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San Marcos free press. [volume] (San Marcos, Tex.) 1877-1892, February 21, 1884, Image 1

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ree Press
San I
- V Ami .
H
PROPRIETOR.
I. II. JTJLIA.7ST,
"Prove All Things I Hold Fast that which Is Cood."
SAN MARCOS, HAYS COUNTY, TEXAS, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1881.
NO. tl.
VOL. XIII.
Free Press.
rVBUUBCO ITEM TBUBSDAT BT
'. '.. ISAAC JL JULIAN,
To whom all Lettri should be Addressed.
OFFICE-North Side of Plizi.
BATES OrSVBSOBlPTlOif.
On J, Is tdveae. ....... fl N
Sis Berth . .' 1
Tore ath M Tl
MATM3 OF ADYXXTRIIX8.
On Blurt, latartlea 91 M mb addtUe.
aj liMrtloa anler eae Burnt. M m mi aa ar.
1 II. Iimi.
IBM.
II M
1 Square
t "
"
ft eom.j
t.OOl I.N
s. ! t o
T.OOl 10.00
'11.11 MOO
.
IS.
11.0
10.0
MM
MOO
10.M
1S0
M.O
M.00
Ke
U.SS
ao.ooi MM
L(l TT.MI.M 4MrtlMBBU Will b.
ebtr.ed One Dollar per !" tor la Brat la
asiuSa, ..d fifty Cant. M' o.ar
tlenal In.ertlon. A eounr I Ik epaoe "
lien" Freetlenal .qusre. will k . " rnll
Tic'aT'.nd Ba.ln.te N.tlee. -III k. '
cu pr lln (or the firet Intertiea. and lfht
Mib line lor twk additional laeartloa.
AnnoanolngeandldaU lor 111.., eeanty, f
or Dlelrlct er State offlee "
Buelnaee Card., oa ib r mm, year, J
Card, la BmIo.m Directory, on veer. SS 00
GENERAL DEtEOTORY.
OFFIGIAIj.
OMQiunui-re DliTmlOTl
Boa. Jam Millar, of Gonial Ceoaty.
aaatToa- i&ni wmioTi
Bon. 00. Pfeolftr, of Comal 0.
Banana ativb Sin auraiem
Boa. Sterile, flther. of Hey. Co.
Boa. i. Stegner, of Oaldwell Co.
... imiOT SO0B 1BTB BUT1I0T.
a. L. W. Boor. Presiding Judge. UQraag.
J. H. Bethany. Attorney, Ao.tln Co.
tibii or bold lira ootjbt.
Bay. M Heodey lo March and September.
OOUMTT OmOBBI. .
Ed R. Koa, Jndg County Court.
Jae. O. Bo.rle.oa, Dlit. and County GUrk.
Owen Cord, Coanty A'terney.
. fl. E. Barker Sheriff. J. at.Tnrner, Deputy.
' . 8. Cock, Ja.tlea ol tbo eeee Pre. Bo; 1
D.,wi.ynck. . ;; V. '
A.-'."' " " -
W." ".'ck, " - " - 6
. J. II. Paturwn, Coanty Treataror.
R. B. rortwn, AM.nor.
Jo. C. , Borreyor.
T.J. MnCarty, Coai'r Preolnot No. X,
' l.B.EatlllT. " . "
l.k. Burlewn, ' !
W. R. Wood, " " i.
J. V. Pltn, Con.tablo Preelnet lol.
' TlMH Or BOLIHim COOMTT ABB PBBOIBOt OOOBTO
County Court lor Criminal, Civil and rr.bata baa
Inem 4th Monday, in J.ull.ry, Marok.Ilay, July,
Beptaniber and November.
Commi.alonar.' Court Id Monday, la February,
May, Ansu.t and November.
Juallee Oturt Preelnot Ho. 1 let Friday In eaob
month, Ban Marco.
Preelnet Mo. J Id Friday In eaeb month Mt. City.
" S 3d " Wimberlry'. Mill.
