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The Calumet news. [volume] (Calumet, Mich.) 1907-1938, September 13, 1911, Image 1

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f THE CALUMET NEWS 18 A r"TT"
THE CALUMET NE
n
js I
H
THE WEATHER
PRESS.
TODAY'S NEWS TODAY.
INCREASING CLOUDINESS
WITH PROBABLY SHOWERS
TONIGHT OR THURSDAY
VOL XX
CALUMET, HOUGHTON COUNTY, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 13, 19"
NO: 268
WS
JAMES J. WARD
STARTS FLIGHT
Another Aviator Begins Coast-to
Coast Trip, Leaving New
York Today
FOWLER WILL BE DELAYED
HIS AEROPLANE 18 BADLY
WRECKED AND IT MAY BE
NECESSARY TO SEND IT
TO FACTORY.
New York, N. Y.. Sept. 13, Aviator
James J. Ward started at 9:08 o'clock
this morning rrom Governor's Island
for a flight to tho Pacific coust, for
a prize of $50,000.
Ward Makes Good Progress.
Ashbrook, N. J., Sept. 13. Aviator
Ward landed here on hlH coast-to-coast
flight, having taken the Lehigh
Valley railroad for Erie. He anmo Im
mediately and started for Mlddletowa
Fowler's Plans Badly Upset.
Alta, Cal., Sept. 13.--Avlator Fow
ler has not yet decided when he will
resume his flight to New York, ft
may be necessary to send his wrecked
aeroplane to the factory for repairs, In
which event he will be unable to leave
for a week.
Fowler met with an accident here
yesterday. As he came Into view in
this section. It was apparent that
something was wrong with his ma
chine. About a half mile from here
his course suddenly deviated sharply.
He did not slacken speed and his ma
chine dashed full Into the two trees.
At a height of about fifty feet from
the ground the right plane of the ma
chine struck tho rlg'ht hand tree with
a splintering sound and the force of
the Impact sent tho craft careening
apalnst the other tree. This second
Wow crufhed the left plane and, with
both wings thus crumpled Into a use
less mass, the machine hovered for a
fraction of a wecond and then over
turned. In falling, the tall-pleco was doub
led up beneath the craft by the force
of the wind and the biplane hit the
ground with Its tall-piece and propel
lers, pointing downward, thus splinter
ing both propellers and the rudder.
Fowler remained In his seat until the
machine struck the ground, when he
was hurled against the motor and
through the debris of the rudder to
the ground. Spectators rushed to his
aid and his Injuries were quickly giv
en attention. It proved that he was
mly slightly Injured, although It was
at first thougnt he was seriously hurt.
STEEL EARNINGS NORMAL.
Profit for Third Quarter Expected to
be 132,000,000.
New York, Sept. 13. Indications
are that the net earnings of the
United States Steel corporation for
tho third quarter of this year will
reach well up to $32,000,000. July
earnings, the first month of the cur
rent third quarter, were approximate
ly $U.000,00fl. If August showed up
as well as July and the current month
records a falling off of even xj.uoo.miv
this will mean $32,000,000 net for the
whole quarter.
Net earnings of $32.ono,ono can be
regarded as favorable, everything
considered. Had all steel hlped
been for domestic consumption, earn
ings would have been larger. As It
Is $32,000,000 net Is larger than gen
erally expected by the trade.
In only four previous third quar
ters, have net earnings fallen l.elow
132tOOOOO Two of theso ,perlods
were times of severe depression.
miv 1!M4 and 1!0. The other
two quarters were In 1001. Just after
the steel corporation haa tecn organ
ized, and 1005.
Generally third quarter earnings
are largo For example, In 1910 they
were $37,385,187; In 1900. $38.24007:
In 1907. record. yr. $43,R04.285; In
190, $38,114,624. and In 1902. 3M.
S9. However, a net of 32.0OO.000
will Insure a fair surplus after all de
ductions. MAKES A RECORD TRIP.
N. Y. Policeman Travels to St. Louis
By Trolley In Five Dv.
St. lunula, Mo.,' Sept. 13.-New York
to St. Louis by trolley In five days,
traveling only In the day time. Is the
record made by Lieut. William A J.
