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Iowa County democrat. [volume] (Mineral Point, Wis.) 1877-1938, May 13, 1909, Image 3

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STILL HAMMERING
IT THE SCHEDULES
SENATORS DISCUSS GLASS BUS
INESS AND RETAIL PRICES
AND PROFITS.
WILLIAM ALDEN SMITH • S
HE VOTED FOR DINGLtY
RATES, NO APOLOGY.
Washington, May 12. —Substantial
progress was made in the considera
tion of the tariff bill yesterday,
amendraen s of the committee on
finance being upheld by the senate
by substantial majorities.
The feature of the day’s session
was the general discussion concern
ing the great disparity between the
wholesale and retail prices of tom
modit'es. Republican senators de
clared this difference was so great as
to demonstrate that the duty levied
by the protective tariff had small ef
fect on the price paid by the con
sumer.
This feature of the discussion was
precipitated by Senator Scott, him
self a. glass manufacturer. On his
desk were several pieces of glass
ware, which he used to emphasize his
position on the arift.
“There,” be said, ** is a hall gallon
pitcher \v< sell for ninety cents a
dozen. It sells at retail for about
forty rents a piece. 1 amblers
which sold (or $2.00 a dozen when he
first went into the glass business now
sell at eleven cents a dozen, he said;
goblets ihat once commanded a
dozen now sell for 20 cents a dozen.
“If we keep on we will soon be
(laying people to carry this glass ware
away.” he added.
Senator Hale took advantage of Mr.
Scott’s exhibition to make a point in
support ol the protective policy as a
whob. He said the present debate
should do much to convince the peo
ple that the policy of protection has
no relation to the high retail prices
pi availing in this country.
Senator Flint cited an instance ol
a set of Haviland china which cost
after all import duties and other ex
penses were paid $lO-8:1. Yet the re
tailer iti this country got $26 for it.
Another article f hat costs 11 cents to
import sold at retail at sd.oo. Sena
tor Smoot cited razors, the wholesale
price on which was* $2.90 a dozen,
which sold for $2 each to the con
sumer. Gloves, he rr* i tl, manufac
tured for $7. in per dozen, sold for $2
per pair or $24 dozen. These high
pricey, he said, had nothing to do with
the protective tariff because, com
pared with the retail prices, the tar
iff charge was small. Mr. McLaurin
defended the retail dealers against
the charge of extortion, saying the re
tailers would lost* their trade if they
undertook to charge too much. He
sa tl h gh prices result from the tar
iff.
Tin* discussion continued on these
lines at some length until the window
glass schedul* was reached. Senator
Cummins offered several amendments
to (his schedule, saying they were in
tended to prevt m in the future any
combination among the manufacturers
or others in that industry from put
ting up juices. He said that at this
time the domestic price of such glass
is less than the duty added to the
cost of manufacturing the product, so
♦hat competition was fixing the price
to the consumer.
An animated colloquy occurred be
tween the lowa senator and Senator
William Alden Smith, the latter de
claring that the senator from lowa
was in a position to make good a
campaign promise to reduce the cus
toms duty which he did not feel un
der obligation to do.
‘1 voted for the Dingley bill.’* said
Mr. Smith, 'and 1 have no apology to
make for that vote. The senator
from lowa fears some possible oom
hination among the glass manufactur
ers in the future wishes to bring the
foreign manufacturer a little nearer
his American competitor and I do
not.”
Action on the window glass sched
ule was not completed yesterday.
The schedule covering the products
of lead were passed over upon the
suggestion of Mr. Aldrich because, he
said, the finance committee desires to
make some changes in the duties as
previously recommended.
DEPUTY MARSHALL KILLED.
In Battle Between Posse of Moon
shiners and Officers.
Hugo. Okla.. May 11—In a battle be
tween a posse and hand of moonshin
ers near Turkey Creek yesterday.
Vniud Slates Deputy Marshal Lou
Holden was killed. The band was
routed after many shots had been
fired. Three moonshiners were cap
tured. The still was destroyed and a
oiiantity of whiskey was confiscated.
Death of Louis Scheller.
Green Bay. Wis.. May 12. —Louis
Scheller, a member of the Odd Fel
lows since 1554. of the Masonic order
since 1855. former county and city
official and pioneer resident of this
city, died early yesterday morning at
the age of 79 years. Death was
caused by a general breakdown.
Want a Cent on Zinc.
