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The Calumet news. [volume] (Calumet, Mich.) 1907-1938, November 26, 1909, Image 3

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1903.
ME CALUMET HEWS.
HANCOCK
'THE ALASKAN" PRESENTED:
OTHER SUCCESSES COMING
Dig Musical Company Departs After
Pleating Two Big Audiences Here
"Graustark," "A Stubborn Cinder
ella" and Others of Prominence
Booked for Remaining Months of
ths Season.
"The Alaskan" company loft today
for Ishpcmlng, after a two nights' in
gagemcnt at the Kerredgo theatre, ut
which thcro were two large audiences
tliut gave every evidence of approval
of the music, ringing and novel effects
of the production. The team of genu
lno Ksklmo dogs gave a decidedly arc
tie atmosphere to the production, and
made a big hit, and the snowballing
ecene In jvhich the audience and chor
us girls participated was a novelty that
took greatly.
This evening Thomas C. Trueblood,
of the University of Michigan, will
give a recital of "Ingomar. the liar
burlan," In the Star entertainment
course of the Grace M. E. church, and
on Monday next the pojmlar Trunk E.
Long company will open for a week's
run with a repertory of popular dramas
and comedies.
Manager Kerredge has announced a
partial list of bookings for the re
maining months of the season, which
comprises Boine of the most successful
metropolitan productions, presented
by splendid companies headed by stars
of prominence.
The December bookings, in addition
to the Long stock company, together
with the dates on which they will be
presented, are as follows: "Graustark,"
December 11; Yankee Doodle Stock
company, week of December 13; "A
Stubborn Cinderella," December 22;
llortense Neilson, In "Magda," on De
cember 25, and the month will close
with the appearance of the musical
clubs of the University of Michigan
on December 29.
"The Climax" will be the first play
of the New Year and will be present
ed on New Year's day. "The Thief"
comes on January 11, and "The Winn
ing Miss," January 31.
February attractions ho fur booked
are "Paid In Full," which comes to
the Kerredge on the 5th, and "The Man
of the Hour" on February 28.
Lyman II. Howe's moving pictures
play a return engagement on March
1 nnd 2, and the great western drama,
William Vaughn Moody's "The Great
Divide," will be Heen again In this
city on March 5. "The Time, the rlaeo
and the Girl" Is booked for March 11
and "The Wolf on March 18.
April's opening attraction Is Hal
Ilcld'a alwnys popular "Human Hearts,
on April 1; Grace Von Studdlford In
"The Golden Rutterfly" is coming on
April 11; 'Tolly of the Circus," April
15; Al Wilson, April 16, and "The
Third Degree," April 27.
Stetson's Uncle Tom's Cabin com
pany, the last that is still presenting
this famous drama of anti-slavery
days, plays here May 7; and lilanche
Walsh will be seen In "The Test." on
May 14. This concludes the dramatic
attractions, but the closing event of
the season, and the crowning feature
of the theatrical year will bo the np
pcarnnco In Hancock of Madam Schu-mann-IIelnke,
In n program of oper
atic and concert selections on Memor
ial Day, May 30.
D'URBANO'S ITALIAN BAND
COMING AGAIN IN APRIL
Leonard Meola of this city has re
ceived a letter from Luigl p'Urbano,
leader of the great Italian band that
visited this city for a week recently, In
which it is stated that the manage
ment of the band has decided to play a
return engagement In this section. The
organization will come sometime In
April and will appear in Hancock and
Calumet, besides ngaln playing In the
Iron country. At present the band Is
In Wisconsin. Since the visit here of
the band a couple of months ago many
who heard them then have expressed
a hope that they would return, the
music given being splendid and the
organization proving one of the best
of tho kind that has ever been heard
here, while Slgnor D'Urbano's conduct
ing was something wonderful. The
announcement that the bnnd is coming
back will bo welcomed.
The nomination of officers of the
Hancock lodge of tho Knights Qf Py
thias will take place this evening at
the regular weekly meeting, and the
unnual election will be held on Friday
evening next. . Following the election
a social session and smoker will be en
Joyed and a special committee is now
engaged in preparing for the occasion.