Koelng of the New York City police
force and his wife. They will start on
the return trip tomorrow. Koelng nam
the trip cost him $19 05 In street car
fares, and only between IFayelte,
Ind.. and Danville, III.. 47 miles, was
tie obliged to use a railroad train. He
lTt Syracuse on Sept. 5 and arrived
here last Saturday.
LAST OF MEXICAN WAR VETS.
Chicago. 111.. Bept. 13.-Two aged
survivors of the Mexican war. Francis
llcnton and Thomas H. Wood, will dis
band the Western Association of Mex
ican War Veterans at Its last camp
fire and reunion In this city tomorrow.
At th fame meeting the Western As
sociation of California rioneors will b3
disbanded. i
FLOOD OF MOLASSES.
One Million-Gallon Tank Bursts
Flooding Street for a Mile.
New Orleans, Sept. 13. A flood of
mousses swept down several streets
leading from a storage warehouse to
day when a tank containing about a
million gallons of the Louisiana prod
uct. A sticky morass 15 Inches deep
covered market street for nearly a
mile.
Thrifty residents secured . a year's
aupply by merely'scooplng up tho syr
up with buckets. '
The explosion wu caused by a' wall
supporting .live similar tanks -crumbling
beneath the .tremendous weight.
The flow of tho molasses was so swift
that two' boilers weighing 15 tons and
near, the warehouse, were swept . from
ineir foundations und carried across
the street. '
The loss Is estimated at $50,000.
CHARGE IS WITHDRAWN.
Truman H. Newberry Will Not Be
Held for Death of Girl.
Wakefield, It. I , Sept. 13. The
charge of manslaughter on which for
mer Secretary of the Navy Truman II.
Newberry of Detroit, was arrested
last Tuesday, when his motor car ran
down and killed a child, was with
drawn when the case came up in the
district court before Judge Nathan
H. Lewis.' Fred C. Olney, the prose
cuting attorney, told the court that
George W. Kills of Mllford, Mass.,
whose 7-year-old daughter. Helen.
was killed by Mr. Newberry's motor
car at Narragansett Tier, did not hold
Mr. Newberry criminally responsible
for the little girl's death and would
not prosecute.
NOTED INDIAN
CHIEF EXECUTED
JUAN GUERRERO WALKS INTO A
TRAP LAID FOR HIM BY
AUTHORITIES IN LOW
ER CALIFORNIA.
Los Angeles. Calif., Sept. 13. Juan
Guerrero, the noted -jCucapas Indian
war chief and reputed bandit, was ex
ecuted in Ensenada, Lower California,
last Friday, according to word brought
to I os Angeles from peninsular capi
talists. A courier bearing the news Bet out
last night for Campo. on the Mexico
California border, where a band of
about sixty' Cucapas are said to be
waiting for the return of their chief
tain. Guerrero left Los Angeles for En
senada ten days ago against the ad
vice of friends. His visit was said to
he. vrompted by a promise from tho
Mexican government to treat with him
over the restitution of lands formerly
belonging to his tribe.
The courier, who brought back word
of his death, said he was arrested as he
left the Ensenada wharf.
CANT KEEP OFFICERS.
U. 8. Gets Resignations From Annap
olis and West Point Men.
Washington. Sept. 13. The navy de
partment has been particularly unfor
tunate In the resignations of young
ollleers who have Just finished their
education at West Potn( or Annapolis
at government cxpenwe. In the past
few weeks eight or ten midshipmen
hiiiI ensisns hav'e nresented their re
signations wlUr reasons sutllclent to
causo the department to accept them.
Iloth the Xvar and navy departments
are periodically confronted with this
questioft.
The withdrawal of young o.lhers
from the service before they have giv
en the government Borne return for
their education Is discouraged by both
departments. A resignation is accept
ed only when It Is believed there ex
ists an Impediment to tho profitable
retention of the young man. The navy
suffers more than the nrmy; ns t- the
number of reasons which disqualify
an officer, one especial disqualification
being susceptibility to sea sickness,
which necessitates resignation of many
young men.
