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The Calumet news. [volume] (Calumet, Mich.) 1907-1938, June 30, 1910, Image 1

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Can you attend to mora
THR1 1 TMRT
business If to, 1st The Nsws
carry your ads. It reaches
Can yeu attend to mere
business? ilf , let The Ntw
the people that make bust
nets.
canry your ad. It reaches
the people that make bust
nest.
VOL. XIX
RAILROADS
m
THEIR PLEA FOR
HIGHER RATES
Commerce Commission Announces
It Will Not Suspend Classi
fication Involving Over
6,000 Items.
RE-ARRANGEMENT FOUND FAIR
In All the Numerous Items and Ratings
Involved There Were Only 58
Changes, of Which 28 Were
Reductions.
Washington. Juno ' 30. Permission
was granted today by the Interstate
Commerce commission to railroads op
crating out of Hnffalo, New York, to
advanoo the rates on Hour and other
wheat products one cent per hundred
pounds -to eastern destinations.
Announcement also was made by the
commission today it would not sus
pend official classification No. 2B, In
volving over 6,000 Items, which was
filed to become effective July 1. This
declination to act Is regarded as a vic
tory for the railroads. ,
For pearly u. month the commission
has been overwhelmed with protests
against the proposed new classifica
tion of freight, many shippers seeming
to entertain tho Idea that a rearrange
ment of the freight classification would
result In largely increased rates.
The subject wag considered careful
ly by the commission through a com
prehensive check being prepared on the
entire classification.
In the 6,000 items and ratings Involv
ed there were only G8 changes, of
which 28 are reductions, thirty ad
vances. The official classification ter
ritory includes all that part of the
United States north . oj the Totomac.
and Ohio rivers and east of the Mis
sissippi river. It takes In the cities of
St. Louis and Chicago.
BENEFIT WORKING GIRLS.
Night Work is Prohibited Among
Seamstresses and Others in France.
Paris, June 30. The decree of tho
ministry of labor prohibiting night
work on the part of seamstresses, mile,
liners and other working girls, which
became effective today, marks a great
forward step In the movement for the
amelioration of the condition of the
women workers of France. For many
yeara the sweating system has been
greatly abused In France, and especial
ly In Paris, where the employes 1"
many fashlonnble dressmaking and
millinery establishments have often
been compelled to work until midnight
during the .busy season.
SHRINERS HOLD
SUMMER SFSSION
AHMED TEMPLE INITIATED A
LARGE CLASS AT MARQUETTE
MEETING LAST EVENING
AN ENJOYABLE DAY.
Yesterday was Shrlners' day In Mar
quette, being the summer semi-annual
nession of Ahmed temple, Nobles of
the Ancient order of the Mystic Shrine.
In spite of the Intense heat, there was
a fairly good attendance from all parts
of tho upper peninsula and the usual
good fellowship and good time was en
Joyed. The business session in the af
ternoon was spent In seeing the sights
of the city and other forms of pleas
ure. One of the Pioneer Motor com
pany buses was at the disposal of the
nobles during the afternoon and many
sought to get away from the heat In
this manner. Others accepted the hos
pitality of the Marquette club, which
was extended to all tho visitors.
In the evening the Shrlners In red
caps and other regalia marched from
the Hotel Marquette to Masonic hall,
h ading the randidat s who were des
tined to cross the desert sands by a
rough and toilsome pilgrimage to final
ly find, comfort and enjoyment In the
oasis of Ahmed temple.
After the ceremonial session a mus
ical and vaudeville program was Riven,
which was followed by ft luncheon and
smoker. The following were the can
didates who were worked last evening:
P. R Ferris, Esoana ha; F. W. flood.
Esonnubn; J. T. Dnnlell. Laurlum; J. M.
floldsworthy, Crystal' Falls; August
Wallen, Ewen; J. C. Hrown, August
Nordlne, Kenton; A. It. fllbbs, C. O. E.