4i . 4 4I0 . Dripping AprlnM.
. tuwb orricaai.
V.vor C. S. vocV. .
Council W. O. Ilulclil.on, fl. W. Donalnon, T. P.
ill.l. A.hvrr, Wm. Cien.
t.r.nl r. M. Prince.
Council meets the llr.l Tuoiday In ecb nio-itb.
ARMVAI. AND DKPAUTURE OF. TO ANP
PROM BAN MA11008 POST OFPICK.
Mall from Auatln irrive at J:5 P. M.i clo.e at 1:00
P. U.
" ' " San Antonio arilve at 1:15 P. M., clo.e
at t:o P. M .......
AjiIIiik, arrive, at IS M., clone, at 11:15. P. U.
AlHivenialU arrlv. and depart dally,
lllaneo, via Wlmberley depart. Monday and Friday
at il A. M. Arrive Tueaday and 8aturday at
7 PM.
General Delivery from 8 A. M., to IS M., and from
1 P- M. to 5 P. M.
Pontolllea open on Sunday on hour after distribu
tion of nialla.
ALBERT BEATON, P. M.
METHODIST. Preaching at the Uethodt.t
Church every Babbatb, Bev. Buckner Harria, Pator.
Sunday School at o'clock, A.M. Cla.a meetlug
or young Man' Prayer Meeting at S o'olook P. M.
Prayer Meeting on Wednesday.
PROTESTANT KPISCOPAL. Service, let and
Sd Sunday. each month, at MX o'clock, a.m., and
T r. ., (at St. Mark'a Church), by the Bev. Mr.
Allen.
BAPTIST. Preaching at th Baptl.t Cbnrck
on th flr.1 and third Sunday lo acb month.
Bev. J. Bendon, pastor. i
CATHOLIC, aervlee th Sunday In eauh month,
Bev. Father Morandi, pa.tor.
CBBISTIAB. Service every Ind and 4th Sunday
eaou month. Bev. J. L. Prltchatt, patter.
PRBSBYTBB1AN. Servloe lad and 4th Sunday,
each month. Rev. J. B. Frenoh. pa.tor.
Baa Marco Lodge Bo. 41 meet. Saturday on or
before full moon. A. 0. Danfortk W. M. Albert
Uea'on Secretary.
San Marooa Chapter No. 11, meeU Tuetday on or
telore full moon. P. J. 0. Smith M. K. B. P.
Albert Beaton. Seeretanr.
Bay. Lodge K. of B. Ho. 1S8, meet Ind and 4th
Friday, or each month. J. V. Batching, Dictator,
T.J. Peel. Reporter.
Lone Mountain Led re Be. ISA meet every
Mondav nlahi. J. T. Holland. B. O. Albert
Beaton- Beoretary.
Park ln InuiDBmt Bo. 6S meet l.t 3rd ind 6th
Friday of each month. J. Ward, CP. Albert
Beaton Secretary.
. Ordar of Ckoeea FrleBd, Baall Dallar, C. C,
Albeit Heatoo. Secretary.
Printing Outfit.
FOR SALE,
C2 Tk Ckaapest Tt I 5CT
The aubaoriber has for sale the greater
portion of t NEWSPAPER AND JOB
PRINTING OUTFIT (except Newspaper
iTesa,; consists or 150 to ZOO lbs of Bour
geois ; about 100 lbs of Nonpareil, (both at
ond hand, bat good, and very complete and
well sorted ;) some FIFTY FONTS more
or lees aa may be wanted of GOOD
HANDSOME DISPLAX AND JOB TYPE,
"of all aorta and sises a pair of chases for
aiz, seven or eight earama paper, with
Column and Read Rule, and an abnndaiie
of Leads and DaAea all complete and (rood:
Brass Galley; Oases; Job Chases; Com-
potdng K ticks. Arc, ate. Also a gooa
NOVELTY JOBBER!
