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The Calumet news. [volume] (Calumet, Mich.) 1907-1938, January 06, 1912, Image 1

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f Tut CALUMET NEWS It A
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED j
PRESS.
f TODAY' NEWS TODAY.
THE CALUMET NEWS
n
IHT I
'IN.
THE WEATHER
SNOW FLURRIES TONIGHT
AND SUNDAY. CONTIN
J
UED COLD.
VOL XXI
CALUMET. HOUGHTON COUNTY, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY AFTERNOON. JANUARY 6, 1912.
NO. 57
JUDGES SHOULD
NOT ABUSE POWER
Col. Roosevelt Tells Just What
His Position as to the
Judiciary Is
HAS HIGH REGARD FOR COURTS
But Brieves They Should Consider
People's Rights
Declares, Howtvfr, Thoro Ar Times
Whin Will of Peopls Should
t Reeisted.
New York. Jan. 0. --Theodore House
veil discusses Judges und Progres--iv"
In nn editorial appearing in the
i urrent Issue of the. outlook. He suys
In iiart:
"Let me. at the outset, put ho clear
ly that only wilful misinterpretation
un deceive people, Just what my posl
tion hk to the court is. I have the very
highest regard, the highest respect ;nid
admiration, for the Judiciary. As a
wlioir. I think that our judicial officers
stand on u higher level than any oth-
er biHly of public servantB, or. for the
matter of thai, Of 'private citlsens. I
could name oillinnd at this moment, a
iiuniher or Judges now on the bench
v. ho render to the people more sub
stantial service of more far-reaching
value than is rendered by any other
men In public or private life and all
of these judges substant tally agree
with the position herein taken, which,
indeed, is largely derived from them.
I believe the courts have rendered our
people incalculable service. I hold
that the attitude of our people towatds
sheen should be one of appreciation
and respect; but not of servility.
! ltlOBt emphatically believe
thai we have been wise in giving great
oarer to our Judges, including this
power of Judicial interpretation of
statutes to sec whether they conform
with the luiidament.il law of the land.
Kill I also most firmly believe that,
like any oilier power, this power can
he ubtiHcd, and that it is a ix.wer with
which the pcupic have mereJj lantnol
a rily parted, and not one which lliey
have permanentl.v alienated. I'sed cau-
tional) ami moeerateii an only in the
dearest cases, as It hus b,en used bv !
our greatest Judges from the days of!
lai hull to the present time, ax it ia
.letec ded by writers such as Mr.
Thayer, it la fraught with the utmost
fc.x. .1 to the body politic. 1'sed reck
lessly, wantonly, and foolishly, where
the case I so doubtful that the Judge",
themselves may be divided nearly
c.puilly on the two sides (III the hake
shop declsli a. first and lust, twelve
Judges held the luw constitutional and
only ten Including, however, unfortun
ately, live of the nine Supreme Court
judges, held it unconstitutional), as it
has again and again been used in re-
cut years, it results In very great
evil.
" I am not speaking of the
nidges' performance of the ordinary
judicial function as performed by
.nidges in all lands, the t uni t ion of the
Mpc which people all over the world j
have in mind when the speak on tin
uprightness of the judge, of the inde
pendence of the Judicial I am speuk
Ing of the peculiar function of the Am
erican judge, the function nf uo other
judge in ttie World, the fanOtlOn ul le-
luring whether or not In ieoplehave
the right to maK. Inns I i themselves
an matters which they m of vital
eoneern. I am not sireaklng of the
Judge In his altitude ul JVdjpl hetvv..n
"lie individual and another, or one in
dividual and the slate, I am speaking
of the judge when, by virtue of his
position, he declares that the people
as a whole have, or have not, the right
ta carry out a given policy, a power
which may give one man or three men
Of live men the right to nullify the
wishes of the enormous majority of
their nlnet -million fellow citizens, a
power which has been exercised re
peatedly, sometimes wisely, sometimes
vie unwisely. Hear in mind that I
am nm at this time even referring to
decisions dealing with the question of
the respective pharOs of action of
national and slate: I have in mind K -elsions
that declare the people have
nf. power to-n t, through either the
national or the slate government.