A two-man bowling match took place
last night between Charles Dover and
Eldred Mitchell. The scores were:
Dover 204, 178, 196, and those of Mitch,
ell 159, 168, 155. Total, 1060.
Charles F. McAsklll arrived home
yesterday from Indianapolis to spend
Thanksgiving day at his home here,
und to see his baby daughter, who ar
rived on Wednesday.
ALCOHOL IN MEDICINES.
Alcohol Is the best known preserva
tive .of medical compounds, and the
average proprietary medicine contain!
from 15 per cent to 22 per cent, which
Is the smallest possible amount to
preserve tho Ingredient, whJlo th
avcrago doctor's prescription contains
from 23 per cent to 60 per cent.
Such standard preparations as Ly
dla E. PInkham's Vegetable Compound
contain but 1 per cent and they even
Tut the Compound up In tablet form,
which the over-scrupulous woman,
who objects to alcohol In any degree,
may use,
0. H.-EIKS CAME Will
BE A BATTLE OF GIANTS
Contest to Take Place This Evening
Between Hibernian and Elks Will
Be a Battle Royal Between Two of
the Strongest Teams of the League
Naval Reserves and Eagles Also
Play.
One of the best and most fiercely
contested jjames of the present sen
son of the Indoor baseball league Is
what the game to be played this even
ing In the Germanla hall between the
Hibernian ami Elks teams Is expected
to prove. The two teams are the
season's leaders so far In tho cham
pionship fight and the keenest rival
ry exists between them, each being de
sirous of landing the season's pen
nant. The Hibernians are yinxus
to retain the honor of standing first,
won so triumphantly last year, while
the nntlored ball swatters are equally
desirous of defeating the boys In
green. Each team has so far won four
games and has not sustained a alngle
defeat.
Carney and Stack, the crack bat
tery of the Hibernians will officiate
for the team tonight and the equally
famous Ross-Montgomery pitching and
catching duo will take care of the
spherlod for the Elks. Carney has
done wonderful work for the Hibern
ians In tho matches so far played, hav
ing been scored on only thirteen times,
while Ross has only allowed fifteen
runs so far In tho games played.
No arrangements have yet been
made for a game with Newt Randall's
team, and from present Indications It
looks as though there would bp
nothing doing.
The Eagles team has been Invited
to Ontonagon to play the Indoor base
ball team organized there recently.
The Ontonagon team will stand all
the expenses of the Eagles and will
arrange for their entertainment while
they are at Ontonagon. If the game
Is played, and It Is ' expected that It
will be pulled off shortly, the Eagles
will go on Sunday In order to go and
return the same day.
MEMORIAL SERVICE SUNDAY.
Knight of Columbus Will Hold An
nual Services at St. Joseph's
The annual memorial services of the
Hancock council of the Knights of
Columbus will be held on Sunday next
at St. Joseph's church, where mass
will be celebrated by Rev. Frederick
Olasner at 10 o'clock. The members
will meet In their lodge rooms In the
Kauth block at half past 9 and will
march to the church In a body. On
Monday morning a requiem mass will
be celebrated for tho repose of the souls
of deceased members of the council.
Arrangements are being made for a
social session to bo held on the oc
casion of tho election of officers of
tho Hancock council of the Knights
of Columbus to bo held on Monday
evening, December IS.
PRAISE FOR THE YANTIC.
Lieutenant Myers Gives Out His Ob
servations of the Cruise.
Lieut. Myers, United States navy,
who was Inspecting officer with the
Michigan Naval Brigade on the cruise
last summer, has made his report to
ithe navy department. Commander
Goodell of the upper peninsula battal
ion. M. N. P.., has received a copy of
the report, from which extracts are
here made. Lieut. Myers says of his
inspection of tho Yantlc:
"I Inspected tho Yantlc and found
tier condition to be excellent in regard
to cleanliness and neatness. The ship
had been painted preparatory to mnk-
ng the cruise and not only looks well
but Is clean throughout. Most of the
cleaning and painting was done by the
lancock division of the naval militia
under the direction of Chief Boat-
wain's Mate F. Nelson. U. S. N., who
Is a good man for head skipper, being
energetic and having proper ideas
about cleanliness and general shlp
shapeness. He Is to be commended on
the good appearance of the ship. It Is
recommended that a carpenter's mate
nd painter be detailed for this ship in
lace of two seamen now on her.