Slobery, A. II. Whlttemore, Menominee;
Thomas Deardon. Hubbell; A. It. Ja
cobs, Sault Ste. Marie; A. A. Mnywood,
Marquette; Nathaniel Lobb, L. H. ste
ward, Munlslng; R. A. Manhard, Mar
quette; William Craig, Ksoanaba, and
J. W. Kingston, Laurlum.
MORE STRINGENT
MARRIAGE LAWS
NEW JERSEY WILL PLACE BAN
ON HASTY WEDDINGS TOMOR
ROW SLIP-SHOD METHODS
ARE FROWNED ON.
Jersey city, N. J., June 30. One of
the most drastic marriage laws yet
adopted by any Btate will come Into ef
fect in New Jersey tomorrow, with the
result that the hasty midnight wed
dings or chorus Kirls, divorcees, glid
ed youths and intoxicated millionaires
who have been in the habit of cross
lug over rrom New York to have tho
knot tied will become a thing of the
past.
The new law requires that tho mar
llage license be obtained In the place
where the bride-elect resides, unless
she be a non-resident of New Jersey.
In the latter case the license must be
obtained In the home town of the
bridegroom-elect. If both are non-residents,
the license must be obtained In
the place where the ceremony is to be
performed. The law provides that he
fore a marriage license shall be issued
the person issuing It shall require one
of the contracting parties to subscribe
to nn oath or afllrmation attesting the
truth of the facts respecting the legal
ity of the proposed marriage, and tho
license shall be issued only if it be
made to appear that no legal Impedi
ment exists. The applicant must swear
that neither party Is an imbecile, epi
leptic or of unsound mind. The per
son applying for the license must also
be accompanied by an Identifying wit
ness who will be required to swear
that the applicants are legally quali
fied to marry.
CENSUS Will SHOW SOUTH
MADE BIG POPULATION GAIN
Washington, June SO. That tho cen
sus of 1910 will show the southern
states, Including Missouri and Okla
homa, made a gain In population or 21
per cent since 1900 is the estimate or
the southern commercial congress. The
congress -estimates the population at
32.4 1 r..2J7. The gain In other states of
tfu union In the' same perlo'd Is esti
mated at IS Vi per cent. The figures
are based upon the provisional esti
mates of tho census bureau.
TWO CARPENTERS FAIL FROM
SCAFFOLD: ONE BADLY HURT
Alfred Mikkola and Oscar Strom
back, two carpenters In the emplo of
Edward ITl'seth of Calumet, were In
jured this afternoon through falling
from a scaffold while at work on the
Hanley residence on Pine street. The
former was rendered unconscious and
was removed to tho Calumet public
hospital where his injuries are being
treated. The latter was not as seri
ously hurt, he having been able to
walk to his home. The accident occur
red at about 2:30 o'clock. Mikkola's
Injuries are serious. The scaffold plat
form was about 20 feet from the
ground.'
FOURTH AT EWEN.
Another upper peninsula town has
come to the front with the announce
ment of a Fourth of July celebration.
Posters were out yesterday announc
ing that Independence day would be
fittingly observed in the good old-fashioned
way at Ewen, Houghton county.
These posters promise that there will
bo speech-making, all kind of snort,
baseball, dancing nnd a grand display
of fireworks In tho evening. Wu H.
Gardner has been appointed marshal
of the day. and W. C. Francis will bo
the chief speaker.
Prizes to tho amount of $200 are of
fered for various races and contents,
such as a 100-yard foot race, a potato
1 ace. xaok race, girls' slow race, flag
race, standing and broad Jumps, high
Jumps and hop, skip and Jump. There
will he a baseball game between Trout
Creek and the Kwen Cubs, to the win
ner of which a prize of $25 will be
given. Oltourke's orchestra will fur
nldi the music for dancing at tho op
era house, 'both afternoon and evon-
'"tIio following committees have been
appointed: Arrangements-Carl J.
Hatfield. W. S. Co". W. fl . Gardner.
SporU-A. T. ORourke. Carl J. Hat
field. Musle-W. 8. Cole. Charles
Heck. Excursion rates will he In ef
fect on the South Shore railway.
MARRIED LAST EVENING.
William Hryant and Miss Charlotte
SMitte. both of Calumet were married
last evening at the Calumet M. E. par
sonage by Rev. E. Sedweek Thev
were attended, by Joseph Rolorts and
Miss Lillian Norden a best man am
bridesmaid, respectively. They will
begin house-keeping Immediately.