"It Is, I r believe, an advantage to
baya fixed in the Cmirt the power to
i He thai a legislative action is uncon
stitutional, but only provided that the
puuer in exercised with the greatest
w ledum and self-restraint. If the courts
eontlnue to use It with the reckless
ness that has too often been shown in
the priRt. it is almost Inevitable that
efforts will be made to amend or abol
ish it; I know, for Instance, that, as
far ns L am persona I Iv concerned. I
earnestly hope to aee In the next New
Vara State Constitutional convention
provisions incorporated In the Consti
tution which will enable the people
to decide for themselves, by popular
battog after due deliberation, finally
and without appeal, what the law of
the land snail be In case such as those
I bnva mentioned, where the courts of
he state hove refused to allow the
people to establish Justice and eipiitv.
" I am sure that ultimately
our people must, and Will, come to the.
view in. i the nation and the states
Continued, on Page Hix.
NIW YORK AUTO SHOW.
Latest Improvements in Motor King
dom to bo Shown There.
New York. Jan. fi During the en
suing t, day all "automoblledom"
will turn It eye and steps toward il.i.-t
city. Beginning tonight and contln
ulng through (he oniiug week the
twelfth National Automobile Kh..w l
to hold forth in Madison Kepiiue tiur-
en. .-iiiiiwiiuneooHi tne annual ex
hibition of the National association
of Automobile Manufacturers is to he
held in the new Grand Central Palace
Months, in fact almost a year, hnve
been spent In perfecting plans and
making reudy for the two shows. The
vlaili.si.h S.ii iv Hard til show Is i un
filled to pleasure cars, while both
pleasure arid . ommcr la I vehicle Hre in
be displayed during the week at the
ill a rid Central Palace. The promoter.
ot both enterprises predict thut new
rUnorda l i i t.-mMnce and general sue-
will lie established.
MILLION DOLLAR LIBRARY.
St. Louis. Ifo.. Jan. I. The new St.
Louis public library build in w .t for
mally opened and dedicated this after
noon with interest Ins ceremonies. The
building cort tl.ooo.000 and is one of
the finest structures of its kind In the
con n try.
TO FLY IN CZAR8 DOMAIN.
. w York. Jan. C. - Hugh Robinson,
the well known aviator, sailed to, lay
en route t. St. Petersburg, where he
is to give demount! at ions, in the Cur-
tlss hydroaeroplane tecently purchased
by the Russian government.
WILT REGULATE
SUGAR EXPORTS
WORLD'S SUGAR CONGRESS WILL
RE-CONVENE AT PARIS JAN.
29 UNION TO BE RE
NEWED. Paris. Jan. fi. The world's sugar
conference, which was held at Urussvls,
adjournment being taken to Junuary
29, ia having difficulty trying to meet
the request of Russia to he permittee!
to increase her y early exportation of
sugjt r.
Russia wishes to increase her exer
' " 111
''"r,la' "'"a I Sugar Fnlon having limit-
eil tile pos-ul.lc c 1 11 n ' a t ion of ea-'h
untry adhering to th
ci interen. e.
The opposition to the Russian petition
catne from Uermaia and Austtia. It
Is thought likely, however, that when
the cuui. ieti. a ic onveaag the Kttanten
leouest will be granted, although the
amount antlmrized may be under 300,
IMM) tons. The piesent Intel national
.Sugar I'nion reuses to be in RsTOg Sep
tember I, S1S, but it is likely that the
nton win be renaired for another
term, that is to say. until IIHR.
PICTURE MEN TO MEET.
Lansing. Mich.. January fi. The
Michigan Association of Moving llc
ture Kxhibitors will hold a session in
this city next Monday and Tuesday.
The association was organized in le-
trolt last July, and while at that time
Muskegon wan .-. lei ted for holding the
next annual meeting in July of this
year, it was recently decided to hold a i
special meeting in this it.