Ihirlng tho past year, it Is said at
the war department, very few cadets
or second lieutenants have presented
their resignation. MaJ.-Gcn. Leonard
Wood, chief of staff of the army, has
refused to permit a lieutenant of the
cavaliy to get out of the army to en
gage In civil pursuits because he was
about to be married. He, however,
granted the young man a three
months' leave of absence for his hon
eymoon. PEACE CONGRESS POSTPONED.
Washington, D. C, Sept. 13. The
International l'eace Congress, sched
uled to be held at Home, Sept. 25. has
been postponed because of the cholera
epidemic In that country. Announce
ment to this effect was made In a
cablegram received today by Secretary
Trueblood on the American Peace so
ciety from Dr. Gabot, secretary of the
International Peace bureau at Hourne.
DIRIGIBLE CATCHES FIRE.
Uerlln, Sept. 13. During army man
euvers ' today the dirigible balloon
"M 3" caught fire and fell near the
village of Grossbelow. The crew saved
themselves by Jumping as they neared
the ground. The airship was almost
destroyed. , , t
I
CHINA. IS NEAR
A GREAT CRISIS
This is the Opinion of Students
of Affairs in the Flow
ery Kingdom
MORE UPRISINGS EXPECTED
Struggle Going on is Gigantic Test of
Strength of Government
and ' Provinces. '
x Washington, D. C, Sept. 13. In -tin;
opinion or students of Oriental' affairs,
China is rapidly approaching a great
crisis In her history. The uprising in
the Sze-Chuon provlence Is expected
to extend to other provinces.
Evidently prepared for trouble, the
Chinese government has been quick t
dispatch troop Into the disaffected
district and to deal with the altuation
with a strong hand.
It Is believed the S.o-Chuen upiis
ing is only the precursor of other out
breaks in different jMirts of thu How
ery kingdom, for thu fact is tho strug
gle now going on Is really u gl.anlie
test of the relative strength and powei
of the control of the government us
opposed to the provincial governments.
Rioters Attacking City.
Jjondon, Sept. 13. A dispatch re
ceived from Tsu-Chau says the prefect
of police there attempted to comrmml
cate with Cheng-Tu by messengers;
but the latter were unable to gel
through the lines of rioters who wert
attacking the city at 'four points.
Troops line the walls of Cheng-Tu, Iho
defending city. There was fighting
within the walls of Cheng-Tu on Sept.
7 when several persons on both sides
were .killed or wounded. The rebels
were repulsed.
Chinese Admiral Received.
Washington, D. C, Sept. 13. Hear
Admiral Chlng Ping Kwung, tho sec
ond highest officer of thu Chinese
navy, was formally received today by
tho ranking officials of the American
nation in Washington, lie called up
on acting Secretary of State Wilson
and Acting Secretary of tho Navy
Wlnthrop, He was cordially greeted
by both officials, who later returned
the call of the Chinese admiral at his
home. Wlnthrop later entertained the
admiral at luncheon.
OSBORN SEES
WILSON PLOT?
SAYS THAT GOVERNOR REFUSED
TO ATTEND CONFERENCE OF
EXECUTIVES IN NEW
JERSEY.
Spring Lake, N. J Sept. 13. Gov.
Burke of North Dakota presided at to
day's session of the conference of gov
ernors. Gov. Foss of Massachusetts
was the first speaker. Employers' Ha
llllles and worklnginen's compensa
tion was his theme ami opposition to
the "unnecessary Interference of Fcd-
ral control," was the keynote of his
peech.
Did Osborn Make Statement?
Former Gov. Fort of New Jersey
took official cognizance today of r.n al
leged interview with Gov. Osbe;rn of
Michigan, in which Osborn was quoted
as saying he would not attend the con
ference on the ground It was part of a
campaign to boom Wood row Wilson
for tho Democratic nomination for the
presidency.
Fort does not believe Osborn made
the statement attributed to him. He
says In his correspondence with Os
born it contained no such Intimation.
Fort aays Wilson had nothing to do
with getting the conference to come to
Spring Lake and he repudiates the
"insinuation tho interview would seetn
to make."
CHICAGO PRINTER MURDERED.
Chicago, III., Sept. 13. Uefore day
light today robbers held up and mur
dered Emmet McChesncy, aged 54, a
newspaper printer. McOhesney was on
his way home when he was attacked
beneath an elevated railroad structure.