"In handling the ship In coming to
anchor, in squadron, In going along-
Ido of a dock, and in navigating
through difficult and narrow channels
the following officers are very profi
cient: Lieutenant Commander H. w.
Goodell, commanding: Lieut. A. P.
Rees, navigator; Lieut. C. D. Mason
nd Lieut, G. T. Stephenson. These
officers all hold licenses as follows;
No. 1, master; 2, second class pilot;
master: 4. Dllot. first class. Tho en-
gl
neer officers are very proficient In
their duties. Lieut. Banks and Ensigns
Macdaugall and DeMass show great
adaptability for this work and should
come very proficient. It Is their in
tention to take examinations ror li
censes. All officers show an Intelli
gence and a willingness to learn, which
very encouraging for the future or
e organization. 1
"If It-were possible to do so. It would
be of great advantage to have the offi
cers nnd men serve their summer cruise
on battleships of the North Atlantic
fleet. But as the expense for this
would probably be too great, It Is sug
gested that ' tho department send out
circulars , to the officers of the naval
llltla, Indicating when they may tako
lort cruises on ships of the North At
iiMt Mnvrrnl officers have in
dicated a desire to take 'a short cruise
n some man-of-war, but have no
eans of finding out In sufficient time
, nhAt shin thev may go. If It were
possible for the officers to take cruises
u. mentioned above. It would be of In
estimable Value to the naval militia or
ganization."
John Stehlln, one of the Orlnnell
Bros, staff of salesmen, left tnis morn.
Ing.on a business trip to Ontonagon.
Miss Minn Prynne of the James In
surance office is spending a wee
vacation in vnicagw.
A.
92OOO.00
Circa (or aav tubfUnce ia-
juhout to keakh found ia food
faulting Iron the um 01
Ba!unrpPi
Powder
DEATH OF MRS. HAMILl
FROM BLOOD POISONING
Mrs. T. R. Hamlll, wife of a well
known Hancock contractor, died last
night at about 10 o'clock at her home
on Superior street in West Hancock,
from the effects of blood poisoning
Mrs. Hamlll was a native of Canada
nnd was 39 years of age. She Is eur
vived by her husband and three chil
dren, who have the sympathy of the
community in their affliction. Word
of Mrs, HamiU's demise has been sent
to relatives at St. Paul, and when they
have been heard from arrangements
for the funeral will be announced.
The news of Mrs. HamiU's death
came as a profound surprise and shock
to her numerous friends, most of whom
had not even known that she was ill
Tho Hamlll residence was recently
quarantined on account of the Illness
of one of tho children with scarlet fe
ver, and it was during this time that
Mrs. Hamlll scratched her finger with
a needle. The Injury was so slight
and seemingly Insignificant that It
was not supposed that anything seri
ous would result, and In fact the hand
was apparently entirely healed, when
a few days ago symptoms of blood pol
sonlng developed. She rapidly became
worse and on Wednesday Mrs. HamiU's
condition was considered very precar
lous.
Mrs. Hamlll was a member of the
Hancock Methodist church and took a
deep Interest In its various activities
and charitable and social work, and
she will be greatly missed by her circle
of friends and acquaintances.
LABOR SITUATION QUIET.
Tho labor situation In this section
Is very quiet Just now, there being a
cessation In the great demand for help
which has prevailed during the past
Bummer here on account of the numer
ous public improvements under way.
The paving, sewer and water Jobs are
now p.ractlcally suspended and most of
the surface work at the various mines
fhas been discontinued so that there
are now many men available, according
to a statement made by Leonard Meola
of the Hancock employment agency.
Until more snow comes there will be
little doing In the woods, but Just as
soon ns there Is sufficient to begin
operations the various camps will be
opened nnd employment furnished for
a considerable number.