CHOPPING. NOT
SAWING, WOOD
EX-PRESIDENT IS CUTTING DOWN
TREES. WON'T TALK POLI
TICS, BUT REPORTERS
ARE ON HAND,
Oyster May. N. Y., Jan. li. Col. Roo
sevelt and a hall doxen Other nun
Icppcl dove a trees today in the woods
surrounding the ex-president's home ut
Sagumore inn. To all Inquirers the
Culutiel sent word that he would suy
nothing. Despite Booaeevlt'i refusal to
talk politics a scpiad of c
cuts are camped here.
pond-
SISTER OF CHARITY SUES
Claims Injury to Health and Compen-
sstion for Work.
New York. Jan. 6. A remarkable
suit, declared to be the only one of its
kind evr tiled, will determine whether
vows of chastity and poverty, taken In
I religious order, w ill stand trcfore the
law.
The suit is thnt of Mary Lehan. who
demands $.'4,04 from the Sisters of
Charity of St. Vincent dc Paul for al
leged injuries to her health and aa
compensation for services rendered
She alleges she Joined the order In
1X91 and remained until 1904 as a sla
ter, teaching. Her health, she declares,
was ruined hut she alleges she was
forced to continue her work.
Mother Superior Josepba, in In r an
swer, sets up that the sisters lake the
...itli of poverty and chastity and lUMM
they are to receive no pay. 'Maid serv
ices to be performed for Ihe love of
llod and the BjBgsJ of the poor." the
mother superior alleges.
COURT 10 HEAR
TRAFFIC CASTS
Railroad and Steamship Matters
to be Argued Before Su
preme Court
TO OCCUPY THE KNTIRE WEEk
First Question to be Considered
Involves Rebates
Cincinnati Shipper to Take up Casts
involving Lower Rats to Chat
tanooga. Washington. Jan. . "Interstate
iiinini ice week w ill he observed .a
the .supreme mini oi the I'n It ed ItStN
beginning Monday. Practically all of
Ho- nuestlons to he argued that we. I.
nr' connected with ruilroad or steam
ship traffic.
The first case to be considered in
volves whether shippers may be Indict
ed for accepting rebates unless it is
shown that the railro.nl concetTed had
tiosted the regular ran-s n the lailrmul
station at olnt of origin. It was held
by Judge Speer, of Georgia, that the
posting of the regular rales In the
community in which the shipper lived
was such an important means of in
formation that the shipper could not
I mulcted, unless It was alleged the
rates had been ported. This ruling
occurred In the indictments of Mai -vey
C. Miller ami May I Is, I-. .Miller, of
Philadelphia, on charges of accepting
cum i-xhIoiih for shipments over the
Merchants & Miners' Transportation
Co., jointly with the Seaboard Air Line
and' with the Atlantic Coast Line.
Another case ia the quarter century
tisht of Cincinnati shippers for lower
raters to Chattanooga and the South. In
IN!U ihlppgW induced the Interstate
Commerce Commission to order a sharp
reduction of rates over the Cincinnati,
.New Orleans and Texas Pacific r,M,
trom Cincinnati to Chattanooga. Courts
held that the ommission could not
tlx a future rate. Later when, this pow
er was conl.ii.. upon It the commis
sion reduced tirut class rates to 7n
rents, and held that while a demund
f r a tin cent rate inluht be reasonable
on a road direct to Chattanouj;., it
would not he so on the Louisville and
Nashville and connecting lines. Fur
ther more, the cornmiseion held that to
reduce the rate to II c ents might make
Inequitable certain rates from Mem
phis to Chattaniui4a and to AMinta.
Tlirinlngham, Montgomery and other
southern cities. The Cinc innati ship
pers made an nnsuccesslul attempt in
the commerce court to have the seven
ty cent rate declared unjust and un
reasonable. Whether a loophole really exists in
the immigration laws such as WOttM
allow steamship companies to shift the
responsibility for bringing in immi
grants of the excluded classes, will
be argued before the court. A New
York court held that while the purpo e
of congress seemingly was : make the
steamship companies pay the cost of
returning such immigrants as are
denied entrance there was nothing In
the law to prevent the companies from
(circumventing the law by requiring
these Immigrants to put up security
In foreign ports to cover the cost of
leturrjing them If rejected.