Witnesses told the police the man had
been followed by a gang of negr'i
thugs, led by a woman. McChesncy,
whose skull was fractured, died In n
hospital.
JOHNSON ACCUSED OF MURDER.
Madison, Wis., Sept. 13. John A.
Johnson was arraigned today on a
charge of murder In the first degree
In connection with the denh of Annie
Lembergcr. Johnson pleaded not guilty,
and In default of $10,000 bail was re
manded to Jail.
SHOPMEN TO VOTE AGAIN.
Chicago, III., Sept. 13. The Illinois
Central shopmen will taka a new vote
on the strike proposition. The result
will not be known for ten days.
French Fleet Ready For Immediate Mobilizations
Germany's Reply to Moroccaji Proposals Awaited.
UfcrVWR-il.i.:.'V
If-:'.-
The iowder niagaalnoa of the French warships are full, and tbu fleet Is declared to be ready for Immediate mo
billiatlon should such action becomo ueccssary ujon the receipt of Gertuany's reply to the French proposals regard
ing settlement of the Moroccan situation. At tbe same time u fleet of more than lot) German vessels Is assembled
at KleL Germany's answer cannot be delayed much louRer1, as It is known that she is anxious" to have the dispute
settled beforo the opening of the reichstag early lu October. The Illustration shows the First Germun hussars Inac
tion at the recent maneuvers, also the new German rapid tire irtin.
LEAD OF "WETS"
IS WIPED OUT
NOW ALMOST CERTAIN THAT
PROHIBITION FORCES ARE
VICTORS IN MAINE
ELECTION.
Portland. Maine. Sept. 13. Returns
from 402 out of 521 cities, towns and
plantations In the state, give a. major
ity against the repeal of the prohibito
ry law of 531.
It was first announced, -when most of
tho returns had been received, that
the "wets" had scored a victory, but
later returns were heavily In favor of
the "drys" ami It now appears prac
tically certain that tho "wets" have
been defeated.
This afternoon, with all but seventy-
six of the 521 cities, towns and planta
tions heard from, there Is an npparc'it
majority of 3S'J against the repeal of
prohibition.
Says "Wets" Have Won.
Portland, Me., Sept. 13. Tho Even
ing Express, a Prohibition paper, this
afternoon issued a bulletin stating
Maine had gono "wet" by 5U0.
ANGELL HAS RECOVERED.
Son of Former U. of M. President
Doubts Apoplexy Reports.
Detroit, Mich., Sept. 13 "UndonM-
Vdly It Is a belated report of father's
illness nlsut ten days ago, from which
he has recovered," said Judge Alexis
C. Angel! In regard to a report that Dr.
James H. Angell, president emeritus
f the University of Michigan, had
been stricken with nMpexy in Ge
neva. Switzerland. "A week ago last
"rlday we received n cablegram that
he bad been very III, but the following
Monday had another to the effect that
he was much better. Since then we
have heard nothing."
ATTELL TO MEET DALEY.
New Orleans. Iwt., Sept. 3. Monte
Attell, former ttantam champion, has
been matched with Johnny Daley, the
Jersey Cltv bantam, for a ten-round
go iK'fore the Orleans Athletic club,
October 2, according to an announce
ment here today.
BIG COTTON GUARANTEE.
Montgomery, Ala.. Sept. 13. Presi
dent Harrett. of National Farmers' as
sociation announced nt the Southern
Cotton Growers' convention today that
a Franco-German syndicate has guar
anteed any amount up to $".". 000. 000
toward the financing of the south's
cotton crop.
!iS . .
MAY STOP BOUT
BEFORE FINISH
ATTORNEY GENERAL SAYS IF AF
FAIR DEVELOPS INTO PRIZE
FIGHT SHERIFF CAN
STOP IT.
Madison, Wis., Sept. 13. Assistant
Attorney General Jackson, In an opin
ion on the Wolgast-McParland boxing
contest, says that should the affair de
velope Into a prize light the sheriff can
stop it.