Washington, May 12.—A delegation
of citizens of Jopl n. Mo., interested
in the zirc industry were received by
President Taft yesterday. The dele
gation told the president that it was
essental to the industry that there
should he at least a cent a pound duty
on zinc.
NEW GOVERNMENT.
Voters Decide on Change at Special
Charter Election.
Concord, N. H., May 12.—The voters
decided, at a special election yester
day to place the city government
under anew charter. The new char
ter provides for but one governing
body, instead of the present two, and
separates the city, state and national
(-]er ions. Candidates for city offices
are to be nominated by direct primar
ies and no political designations will
appear on the ballot.
SEEK TO DISSOLVE
HARRIMAN MERGER
San Francisco, May 12. —A number
of witnesses were questioned yester
day by Special Assistant Attorney
General Severance before Examiner
Williams, in the government suit to
dissolve the so-called Harrirnan
merger. The testimony was designed
to show that competition between the
Union Pacific and Southern Pacific
practically ceased after E. H. Harn
man secured control of the Southern
Pacific and the Oregon Railroad and
Navigation company and the Oregon
Short Line in connection wdth the Un
ion Pacific.
ELECTRIC ROADS SOLD.
Rockford Traction Interests, Includ
ing Line to Janesville.
Rockford, 111., May 12.—The Rock
ford Interurban Railway company,
operating the local system and lines
to Belvidere, Illinois, Freeport, Illi
no's. and Janesville, AATsconsin, has
been sold to an eastern syndicate
which owns a -as plant in Peoria, Illi
nois, and street railways of Spring
field, Illinois, Portland, Oregon, and
other cries. The change of owner
ship is to take effect July 1. Holders
of preferred and common stocks will
receive par value for their shares.
There is $50,000 referred stock and
$1,000,000 common. The new owners
will take over the entire property and
assume the bonded indebtedness of
$2,725,000.
NIGHT RIDERS GUILTY.
Sentenced to Ten Days in Jail and
SSOO Fine.
Waverly, Tenn.. May 12. —A verdict
of guilty was returned yesterday In
iln* ease of 14 men charged with be
ing members of a night riders’ organ
ization. and with whipping Esquire
Reece on October 15, 1908. Punish
ment was fixed at ten days in jail
and a fine of SSOO for each. They
\v<ue remanded to jail under strong
militarv guard.
Eliot Receives Decoration.
Poston. May 12. —President j
Charles W. Eliot of Harvard univer
sity was last night invested with the
insignia of the Rising Sun, bestowed
upon him by the order of the emper
or of Japan in recognition of his
services as an educator, ©specially in
the education of Japanese students at
Harvard. Japanese Ambassador Tak
aliira presented the decoration.
FRENCH POSTfiL
EMPLOYES STRIKE
FOLLOWING ACTION OF CHAM- I
BER OF DEPUTIES. RESULTS
QUICK AND DECISIVE.
Paris, May 12.—The chamber of
deputies, after a stormy session of
four hours, yesterday adjourned the
debate on interpellations on the post
al situation until May 12. The re
sponse of the postal employes was
quick and decisive. Within halt an
hour the federal committee had is
sued an order for a general strike,
and railway mail clerks walked out
in a body. An hour later a meeting
of 6.000 postal employes unanimously
voted to strike. The determination
and resolution to force the hand of
the government were apparent.
Old Settler Dies.
Hartland. V\ is. May 12. —John B.
Christensen, aged 74 years, died yes
terday morning at Delafield. Mr.
Christensen was one of the oldest set
tlers in Waukesha, corning here from
Denmark in 1847.
He is survived by his wife and
three daughters. The funeral will
take place Thursday at 2 o’clock.
Ml mill OF MANIAC
Tensing. Mich.. Alay 12—Repre
sentative William H. Schanez of
Hastings was attacked on a street
here last night by an assailant who
cut the legislator's throat with a ra
zor. At the hospital it was reported
that Schanez would probably recover.
It is thought the assault was due to
the vagaries of a "dope fiend.” James
Duggan has been arrested.
Two Asphyxiated.
Indianapolis, Ind.. May 12. —Mrs.
Mary Manlove. aged GO. and J. W.
Hawkins, aged 52, a laborer, were
asphyxiated last evening by escaping
| gas.
Fare and a Third.
Seattle. Wash., May 12. —The rail
roads yesterday announced a rate of
one and one-third fare for the round
trip to the national irrigration con
gress at Spokane next August.