10x14 inch mi inside of chase. All of which
will be sold AT A BARGAIN FOB CASH.
bing entimly BO-rprcM to any office. IjnpTes
aotat of typ And other particular will be
est on afpUcauoa. uoa i nu to vrriie me,
for I ain prvpared to offer the grrtUrH bar.
pi in PritUttff Xntrrial U be found in
tiu SUUt r rif
Addraaa L H. JULIAN.
Froprietor Fa Pacaa,
rWa MarrOB. Texas.
TEE 8 AH MARCOS FREE PRESS
mmd IW LealerlTte
WEEKLY COURIER -JOURNAL
On fmmr ler tf Tomb far BBale sen
e as re w11
fteoanwarael. Ik rr
er aW Seveh. Ij eaialti
ar -.. e4 eW WM, eal
aa MrtMiaaif Hv ake fr m ,
T"wwi in l.n a oeay a Cower-
e aa a e Ve
BUSINESS DIRECTORY.
BANKERS.
ED. J. L. OREO, Boutboojit Oornw
l'lajut, bI Uttloue's old atund.
D.
A. OLOVEI1, North aiJo TUx, .
... . ,
la wrsita.
w
000 4 F011D, Wood's NewBulldlnR
UpaUlra. .
O
T. BHOWN. Ofncoln Uitohell Build.
, inn, apatuira.
FI8HE11 & ROBE, Offlco In Wood's Now
linildiiig npatAirB,
NOTARY PUBLIC & G'L AO'T.
TL JULIAN, Jadgo Wood's New Build.
, Iur, npaiitlni.
PJI YS1C1A NS k SURGEONS,
D
ItS. WOODS A BURLESON, Offios at
Uaynolda t Danior dntgHtora.
D
B. WU. MYE11S, Office at Fromme's
Drugstore, 8outbeatit Corner Plaza.
DENTISTS.
D
B. J. H. COMBS, Judge Wood's New
Bmldiug, upstairs.
D
B. N. B. MoLEAN, Offloe in Jud.
Wood's Building, wltnDr. uouids.
DRUGGISTS.
FltOMME, South side Flaza.
RAYNOLDS Jb DANIEL, North aide
Flaza.
DRY GOODS.
CI BEEN & l'HICE, at MiUone'a old stand,
T Southeast Corner Plitza.
DRY GOODS & GROCERIES.
JOHNSON & JOHNSON, Mitchell Build
ing, North side plaza.
L.
JT. DAILEY, Went Side of Main Plaza.
DAIL1
Pli
AILEY & BRO., Southwest Oornoi
iitza.
E
I. IGLEHART, Enst side of Plnzn
. Opposite Court House.
BOOTS if- SHOES.
JB. HANKLA, Mituuffteturor nud VciC
, er, North side Plaza.
f ERH. LAUMEN, EaHt Side Plaza.
WHOLESALE GROCER,
MARTIN HINZIE, Boutheaat Corner
Pltza.
GROCERIES.
A.
J. SWASEY. South sido Plaza.
GROCERIES & HARD WARE.
GW. DONALSON & CO., North aidn
. Plaza.
FURNITURE.
J.
WARD, East side Plaza.
J
W. NANCE, nearly opposite Hinzie's
. Grocery Store.
WA TGHMA KKJtS & J IS WHLEJiS.
W.
H. BOBBINS, North side Plaza.
STOVES it- TINWARE.
M
ABTIN HINZIE, Southeast Cor Plaza.
Gr
EO. IIENNE. East Side Plaza.
S ADDLES it HARNESS.
c.
S. COCK, Southwest Corner Plaza.
WK. McMULLEN, East side Plaza at
, Iglehart's Store.
LIVERY A SALE STABLES.
B
ALES & SON, San Antonio Street.
MEAT MARKET.
S.
L. TOWNSEND, Southwest Plaza.
BAKERY A CONFECTIONERY.
F
EITZ LANGE South aide Phua.
LANDA & BRO.,
"Wholesale Dealers in
GRAIN. FLOUR. MEAL, PRODUCE AND HAY.