The Teter Martin, charged with ob
taining money under false pretenses
nnd recently sentenced by Justice Ar
mil to alxty days In the county jail.
Tn not Peter Martin of Red Jacket
shaft, but a resident of
Martin of Red Jacket shn left last
Sunday for Detroit on a vWt
CALUMET, HOUGHTON COUNTY, MICHIGAN. THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE
THOUSANDS AT
ANNUAL YALE
HARVARD RACES
Interest is Very Keen in All Three
Contests Between the Crews
of the Crimson and Blue
on Thames River.
OLD III SENTIMENT STRONGER
Harvard, However, it Still the Favor
it Because of Veterans and Vic- '
tories of Past Two Years
Course is Changed.
Harvard Wins First Two.
The Harvard Freshmen eight beat
Yale three lengths.
Tho Harvard Varsity four finished
four length ahead of Yale.
Harvard's weight stamina told In
tho Freshmen race, Yale weakening
only in the last half mile.
.Now London, June 30. Thrco hard
races for the Harvard-Yale crews and
a ccorching for the spf-ctators, were
the early morning predictions for Mm
race today on the Thames. John Ken
nedy, veteran coach of Yale, ventured
the first while the Harvard-Yale men
agreed on the second.
The morning dawned clear and tho
river was smooth. Thousand, throng
ed the river banks. Yachts formed a
lane three miles or more t hi ouch
Lwhich the crew row. Two war craft
gave a business look to tho scene. As
tho hour approached for the races,
special trains began pulling Into the
station, unloading collegians and the
streets became congested.
Tho morning races with the fresh
men eights tart at the drawbridge.
Its a straightway pull of two miles for
the freshmen, and practically the same
for tho fours.
To a large proportion of spectators
today a finish of a varsity race at the
drawbridge Is a novelty. Tho course
of the eights recalls President I lad
ley's words nt the recent Alumni din
ner at New Haven, when ho said
"Pill Taft of '7S Is In the eel grass
on tho second mile of the course," und
ho added, "Yale won many victories In
tho third and fourth mllo after get
ting out of the eel grass."
Harvard Rules a Favorite.
To the Yale and Harvard oarsmen
the simile Is an apt one. The start of
the race is abreast of red top over to
wards tho westerly bank. Yale took
the west course for the afternoon'
race on account of tho prevailing
westerly wind. The disadvantage of
the eel grass is tho reason the course
this year was shifted easterly a tri
fle, helping out the crew on the wes
terly side, so In effect the first race
down rtream in several years disposes
to some extent the former bugaboo of
the"eel grass."
The morning races had the advan
tage of the flowing tide, which hero
Is very strong. While tho Crimson
has been the ruling favorite for tho
varsity and freshmen eights, thero Is
some slight change of sentiment over
night in spite of the fact Harvard
men are here In great numbers. Har
vard nevertheless went to the start
this morning a flight favorite, based
on veteran material and two success
ive victories.
HIS STATEMENT INCORRECT.
Baggage Car of Northwestern Train
Only Car Which is Not Steel.
Representatives of the Chicago &
Northwestern railroad In this city as
sert that the train which cornea to this
city Is not composed of mixed wooden
nnd steel coaches as recently claimed,
but that the entire train with the ex
ception of the baggage car. Is com
posed of steel cars. The baggage car
is partly steel and partly wood and Is
up-to-dnte In every way. Local repre
sentatives of the road claim that the
commercial man quoted in this paper
last evening as stating that the wooden
nnd steel cars were mixed, with the
result that in case of an accident the
Hteel cars would likely telescope the
wo,len ones, was misinformed. They
mv that there would be practically no
danger of such a catastrophe as he
train is now arranged. The cars which
nro used for the passengers are built
most entirely of steel, this part of
the train being Intact.
nrw York riKt-
GENERALLY
FAIR TONIGHT
AND FRIDAY.
SLIGHTLY
COOLER.
Temperatures:
IfWOaKS DEALIR3.
HAVE INVtNTtBH
LCRACKt k . TO TnL
AVERAGE JWMj-
about A3 AHmiKfl
TVW IT W IA. nt.
