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The stayer. (Canyon City, Tex.) 1896-1903, January 23, 1902, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86088093/1902-01-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER DEVOTED TO STOCK-FARMING.
CANYON CITY, TEXAS, THURSDAY. JANUARY, 23, 1902.
NO. 43.
1
1
low to Prevent Pneunio-
A urn..
a well established fact
leumonia can be prevent-
ns disease always results
'a cold or from an attack
influenza. Among tbe tens
of thousands who have used
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy
for these diseases, you will not
kfind a single case that has ever
resulted in pneumonia, which
shows conclusively that it is a
certain preventive of that dread
disease. The fact is it counter-
i acts any tendency of a cold or
attack of the grip towards pneu
monia. It is famous for its
quick cures of colds and grip.
Try it. The Hadley Drug Com
pany, The Leading Druggists
sell it. 44
Texas Inspection.
' V. D. Jordon of Quanab, has
prepared the Texas section of
the annual report of inspections
to be made by the bureau of an
imal industry. It shows the
number of cattle inspected last
year to be '4 18,596, as against
307.658 for the preceding year.
The cattle were distributed as
follows: Montana 99,408,
Soulh Dakota 71,285, New Mex
ico 63,000, Colorado 10,885, Iowa
6780, Oklahoma 470, Kansas
63,972, North Dakota 42,730,
Wyoming 30,097, Nebraska 16,.
470, Missouri 3200, California
2598, Illinois 2240; total 418,596.
Texas Stock Journal.
Home Comfort coffee is the
best. J, A. Wansley & Co. tf
Dale Brought $ lO.OOO.
The noted bull Dale, sire of
Perfection, was sold last week
to J. C. Adams of Moweaqua,
111., for 10,000. Just before
the Clark sale of Herefords at
Chicago at which Perfection
brought $9000, Clem Graves of
Bunker Hill, Ind., sold Daleto
Wabash Stock Farm Co. of Wa
bash Ind., for $8000. On the
day following the Clark sale
the purchase of Dale by Mr.
Adams was made. Texas Stock
Journal.
We desire to call your atten
tion to the beautiful display of
furniture at Oscar Hunt & Co's.
store, some lovely pieces and
suites for sale at reasonable
prices.
We frequently see a man walk
into a confectionery or grocery
store, pick up an apple, a stick
of candy or a banana, and de
vour it with as much nonchal
ence as if he were the, proprie
tor of the establishment.,; Now,
of course an apple or a stick of
candy is not worth much, but
suppose everybody who happen
ed into the store should help
themselves in this fashion,
where would the merchant's
prolit come in? It would not
come in at all; on the contrary
he would go broke in a short
while. You have no more right to
sponge on the dealer than any
body else. So when ever you
want a little fruit or a little
candy, plank down your nickel
and don't "sponge" any
Ex.
longer.
mc.mni
mot J5c
XHnoeveolo.
Y0N UMBER (5T
CANYON CITY.
TEXAS.
IITH WALKER & COMPANY
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
TPIAT THEY
WILL CONTINUE IN BUSINESS.
3
t
1
u
, t
.
ROCEREES
OUR STOCK IS COMPLETE AND OUR PRICES ARE THE
LOWEST. AN INVESTIGATION WILL CONVINCE YOU.
RY GOOES
WE ARE FILLING IN ALL BROKEN LINES,
HOWEVER, FOR THE PRESENT WE WILL
rmmiviTF, to W, at COST.
REMEMBER ALL GOODS CHARGED WILL BE AT REGULAR PRICES.
SMITH, WALKER & COMPANY.
THE CENTER OF THE LIVE
STOCK INDUSTRY.
