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The Calumet news. [volume] (Calumet, Mich.) 1907-1938, February 27, 1911, Image 1

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No Evening Complete
Without
THE CALUMET NEWS
Calumet'a Homo Paper.
THE CALUMET NEWS
CALUMET NEWi
Ads Toll You
Whoro to Get the,
Boot Bargain.
VOL XX
CALUMET HOUGHTON COUNTY, MICHIGAN, MONDAY AFTERNOON FEBRUARY 27, 1911
NO. 10!
VOTE MAY BE
TAKEN BEFORE
THE DAY ENDS
On Motion of Burrows Senate A
. grecs to Proceed Immediate
ly With Consideration
of Lorimer Case
MAY BE AN-EVENING SESSION
Intention of Illinois Solon's Friends is
to Prolong Sitting Until Voto is
Reached Several Yet to
Be Heard.
Washington, D. C. Fcb. 27. With a
full realization that after today there
would bo little opportunity to give
any consideration to the rase of Sen
ator Lorimer, hla friends went Into
today's session of the senate with de
termination of pressing the question
to vote before adjournment' If possible.
As usual there were obstacles In the
way, "but Lorlmer's friends were de
voting: themselves with might and
main to their removal. Penrose, 1n
charge of the postofllce appropriation,
was regarded ca the principal of these,
tiut he appeared willing to yield In
favor of the Lorimer case If toy so do
ing he could Insure a vote upon it
Senators Stone, Crawford, Root end
Owen are still standing with undeliv
ered speeches, twit all promised to be
brief.
LaFollette Is still an uncertain far
tor, but the supporters of Lorimer
were confident, even though LaFoI
htte's opposition rhoukl develop into
a filibuster, 'they still could force a
vote unless ' reinforcements thould
ome to his assistance. The plan,
therefore, was to prevail upon Ten
rose to-get out of tho avay. with . the
postofflce bill to take the Lorimer
matter up at the beginning of the ses
sion and to continue the day's" sitting
unt'I a vote should be readied, even
though a prolonged evening session
should become necessary. .
On motion of Burrows the senate
voted to proceed immediately with the
consideration of the Lorimer case.
Crawford Defends Oeneen. '
Crawford took the floor to reply to
wmo of Lorlmer's expressions In his
own defense. Crawford ppoke espe
cially of Lorlmer's criticisms of Gov
ernor Deneen. Ho had been of the
opinion the governor should have an
orrortunlty to defend himself, ho paid.
On this account the' South Dakota
senator said he had notified. Governor
I-)eneen of Lorlmer's charges and had
received a telegrom in reply, saying
the governor had not favored Lorl
mer's election and referring him to
th published statements by himself.
Characterizing Lorlmer's discussion
of the case as a charge against Ic
neen of "usurpation and tyranny,"
Crawford criticised the minors sena
tor's course as unjustifiable in view
of the fact the testimony had been
closed, and the governor foreclosed
against a reply.
Crawford read Denocn's newspaper
rri ly to Lorlmer's speech. Referring
to the plea that tho present proceed
ing Is an effort to assassinate the
character of Irlmer, Crawford de
clared that if deterred by su ' allega
tions the Senate would bram' Itself as
cowards, abject cowards.
Crawford asserted, that In his cam
paign for governor, Deneon was
"hounded not only by the Democrats
but by the Republicans led by Lori
mer." He reiterated tho election of
Shurtleff as rpeaker, and Browne, as
Democratic leader, were steps In tho
corrupt program.
May Be Further Delay.
Without having concluded, Craw
ford yielded the floor at 3 o'clock. That
procedure presaged a further delay In
the Lorimer case, as the yielding was
to Huron who was to speak on the
Popular election of senators. liacon,
however, immediately yielded to Raln
er, who entered upon the delivery of
a set speech upon that subject.
. " Hobson Bill Reported Out.
Washington. D. C, Feb. 27. The
Hobson bill to prevent the disclosure
of national defense secrets, which has
passed the House, was today reported
out of the Senate committed on Judi
ciary with a favorable recommenda
tion. .
TRAIN WRECKED ONE DEAD.
Jennings, Kas., Feb. 27. 'An extra
Hock Island pasengcr train, loaded
with weMern home-seekers, went in
to a ditch near here this morning. C
W. Vanoleave of Alta, la., was killed.
None of the other passengers were
"erlously hurt.