EXPECT GREAT COAL STRIKE.
Operators Plan Reduction in April
Men Say 250,000 Will Fight.
Pittsburg, Nov. 26. Although the
working agreement between the bitu
minous coal operators and United Mine
Workers of America docs not expire
until next April, the operators are al
ready making preparations to force an
issue upon the miners that may result
In another great national conflict. In
which, the miners assert, 250,000 miners
will Join.
Tho association of bituminous coal
operators In central Pennsylvania has
held several quiet meetings and dis
cussed matters that are creating con
siderable uneasiness In the miners'
camp. It has leaked out that many
Independent operators have attended
these sessions nnd every effort Is being
made to strengthen the association to
Inaugurate a combined movement to
reduce wages next spring. The oper
ators claim that there Is an Insufficient
margin of profit for them at the pres
ent market price of coal, for which they
are compelled to pay slxty-slx cents
a ton for mining, and they demand
that the miners accept a "reasonable"
reduction.
On their part the miners are reso
lutely setting their faces against any
reduction In wages. They claim that,
owing to the slackness of work and
present low wages, they are barely able
to make a living for themselves and
families, and that they will go to the
finish before they permit themselves to
be pressed over the border line and In
to starvation and abject poverty.
Somo of the Hancock teachers took
advantage today of the extra holiday to
visit the Calumet and Houghton
schools, where sessions are being held
today. The Boston school also held
sessions as usual.
Use Dr. Taylor's Antiseptic Skin Soap.
CHALLENGE
We challenge anyone to produce a case
of Eczema or other Skin Disease that
Dr. Taylor's Eczema Remedy will
1 not cure. " '
Cured After Eleven Years of Suffering.
Clrclevllle. Ohio, March C, 1908.
Gentlemen: It affords me much
pleasure to add my voluntary Indorse
ment to your Eczema Remedies. I
have suffered for many years with
eruptions on my body and during that
time have tried other remedies, but
without avail. After having used your
Remedy for a few months I have been
completely cured, and feel that a word
of praise Is rightly due you for the ben
efit your Remedies hnve given me.
Very truly yours.
Nelson R. Phillips.
Sold by Eagle drug store, Calumet,
m
PROGRAM COMPLETED FOR THE
. TEMPERANCE RALLY SUNDAY
The arrangement.i has been com
pleted for the big temperance rally to
be held on Sunday afternoon at 2
o'clock at the Kerredge theater. At
this meeting Rev. J. S. Gould, pastor
of the Hancock Congregational church,
will preside and Dr. Samuel Dickie,
president of Albion College, famous
for hi temperance debates with May
or Robo of Milwaukee, will bo tho
principal speaker. The program for
tho meeting Is as follows:
Hymn Onward Christian Soldiers.
Invocation Rev. M. H. Eldred of
Pewablc.
Hymn Battle Hymn of the Repub
lic. Offering.
Introductory address by Bishop Da
vid H. Moore.
Selection Male quartette.
Address Rev. Samuel Dickie.
Hym n America.
Benediction Rev. F. P. Knowies.
A large chorus choir Is being or
ganlzed to lead the singing. Besides
speaking at the afternoon meeting, Dr.
Dickie will preach nt the evening serv
ice In the Hancock M. E. church.
PRETTY HOME WEDDING IS
SOLEMNIZED LAST EVENING
A pretty wedding occurred last even
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John
Ashton of Pewablc, when their son,
F. II. Ashton, of Calumet, and Miss
Edna 'Ethier, also of Calumet, were
united In marriage. Rev. M. H. Eldred,
pastor of the Pewablc M. E. church,
officiated. The bridesmaid was Miss
Lottie Fetterly of Calumet, and the
best man J. L. Ingersoll, also of Calu
met. The bride was attired In a soft
grey material, trimmed with lace, and
she carried a bouquet of carnations
and smllax. A similar bouquet was
carried by the bridesmaid, who was at
tired In a tan colored material, cut
Princess style. The parlor and dining
room was beautifully decorated with
carnations and smllax.