IOWA COUNTY DEMOCRAT, MINERAL POINT, WIS., THURSDAY. MAY, 13. 1909.
WRIGHT BROTHERS
VISIT AMERICA
FAMOUS AEROPLANISTS RETURN
FOR BRIEF STAY—IMPORT
ANT ENGAGEMENTS.
\
HAVE SIXTY MACHINES NOW
UNDER CONSTRUCTION FOR
FOREIGN POWERS.
New York. May 12. —Wilbur and
Orville Wright, American aeroplan
ists, returned from the scenes of
their European triumphs yesterday
aboard the steamer, Kronprinzess.
They were about the shiest and most
retiring heroes New York has wel
comed in many days. Despite the
honors and successes they have
achieved, they were reluctant to talk
of their work. They told those who
talked with them that they had
signed contracts enough to keep them
busy until they could get back to
Europe and sign more; that about 60
of these aeroplanes were now in pro
cess of construction, and that th e of
ficials of certain European military
powers had asked them to demon
strate that their flyers can be driven
safely out of range of rifle fire. The
Wrights will probably return to
Europe late in August. Th s arrange
ment will prevent their taking part in
any exhibitions on this side in the
autumn. Their unwillingness to con
sider any proposal to remain here is
cited as strengthening the rumors
that they have important engage
ments with Germany and Russia.
CHINS SNB ROSSIS
REACH AGREEMENT
ENTERS INTO CONVENTION CON
CERNING RULE OVER
MANCHURIA.
Pekin, May 12. —An agreement be
tween Russia and China providing a
method of government for the Rus
sian rail way zone in Manchuria was
signed here yesterday.
It consists of IS articles, is based
on the guarantee off Chinese sov
ereignty. and fixes the principle of
joint administration. It provides lor
Chinese and Russian municipalities at
Harbin, and the participation of for
eigners in the administration on an
equality.
The president of the Chinese East
ern railway is to act as referee for
foreigners in all disputes arising.
One clause of the understanding es
pecially guarantees foreign interests.
The agreement is to become effect
ive on condition that detailed admin
istrative regulations be completed
within one month.
WILL RETURN TO CHINA.
Sir Robert Hart to Resume Chaege of
Oriental Customs.
London. May 12. —The Times learns
that Sir Robert Hart, following a re
quest made by the Chinese govern
ment. intends to return to China and
resume his post as director general of
Chinese customs, if his health per
mits. , I
1
Fairbanks Off f or Japan.
Honolulu. May 12. —Charles W. Fair
banks. former vice president, who has
been visiting points of inierest in the
Hawaiian Islands during the past two
weeks, sailed today for Japan.
HAINS FOUND GUILTY
OF MANSLAUGHTER
ARMY CAPTAIN CONVICTED OF K ILLING WILLIAM E. ANNIS—JURY
MODERATES MURDER CHARGE BECAUSE OF CIRCUMSTANCES
—PRISONER LITTLE MOVED BY VERDICT. FATHER WEEPS.
Flushing. N. V., May 12. —Captain
Peter C. Hains. Jr.. U. S. A., faces a
prison term of from one to twenty
years. Despite all the testimony sub
mitted by the defense as tending to
show insanity, he was convicted late
yesterday ot manslaughter in the first
degree for the killing of William E.
Annis last August.
Quickly following the army officer's
conviction, his counsel announced that
they \vonld produce affidavits to show
that, the jury had not been properly
guarded during the trial and upon this
allegation will urge anew trial be
granted. These affidavits will be
submitted Monday, the time set for
passsing sentence, and for any mo
tions. the defendant's counsel de
sires to make. There will, of course,
be the usual motions to set aside the
verdict as against the weight of evi
dence and contrary to law, hut the
unguarded jury feature is the only
departure from the stereotyped pro
cedure looking to anew trial.
Daniel Oreily. of counsed for the
defense, said;
"There was no evidence in this
case to warrant a verdict of man
slaughter. It should have been either
murder in the first degree or acquit
tal on the ground of insanity. Jurors
were permitted to roam about the
county in automobiles and go right to
the verge of the scene of the homi
cide. which is clearly against the law.
We will have affidavits to prove that
such is the case and also that the
jurors were permitted to leave the
jurisdiction of the county and have
been on government property at Fort
RELIEF TO ST. PETERSBURG.
Settlement cf Cabinet Crisis Satisfac
tory in Every Way.