NO DECISIONS ANNOUNCED.
Washington, I). C, Feb. 27. Not a
'irgle opinion was announced today
''y the Supreme Court of the United
States although this was decision day.
Hiich a failure Is almost unprecedent
ed. BIO 8TRIKE AT KALAMAZOO.
'Kalamazoo, Mich., Feb. 27. Seven
honored employes of the Kalamazoo
Corset company struck today because
"f reduction pay.
300 ARE SAVED
BYJIRE DRILL
CHILDREN IN LA CROSSE, ' WIS.,
SCHOOL MARCH DOWN BURN.
ING STAIRWAYS TO SAFE
TY, TODAY.
IjO. Crosse, Wis., Feb. 27. Three
hundred children were endangered to
day by a fire In tho Logan school. Un
der the direction of the teachers nnd
the training resulting from fire drills,
the children marched through tho
smoke filled corridors and down the
burning stairways without a single
accident The fire was extinguished
with small loss.
F've Perish at Hazleton, Pa.
Hazeltoni Pa , Feb. 27. Supposed to
have been caused by an explosion of
a lamp,' flrb during the night burned
two houses at Oneida, near here, occu
pied by Gabriel Oerotsky und Michael
Slovak, Hungarians. Five members of
the Gerotsky family" lost their .lives In
the flames. . ' " '
NO LEAK IS FOUND.
Red Jacket Will Use Less Water This
Month Than Last.
After uncovering and tapping all of
the principal mains supplying water to
the village ofRel Jacket, the plumbing
inspector has been unable to discover
any leak of importance, and with the
main water meter, operated by the C.
& II. Mining company, again register
ing at normal, it is supposed that some
cause other than a leakage was re
sponsible for the largo amount of wa
ter registered by the meter last week.
Tho meter Is now registering cor
rectly, It is believed, and It Is estimat
ed that despite tho large amount of
water registered against the village for
a couple of days last , week, the total
water used this month wltl fall at least
1.000,000 gallons below January, when
6,000,000 gallons were consumed.
A, large quantity of sand has passed
through the water pipes during the
past few days. This Is believed to
have been partly duo to the mains be
ing tapped, and also to a previous ac
cumulation of sand in the pines. Now
that the meter Is again registering at
normal, and there is an absence, of
sand In the pipes. It Is believed no
more difficulty will bo experienced.
TO GIVE DANCING PARTY.
Italian Young Men's Club Will Enter
tain Friends.
The Calumet City Orchestra has ar
ranged a fine program for the dancing
party to be given under the auspices of
the Italian Young Men's Social Club
at the Italian hall tomorrow evening.
The following numbers will be given
Waltz Gadren of Love.
Two step Carnival Maid.
Waltz Venetian waters.
Two step Wild Cherries.
Wal t z Espa n I ta.
Two Step Miss Liberty.
Waltz Scented Roses.
Two step That Mescerlzlng Men
delsohn Tune.
Waltz Oriental Belles.
Grand March The Masquerade.
Waltz Silver Threads Among the
Gold.
Two Step Jungle Queen.
Waltz Bohemian Girl.
Two Step That Chinatown.
Waltz Poet and Peasant.
Two Step The Great Divide.
IFour Extras.
BESTS CONLEY
RETAINS TITLE OF BANTAM
WIEGHT CHAMPION BY OUT
CLASSING BADGER BOY
AT NEW ORLEANS.
New Orleans, Feb. 27. Johnny Cou-
lon's title to the bantamweight cham
pionship of the world was firmly estab
lished yesterday when he won a clear
decision over Frankle Conley, claimant
to the honor, at the end of a twenty
round bout. Conley was outclassed
and only in two rounds did he have a
shade the better of Coulon.
The fighters were In frequent cllnch-
l- .,A
fs. Here coition wb uf"i, mm
his short body blows told on the Ke
nosha lad. Oonleys right and left
swlnga went wild, except In a few In
stances. In the fifteenth round, Con
ley sprained his left wrist and aer
that the Chicago boy had little t rouble
In landing telling blows on Conley'H
face and body.
PROVIDES RAISE IN SALARY.
Washington. D. C FeU C7.-fhe
1 i.,da,v. 151 to 11. adopted the
conference report of the legislative
and executive appropriation diu wwen
carries an increase from 16.000 to $7.
500 In the salary of the secretary to
the president
There are other ways of displaying
your firm disposition than by disputing
the dictionary.