About eighty guests were present,
Including the employes of tho Tama
rack Co-operative society, where the
groom is employed. A special street
enr was commissioned for the use of
the Tamarack store employes, bringing
the party home again after tho wed
ding. The ceremony was performed at
8 o'clock, the full ring service of the
Methodist church being used.
There were many beautiful and cost
ly gifts. "They will make their home
In Laurlum.
FINED FOR THEFT OF FURS.
William Kemp, of Chicago, was ar
rested 'in' Hancock this morning, and
brought before Justice Olivier, charged
with' tlie theft of Some furs from a
Houghton woman. The defendant was
found 'with the goods, but ho said he
did not intend to keep them. The man
has been 'engaged on tho paving Job In
Hancock, coming to this city from Chi
cago, lie was fined $5' und costs.
HANCOCK BRfcYfilES.
Harry Cannon, formerly proprietor
of the Board of Trade Cafe In Hough
ton, called on Hancock friends yester
day. Mr. Cannon went west several
years ago, going to Alaska nnd Port
land, Ore.,where ho prospered and de
cided to return here for a visit. He ar
rived last Tuesday.
A daughter was born Wednesday to
Mr. and Mrs. Charles' F. McAsklll.
Edward I. Field, ' a mining engineer
from Grass Valley, California, Is In
the city for a tew days-on business.
" J. H. Jasberg has purchased an "ar
ctic sleigh," the first of Its kind seen
In the copper 'country, It being a
samplo received, at tho Kerredge hard
ware store from a manufacturing firm.
Tho peculiar featnre of the sleigh Is
the high; back, vtyeyond, which the run
ners extend about eighteen Inches, or
thereabouts, on which a person stands.
the same ns on a skee, und propels the
vehicle with the foot The seat is
shaped like a snowshoc and Is laced
with ropes, forming a sort of net on
which tho rider sits.' '
CUPID'S AIDE A HUMAN TORCH.
LITTLE HELEN KIRTLAND.
Marinette, Wif., "ov. 25. She was
Just a little mite, was pretty Jlelen
Klrtland and she was the pride of the
twin cities of Marinette and Menomln-
ee. At the recent society wedding,
the Oennet- Porter society event of
the season, this little wee girl was
the flower bearer. She captivated all
the guests and she was loved more,
well, more than the happy bride. Just
the other day Utti Helen went up
ir
ii
sea
(I
to the attic of her homo to play house.
Her mother was serving , a mid-day
luncheon and little Helen was toying
with the blocks and dreaming of tho
day she would bo a happy brido.) Of
courso she had to have a fire In the
grate of her toy house. She found the
matches down stairs In the safe and
sho raced back to kindle , the flame.
Then the big fire started 'and before
her father I. B. Klrtland, a prominent
attorney, could reach her she was a
mass of burns and' Just a little whilo
afterward she was carried away to
the fairies of whom she had been.
dreaming.
MARGARET ELIZABETH SANGSTER
Glen Ridge, N. J.. Nov. 23. Mar
garet Elizabeth Sangster, whose name
la a household word In America, has
Just produced another book which
will be of Interest to every mother of
every child who has ' followed' her
stories for years. She has written nn
Interesting volume of personal recol
lections which cover half a century of
active life. She Is particularly known
for her contributions to tho Youths'
Companion, Harpers Young peoplo
and other publications. She was born
at New Rochelle, N. Y., 'on Washing
ton's birthday, 1S38. She became a
contributor early In Hfo to the lead
ing child publications of America.
She became editor of Hearth and
Home in 1871 and continued In this
capacity for two years. She has writ-
THE PRESIDENT
IN CALUMET '
DR, HAW LEY
President of tho German and English
Staff of Thyslclans and Surgeons,
Composed of German, English and
American Doctors . now permanently
located at tho
Central Hotel
AND WILL RENDER SERVICES
TO THE SICK.
F RE E
UNTIL THE EVENING OF JAN 1st. I
, You need not bring money, as con
sultation nnd advice Is free, the rich
and poor alike treated. All who call
upon the doctors before the above date
will receive consultation, examination,
advice and surgical operations free.