According to the Federal cen
sus, giving the number of head
of livestock in the different
states of the union on 1st of
June 1900, tie great state of
Texas stood first in cattle with
9,546,970, Iowa was second with
5,338,849 and Kansas third with
4,495,043. Missouri, Nebraska
and Illinois had about 3,000,000
each, Indian Territory and Okla
homa combined 3,000,000 and
Colorado 1,500,000. Kansas
City is thus shown to be the
central point and natural market
of the greatest cattle producing
territory in the world. During
the first of the New Century,
Kansas City's chief mission
seemed to be tbe smashing of
commercial records and so sue
cessfu! were its efforts that in
the receipts of live stock and
tbe percentage , consumed by
local abattoirs, the new records
established out number those
' of any other city. Cattle re
ceipts for the year amounted to
2,000,105 head, out numbering
the previous year's, and heavi
est previous receipts, by over
30,000. There were 126,410
calves received, also a record
breaking supply, and the hog
receipts, which aggregated
3,719,404, were the largest ever
recorded and over 600,000 in ex
cess of the previous year's arri
vals. Sheep receipts, while
not the largest on record, were
very heavy, having reached a
total of 980,978, and of tbe num
ber, 776,693, were slaughtered
in Kansas. City, representing
79.3 per cent of tbe total supply
and eclipsing all previous
slaughtering records, as did the
killing of cattle which readied
a total of 1,142,289 or 58.4 per
cent of the receipts and the
killing of hogs which amounted
to 3,544,800 or 95.3 per cent of
the total supply. There were
also 96,957 horses and mules re
ceived during the year and the
total valuation of live stock
Dassinar throutrtr the Kansas
City stock yards was $130,377,
653.00, over 4,000,000.90 greater
than in 1900 and representing
about one seventh of the total
l 1 1 C A 1 n
oanK cieanngs ui iue jcai,
which readieitiifi enormous o"-
tal of $918,000,000.00, within it
self a record breaker and $143-
000,p00.00 in excess of the pre
vious year's clearings.
In the summer and fall of
1901 the territory for hundreds
of miles around Kansas City
passed through a drouth that,
for severity, ba3 seldom been
surpassed, but so far from prov
ing a disaster to the industries
of the city, its effect was only
felt in showing its greatness in
adversity and how little are its
institutions dependent upon lo
cal conditions. Much of this
supremacy is due to the perfect
railroad facilities which Kan
sas City's geograpical position
affords, and when thousands of
immature cattle were forced on
to the market during the dry
months the demands of the far
away states of the north and
northwest, where feed was
plentiful, absorbed a large por
tion of the surplus in as simple
and natural a manner as if the
exchange had been made by
next door neighbors instead of
between men living thousands
of miles apart. These exchang
es were affected through the
Kansas Citv market which
maintained its position as the
largest stocker and feeder mar
ket in the world, having distrib
uted 50,000 more cattle to the
range and feeding points during
the year than, any other two
markets combined and having
approached within less than
9000 head of the greatest of all
distributing years 1900 when
from Kansas City alone, about
670,000 cattle and calves found
their way back to the country.
An idea of the increase of stock-
ers and feeders called tor oy
what was formerly considered
"outside territory" may be ob
tained from the Kansas City
Stock Yards Company's annual
distribution report which shows
Montana to have taken nearly
30,000 cattle compared with 300
the year before; South Dakota,
11,000 against 1,100; Wyoming,
10,000 against 1899; Minnesota,
3000 against 300 and Washing
ton, 2400 against none at all in
1900.
Two thousand pure blood cat
tie sold at auction at Kansas
City at a general average of
$226.15 during 1901, out of about
15,000 pnre blood cattle sold at
auction during the year through
out the whole United States;
and at Kansas City, during the
first month of the year, the
pace was set for high priced
heifers when Carnation 7704
was sold oy uiem uraves, oi
Bunker Hill. Ind., tc J. C.
Adams, Moweaqua, 111. for
$3700. Other high prices were
paid during the year for female
pure blood cattle at ivansas
City and other places until the
climax was reached in Decem
ber when W. S. Marr, of Aber
deenshire, Scotland, sold Nissie
153d to W. C. Edwards & Co. of
Rockland, Ontario, for $6000.
This was not only the highest
price paid for a cow during the
year, but exceeded any like con
sideration since the famous
"New York Mills" sale in 1873
which took place near Utica, N.
Y. and at which one Shorthorn
cow sold at 40,000, and another
at $35,000.
In fact, the 1901 was the most
successful year in the history
of the Kansas City market and
shows the steady trend of the
business to that poiut which is
destined to become the greatest
livestock market in the world
Mr. Leslie Kobtnon of Hereford Is
rlHltlug In town tbl week.
WE ARE HERE
to sell the best goods at reasonable
prices. We want a share of your
patronage and by courteous treat
ment and honest dealing we hope to
hold your trade. Our stock of
GROCERIES, COUNTRY PRODUCE,
CONFECTIONS, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
is the freshest to be found on the market.
J. A. WANSLEY X CO.

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