RANGE MUST
FORM A NEW
CABINET NOW
Resignations of Briand and His
Ministry are Formally Ten
dered to the French
President
PREMIER TIRED Of POUT ICS
Feels Greatly Relieved to Put Down
the . Burdens cf Government For
' mation of New Cabinet Not
Yet Decided.
Paris, Feb. --27. Premier Arlstido
Jlrland, who succeeded Clemenceau as
head of the French , cabinet July 23,
1909, today tendered the resignation of
his ministry to President Fullleres. '
November 2 last, Briand formally re
tired, but a few hours later was re
stored to power and formed a new cab
inet, from which all elements not thor
oughly In sympathy . with his attitude
toward labor' had been eliminated.'
The situation at present Is ' wholly
different, and the premier having de
clared himself weary of the bickerings
of parliament and the Intrigues of
groups nominally supporting him, and
expressed the wish he might be re
lieved of the responsibility, of govern
ment. Last Friday night, when he was
attacked on the ground he had not en
forced the laws against congregations
as set forth In the separation act, the
government escaped censure by the
slim majority of sixteen votes. At a
conference Saturday the ministers de
termined to resign as soon as today's
obsequies for General ltrun, lato min
ister of war had been held.
At 1:30 o'clock this afternoon tho
cabinet met at Elysee Palace with
President Fallieres, and soon after
wards the announcement of retirement
was made.
Tho retiring ministers are: Premier
Briand; Justice GIrard; Foreign Af
fairs, Plchon; Marine admiral, Boue De
Lapayrere; Public instruction, Faure;
Finance, Klotz; Commerce, Dupuy;
Agriculture, Raynaud; Colonies, Morel;
Labor, Lafferre; and Public Works,
Paefh. General Brun, minister of war,
died February 23.
New Leader Not Selected.
President Fallieres has not indicated
whom he'll request to form a ministry.
He spent the afternoon In consulta
tion with political leaders. The avail
ability of Senator Antolne iMonls has
been suggested. Monls was minister of
Justice In Waldccic Rousseau's cabi
net, and for thirty years ttas seen an
important figure In public life.
MARDI GRAS IS OPENED.
ThousanHs Witness Formal Opening
of New Orleans Festivities.
New Orleans, La., Feb. 27. What la
believed to tx the largest carnival
crowd ever gathered In New Orleans
today witnessed tho arrival of Rex,
marking the formal opening of the
Mardl Gras festivities. Thousands of
persons greeted the King of the Car
nival as he came up the (Mississippi
river and landed from tho royal
yacht. The formality of turning over
the keys of the city to him followed.
Pentacola's Mardi Gras.
Pcnsacola, Fla., Feb. 27. Army
troops, sailors from the United States
battleships, mounted knights and .'city
officials participated in the (gorgeous
parade here today In honor of tho ar
rival of King Trlscus and his court,
marking the formal opening of the
annual Mardl Gras carnival. Thous
ands of visitors witnessed tho festivi
ties. '
DR. WILEY IS MARRIED.
Washington, D. C, Feb. 27. Only
relatives and a few Intimate friends
were Invited to the wedding today of
Miss Anna Campbell Kelton and Dr.
Harvey W. Wiley, Chief Chemist of
the Department of Agriculture. Tho
ceremony was porfcrmed at noon at
the home of the bride's mother, Mrs.
John C. Kelton, and was followed by a
brrn.Vfast and reception.
MARRIED THIRTY YEARS.
Berlin, Feb. 27. Tho German Km
peror and Km press, who were married
Feb. 27. 1881, when the former was
Crown Trlnce William and tho latter
rrlncess Victoria of iSchleswlg-IIoI-steln,
today received Innumerable
messages of congratulation and many
valuable presents on the occasion of
their thirtieth wedding anniversary.
ROBIN ARRAIGNED TODAY.
New York, ' Feb. 27. Joseph G.
Robin, eH bank promotor whom a
Judge Hnd Jury recently declared sane
despite the testimony of the so-called
eminent Insanity experts to the con
trary. wa arraigned for trial today In
the criminal branch of the supreme
court. He la to be tried on indict
ments charging him with the larceny
of funds from tho banks In which he
was Interested.
F
Chihuahua, Not Juarez, Real Goal of Orozco?
Mexican Federals Lured by Old Trick - Is Claim.