Another question will be whether a
..p.cial rate on coal may be given
railroads. Still other cases involv
ing conflicts of Jurisdiction between the
Interstate Commerc e Commission and
the Commerce Court will he heard.
NO NEW TRIAL FOR SPENCER.
Attorneys Have Until January 20 to
File Exceptions.
Boston. Jan, . A motion for a new
trial of Bertram ;. Bpeaoer, convict
ed November N Ol murder In the tirst
degree for shooting Miss Martha
Hlackstone. was denied today by Judge
Crosby of the superior court. The at
turneys for the prisoners reserved until
January '0 to Hie exceptions to the su
preme court.
It Is said after sentence has been
passed on Spencer his attorneys will
move for commutation on the ground
ot mt anit) .
TWO CLUBS CLAIM BOUT.
New Vork. Jan. . Two boxing
clubs tod a) are claiming that Knock
out Hrown ami Abe Attell will fight
before their audiences. The National
Sporting c!ib advertises the bout for
Jan. I", while the Kmplre Athletic club
advertises it or Jan. is. There may he
legal action on the part of one of the
clubs to force the fighters t. keep
contracts, it Is declared today.
SIR SANDFORD FLEMING 15.
Ottawa, Oat Jan. H. Sir Ramlford
I Mcminn, the eminent railroad build
er ami capitalist, will celebrate his Rath
birthday anniversary tomorrow.
Though a k nil, in Commander of Rt.
Michael and St. Ueor;e and a direc tor
of the Canadian l'acillc Railway and
numerous great industrial concerns.
(Sir Ha ml ford is proudest of his title of
"lather of the Raclllc cable and of, the
twenty-four-hour system of MM M
tutlon. '
MoNAMARA FUND 8M ALL.
I ittla Remains of th $190,000 Sub
scribed by Unions.
Washington, 1. '.. Jan. 0 -Thi x
cutlve council of the American Federa
tion, of Ijibor, comi I of in i ld -
Lempers, the Hght ,i . . i,. ,t ... and j
the secretary at'cl treasurer, will meet
at the headouart. i ,,i tl rgariisui-
tion in this oily on Monday lor a
mom important session. The McNa
tnuru case, with erticular reference la
tin disposition ot what remalna of the
defense fund, will h.- the chief sub
ject of caiialgsjfatioi just how much
ratnalna ol the fund is problematical.
but it is said on y .niih-.rltv tin
unexpended baliim .- . u... (....
subscribed Is camparaiiv.lv small. It
believed arrangement will he made
to distribute the hal. uue aiming the
subscribers.
TEN CHICAGO FIREMEN HURT.
Chicago, lan. . Ten firemen were
injured, three aprioualy, whan H hose
cart skidded ai. r an ley pavement
and crashed into r ant Idle patrol
I ere today . Roth v ni. Ic v ei .. ,;,.!.
ished. Sex en vlrtil.is vvere- rei. i.ived t . .
a hospital.
LA FOLLETTE GOES TO INDIANA.
Chicago, Jan. ; lletto closed
his campaign In Illinois with a speech
this morning at l)ar, ill. Late: .,i ihe
day he expected to bejun a tour of In
diana. BRITAIN READY
TO BUILD ROAD
GOVERNMENT WILL EXPENO $20,
000,000 FOR CONSTRUCTION
OF RAILROAD IN AUS
TRALIA. Londoii, Jan. fi ah the neoeajary
legislation him been enacted In -n-ne.tio:i
with the proposed construc
tion of the trans-Australian railway
and work on the project, which is to
be carried out by the IVderal govern-
nient Itself, will commence very
shortly and ita completion is looked
fir within three years.