I A3 A doughnut
irnm
Midnight 74
3 a. m 78
6 a. m 77
9 a. m 87
Noon 92
Highest yester.
day M
OPEN CONGO FOR
TREE COMMERCE
LONG ADVOCATED REFORM TO
BECOME - AN ESTABLISHED
FACT TOMORROW TO ABOL- .
ISH FORCED LABOR.
Hrusscls, June 30. Congo reforms
for which the governments, churches,
mlH.slonury societies and other organ
izations throughout a large part of the
civilized world have been working for
years, will become an accomplished
fact tomorrow, when tho plans for
mulated by the Belgian ministry of
tho colonies and approved by King
Allert will become effective. Simul
taneously a large area of the Congo
region will , be opened to free com
merce. The reform include the suppression
of polygamy, the substitution of native
for white officials, a reduction In tho
taxos which will .be collected In mon
ey and not paid In labor, and the re
striction of obligatory labor on the
part of adults to the works dedicated
to the Improvement of their own con
ditions. ,
The most vital feature of the reform
program is the provision for the sup
pression of forced la.bor, a 'situation
which has rendered possible tho ter- j
rible conditions which In the past nave
roused the horror of the civilized
world. . ,
Under the Leopold regime the col
lection of taxes through labor instead
of money, enabled that monarch to
work his immense rubber trade free of
expense. A quota! of so much rubber,
In lieu of taxes, was demanded, from
each village, an amount which would
require the labor of every adult In
the village virtually all of his or her
time. Failure to produce the allotted
portion at the required time was fol
lowed by the immediate punishment at
the hands of the black soldiers of the
Congo government, consisting too fre
quently of tortures, mutilation, or
death.
LATTER DAY SAINTS MEET.
Reglna, Sask.. June 30. A conven
tion of the Church of Latter Day Saints
for the provinces .. T Saskatchewan and
Alberta began here today and will
continue until next Monday. The con
vention is attended by several hundred
delegates and visitors, among whom
nro Wshop Evans of Toronto. Klder
A. Smith of Lamonl, la., and other
prominent dignitaries of the church.
MOVES TO HAVE
U. S. INTERVENE
PETITION WITH 700 NAMES PRE
SENTED TO GEN. ESTRADA,
ASKING U. S. TO TAKE
HAND TO STOP WAR.
Washington, June 30. Intervention
in the Nlearaguan situation came to
the foie ngain today when United
States Consul Moffat, at Pluenelds.
telegraphed the state department that
a petition with 700 signatures had been
presented to General Estrada asking
that the United States Intervene. The
department has heard nothing from
General Estrada himself. The sugges
tion that the United States Intervene
is taken as a counter move to offset
the undesirable Impression likely to
result from the refusal of General Es
trada to accept the proposal of the
Cartago court of Justice to have the
warfare ended by mediation. '
Tho dispatch from Mr. Moffat also
told about the courtmartlal of Win. I'.
I'ittman. the American engineer held
by the Madriz forces as a prisoner of
war. The statement of tho consul on
tills point, taken In connection with the
facts is that the treatment of IMttman
has been a subject of diplomatic In
vestigation, led by tho department to
the conclusion that Tillman's court
martial was premature.
Senor Corea, representative of the
Madriz government In this city, to
day received two dispatches from Ma
driz, one denying many of the reported
antl-Amerlcan manifestations nnd
the determination of his government
to keep them from resulting In harm
to Americans In Nicaragua.
The first telegram read:
It Is false that the revolutionists
are In control. Chontales. Acoyapa,
San Yubaldo are In our power. The
revolutionists are near Acoyapa In a
very reduced number and with few
supplies. Will soon be beaten In the
way that a revolutionary band that ap
peared near Mombacho was destroyed
at Escalantillo with death of Its chief
Talavera. The entire country. Includ
ing the Atlantic coast, has submitted
to the government authority, with the
exception of IMueflelds and Rama."
The second read:
"The government haa given orders
to stop the antl-Amerlcan manifesta
tions and has made more rigorous the
censure of the press In this particular.