The mystery of General Crorco's passlveness In not capturing Juarez when It was at his mercy and then permit
ting federal re-enforcements under General Navarro to enter the beleaguered city has been explained. According to
revolutionary, leaders In the United States, these maneuvers were to draw the federal strength to the northernmost
Mexican boundary and leave open country for a descent upon Chihuahua, a much more Important point. Orozco
now controls all railway communication between Juarez and the capital of the Btate of Chihuahua. Thi3, It Is ar
gue!, will prevent Navarro from getting more men or rushing back to Chihuahua In case an assault Is made there.
This bit of strategy was planned on that of General Jubal Early In 1SH3, when the Confederate leader made a dem
onstration against Washington to disrupt the Union troops that were marshaling for an atack on Richmond.
COX CHARGED
WITH PERJURY
NEW INDICTMENT IS RETURNED
BY GRAND JURY AGAINST
CINCINNATI POLITICAL
LEA DE R.
Cincinnati, Ohio, JYb. 27. A new
Indictment, charging George B. Cox,
political leader of Cincinnati, with per
jury, was returned today by the grand
Jury. It alleges that In addition to re
ceipts of $48,500 interest money paid
by banks to former county Treasurer
Gibson, as charged In the first indict
ment, that Cox was given $17,S00 from
the same source by Tilden R, French
when the latter was county treasurer.
TO AID STAGE CHILDREN.
Mammoth Performance in New York
to Interest Public in Movement.
New York, Feb. 27. Under tho pat
ronage of tho National Alliance for
the Protection of Stage Children, of
which Daniel Frohman, Augustus
Thomas, "Mrs. Fbke, Julia 'Marlowe,
Francis Wilson arid other persons
prominently connected with tho stage
aro active members, a mammoth per
formance was given in the Metropoli
tan Opera House this afternoon to
enlist public attention in the Interest
of tho children of the stage. Tho al
liance has been working for several
years to bring about tho repeal or
modification of the laws restricting or
preventing the appearance of children
on tho stage. Tho complaint Is es
pecially strong against the exist Ins
laws in Massachusets, Kentucky, Ill
inois and Louisiana. In these states
the law absolutely (bars children under
sixteen yars of ago from appearing
In theatrical performances.
EIGHT INDIANS ARE KILLED.
Reno. Nev., Feb. 27. In a battle
yesterday at Kelly Creek, eight In
dians and one policeman were killed
and the other four members of an
Indian band captured. The Indians
were suspected of having murdered a
party of stookmen, and olMcers hive
been on the trail of tho Indians for i
week. When overtaken, tho Indians
refused to surrender and the battle
ensued.
TRAGEDIES OF THE SEA.
London, Feb. 27. A despatch from
Odesla says a tragedy of the sea was
revealed In the discovery In the Cas
pian Sea, off Astrakhan, of a derelict
vessel, tho whole crew of which, num
bering thirty, was frozen to death. The
ship was a mass of Ice.
Cuxhaven, Germany, Feb. 27. The
fishing steamer, Senator Strack. sunk
In the North Sea during last week's
storm. The crew of ten perished.
SURVIVAL OF THE UNFIT.
Chicago, Ills., Feb. 27. President'
Ferguson, of tho Chicago Medical so
ciety, addressing the Association of
American Medical Colleges today, de
clared the medical profession Is over
crowded "not by the survival of the
fittest, but by the survival of the unfit.
We don't need more doctors, but we do
need tho letter brand."
i tills
GIVES
SIRONG SPEECH
SPEAKS IN THE SENATE IN FAV
OR OF POPULAR ELECTION
OF UNITED STATES
SENATORS.
Washington, D. ., Feb. 27. Sena
tor Rainer of Maryland today address
ed the Senate In favor of the popular
election of senators. He declared It
weuld bo the "greutest political re
form accomplished by tho present
generation."
Tho per. pie want this change and
they'll have It," he said. "It Is not
the clamor of a Job; it Is not the lin
pulso of asrltatlon; it is the deliberate
and matured thought of the American
people th.it the change shall come.
Between the people and the legisla
ture I prefer the people, and I would
not want to hold my place here for a
moment If I thought popular senti
ment in my state was against mo.
Legislatures are one thing and the
peoplo are another. Legislatures are
sometimes controlled by political man
agers, and the people at this hour aro
In tho humor of breaking the bonds of
political despotism.