All that Is asked is that every por
son treated will state to their friends
the result obtained by their new sys-
stcm.
The object In pursuing this course
Is to become rapidly and personally
acquainted with the sick and afflict
ed. "
ALL DISEASES OF MEN, WOMEN
AND CHILDREN TREATED.
These doctors are said to be the
greatest Stomach, Liver and Kidney
Specialists In America.
No matter what your dlsens may
be or of how long standing, the doe-
tors will locate your disease without
asking you any questions, '
RUPTURE POSITIVELY CURED
In threo treatments, many cured with
one. No knife, no pain, no risk, no
detention from business.
These doctors are skilhd specialists
ani will be found ready and willing to
extend the hand of help, bringing back
health and happiness where now exists
sickness and sorrow. A special Invita
tion to anyone suffering from disease
pronounced Incurable. It matters not
what your disease may be, go and be
examined; If curable, they will treat
you; If Incurable, advise you. These
doctors treat every variety of dis
ease and deformity. They have had a
vast experience In London, rnrls,
Heidelberg and Stockholm.
OFFICE HOURSt 9 u m. to 8 p.m. -
(""SHBUBNCBOSSTtllt
fllUlMEDALFlJDllBNji
WRITES A NEW BOOK. "
(DjQ
UUD
ten a number of charming poems and
today la known as the "Friend of
Children."
Compulsory insurance In Germany
lias hud a distinct c-ffeet upon the
medical profession. Many people can
not chooHo inedk'i.1 advisers at will.
Phjhieian aro engaged by the ofli
ials of Insurance organizations on
fixed contract terms, which are usual
ly far below the minimum rate flxe.l
by law for medical services. Tho old
time relations between physicians an J
those engaging their services, relations
of mutual confidence and respect, are
given away to a purely business con
nection, in which the personal equa
tion Is of diminishing importance.
There is keen competition to secure
the posts of medical otllcers of the
different insurance funds, and thoe
who secure them may be tempted, on
account of tho very lw soulo of fee,
to render perfunctory and Inadequate
service. Tho Btlmulous of doing his
best to win the confidence of each
patient, as well as his family and
friend, is no longer felt. On the pa-t
of some of th Insured It Is alleged
th ro is a tendency to abuse their
ability to command tho services of a
doctor to an almost unlimited extent
and to summon him at any hour of
the day or night on the slightest pre
text. Washington Herald.
(torch lake news)
ODD FELLOWS WILL OBSERVE
THIRTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY
Committeemen of tho Lake Linden
lodge of Odd Fellows are preparing a
program for next Monday evening when
the 33th anniversary of the institution
of the lodge will be observed. The
lodge has had a successful career, also
nn eventful one as a portion of Its ex
istence has been of such a nature as to
make Its struggle for life a hard one.
Nevertheless It conquered nnd the an
niversary will be observed here next
Monday evening when a program by
good local talent will bo rendered.
The committee looking after tho
work has reported progress In every
respect and the members of the three
link organization and their friends an
ticipate one of tho best anniversaries
ever held under their auspices. The
program will consist of recitations,
reading, songs and short but interest
ing talks on tho good of tho organiza
tion. !
The numbers of the program have
not been completed for publication.
A large number of tickets have been
sold In advance and there promises to
tie a good sized crowd present.
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FAIR.
Will
Be Held in Congregational
Church This Evening.
The young people of the Congrega
tion church of Lake Linden will hold
a supper and fair this evening In the
parlors of the church. A large selec
tion of useful and pretty gifts will be
offered for sale. The young people are
arranging several pretty booths. One
of them will bo "The Old Woman In
the Shoe," and this ns well as all the
ethers will be attractive. In addition
to the fair supper will be served start
ing about 6 o'clock. Those who have
seen some of the articles which the
young people arc to offer for sale de
clare they are very good and there Is
every reason to believe there will be
a large number of articles disposed
of. J
MARCOTTE TO CLEVELAND.