St. Petersburg. May 12.—The settle
ment of the cabinet crisis has been
received with great relief in all cir
cles, excepting the reactionary camp.
The struggle of the reactionaries to
oust premier Stolypin has resulted in
only a partial victory, while the
premier won final honors in getting
his majesty to sign the imperial re
script drafted by himself.
The situation, accord ng to men
close to the premier, is regarded as
satisfactory in every way. Stolypin
will remain in office and will not leave
the city on a vacation.
LE ROV FLAYS
THE LOBBYISTS
DECLARES THEY SHOULD CON
FINE THEMSELVES TO LEGIS
LATIVE COMMITTEES.
ALSO CRITICISES LOG ROLLING
AND DODGING OF ROLL CALL
ON IMPORTANT MATTERS.
Madison, May 12.
Lobbying among individual mem
bers of the legislature, log rolling and
the dodging of roll call on important
questions were condemned by Assem
blyman E. AV. Le Roy in his address
on How Laws Are Made before the
west Madison Brotherhood of the
west Madison Methodist church last
night. He said that at the next ses
sion of the legislature lobbyists
should be compelled to confine them
selves to committee meetings as the
law requires them to do and not work
among the legislators individually.
Log rolling, a scheme by which solons
trade votes for the purpose of get
ting favorable action on their meas
ures, was also criticised by the
speaker.
Mr. Le Roy declared that those leg
islators who dodge roll call on im
portant matters to escape going on
record are not only dishonest to them
selves but to their constituents. He
blamed the constituencies in many
cases for not sending better men to
the legislature and congress.
Mr. Le Roy gave his listeners a
good idea of how laws are made. He
explained to them all details of the
legislative machinery from the time a
bill is prepared and introduced until
its passage or defeat. He gave an
illustration ot parliamentary delays
and said that frequently measures
recommended favorably by commit
tees .ire talked to death by eloquent
speeches and vice versa. He recalled
many funny things that happened on
the tlonr of the house since be has
been a member. In conclusion he
praised the Wisconsin legislatures.
The address was greatly appreci
ated and Mr. Le Roy was accorded a
cordial reception.
KILLED UNDER TRAIN.
Ben Habeck Struck by Northwestern
Passenger Near Shawano.
Shawano. Wis., May 12. —3en Ha
beck. aged 3G, was killed by the
Northwestern passenger train from
Clintonville, a quarter mile west of
the paper mill. The train dragged
him 200 feet. The top of his head
was battered off and one arm cut off
at the shoulder. The body was not
discovered until 6 o'clock yesterday
morning. Habeck was going to Belle
pla'ne to work as a stone mason.
His home was near Caroline and he
leaves a wife and two little daugh
ters. Three brothers also reside in
the. county.
Toiten, all of which will be urged as
ground for setting aside the verdict.”
The comic.ion of Hains after the
jury had been out less than three
hours, came as a general surprise. It
had been expected that the jurors
would deliberate much longer and
that a verdict of acquittal on the
ground of insanity, or a disagreement
would result.
Xo one was more surprised than
District Attorney Dewitt, who had
said that all he could hope for was
a disagreement. As he heard the de
cision of the jurors. Hains’ face was
as white as chalk. He stood for a
few moments motionless, staring at
the jury after he heard the verdict.
Then one of his lawyers touched him
and he quietly sat down. Apparently
little affected by the verdict, he was
taken back to the Queen county jail.
In striking contrast to the demeanor
of the prisoner was the grief of his
aged father. General Peter C. Hains,
and his brother. Major John Powers
Hains. For a moment they sat as if
dazed, then they broke down and
wept. The captain's aged mother was
not in court.
After the jury was discharged.
Juror William Craft said that little
consideration was given to the expert
testimony. They believed, he con
tinued. that Mrs. Claudia Hains. the
defendant’s wife, had made a confes
sion to her husband of improper re
lations with Annis and that Annis de
serv-'’* his fate, but none of them
won Ia consider the unwritten law ana.
therefore, the manslaughter verdict
resulted.
BOWMAN AGAIN
IN THE LIMELIGHT
TELi_S INQUISITORS OF ARRANGE
MENTS WITH EDMONDS
AND STONE.
CONFRONTED WITH LETTERS
WRITTEN DURING CAMPAIGN
PROFESSES IGNORANCE.
Madison. May 12.