"Tho day of tyranny Is over In this
republic and the rising generation Is
no longer being driven to the polls
like cattle to the shambles, but Is
niarciiini? In unbroken phalanx with
free ballots and ballots that aro not
for sale. They understand this ques
tion and demand It Fhall bo submitted
to the legislatures of th.j states."
MARTINDALE A CANDIDATE.
Secretary of State Will Run For tho
Governorship.
Lanslnp, Mich., Feb. 27. Secretary
of State Frederick C. Martindalo of
Detroit announced this morning that
he would be u candidato for the nom
ination for governor at tho primary
dectlon in 1912.
Mr. Martindalo has considered the;
proposition for some time, and owing!
to the fact that Gov. Osborn has said
that he will not be a candidato to I
succeed himself, Secretary of State;
Martindalo has decided to comply with '
tho urgent requests of his friends In ;
various parts of the state and enter
the contest.
says Mcquillan is all in.
Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 27. Charley'
Dooln, manager of the Phillies, de- j
clares. he had traded George McQull- j
lan to Cincinnati because he had dls-!
covered that the once clever pitcher j
had lost the use of his twirling arm.'
"At the end of last season," said Iooln.
"McQuillan could not throw a ball ten
feet. He has the same ailment that
made Overall of the Cubs practically
worthless all of last season and I doubt i
If McQuillan can ever 'como back."
DISCUSSING VETO BILL.
Iondon, Feb. 27. The second read
ing stage of tho Lords' veto bill opened
In the Commons this afternoon. The
discussion will occupy At least four
days and a vote will not be taken be
fore Thursday night, and possibly not
until Friday.
r ... . . .
BIG ROBBERY
ABOARD SHIP
GEMS VALUED AT $130,000 DISAP.
PEAR FROM STATEROOM OF
WEALTHY WOMAN ON
THE AMERIKA.
New York,' Feb. 27. Mrs. Baldwin
Drummond, formerly Mrs. Marshal
Field, Jr., of Chicago, was robbed of a
fortune in Jewels Saturday night
aboard a trans-Atlantic liner. Dia
monds, pearls and other gems to the
value of ajiproxlmately 130,000 disap
peared mysteriously from her state
room on the steamship Amerlka, of
the Hamburg-American line, some
time between 9:30 Saturday evening
nnd 5:30 yesterday morning.
A wireless message sent from the
Amerlka as she neared port summoned
detectives down the bay in a tug. They
learned from Mrs. Drummond the de
tails of the theft and began a search
of the vessels and the crew. Not a trace
of tho Jewels was found.
Chicago Residence Burglarized.
Chicago 111., Feb. 27. Diamonds and
Jewelry valued at $fi,000 formed the
booty of burglars who entered the
home of .Mrs. J. A. Fullenwlder, 441
East 4Jnd street last night.
PLAN TO ELECT SHEEHAN.
New York. N. Y.. lVb. 27. Friends
of ('harks Murphy, Tammany leader,
made It clear today that tho with
drawal of Kdward M. Shpard from
tho senatorial contest would In no
wl.e affect tho plan to elect William
F. Sheehan.
IMPOSING MILITARY FUNERAL.
Paris, Feb. 27. An Imposing military
funeral for the late Minister of War
Brun was held today. Tho entire gar
rison of Paris, President Fallieres,
cabinet, diplomatic corps, members of
parliament, and those dist Ineulshed in
every walk of life, participated.
BUTTON FACTORIES SUSPEND.
Muscatine. Ia., Feb. 27. The pearl
button factories of Mucatine avs-jH-nded
operations today for an in
dcllnlte time. Two thousand opera
tives are out of work. The manu
facturers give over-production of but
tons as the cause, uhlle the employes
think It is a move against tlWr union.
ROBT. 0. BAILEY PROMOTED.
Washington, D. C, Feb. 27. nobert
O. Bailey, who has been private secre
tary to Secretary MacVeagh since the
latter has been a member of the cab
inent, was today nominated, by Pres
ident Taft t be assistant secretary of
tho treasury.
INSURRECTOS WIN FIGHT.
Fl I'a.-o. Texas. Feb. 27. -Mall ad
vices st. ue that Iidura was the
scene last Friday and Saturday of
some hot fighting. The Insurrectos
attacked tho town and by using dy
namite dislodged the Federals, who
surrendered.