The line starts from Kalgoorlle, 380
miles from Perth, one of the Kastern
limits of theW astern Australian sys
tem, whence it connects wiih other
railways through South Australin.
Victoria. New South Wales ami
Queensland. The new line is 1 .060
niil.s In length and Its cost is estimat
ed at nearly twenty million dollars.
While the railway will be of great
commercial advantage, the necessities
of defence have chiefly Influenced Aus
tralia In making the expenditure. The
country faced with the danger of
poR-lble Asiatic Invasion, one reason
for the desire that Rrltaln and Ameri
ca should control the Pacific, hag bnerjmttf 0WM where
putting her defensive resources In
order ever since confederation.
Modified conscription has been
adopted as the military system of the
country nnd lihpral contributions of
ships and men have been made to In
crease the Rrltish naval forces in the
South Pacific. Lord Kitchener too
went out to advise the government on
the measures to be taken to defend
the c ountry and one of his first recom
mendations was the construction of
this railway to bring Western Austra
lia nearer to the other states of the
confederation, nt present the western
province being entirely dependent up
on assistance from sea.
MICHIGAN BANKS
ARE PROSPEROUS
COMMISSIONER DOYLE'S REPORT
ISSUED THIS WEEK. SHOWS
AN INCREASE IN
BUSINESS.
Lansing. Mich.. Jan. fi. An al
stract of the reports of the 4li; stat.
tanks und live trust companies In
Michigan, shovfjtig their condition at
the .lose oi Iu8iness on Tuesday,
Dec. "., Uf,lc was issued hy llankiiiK
Commissioner Edward H Doyle, dis
playing a most favorable oUUsSMI
When the report waa compiled
there was $'.s43,s4.o: in the com
merclal departments, of the various
state banks, while the savings de
partments show a total of $39,555,
iv, v: As compared with the report
of the banking commissioner made
Nov. 10, lslO. the commercial deposits
have Increased $l2.23,!80.r.s. While
the sav ings deposits hav e In i Htd
to the extent of tlciltTtMl.fl. The
total reserve maintained by Michigan
state hanks n Dec. :.. I'M I was $fij -M6.O29.0.
OT II. I per cent. The total
cash reserve amounted to III, Ml -fifi9.4fi,
oi 7fl per cent. The total re
serve carried hy Michigan state
banks Is therefore $l,i541,!31.3s over
the requirements of the bunking law.
Rased on savinge deposits of 1!H,
rt90,212.."l, the law requires mortgage
and bond Investments of at least $4,-
03K.47.n. The abstract shows that
the- m-irtgaire and bond investments
exceed the reoulremenD of the law
by $27. 47. 7.V 74. The savings Invest
ments, together with the savlrgs re
serve, exceed Ihe savings deposits by
$4.330,R02.S:i.
DEMOCRATS TO
MEET IN WEST
Convention City to be Determined
at Jackson Day Banquet
Next Week
CHICAGO WILL BE FAVORED
Party Leaders Gather in Wash
ington to Attend Meet
Brilliant Array of Spoakers Named.
Including. Rival Candidates for
Nommotion.
Wa blnCtoa. I C . Jan. 6. Rt. Louis,
Kansas City. Chlcaao. Denver. Lulti-
more. .New York -where shais the na
t wmal lonveiition of the Democratic
arty be bn held nrui summer? This
in the leading queatton to be CaaaJdrred
luni eted upon b the Iemncrath
na-
tionul committee it its meeting In this
city Monday. Muny members of the
r ational committee, together with nu
merous other Democrats of wide prom
inence, arrived In the capital toduy in
anticipation of the meeting of the com
mittee and the banquet to he held at
I the Raleigh Hotel .Monday night in
memory of the patron saint of Demo
rr.' cy, Andrew Jackson.
The speakers at the banquet will In
.Imle a number of the most promi
nent Democrats in the country, several
Of tin m c andidates for the presiden
tial nomination. The list is as fol
lows; Senator James A. iKronnan of
New York, toastmaster; Norman E.