Charles "Sailor" Marcotte of Hub-
boll, who played on the Calumet hock
ey team last season, leaves this after
noon for . Cleveland, 1 0 where he has
been offered a lucrative position. He
WE OFFER A SELECTION OF DIAMOND RINGS AT
$7.0, $10.00, $15.00, $18.00 AND UP TO $30.00 WHICH
ARE REALLY EXCEPTIONAL IN QUALITY AND VAL
UE. IN MOUNTING THESE RINGS WE CHOOSE THE
STONES WITH AS GREAT CARE AS WE DO OUR
M n qt ryDTMCtv r- niAiinunt a c nn unT ! iw a
WHOLE PAPER OF
OUT EACH STONE SEPARATELY AND UNDER A GLASS AND SE
LECT ONLY THOSE OF CHOICE COLOR AND QUALITY. J.
WE CHARGE NO MORE FOR THESE CHOICE GOODS THANYOJ
WILL PAY FOR INFERIOR GRADES, AND THEIR SUPERIOR BRIL
LIANCY IS QUICKLY SEEN WHEN A COMPARISON IS MADE. 1
WARREN JEWELRY CO,
II
U f J J&h
will play on the team of that cily. Mr.
Marcotte has a large circle of friends
here who regret his departure us he is
one of the best players In tho copper
country.
DANCES DRAW CROWDS.
Hubbrli Firemen and Lak Lindsn
Band Give Successful Parties.
The two dances held here this week:
were very successful both from a so
cial and financial standpoint. Tho
fifth annual ball of the Hubbell vol
unteer fire department, held Wednes
day night in Opal's hall, was well at
tended and the members of the de
partment outshone their previous ef
forts as good entertainers. The hall
was filled with friends of the firemen,
and according to reports all had a good
time. The Hubbeli band played a
lengthy program of dance numbers and,
all were well pleased. The fire fighters
served luncheon.
The Thanksgiving dance given by thj
Lake Linden band, its first annual so
cial affair, held Thursday night, was
one of the most successful of the sea
son. The affair was held In the Lako
Linden opera house dance hall. '"Thero
were a number present from out of
town. So well pleased were tlc mu
sicians with their success that they
will probably hold a dance annually
In the future. They have made rapid
progress under the directorship of their
leader and Instructor, Victor Gillette.
TORCH LAKE BREVITIES.
Arthur Marcotte of Hubbel went for
bis first deer hunt last Wednesday.
He went out that morning and In th
evening returned home with a fine
buck. Other Ilubbeliltes who were
successful were John H. Hodges who
killed two deer, and Joe Wise who had
one.
The members of the C. O. I Indoor
baseball team of Hubbeli will hold a
card iKirty tomorrow evening In tho
convent hall. The object of the party
is to raise money with which to secure
new uniforms for the players.
Robert ltenson of Duluth arrived at
Hubbeli yesterday and will spend tho
remainder of the month visiting rela
tives and friends here.
Will Roberts leaves this evening for
Duluth where he will take a position
with the Minnesota Steel company.
Mr. and Mrs. . Malcolm lVrris and
daughter returned to their home at
Mandan today after spending a couplo
of days visiting at the Dee home In
Hubbeli.
The steamer G. A. Flagg cleared port
this morning at 11 o'clock. This makes
the last trip of this boat for tho sea
son. Here is the Difference
When we enlarge pictures Us
pure, clean and bright work and
will last for a lifetime. When
the other fellows do your work
Its not worked out. It's black,
dirty looking and will fade
away In a short time. Don't tako
our word. Call and compare
our work to others, or ask your
fi i. ;ibout is. '
U :: ; tock of picture frames
Is larp. In assortment' nnd low
In prices. We do nil kinds of
picture framing. If you have
pictures to frame bring them
along. If not you will find a large
assortment at our store. We
also enlarge photos on Pillow
Tops, Brooches, Fobs, Watch
Charms, etc., made with your
own pictures In It.
Rrlng all your work early If
yon want It for Christmas.
The Peninsula Art Store
441 fiflh St., Cor. Pine
Phone 503 M CALUMET
ASSORTED GRADES, BUT PICrC

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