WAREHOUSES at New Braunfds, San Antonio, and
Laredo.
WE QUOTE PRICES FOR CASH ONLY.
AT KETAIL
Patent Mismri Fkmr, in barrr-U, rrr
" Extra Mo. " " saw "
Extra Fancy " " "
F.7
Cboioe Family
1W NirBntKna " -
fWd Oats, jr bri-lvl
reeding ditto per imum
White uorn - -
Choke ewXn rtaio in aarks, rr
Urly Atoae na.
AH Good Gmrni4
The Free Press ofiicc docs
TtltC
Central Hotel.
MAIBPLAIA.
SAN ANTONIO TEX.
Bl.S. per air.
ItaaleS a the Mala Plata, la th. vary alr f
Ikeally.betnoaatuo Uepote. arlln Street oer IB
front renalng to all Pablie Plaoe and Pleaaar Be.
ana. Hnaare la all Train., aad Daily Slene ta all
point.. Telephoo connection, with every part af
Ike ity an vaiiona point. Bona, ana wee, awt.
trio Ughl, Semi-dally Mall Delivery, la Ike meet eea
venlent to ba.laeaa and pleaear, aad balag aader
the eldeai maaagemoal la lb beat plea to eatals
latorm.iloa aboal th eoaetry, Owning er ova
Improveajenl. we aaa taralab flral-elaaa aaaaatBM
daUoB. al SI AO per day, Ibue aavlog I oar pa Irene
llra.ltl.O per day. Bngllik, Garmaa, Praack
aad Spen!k tpokea. Oa.fW will raoelva tka boat
attention. aelS
i. m. ii4Ki:n.
rrBiV.
W. H. BOBBINS,
ajBaBaT
THE "OLD RELIABLE"
WATCHMAKER
JEWELER,
-)n(-
OPTICIAN,
tad dealer in all grade of
CLOCKS, WATCHES, JEWEL
BY, SILVERWARE, FANCY
GOODS AND NOTIONS.
NORTH HI UK OP TBI PLAZA.
All goods warranted as represent
edail work to give satisfaction, or
money refunded. . . - "
C7 All goods sold as low if not lower than
can be bought olsewhore in Texas. :
"A Merciful Man is Merciful to his Beast."
ONLY 25 CUNTS-
2,500,000 ALREADY SOLD.
A TREATISE ON THE .
t HOR'SEHa
INS HIS DISEASES
BY
B. J. KENDALIi & CO.,
FILL F .
Valnabie and.. Practical
l.l'OBATI01,
AND CONTAINING
AN INDEX OF DISEASES.
Which gives the symptoms ; Cause and
Best treatment of eneh ; a Table giviug
all the principle drugs used fbr the Horse
with the ordinary dose, effects and anti
dotes whon a poison, a Table with an en
graving of the horse's toeth at different
aces, with rules for telling the age of
the Horse ; C5 Engraviugs showing the
important points in the structure of the
Horse, also illustrating various diseases.
A valuable collection of receipts ninny of
which would cost a horse owner three to
five dollars each.
Every Farmer,
Should Own This Book
PRICE
25 CENTS 25
Remittances may be made in currency sil
ver or stamps.
Send all Orders to
IBtFREE PRESS KK
WESTERN
NURSERIES!
The anderdgned wonU announce lo all wheal It
nay eo.ieem, the! tbey have now on hand at their
ground, near WI.TillKHl.EV. IIAV8I CO..
Hp W V At M . tnrl BU BUMrtatta
BE jT.jmr- at ssttftn
Surscry Stock mainly of Home Growth,
and hence more likely to do well la tbl. toll and
climate than taoee produced la ether ell mete, and
aoil.. Theiretock oon.ut. In ptrt of Peach, Plom.
Apricot, Almond, and Apple Tree., Ortn Vlnee a
peclalty. Aleo Greenbouao and Bedding Plant..