The government guarantees complete
safety to all American citizens. You
will call to mind the casea of Fowler,
Cannon and rittman."
WORD PICTURE :
OF CEREMONIES
AT RENO CAMPS
Jeffries Goes About Business of
. Training for big Bout Like
Pick Handler on Rail
t road Tracks.
MANY WATCH THE MtN WORK
White Gladiator is Serious, but He
. Laughs at Times Champion Gives
4 Musical Prelude to His Spar
ing Scenes.
Reno, Nev., June 30. Hero Is a view
of the daily morning ceremony that Is
helping to make Reno a mime In the
world'a mouth wherever wires spread.
What happened this morning at Alca
na Springs .before the sun was well
up over the ragged tojs of Woshie
range may bo described as typical of
what has been appenlng for a few
days, and will continue to be a daily
morning ceremony until July 4.
Thero Is a valley, blue-green with
alfalfa, a sun-baked range of moun
tains on the east .and tho snow
uplotched Sierras on ,. the wet; a
sprawling, white" bathhouse over a hot
soda spring on one side of a dusty
road, and on the other a low cottage
covered with vines. Behind tho cot
tage is a tent, and the tumbled bed
ding on a cot with it always holds the
spectator's eye for a moment.
Whispers in Their Ears.
Near the, tent and Just where two
cottonwood trees mingle their branch
es to make a shade .Is a small dancing
platform, and Its surface Is. covered
with little lumps of rosin and rosin
dust.
On tho night . before Jack Jeffries
draws this -or. that newspaper man
aside and whispers Th his ear that he'd
bol(or get out to the .springs . early
next morning, for the, big. fellow in
going to get to work before the pun
Is too hot. l'.rother Jack-.gives this
advice tentatively and with an air as
of In some degree betraying a confi
dence. The electric car that leaves Vir
ginia fltreet, In tho center of Reno at
7:30 o'clock the next morning Is com
fortably crowded. Tho occupants are
mainly newspaper men, photographers
nnd sports who have dropped Into
town from Pacific coast points.
Hy 8:20 o'clock there are about 100
people about the dancing platform In
the yard of the training quarters at
tho springs. The privileged ones are
allowed to occupy the seats along the
four sides of tjjie platform, llehlnd
these seats the plain citizens of Reno
are allowed to stand.
A long, lanky negro Jn a black bath- j
robe comes through tho kitchen door
and climbs onto tho platform; that's
Bob Armstrong, one of the trainers
and a sparring partner. Then through
the door comes Jeffries. The fighter's
face Is flatly unemotional; he goes
about his business with the dispas
sionate air of a pick handler on the
railroad tracks.
They Put on the Gloves.
The negro drops his bathrobe and
both put on the gloves. While they
do .so the Interlude Is filled with nod
dings and whisperings among the se
lect spectators on the benches. Jef
fries and the negro begin to wpar.
They go for three rounds. During
each of them the white fighter with
the flat, uninterested expression on his
browned face does his business with
unbroken seriousness. "Top" Van
court and Jim Corbett confer In whis
pered sentences. They extol the speed
which Jeffries shows.
After Armstrong retires Sam Tterger
Is taken on for three more rounds. In
one of these rounds Jeff, for the first
time, shows human emotion as he sud
denly lifts Herger's guarding right
with a sweep of his fist and crushes his
right Into Merger's stomach. He
laughs and the spectators Join.
"How's that for high?" says Jeffries,
and he continues his work of prac
ticing crushing blows on Tterger's body
only he puts a "pull" on his arm.
After Merger come Choynskl and
Corbett.
For forty-live minutes of breathless
boxing the spectators have all their
expectations of thrills and shocks ful
filled. Then, at the end. tho big man
spends ten minutes more In neck-to-neck
wrestling wlUi Farmer Rums.
After this, with the same serious busi
ness air, Jeffries stalks off to his rub
bing room to be kneaded and mailed
In the hands of his masseurs. Thus the
ceremony at Mioana Springs comes to
Its conclusion.
A far different spectacle Is that which
Reno attends In the afternoon out nt
Ricks' Road House. Thia Is a vaude
vlllo performance with a pleasurable
dash of excitement thrown In Intermit
tently. There are said to be three
hundred automobiles In this little des
ert city at present, and all one has to
do to get to Champion Johnson s
training quarters Is to stand on any
corner and hold a $3 gold piece up to
the sun.