Deputy Game Warden H. A. Bow
man of Genessee was the only witness
on the stand during yesterday after
noon’s session of the senatorial inves
tigating committee and for two hours
he was again subjected to a stringent
cross-eamxinatiou regarding his ar
rangements with Stone and Edmonds
before he took an active part in the
campaign in the interest of Senator
Stephenson. He was confronted by
two original letters written to Stone
in an effort on the part of the sen
ators to contradict his statement, that
he did not expect any money or had
any idea that he was to receive a sum
from the Stephenson fund before he
got the first SSOO from Stone on Au
gust 12. Under close questioning by
the senators, the witness clung to his
story that he had no arrangements
with Stone or Edmonds to take part
in the campaign or to receive any
money to use in the interest of Sen
ator Stephenson. The witness left the
stand with the understanding that he
would be recalled before the commit
tee finally concluded it's labors, pro
bably at the end of this week.
Bowman Testifies.
Deputy Game Warden H. A. Bow
man was called to the stand at the
opening of yesterday afternoon’s ses
sion of the investigating committee.
He was questioned about a conversa
tion with Edmonds in Milwaukee ami
said, as he had testified before, that
he did not expect any money and had
no idea that he was to receive a sum
from the Stephenson fund, before Mr.
Stone gave him the first SSOO. He
acain contradicted Stone’s testimony
and declared that he was not the first
to suggest the acceptance of money
from Edmonds.
Senator Marsh introduced in evi
dence a letter written to Stone by
Bowman. He read parts of this
epistle and questioned Bowman in an
effort to prove that Bowman knew he
was to receive money from the Steph
enson fund before he received the
$1,250 from Stone on August 12. It
appeared from the letter that the wit
ness had a telephone conversation
with Edmonds in which the latter told
him that “everything was O. K.” Bow
man said something to Stone ahoui
“the great responsibility that he was
assuming in selecting the game ward
ens to work for Stephenson,’’ that
“this was no game to fool about,” and
That, he “wanted to get clear on the
matter.”
“You mean to say that you don’t
remember writing this letter or re
ceiving an answer to it?”
“Yes.”
“Yon further mean to say that you
didn’t know you were to receive
money from Edmonds or Stone, after
you had th's telephone message from
Edmonds and had a conference with
him a few days’ alter, and after you
had assumed the responsibility of se
lecting the game wardens to work for
Stephenson ?”
“I had no conversation with any
body about receiving money before I
got the first SSOO on the twelfth of
August.”
that no costs are allowed for printing.
A second letter from Bowman to
Stone, written during the campaign,
was taken into evidence by Senator
Marsh.
“Wha* do you mean by saying here:
'I have it fixed so that Jim Thomas
gets some help - ?” was asked.
“I have absolutely no recollecfon
what I meant by that,” Bowman re
plied.
Senator Hasting read the two let
ters into the record. The first was
writ'en on August 5. before Bowman
received the money from Stone, and
the second on September 15.
“You had $450 on hand at the time
you wrote this second letter and this
money was collected from or con
tributed by the game wardens for the
governor’s campaign fund. It ap
pears from the letter that you had
some dispute with Stone. Now isn’t
it a fact that this dispute was over
the $450 which was to go into the
governor's campaign fund?” Senator
Husting asked.
The witness denied that the dis
pute with Stone was about the money
collected from the game wardens.
Bowman could not remember any
thing abotit the purpose or the mean
ing of this letter. He said that he
didn’t give “Jim” Thomas any help
and that he didn’t know whether he
got some or not.
Senator Husting again asked
whether it wasn’t a matter of fact
that the second letter to Stone wasn’t
in regard to the money for the gov
ernor’s campaign fund.
“Isn’t it true that you put the pro
position up to Stone that the govern
or had enough after he bad received
the first SSOO from Stone and that
you should divide the remaining $450
that you still had in your possession
from the game wardens and keep
this money?” Husting asked.
“I didn’t do anything of the kind.”
Bowman repl'ed. “I had no dispute
with Stone about any such matter
and I can't recollect what the pur
pose of this ktter was.”
Shortly after the witness was ex
cused and the committee adjourned
till this morning at 9 o'clock.
Sanders Defeats Schelinsky.
Washington, May 12. —Judge Leon
Sanders, of New York city, opposi
tion candidate for grand master of
the Order of the Brith Abraham, was
elected yesterday over Sam Sohelin
sky. administration 'candidate. The
convention concluded its work and
adjourned to meet next year in New
York,
KILLS WIFE AND DAUGHTER.