It Isn't, as a rule, the splrtuelle
raalden who boasts how little she eats;
It Is the man. .
, - -
CAMPAIGN IN
TO END TODAY
Tomorrow All of the Parties In
volved Will Hold Primaries
For Nomination of
City Officers.
EIGHT SEfK THE MAYORALTY
This ia the Plum That ia 8ought by
Five Republicans and Three
Democrats. Keen Aldermanie
Contests Also.
Chicago, 111.. Feb. 27. Today saw
the close of one of the most exciting
political campaigns Chicago has wit
nessed in some years. Tomorrow all
of the parties will hold direct pri
maries for the nomination of candi
dates for mayor, city treasurer, city
clerk and members of the board of
aldermen. The mayoralty, which is
for a term of four years at an antluai
salary of 118,000, la the plum that la
sought by eight aspirants, five Re
publicans and three Democrats. The
name of one candidate each for the
Socialists and Prohibitionists also will
appear on tho ballot, but neither of
these parties Is expected to cut much
of a figure In the race.
The five .candidates for. the mayor
alty ; nomination on ' the . Republican
side are Charles . E. . Merriam, John E.
Scully, John B.. Thompson; Tom- Mur
ray and John F. Smulki. Mr. Mer
riam is a professor at. the University
of Chicago and a member of the board
f aldermen. He is classed as the Re
publican reform candidate.' Aa an al-
ut iiuau uc wa viuiiniuin.oi . ipePin
mission on City Expenditures, whose
investigation Into the city 'administra
tion resulted In the removal of seVeral'
city officials in the past year.
John E. Scully, .whose name ap
pears second on the ballot, ls a mem
ber of the board of aldermen and an
experienced politician. The principal
plank of his platform is opposition to
the public service corporations.
John R. Thompson, the third Re
publican aspirant for . the mayoralty,
is known chiefly aa the proprietor of
a string of popular restaurants. He
has mixed In politics for some years
and once served a term as county
treasurer. In his fight for the mayor
alty he has the backing of Senator (
Lorlmer s chief lieutenants.
The candidacy of Tom Murray who
is fourth an the Republican list Is hot
taken very seriously. Murray M a
clothing merchant and far famed for i
his unique methods of advertising. He
has never been a candidate for pub
lic office before.
John F. Smulskl, the fifth of the
Republican aspirants, is a veteran pol
itician, who used to be State treasur
er. He Is said to be favored by Gov
ernor Deneen and his local following
for the mayoralty nomination.
On the Democratic aide there ire
three candidates for mayor, Carter If.
Harrison, Andrew J. Graham and Ed-
ward V. Dunne.
Carter H. Harrison, who already has
served four terms as mayor, wishes
to equal the record of his famous
father, who was elected five times.
Behind the Harrison candidacy la the
notorious K en na-Cough Ian First ward
regency and a considerable portion of
the old Harrison administration.
Andrewr J. Graham, the second of
the Democratic aspirants, Is a West
Side Banker who has figured In Dem
ocratic politics for f. long time, but,
has not held office. He has the back
ing of the Democratic county organi
sation. His campaign for the nomina
tion has been notable chiefly for his
lavish expenditures.
Edward F. Dunne, the third Demo
crat It the field, was elected tna5'or
several years sgo on a municipal own
ership platform. Before that he lihd
teen on the bench. When mayor 'he
made a good record, lie lowered tel
ephone rates, and, although he ve
toed sevcnty-five-cent gas, an ordin
ance was passed giving the people a
reduction from $1 to 85-cents.
W. A. Brugaker la the only Prohi
bition candidate for mayor and W. E.
Rodriguez has no opposition at the
Socialistic primaries.
In addition to the mayorallty keen
Interest Is displayed In the aldermanie
contests In nearly all of the thirty-1
five wards. The aldermanie contests'
are more numerous than for many
years. Particularly Is this true on
the Democratic side, where the bit
ter mayoralty battle has brought Out
Graham, Harrison and Dunne alder-'
manic candidates In nearly every
wa,rd.
The reform organisation are put-.
ting forth efforts to defeat alleged
"gray wolves." because the next board
of aldermen probably will hate to de
cide upon several important municipal
IssueA. i .'II
Figuring as . leading Issues In the
mayoralty and aldermanie contests
alike are graft and vice, cheap ires,
lower telephone rates, mrbwaya and
universal transfers," the smoke not-'
saner, and cold cam.

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