Koeee aad Ornamental shrubbery, aad Piowar In
variety. All order, promptly Slled. Addroea,
BOZARTH & WIMBERLY,
Wimberly, Hays Co. Texas.
eplS Sm
barrrL
hundred
" --
" -
"
C 50
S 13
i on
75
t So
t M
no
1 W
1 M
or Mmj I.VfwJtLj?4
LATJDA & BRO.,
New I'rxrrnf'-ls or Sin Anf'WiioL
only first-class Job Printing.
aBTIBBU .
.ABaU. JB- XV JBf Ta, JV
Jr leiw
TRUE LOVE.
I think true love is never blind,
But rather bring an addod light,
An luner vision qulok to Jlnd
The beauties hid from oommon sight
No soul can ever clearly sea
Auother's highest, noblest part,
Save through the sweet phllosophx
And loving wisdom of the heart
Yonr nnanointed eyas shall fall
On him who fills tny soul with light
You do not sea my friend at all,
You see what hides him from your sight
I are the feet thai fain would climb t
Yon, but the steps that turn astray ;
I see the soul unharmed, sublime t
You but the garment and theclny.
You see a mortal, weak, mislod,
Dwarfed aver by the earthly clodj
I see how manhood, perfected.
May reach the stature of a god.
Blinded, I stood where now you stand.
Till on mine eyes, with touches sweet,
Lore, the deliverer, laid his hand,
And lo t I worship at bis feet 1
Rf mlnlsconcfs of a Texan VctoranThe
SanUFe Expedition, etc.
BI 0. BKBABO. .
LVII.
Kendall's kariiativb oomtimcbd.
The dav following that on which
Colonel Cooke and his comradeBwere
marched through San Miguel, we
petitioned the old alcalde for a change
of quarters, the room wo were then
occupying, although comfortable in
every other respect, being so com
pletely overrun with chinches and
other vermin, that it was impossible
to sleep at night. After we had wait
ed with great impatience for two
days and passed two more sleepless
nights, the old fellow finally procur
ed for us a clean and comfortable
room, directly on the plaza. A hint
from Van Ness to the effect that Arniijo
should be made acquainted with the
kind of room the old alcalde had fur
nished us, probably induced that
functionary to haston our removal.
When established in our new quar
ters, our time passed more agreeably.
Oar only occupations were eating,
drinking, sloeping,. chatting with tho
gh-la, who male us daily via. is, and
speculation on our, past reverses,
our presont position, and future pros
pects. At dark wo would build a
fire, for the evenings wcro now cool
among the mountains, and then prob
ably Emend half the night m song and
story. Each one of our little party
had a checkered oxpenonce to relate,
and the recital of some ludicrous ad
venture would bring forth a peal of
uproarious laughter, much to the as
tonishment of the little knot oi Mexi
cans congregated among us, who
could not conceive how prisoners, in
the power of such a man as Armigo
could indulge in such boisterous mirth.
For myself, I must Bay that I never
laughed more heartily than while
confined in that little prison-house,
and could our anxious friendB have
been spirited to that wild and roman
tic land, and permitted to eavesdrop
under the walls of our carccl (prison),
on some of these evenings, they could
hardly have deemed us other than a
party of merry fellows holding jolly
carousal.
But through all this hilarity,
thoughts of escape frequently enter
ed our minds. Those of our guard
who manifested the greatest astonish
ment at our indifference to our im
prisonment, we could have captured
and tied with their bows and arrows,
and a German double -barrel in their
possession, wo could next have taken
tho town of ' San Miguel with the
the greatest ease. On several occa
sions so careless was the guard, that
they allowed us to make trials of skill
with them with bow and arrow, Mai.