Mill Watchman Does Deed Because
of Family Trouble.
Everett, Wash., May 11. —James M.
Dawson, night watchman for a mill
company at Three near here,
shot and killed his wife and 14 year
old daughter and then killed himself
yesterday. Mrs. Dawson arrived a
few days ago from Arkansas, their
former home. Dawson and wife had
been living in the same house for a
few days, but are said to have been
divorced. The police say family
trouble caused the shooting.
TWENTY DROWNED
IN OHIO RIVER
THIRTY LABORERS TRY TO
CROSS IN LAUNCH AND GO
DOWN AMID STREAM.
Pittsburg. May 12. —Twenty per
sons are missing and all are believed
to have been drowned when a gaso
line launch sank in the middle to the
Ohio river near Schoenville, four
miles below Pittsburg, last night. Of
■SO occupants of the boat, only 10 arc
known to have escaped. The missing
are; Albert Graham, pilot; George
Thompson. “(Boots”, OlTNeill. Jam< s
Connor, Walter Low, Thomas Ken
nedy, William Guthrie, Henry Vigelei,
Dennis Murphy, Tony Bole, Louis
Golstein. William Davis, Joseph Lyle,
Will Burke. two brothers named
Botts, and five others, whose names
are unknown.
All were employes of the Pressed
Steel Car company at McKees Rocks
plant. The men had been working
overtime until 8 o’clock and left the
works to cross the river in the launch
about 15 minutes later. The boat is
said to have been intended for not
over 20 persons, and it is said it was
dangerous to attempt to carry as
many as 25 in it. But all the men
wanted to get ashore on the first
trip ami 30 crowded in. When the
boat reached the middle of the stream
where the water is perhaps 20 feet
deep, the boat suddenly sank. As it
sank it caused a suction which took
many of the men down with it; Many
attempted to swim ashore, but were
chilled by the cold water and became
exhausted before reaching the shore.
As far as is known, only 10 reached
shore.
FRANCE MAINTAINS
MAXIMUM RATES
j NEW TARIFF BILL EXTENDS NO
FAVORS TO UNITED
STATES.
Paris, May 12. —In the senate’s new
draft of the tariff bill, the maximum
duty on canned meats has been re
duced from 30 francs to 20 francs per
hundred kilos. Increases in the maxi
mum with respect to apples, hops,
meat extracts, preserved vegetables,
cotton seed oil, vaseline, iron, steel,
machinery, tools, wire, cutlery, nails,
bicycles, leather and shoes, in which
the United States is interested, are
generally maintained; in some cases
they are notably higher.
WILL EXONERATE
SUPERINTENDENT
Madison, May 12.
Members of the state board of con
trol for charitable and penal institu
tions returned yesterday from Janes
ville, where they went to investigate
charges made against the manage
ment of the school for the blind lo
cated there. The charges were pre
ferred iby inmates of the institution
that Superintendent and Steward
Harvey Clark ill treated the blind
students and did not provide them
with sufficient food.
The board made a careful and thor
ough examination of all the facts, and
while they have not yet formulated
their report it is said that when it is
ready for publication it will complete
ly exonerate Superintendent Clark.
TO BREAK POWER
Of TAMMANY BALL
New York. May 12. —Zealous citi
zens of greater New York, to the
number of 250, gathered in Cooper
union last night to inaugurate a move
ment to “determine % means of secur
ing the nomination of proper candi
dates for city offices to be filled at
the coming municipal election.” In a
nutshell the movement is aimed
against Tammany hall. It is non-par
tisan.
Isaac N. Seligman, banker, called
the meeting to order. Robert C. Og
den was elected chairman.
The chairman was authorized to
appoint a committee to select names
of 100 citizens, to serve as a general
committee to be charged with the
duty of securing nominations.
$2,340,000 fcr U- of Illinois.
Springfield, 111., May 12—Appro
priations for the university of Illinois
aggregating $2,343,000 were allowed
yesterday by the house committee
on appropriationss.
LOST JOHN ORTH
FOUND AT LAST
PRINCE OF HOUSE OF HAPSBURG
A MACHINIST IN PAINES
VILLE OHIO.
SUDDENLY DISAPPEARS Wh£M
STORY OF LIFE IS MADE
PUBLIC.