There's No Other Way.
There la no other way, except on
foot, to get there. Tho procession of
30, I9I0..
200,000 WATCH
NEW YORK FIRE
SPECTACULAR BLAZE ALONG
1 WATER FRONTON HARLEM..
RIVER GIVES FIREMEN
, HARD BATTLE.
New York, N. Y., June 30. An ear
ly morning blaze, which threatened to
destroy several .blocks of valuable wa
ter front. on the Ilrlem river, was
stilled by firemen after a hard, battle
shortly before daybreak today. . The
loss will not exceed one hundred thou
sand dollars. The blaze was .'a' pec
tacular one and was watched by two
huiulred thousand persons. ; :
Costly Fire at Wymore, Neb.
Wymore, Neb., June 30. A block of
buildings was destroyed by fire this
morning. A special train carried fire
men from Iteatrlce to assist In putting
down the conflagration. The loss. ex
ceeds two hundred thousand dollars.
There were no casualties.
S. DAKOTA'S NEW CAPITOL.
T'lerre, 8. D., June 30. In conjunc
tion with the South Dakota conserva
tion congress now In sesvdon here In
teresting exercises were held today to
mark the formal dedication of the new
state cnpitol. The participants In
cluded the governor and former gov
ernors of the state, the Judges of the
supreme court, the South Dakota rep
resentatives In congress and a num
ber of distinguished visitors from
Minnesota, North Dakota and other
neighboring states.
CHILE Will HAVF BIGGEST
BATTLESHIP. IN THE WORLD
New York, June 30. A South
American republic. Is to , have the
world's biggest battleship. Chile has
commissioned an English firm of boat
builders to begin work on a . vessel of
320.000 tons,- of a speed equal or ex
ceeding the fastest warship afloat.
The armament .will correspond. The
ship will cost $15,000,000. - ' ' .
STEAMER TIONESTA AGROUND
ON ROUND ISLAND NEAR S00
Sault Ste. Marie, June 30. Three
steamers, the Tlonesta, Eads and Schil
ler, grounded . on Round . Island last
night In a heavy cloud of smoke, caus
ed by forest fires.
The Tlonesta left Houghton yester
day, down bound. The Anchor line
agent at Houghton was not aware that
the boat had grounded when The News
telephoned him this afternoon, but he
believes the craft Is In no danger
whatever and that she, will soon be re
leased If not already pulled off Into
deeper water.
TAFT AND TEDDY CONFER.
Reverly, Mass., June 30. Taft and
Roosevelt are expected to meet this
afternoon at Murgesa Point In what Is
regarded by many as the most Import
ant political conference In years. Or
ders have been Issued excluding all
visitors from the grounds surrounding
the Taft house.
gasoline vehicles begins to stream out
over the eastern road at about 2
o'clock. It takes fifteen minutes to
make the run. The end of the Jour
ney comes when the autos chug Into
the front yard of the large, white
hotel. In the parlor of the hotel John
son, with his bass viol, entertains all
comers with such tunes as "'My Money
Never Gives Out."
Accompanied by a lark skinned
brother on the piano, iMr. Johnson,
with his ever-ready mile of welcome,
passes easily from one tune to an
other.
During the Impromptu concert, Mr.
Jack McAullffe and Mr. Jack Root
sit on the front steps with Mr. John l
Sullivan and gravely talk over "pros
pects."
The Impromptu concert over, there
Is an Interval of waiting. Finally, the
hundred-odd folks who have motored
up to Ricks dispose themselves on the
grass around the ring erected on a
platform near a cabbage patch. The
champion. In sky-blue tights and with
an American flag twisted Into a belt,
soon appears. Then follows juggling
with the medicine ball. The .Mr. Al
Kaufman puts on the gloves and the
colored champion plays with him
through four languid rounds.
Blocks Blows by Instinct.
Johnson blocks blows seemingly by
Instinct even while he Is grinning at
one of his friends In the crowd. After
Kaufman follows Walter MVmchon
"Dave" Mills and Oeorge Cotton.