Howard beating the best of them at
a game which may be considered
their own ; but, even with their anna
in our possession, where were we to
goto! Had we known thia, what
we afterwards ascertained, that bo
many dreary months of toil and cap
tivity were in store for us ; hail we
been aware that by forced marchea
we could have reached Bent's Fort in
three or four daya, we might have
made the attempt There was do
one. however, to give ns advice, to
i friend without to aid na in an' under
tiking of the kiuJ, we knew rjothib
' of the country, and thus we wire
'comrw-llc-l tt giTe np all UiooliU of
!an eecape at a time when he cLan
of iU beixig aacowful were a!to til
ler in our fAvoc. With the knowledge
I te Lave aicce ' 0 I d-ruLl if
wiae t'trtj yraid bo ffclj k-pt ai.
otV-r tn-irith in Sn lli-l, at k-t
rit'j si weak a giiw 1 an 1 nn ler I V
urcmatT.x-n
V LaJ Ud t-t a weti ia vsj
new Quarters before a caravan arriv
ed direct from St Louis, owned by
ono of the Chaves, family a rich and
poworfnl connection in New Mexloo.
Chavoa bimsolf, in a neat buggy
wagon, aocorapaniod his men. I
could not help reflecting while gas
ing at him in tho plaza, npon the dif
ferent treatment ho had met with in
the United States from that I had
met with in his country, knowing aa
I did that my foelings and intentions
on entering the latter were precisely
the saiue as his on first aotting his
foot on that soiL As he thore bo
hero I claimed citizenship. I would
have ohcorfullv endured a months
extra imprisonment for an opportun
ity of making known my reflections
and feelings to Chavez, but this was
not to be he did n6t como within
speaking distance.
Three or four days after Chavez
passed through San Miguel, another
caravan, made up of Americans on
their way to California, arrived bore
from St. Louis, and after resting
themsolvos one .day, again took tip
thoir departure for their new homes
west of the Rocky Mountains. Anx
ious as we were to converse with these
men, and gather news from them of
tho world without from which we
had been cut off more than four
months, we were forbidden the privi
lege. The alcalde undoubtedly had
his orders not to allow any Jnter-
course, and scrupulously did he obey
them,
WASHINGTON LETTER.
IFrom Our Bfguler Corre.pondent.l
"Washington Feb. 11th, 1884.
The report from Mr. Randall's com
mittee on rules provided that the
roles of the House of the Forty-sixth
Congress, as amendod by the presont
IIouhg, Bhall be the rules for the Forty-eighth
Congress until furthor or
dered. But about fourteen amend
ments wcro thereupon submitted,
nearly all of which were opposed by
Mr. Randall, and suffered defeat.
Mr. Anderson's amondment forbid
ding the floor to ex-nicmbers who
lined their privilege of admission for
lobbying purposes was lost, but Mr.
Cox, with his usual tact nnd good
luck, carriod tho House with him on
his motion to continue the census
committee. Mr. Bolford and "Ca
lamity" Weller entertained the mem
bers by. their observations, the for
mer in favor of his amendment pro
viding for a clerk for each member of
Congress not the chairman of a com
mittee, and the lattor by a vehement
speech, attacking the national bank
system. Mr. Reed also "talked right
out in meeting," and gave the House
and the country some needed facts
on the inability of Congress to cope
with the business of legislation un
der its present rules of procedure.
He claimed that Congress does not
reach eight per cent of its business.
In the last Congress, of a total of
ten thousand bills and resolutions in
troduced, only three hundred were
passed. But the "physical impossi
bility," as claimed, for Congress to
deal with more than a small fraction
of its business might be materially
lessened by giving a greater measure
of time to legislation. As it is now,
Congress is in session loss than one-
half of the time, and when in session
gives itself many holidays. Except
at the end of the session, Saturday
is always a holiday, and Friday gene
rally so, and fourteen out of twenty
four months are spent in vacations.
The bill providing for a now Con
gressional library has been made the
special order in the Senate for next
Tuesday, and there is reason now to
hope that the effort to provide the
Congressional library with suitable
accommodations will not much long
er be frustrated. The library is grow
I inff steadily year by year. Twelve
months ago it numbered 480.078 vol
uxuea and 1CO,000 patnpLleU. It now
conUiLS 513,411 books and 105,000
IpftmpalctB, not half of which nn r
I male available for want of jroTr
' spare. One has only to eaUr tie
rxooi tu be given tto ocular jToof"
,of lL feTCit Deed of Larger aocomrco
'dations. TLe toUal niUxuate cost of
' tLe j-rvp -J new lnii.Lng will be
i ISCI'VpO, and it wi3 amxnnmodate
3.0-Xl.OCO book.