Mack, chairman Qf the Democratic na
tional committee: Speuker Clark. Jml;.
Alton It. Raiker or New Vork, Wil
liam It. Hearst of New York, (Wivertior
Woodiow Wilson of New Jersey, Sena
tor Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee.
C.overnor Baldwin ot Connecticut, W il
liam J. Rryan of Nebraska, former
Qovamor Joseph W. Folk of Missouri,
Senator Francis C. Newlands of Ne
vada. Governor Thomas R. Marshall of
Indiana, Senator Romerene of uhio.
and Represei tative James T. Lloyd of
Missouri.
Politics Enter Into Choico.
The choice ul the party for a con
ventiuii city promises to he brimful
Of popti. s The contest Tor the DUM'
ocratla nomination betweem recogn
ized representatives f the conserva
tive ami progressive wmgs of th. party
makes the choke of the convection city
one of the main factors to be consid
er..! by ihe national committee.
If it were a foregone c onclusion that
any certain candidate would be nomi
nated by the Democrats, it would hoi
the convention
was held. As the situation stands.
however, the choice- ot a convention
city may have a most important bear
ing on the nomination.
The first matter to be determined g
whether the convention shall be held
In the Kasp or the Wait No IVnio
cratie candidate for President has been
named in the- Baal since the civil war
and many of the party leaders be lieve
tl would be poor politics to take the
gathering away from the West at this
time.
Many Influential Democrats are more
thun half inclined to believe that the
(invention will go to Chicago. They
predict that if it does not it will go
as far west as Kansas CltJ Or Denver
The claims of St. Louis, which Is well
able to take care of the convention,
will receive consideration.
Eastern Cities Aftor Honor.
New York apparently Is In earnest In
Ia r desire to secure the convention, but
If the gathering is held in the East it
is believed that Baltimore will get the
prize. The Maryland city was the
first to put in a bid and has been con
ducting a hard campaign lor nearly a
raar. if the Daaaobrali are supersti
tious and believe- in luck they certain
ly will hold their convention In Balti
more, for Baltimore- and Democracy
have four times proved a winner, whh h
Is more than can be said of Chicago.
St. Louis. Kansas CM) or Ienver.
Chicago would be regarded as neutral
ground for the convention. The se
lection of New York, on the other hand,
would, in the- opinion of many Demo
crats, give the nomination too much
ot a Tammany taint. Denver as the
convention city would give the pro
g. siv es an idv .intake- over the con
servatives The selection of St. Louis
or Kansas City might possibly be con
strued as an advantage1 for Champ
Clark or Joseph W. Folk, but the pos
sibility Is so remote that it Is not
likely to interfere with the c lian. e-s ot
either city.
Other Fsctora.
Politically speaking. Baltimore may
he regarded as favoring Harmon for
President. The Ih-mcKrats In the
Mgry aad city belong to the conserva
tive wing of the party. At the same
time It is believed that the Harmon
managers and those of Wood row Wil
son as well would prefer that the con
vent ion be held in the West. In this
matter they share the ix-lief of many
other Democratic leaders that the nom
ination of Governor Harmon, tlovernor
Wilson, or any other Democrat, for
that mutter, if brouabt about among
the progressive Democratic communi
ties of the NVe-st, would be more satis
fying to the rank and file of the party.
fhey argue that. IT It shall turn out
that tlovernor llatmon is a stronger
H. 0. YOUNG SEES DANGER.
L'nloss Small Harbors Aro Deepened
Big Boats Cannot Entsr.
Washington, Jun ; -R. presenta-
V ig of Ishpeming, member ol
the b-'iisc committee .,r, ri.ei ami
harbors, has written William Living
ston of Detroit, president oi the Lake
Carriers association, requesting his
ervicwe us to appropriations lor the
great lakes in the forthcoming rivers
and harbors bills.
Mr. Young has stood unswervingly
fcr the improvement ul the grvut lakes
wnter ways and ot Michigan rivers
and harbors -and to his efforts are
lurgely due the big appropriations car.
ric .1 lu forme! hills.