I loth Wolgast and McFarland ceased
their heavy work of training today and
will Indulge only in light exercise until
the tlmekts'per's signal calls them in
to the ring. IFrlday afternoon at 3
o'clock, according to the articles of
agreement ,tloy are to tip the beam at
133 pounds, the lightweight limit.
Each lighter expressed himself today
a .'3 certain of .victory, and the consen
ts of opinion of fight followers pre
sages a contest that will make ring
history. The followers of Champion
W'olgast appear to share his confi
dence. The Chicago crowd, however,
can see nothing but the stockyards
lighter. Most of them assert McFar
land should be the top favorite In the
betting. They contend that Paekey
will overshadow thtt Cadillac boy In
ten rounds and earn a decisive verdict,
even if one will not be given.
The general view of the conservative
critics is that the affair will be an even
go, and that it will lead to a longer
mill to be staged on the Pacific coast.
Gambling is Alleged.
Chicago, III., Sept. 13. Seventy-five
subpoenas were Issued today for wit
nesses to appear at the e-lvil service
commission's police Investigation,
which next Monday Is expected to take
up alleged gambling at tho Got h
llaeke nse hmldt wre stling niate h on
Iahor Day. Several peri Ice officials
are charged with permitting gambling
near the baseball park where the
match was held.
SOME SHOOTING, THIS.
San Franclseo. Cal., Sept. 13. The
27th company, Coast Artillery, practic
ing yesterday with ten-Inch guns at
Lattery Cranstem In tbe Pre-sido mili
tary reservation, hit a moving target
at 10,000 yards six times with six shots.
WIND DOES MUCH DAMAGE.
Springfield. HI., S pt. 13. Much
damage was done In the city by high
winds last night. This niernlng the
streets were strewn with de-brls and
street car traffic was suspended.
PEOPLE FLEEING
FROM ML ETNA
MORE THAN THIRTY OPENINGS
IN THE VOLCANO ARE BELCH
ING LAVA AND HOMES
ARE ABANDONED.
Cantanla, Sicily, Sept. 13. .So threat
ening is the eruption of Mount Etna
that people are .loaving their homes
and farms and the railroad depots at
Moio and Alcantara.. have been aban
doned. More than thirty openings in
the- mountain ire belching smoke and
lava.
People Are Frightened.
Country About Etna is Covered With
Ashes From Volcano.
Canania, Sicily, Sept. 13. The erup
tion of Mount Etna has beceime more
intense. The shrwers . of ashe-s) and
elnders are 'heavier and the rumbling
eif earth shocks at short Intervals is
heard for miles. The shocks are grow
ing in violence and a panic prevails.
The fear ef the people Is nugume'nted
hy the great heat. All the country
round about l.e e-eveTcd with ashes.
It Is reported that three new craters
have eipe-ne'd. but so far It has been
Impossible to ascertain, whe-ther they
are emitting lava, ben-ause of their 'iilgh
situation and the thick smoke that
lis over Thern. People ef the villages
on the slopes of Mount Fcna . have
abandoned their homes. Several
house. have bee-n damaged by . tne
eartlniquaks, and hundreds ef men.
wemien and children, who nre without
she-lter, go about from place to place
carrying pictures of the saints, crying
and Imploring for mi rcy
At Giarre, sixteen miles frein Ca
nanla .the pilicnls were carried enrt
ef n he.spital by nurses, who fe-ared
the building would collapse.
REVENUE MEN TO GATHER.
DctreMt, Mich.. Sept. 13. pet ween
200 and 300 Internal revenue officers
of the United States will meet In this
city next week to eliseuss plans for the
bctte'rment ef the service. The e-onfer-ence
will ho the first ef Its kind ever
held, with the except lem ef a prelimi
nary meeting held In Washington . last
year for erganl.atloon purposes.
EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY.
Spring Tike.' N. J., Set. 13. The
entire sesslems ef this, the second day
of the annual conference of Oovernrs.
were elevoted to the ellscusslon ef em
ployers' liability ami worklngmen's
condensation. The opening address
this morning wss deliverer! by Gover
nor Eugene N. Foss of Massachusetts.