1'rtxl IfcTAgU, tLe eruizietit ecJoreu
oritur, m Laving U tratla of tl old
axliA. e unj ntl rj;ti L.ro, thai tL
ctar oi true-lore) bcvi-v raxra manih.
II .a ciirocratAe ixu4raui,atJ vet! ye
has eausod much family unpleasant
ness, and now his ex-honso-keoper
proposos to sue for 13,000 for ser
vices. He is aaid now to have a for
tune of 1200,000, the foundation of
which was laid by a Miss Griffith, an
English Abolition enthusiast, who en
tered his family as a member oi it,
bought him a house and Bet him np
as the proprietor of a newspaper in
Rochester, just after be bad secured
his freedom.
We have an inundation from the
Mississippi River in the shape of a
vinvflntion composed of delegates
from theSlatea borderinff on the "Fa
ther of Waters." Tbey came to dis
cuss plans for improvement oi tneir
rtvAr and to flood Congress into a
recognition of the neocossary meas
ures towards this end. ajxmox.
The Iroa-Clad Oath."
RiinRflt Cox never made a more elo
quent speoch in his life than on the
repeal of the iron-clad oath. To the
credit of more than a hundrod Re
publicans in the House be it said that
only eloven votod for tho retention of
war leirislation. Under
the spell of Cox's impassioned nttor-
ancea the bill passed tne nouso into a
gale of success. As a similar meas
ure introduced by Senator Edmunds
is ponding in the Senate, thore is good
reuBon to nope tne present session 01
rvmoTOHfL whatever else it fails in do
ing, will be signalized by the obliter
ation oi tne tost oaui jaw irom ue
national statute books. It is high
time to dispense with it We are a
united people now, and it only serves
to keep alive the memories of an un
happy ponod, wnicn, in tuo proviaonce
of Gotland the oommon patriotism
and confidence of ft groat prosperous
and intelligent people, will never
come to this country again.
Thb star route crowd formed a
Eoworful combination. Even after
Irady was removed and members of
the gang had been indicted. Elmer,
tho second assisstant postmaster
o-enoral. kont ricrht on making con
tracts with the indicted men. And
Elmer was but recontly removed
from his office. When all tho facts
aro known il will doubtloss bo found
since the Btar route rogueries were
- . .. ai
exposod to tuis day mere nave ooon
mnn in lnVh nnnifinnH in Washington
who have usod their power to help
tuo rascals escapo punisumont lor
their misdeeds.
Robert G. Ingersoll's fathor was a
minister of the last generation, and
tnr n lnnrt l.iinfl iinnfor nf ill A flonoTO-
gational Church at Madison, Ohio,
and at Ashtabula, the place of the
memorable railroad disaster. He was
successful as a revivalist, and finally
gave up tno settled pastorate in or
dor to spend his time in evangelical
work. He was capable of arousing
the emotion to a high pitch of ocstao-
tic enthusiasm, xnis description is
hv a man who sat under his ministry.
and who also tolls how little Bob used
to engage bis father in long disputa
tions, bringing up the iormer ekept
inol nn7loa nf thfl whale, the frocs
and the sun standing wtilL -
Tma sentence in the Cleburne
Chronicle sneaks a whole volume re
garding the narrow mindednoss of
tho ''old Alcalde:' "JSx-uovcraor
Roberts said he would like to be
(lovernor acain for ten minutes in
order to veto the school bill. The
Professor sooms to be in favor of
free education for those who are rich
enough to attend the university, but
ODDoscd to free schools at the homes
of tho poor who are unablo to go off
to high schools. While the i'roies
sor draws $3,000 a year for teaching
Law at the univorsitv he is not willing
to pay $ GOO a year to the teacher who
performs the more unpleasant lasit oi
teachinor the common school. Pro
fessor Roberts is inconsistent"
An Englishman representing a
syndicate desiring to invest aoout
!S25,000,000 in ranch projierty in
Texas, has left that State in disgust,
and will make an adverse report to
his principals. lie thinks there is
is more security for property in Ire
land, and no prospect of improve
ment in the near future t,x.