Kince the lake freight boats have
grown so large and have practically
displaced the little boats that used to
enter the hurbor of small towns, there
is no longer any use for the little
harbors unless they are to be deep
ened to admit the big carriers, und It
Is a question whether the great ships
would stop nt the small places even
though the water was deep enough.
LEATHER TARIFF JAN. 16.
Washington. Jan. 6 The tariff
boards investigation of the leather
schedule will actuallv heain Jan. 1.
when shoe manufacturers and tanners
throughout the country will be given
a hearing as to the- h.-st method of
(inducting the iniuiry. Shortly after
the conference the board will send
its agents into the- field to study the
industry and gather the statistics up-
n which the hoard will base It- con
clusions.
TWENTY YEARS
ABBAS HELMY II HAS MADE EX
CELLENT RECORD AND HAS
SUCCEEDED IN AROUSING
SUBJECTS.
Cairo, Egypt. Jan. fi It wilt be
twenty years tomorrow since Abbas
Helmy II. succeeded his father on the
throne of Egypt, in view of which fuct,
by the way. If is difficult to understand
why most people still persist in speak
ing of him as the "young" Khedfee.
Although possessed of little of the
;iower usually associated with ruleT
ship. being theore tically the vasaal of
the Sultan, and in reality the vaseal
I Ki.kI.iikI Kl.oive Aid. as possesses
ability of a hinh smrt and deserves
much credit for his successful efforts
to arouse dreamy old Egypt from the
hthargy that hr.s enshrouded her for
centuries. The Khedive is a busy man.
ind Is ((instantly planning new pro
jects for his country's good. Cnder his
Inception the country has made re
markable progress during late vears.
Railways have been built, fresh canals
have- been made, and. f still greater
importance, great Irrigation projects
have been completed for the rUStMM
lion of vast areas of waste land. The
cities as well as the rural districts have
prospered Cairo. Alexandria and other
large centres are full of proofs that
F.k pt is ce asing to be asleep, for
modern buildings and improvements
in the European style are to he ween
on all sides.
SUPERIOR AND
DULUTH COLDEST
MOST FRIGID SPOTS IN THE
UNITED STATES, TEMPER
ATURE BEING THIRTY
EIGHT BELOW.
Chicago. Jan. 6. Another decided
drop in temperature marked the sixth
loy ol the c. ld wave- through the mid- i
. I
lie west. Superior. Wis
i-u lie i nil . is. . i I'i'i i ceo .. -v
below zero, the lowest touched In the
Tinted States. Duluth. however, was
only half a point behind, with 37'?.
A general snow fall throughout Ill
inois. Iowa. Michigan ami Missouri
added to tin- misery. In Chica&a ten
he-low .To was the .arly mark toduy.
The telegraph companies experienced
much wire trouhle
SHOT BY A MILLINER.
American Business Msn in Berlin Msy
Die From Wounds.
i:. riin, Jan. 6 Norbert M. Rodkln-
ii. director of the American cham
ber of commerce hen. was shot, prob
ably with fatal effect, last evening by
Miss Siede. n milliner The woman
when an attempt was ma le to arresi
her, shot and seriously woundesl her
self. The woman's friends say she
and Rodkinson had been Intimate
friends and had quarreh-d. Mrs. Hod
kinson. however, asserts it was at
tempted extortion on the part of Miss
Si. ). who hid been a servant In the
family years ago in Russia.
andu late in Ihe Hasl than in the- West,
then it we old be- a good thing for him
if he were nominated In the West.
Likewise, If a convention held In the
Wt were i. nominate an Eastern
man like- Governor Wilson. It might
strengthen the latter in his own section.
PASTOR RICHESON ,
CONFESSES TODAY
Declares He is Guilty of Poisoning
His Former Sweetheart,
Avis Linnell
DEEPLY PENITENT FOR HIS SIN
Wishes He Might Live to Atone
in Measure For Past
Distr.ct Attorney Declares, However,
Trial Will Proceed Deep. to
Confession.
