worse.
In the movement of the 1920 tobacco
in bundle there i9 not mucli of any
hitch. The 9temmers take it, seen or
unseen, at 8 cents. Some 1920 tobacco
was assorted and packed on the farms;
the amount of this class is not so very
large, but it offers opportunities for
investment, as it most likely never can
be bought at lower figures than would
buy it right now. The reason is this'—
that this tobacco suffers for lack of de
mand through the same reasons that
the warehouse men are unable to dis
pose of their packings, due to the ex
ceedingly cautious buying on the part
of the manufacturers, which in turn is
due to a slack demand in the cigar mar
ket. We will buy, says the indepen
dent packer, if we can sell
New York
New York, Feb. 23, 1922.
The Leaf prognosticates as follows:
The majority of leaf merchants in
cline frankly to the opinion that there
has undoubtedly been a decided drop in
the consumption of cigars of all classes,
quite apart from the record of produc
tion figures. At the same time they
feel that the downward trend in con
sumption has traveled the limit and
that from now on there is certain to be
a steady improvement in this respect.
It is also, significant from the stand
point of the cigar leaf merchant that
practically no surplus of cigars of the
type which the public is demanding ex
ists, and that the cigars which will be
consumed during the current year are
yet to be manufactured. If this inter
pretation of the status of the cigar in
dustry be correct, and there seems lit
tle reason to question it, we are fur
nished with a pretty good basis for the
belief that business in the cigar leaf
market is also certain to improve as
production goes on.
New England
Hartford, Ct., Feb. 23, 1922.
The Connecticut State Board of Ag
rculture, at a hearing in the capitol
here today, decided that the tobacco
dealers, when they make out their
blanks to be filed with the state author
ities, must give the highest and lowest
prices received for their tobacco during
the last three months in 1921. They
may omit putting down the average
price received, it was ruled by the com
mission.
Every tobacco dealer must also give
the number of pounds he has sold of
each specific grade of leaf and the
number of pounds unsold on January 1,
1922.
An extended time was given the to
bacco men by the state board in which
to file returns, as February 20 was the
original date named. There are two
kinds of reports to be returned, one by
dealers, warehouse owners or agents,
and the other for tobacco in warehouses
owned by the owners.—Journal.
Pennsylvania
Lancaster, Pa., Feb. 24, 1922.
The prediction is freely made here by
those who beiieve they speak with the
voice of authority that within another
month the entire crop of 1921 Lancas
ter county will have changed hands.
The crops that go to make up the en
tire output of Lancaster county will
by the end of that time, they contend,
either be in the hands of the manufac
turers direct or the independent pack
ers or it will be pooled for working at
the Mt. Joy, Lititz, Lancaster or the
smaller community packing houses.
Certain it is, however, that there was
considerable buying done up to the re
cent snow storm in this section. Dur
ing the storm and while the roads were
still bad there had been a let-up in the
buying, but a general activity has been
noted recently and the agents for the
big concerns took the field again this
week. Latterly the General Cigar Cos.
and Bloch Bros, have been paying par
ticular attention to the crops in New
Providence and the lower end of the
county generally. The General Cigar
Cos. seemed to hold to a fixed price of
13 cents and they picked up what they
wanted at this figure. Bloch Bros.,
who wanted scrap goods, bought in at
from 4 to 8c off the stalk.—Journal.
FULTON LODGE NO. 69
A. F. AND A. M.
Meeting Ist and 3rd Tuesdays of
Each Month.
Edgerton Chapter R. A. M.
Meeting 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of
Each Month.
Visiting Brethren Welcome.
E. M. HUBBELL
Leaf Tobacco
Edgerton - Wisconsin
NELS E. NELSON
Leaf Tobacco
Choice Northern Leal
WAREHOUSES
Ferryville - Edgerton
ROCK COUNTY
Tobacco Browers Association
Packers of
Leaf Tobacco
202 Riverside St., Janesville, Wis.
CARROLL & DEMBO
Packers and Dealers in Fine
Wisconsin Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wisconsin
New York Office—l 47 Water Street
EBER ARTHUR
Packer and Dealer In
Tobacco,
616-620 W. Milwaukee St.
Janestille, Wisconsin
HERMAN ANDERSON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco
Janesville, Wis., R. D. No. 1
C. W. BACON
DEALER IN
Leaf Tobacco,
Packer of Wisconsin
New Binders Now Ready
Madison - Wisconsin
A. E. GAREY
Attorney-at-Law
First National Bank Bldg.
Edgerton, Wisconsin
E M. LADL>,
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
REAL ESTATE
FIRE INSURANCE
Edgerton, Wisconsin
GEO. W. BLANCHARD
Attorney-at-Law
Mclntosh-Thompson Block
£dgerton, - - Wisconsin
MRS. VAN NESS GREEN
Teacher of Voice and Piano
Fall Term Begins Oct. Ist
Residence at Carlton Hotel
Private Phone No. 380
MARGARET L. MOONFY
Life Insurance
Office - - Henry Johnson’s Agency
EDGERTON, WISCONSIN
MAX HENDERSON
Lawyer
Care Potter, Sherwood & Henderson
112 W. Adams Street
CHICAGO
NUMBER 17

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