Chicago. 111., May 12, —The Jouru.c
yesterday devoted its entire front
page to the elaboiation of an uu
equivocal statement that it has dis
covered “the lost John Orth," other
wise Archduke Johann Salvator of
Austria, prime of the house of Haps
burg, who disappeared nineteen
years ago alter marrying Ludmilu
Stubel. an opera singer. Briellv
sketched, the sloij says:
"John Orth was discovered at
Painesville, ()., working as a mu
chiuist at sls per week. Previously
he had followed this occupation at
Orand Rapids, Mich., and Cleveland.
O. His reason for making his iden
tity known at this time, the Journal
states, was due to his advancing ago
and his desire that he might be bur
ied in Aus'ria.
Johann Salvator, as the alleged
archduke, lias always been known
since he left the court at Vienna, was
mat t ied in London, and he and his
wife afterward sailed to South Amet
iea in the "Santa Margarita," a
schooner which he had chartered.
11 has always been believed that
the archduke lost his life when the
schooner sank off the coast of Chile
According to the stor\ of the Paines
ville machinist he and his beautiful
wife were not aboard the ship, as was
generally thought to have been tin
ease. They went ashore at Cusa
vana. a small port on the Rio de La.
Plata. K was planned that they
should* meet the ship at Valparaiso
but the craft sank en route.
The roman!ir couple drifted all
over the world, dually taking up a
plantation on the island of Marti
nique. When the first tumblings ot
Mount IVlee gave warning of the ca
lastrc plie which lollowed soon after,
Johann Salvator made a hurried visit
to the city t arrange to get his fam
ily away. Hut the warnings had
come too late. Mis wife and their two
children were killed. Salvator was
teseued by a French gunboat, and
came io the United States.
I’ainsville. ()., Ma> 12.—As sudden
ly as he came into public notici
when he proclaimed himself the miss
ing Archduke Johann Salvator of
Austria, John Salvator, a. machinist
who has been working here in a
foundry for (he las; five weeks, disap
pen red last night. Finding upon bis
return to his hoarding bouse, the
published story of bis .alleged noble
birth, his renunciation of his imperial
title for love of Ludmilla Stubel. tin
opera singer, and his sulbsequem.
tail into poverty and obscurity, Sal
vator. snpperless and dressed in his
working Ho lies, hurried away.
“I shall be back in a few minutes,
he shouted to his boarding mistress,
as lie hastened out the door. Scores
of people. Austrians of noble and
common birth, interpreters, resident*
of Painesville and surrounding cities
and a horde of newspapermen gath
ered at the little room in tin* board
ing house to await his return. They
waited for many hours, tint Salvator
did not come back.
FEDERATION IN WASHINGTON.
For y his the American federa
tion of labor had a free hand In its
work of intimidation at' Washington.
With its headquarters in that elty, it
maintained a numerous and unscrupu
lous lobby there from the beginning
to the end of every session of con
gress. My threats to defeat them in
the primaries or at the polls it had
many legislators at its mercy. Thus,
while the federation's agents were t he
most detested men it (lie national
capital, they were also the most
feared m< n. Hut the federation has
lost its old ascendancy at Washing
ton. Largely through the education
al work of the American .Manufac
turers, public sentiment is asserting
itself decisively against the lawless
methods of labor unionism.
Defeated at the national capital,
however, the federation has transfer
red Its battleground to the various
state law making bodies. The Pearre
bill, which was before resent sessions
of congress, would have virtually de
stroyed the injunction In labor con
troversies. ami would have left em
ployers in all interests at the mercy
of the labor chiefs. The manufac
turers killed the Pearre bill in Wash
ington. Immediately, under various
names ami fathered by various per
sonages, Pearre bills appeared in
many legislatures all over the coun
try. With the assistance of the manu
facturers and- under their initiative,
bill’s of this class have been defeated
in the legislatures of Massachusetts,
Ohio. Indiana and Missouri. The same
class of bills show themselves In the
legislatures of all the states until
this class proscription has been ex
tirpated everywhere.
King and Empero- to Meet,
Rome, May 12.--King Victor Em
manuel, Queen Helena and Signor
Tittoni, foreign minister, left here
yesterday for Brindisi to meet the
eynperor and empress of Germany
today. No political importance is
attached to the meeting.
Mrs. Mary Nevins Bull, widow’ of
Dr. William T. Bull, has presented to
the New York academy of Medicine a
bronze bust of her husband, which
was Dr. Bull’s last gift to her before
he died. She gives it to the acad
emy in his son’s name.
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