Boston. Mass Jan. Rer. C. V. T.
Fth heeon. former pastor of lmmanuel
Baptist church. Cuinbpdge. today
made- a written cunfeaaioti to the eff .-,
he poisoned his former sweetheart.
Avis Linnell. The statement was made
public by his couneeL
The eonfeeslon, bearing Riehesone
signature, rvada as follows.
1 PR penitent fea- mv air. and
earnestly deairing, so far aa in my
power He, to make atonement. I
hereby confeae I am guilty of the
offenee nf which I stand indicted.
"I am moved to this course by
no inducement of self benefit or
leniency. Heinous as is my crime,
God baa not wholly abandoned me.
and my consxience und manhood,
however depraved and bllafhtcl.
will not admit of my still further
wronging, by public trial. hei,
whose pure young life I have' de
stroyed. I 'tiller the lashing of remorse
I huve suftered and- am suffering
the torturee of the damned. In
this I And a meaaure of comfort.
In my mental anguish 1 recognize
there, ia still. by mercy of the
Master, some remnant tff the di
vine spark of goodness still lin
gering within me. I could wish to
live only because within some
prisons wall 1 might, in some small
metisure, redeem .he sinful paat.
hasp some ..tber deapairlng soul
and at last find favor with my
Dod."
May Impose Death Sentence.
District Attorney Pellet ler declared
the trial will go on Juat the same, no
matter what statement may be issued
by RJcheaon."
If Rich. -soi: appears 1n court Jar..
15, the date set for his trial and ac
knowledge his guilt, the court, under
the law, will be obliged to Impose :h -death
sentence. In the opinion of the
i ourt house offic iais.
HE BLAMES OUTSIDERS.
Indianapolis Labor Men Not Responsi
ble for Explosions Says Leader.
Indianapolis. Ind.. Jan. 6. -Spur-geon
P. Meadows, a prominent labor
leader and business agent of the Inter
national Brothrhood or Carpenters.
Joiners today declared that out of
town men caused four dynamite ex
plosions In this city the night of Oct.
24, 1909. In support of this John Half
man. a hotel man. says that three
weeks before the Von Spreckleson ex
plosions two Chicago men. who said
th.-y came to fHghten away "scab"
workers and "tlx" non-union Jobs,
rente-d a room from him. Many union
men visited these two. Half man says.
Three days before the explosions the
Chicago men left. He named Mea
dows Im one of thoae who called on
the Chicagoans. Meadows denies
meeting the Chicago men at
Halfman's but asserts positively
that "imported men pulled off the e
..ns." .vf
NEGRO DIES WORTH $116,000.
Ex-Slava Made Fortune In
Operating
.,,
Champaign. 111 . Jan. 6. To be horn
-
iirRi" t .4 . ' . fc cue coil III . 1 It.llV",
Is the life story of Oeorge W. Smith
of Rroadlands Chamnaign county,
whose- will was (lied for probate here.
Hmlth was bom a slave In Tennessee
in l3fi. but ran away in 1862 to Join
the Union army He acted as a guide
for OsMV John A. Login.
After the war he engaged in farming
near Springfield, but thirty-five years
igo he bought land in Champaign
county He steadily added to his hold
ings, until at hbi death his land con
sist e-d of 440 acrea of rich county
land.
The ex-slave was highly respected in
his section He gave his sons a uni
versity education and one Is a lawyer.
LOOKED GOOD TO HIM.
Washington. D- C. Jan. . -Norman
K. Mack, chairman of the Democratic
natlonil committee, called on President
Taft today. Mack said the White
b.vuse looked attractive enough to be
... upled by a Democrat.
OFFER TERMS TO MANCHU8.
Shanghai, Jan. a. The Republican
government feels so secure that Its
leaders have offersnl terms for submis
sion t.. the- Mam has These include a
free- grant of the "forbidden city" and
the summer palace In Peking: also life
pensions equality t ctiinshtp: and
holding office under the state.

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