FRANCE'S REPLY
SENT TO BERLIN
It Insists tbe French Shall Have
Free Hand Politically
in Morocco -
PROPOSALS ARE ANSWERED
Maintenance of Commercial .Equality
v , Desired Germany Expects "
Peaceful Settlement.
Paris, Sept. 13. The minister of
foreign Affairs went to Ramboulllet
today to s"bmlt to President FalUerea
the Frencii 'eply to Germany's coun
ter-propost. !- In the Moroccan affair.
It Is undo:-( d France emphasises
thev necessity of maintaining the com
mercial equality of all in Morocco,
and insists France shall , have a free
hand politically In that country. ;
Faltieres Approves Reply.
Ramboullet. France. Sept. 13. Presw
ident Fallieres today, approved , t.ie
French reply to the late-st note from
Germany regarding Morocco. It will
be sent to Uerlln at once.
Peaceful Settlement Expected.
Berlin, Sept. 2. During the .past
few days the minister of foreign af
fairs has expressed implicit confi
with France regarding Morocco. Th
French answer to the latest German,
note, it Is believed, will accept part
of the German proposals, leaving
others for further negotiations.
Spaniards Defeats Tribesmen.
Madrid, Sept. 13. An undated tele
gram from Melllla, Morocco, delayed
by censor, and received Tiere today,
reads:
"The losses to the Spaniards In tho
action yesterday were eighteen dead
and 77 wounded. The losses to the
tribesmen were about 600 to 700 hun
dred. It was a complete Spanish vic
tory." CRANES' ASSERTION DENIED.
Faculties of Colleges Attack. Statement
Regarding Drinking.
Chicago, Sept. ' 13. Members of the
faculties ef several colleges aad uni
versities near Chicago say there Is no
basis for the charges .made by It. T.
CTane, so far as they apply to the
schools of the middle west.
"I don't think that any attention
should he paid to Mr. Crane." Thomas
F. Holgate, dean of the university fac
ulty at the Northwestern university,
said. "I know that B0 per cent of the
college body In the middle west .are
teetotalers and that less than 10. per
cent ever get drunk at all College of
ficials are constantly weirklng toward
the prevention of drinking or other
forms of dissipation among the stu
dents." t
Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 13. The
statement sponsored by R. T. Crane,
the Chicago business man, that the life
of the average student at Harvard was
one, round ftf elisslpatlon received, only
adverse criticism among the few who
have, arrived In town. A telephone
call to president Lowell's summer home
at Cotuit brought this statement from
the president: President Lowell haa
not seen the report prepared by. Air.
Crane, and therefore does not care to.
discuss it In a general way. He be
lieves, however, that a great Injustice
has been done to Harvard and that the
least said about the charges at thla
time the better.
New Haven. Sept. 13. By the offi
cial figures of the number who drink.
figures compiled from the membership
of each da-. Mr. Crane's statement is
found to be -ong regarding Yale, In
the class of i: out of 314, only 176
drank, a littli over 50 per cent. In the
class of 1909, out of 2S"i, those who did
not use Intoxicants number 115.
MRS. GERAGHTY SNUBBED.
Newport, R. I., Sept. .13. However
content she may be to live apart from
exclusive society In a humble cottage
with her chauffeur husband. Mrs.
Jack Geraghty has suffered a deliber
ate snub which would be painful under
any circumstances. The former Julia
French did not attend the army ami
ravy lawn fete, as she has done In for
mer years, hut elrove past the Kay
scene with her husband. Sitting near
ti e edge of thn-lawn were-her eld-tlme
chums, the daughters of J. II. Wlllard.
Mrs. 'Geraghty noelded pleasantly, but
tho Wlllard girls deliberately turned
their backs. '
ONE KILLED; TWO "HURT.
Grlrinell. Iowa. Sept. 13. Mrs.
Urnsslngton, ef Altona, Pa, was killed
here early toelay when her carriage
was struck by a train at the Iowa Cen
tral crossing, and her grown son and
her uncle William Itartell of this city
were Injured.
PLEDGED TO LA FOLLETTE.
Huron, S. D., Sept. 13. Progressives
Republicans last night adopted resolu
tions favoring the selection of a dele
gation to the Republncan National
convention pleelgwl to LnFedlette for
president, , ' , ( j

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