There are occasional flashes by John
son during these bouts of almost vi
cious activity, and the spectators hold
their breath at these Instants, waiting
to see on of the sparing partners Jifted
nto oblivion.
After about an hour's work, when
the champion disappears to his rub
bing quarters, one old sport turns to
the other, looks him quizzically In the
eye and says: "Well, If he ain't the
limit; nobody can get a line on him
NO. 199
mmm
111 UUH
IN PRIMES
INN. DAKOTA
Re-Nomination of Present Mem
. bcr of the Upper House Is .
Conceded By the Oppo-
, . sition Today. r
HAY BEEN III SINCE APRIL
la Informed of Good News by Wire
Today Senator Daniell of Virgin
ia Passes Away Noted Mem- ,
ber of Senate,
.Washington, June 30. Senator Mc
Cumber of North Dakota, who haa been
111 here since April 11, received a tele
gram today, from Representative IIan
na of Fargo, saying:
, "There Is no question but that you
have been elected. The Fargo New
concedes It."
: The primaries were held In North)
Dakota yesterday.
Senator Daniel Dead.
Lynchbu rg, Va, June 30. John W.
Daniel, senior United States senator
from Virginia, died at a sanatarium
here at 10:35 o'clock last night, death
being due to paralysis. The Imme
diate cause was a cerebral hemorr
hage. The senator began linking late
In the afternoon and te relative were
all summoned to his bedside. The fu
neral will be held Friday at an hour to
be determined later.
The lllne&s tegan'wlth a llght at
tack of apoplexy In Philadelphia last
October, "keeping him from the senate
at the opening of congress last De
cember. Only once since had he ap
peared before an audience; that for
an Informal talk in January. At no
time was there horTe of recovery. The
senator was iborn (n 1842.
WILL VISIT SCENE OF WORK.
Township Board nd Contractors Will
Inspect New Road District.
The members of the Calumet town
ship road committee, and the several
local contractors who are figuring on
the Job of building of a new road lead
ing from Copper City to the Trap
Rock river valley district, and the re
pairing of a stretch of road In the
same district, will go to the scene of
the proposed road Improvements to
morrow morning, accompanied by En
gineer Crlerson. ;
The plans and specifications are now
on file In the township clerk's office,
and are open for Inspection. The reg
ular monthly meeting of the Calumet
township board will be held Tuesday
morning of next week, when bids will
be opened and the contract for the
work awarded.
The length of the new road to he
built is approximately 7,200 feet, while
the old road which is to be repaired.
Is about one-half mile In length.
SUIT AGAINST
COL ROOSEVELT
WOMAN WANTS BALM FOR NOT
BEING PRESENTED TO KING
OSCAR OTHER AMERICANS
ARE ALSO SUED.
New York, June 30. A big bundle f
papers purporting to be the complaint
in a suit for $1,000,000 damages against
Theodore Roosevelt, Robert Hacon,
American ambassador to France, Chas.
Graves and the American nun
Ister to Sweden and his wife, Is In the
county clerk's office here awaiting dis
position. The bundle was thrown Into
the office today by Mrs. Ida M. Von
Claussen after the clerk's refusal to
file them because of irregularities.
The attempted suit is an outgrowth
of the refusal of Minister Graves to
present Mrs. Ida M. Von Claussen at
the court of the late King Oscar of
Sweden In 1907. The complaint In
part says:
'I hereby make formal demand of
the supreme court of the United .States
to procure me an honest lawyer to
plead for Justice f.ir me If the United
States of America has laws capable
to protect me; If not, then the legisla
ture must be appealed to."
' So far, Mrs. Von Claussen says she
has boon unable to find such a lawyer.
The complaint continues:
"I therefore file In the supreme court
this complaint and institute a suit for
slander, malice and revenge to recover
$1,000,000. . . . The gross Insult and
slander I received In Sweden of which
the world has cognizance. Is laid di
rectly to the foregoing conspirators."
Mrs. Von Claussen has figured con
spicuously In the newspapers ever since
her return from Sweden. She says
King Oscar gave her his photograph
and Invited her to visit him.
'1
T. I
1
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