Just so. 100,000 good farmers or
mechanics, each with a single dollar
in his pocket, would add five times
that sum, to make a low estimate, to
the wealth of the State within one
year, and whilo the proceeds on the
j foreign investment, would le dmin-
ed fmm the SUto to be spent abroad,
! in the other tho wealth created by
'her own citizens would remain, con
' stanUy ansahting in the further de
velopment of the State.
Let the bloody HiDglihbman go.
i The wire fetr enctrtrverey rn -ttirakais
the antitbern of that in
, Texas. In N-lTBka it is a runri
' otjrirny wWh hnn ft'evl in, as it is
Cl'-g'vl, 62. Wr) acres ox proiri guixla
bt-kitiging to the pcUie domain, and
th Vb.ted Sut) DiMrict AUorr.ey
hum tv-pra rxt (f tiretaoval of tb
fne aTrrrirg that ettJfT baT l-n
jTt-rttitd from ta.1 .rj np Lo IaxkL
WWttlf r oa Teprasfe.
The following lottor was written by
John G. Whittier to the Women's
Christian Temperance Union, at its
recent anniversary celebration at
Cleveland of the women's crusade:
TWv TViflndH! I flfalinot let the
ntftl nf the Women's National
Christian Temperanoe Union" pass
without expressing my nearty sym
nafk with ita nhiiwta and mr annrov-
al of its methods. Its beneficial in-
flu nn haa I men felt in everv section
of the country. It baa baffiod'tha
schemes of politicians and parties) by
. .a a il . ... 1
appealing curecuy to tno morai bwibs
of the people, and infused fresh lift
into churches and sects by its practi
cal application of the precepts of the
gospel of Christ When I reflect
upon the awful magnitude of the evil,
the crime, the pauperism, the wreck
of home, and the unspeakable de
basement of humanity everywhere
apparent, I am appalled, and some
times almost hopeless. But when I
think nf vonr organization, and what
it has done during the last ten years,
. mi .a
I take new courage, xne women oi
the country will yet save the men of
nf it Give them what they are now
unjustly deprived of, the right of suf
frage, and the elose of the next de
aaIa will seethe liauor trafllo abolish
ed in every State in the Union.
Thino truly, v
! John G. WHrrnra.
A Fenee Cutter's Letter.
New Yobk, February 4. The Bun
has a communication defending the
fenoe cutting in Texas. He says that
by the homestead laws tho public
lands were reserved for actual settlers.
They went there under this pledge,
and in time acquired herds of cattle.
They did well, and encouraged others
to follow their example. When it
was soon that the business of raising
cattle was profitable, large capitalists
non-residents, and many of them
foroignors engaged in the business,
and sought out some ranches and
brought nerds of cattle from Texas
and elsewhere. They then set to
work stretohing wire fences across
the country bo as to exolude the cat
tle of settlers from grazing on the
lands oxcept in their immediate neigh
borhood. By this means tney are de
spoiling the settlers of their country.
It is called "freezing them out"
They in this wholly defeat the object
if the homestead law, and prevent
the settlement of the country. The
settlers have taken their families and
made tho country thoir home. It is
a country fit for nothing but raising
cattlo. If the settlers are deprived
of this resource, they must leave. They
know this, and believing that the ex
clusion of them from the range is a
violation of their rights, they have,
in many cases, cut these fences.
Thoy cannot contend with companies
unless the government passes string
ent laws to protect the settlors from
encroachment , s , .
What Is Exempt Under the Texas Home,
stead Laws. "
, One gun.
Burial lots. .
Twenty hogs. ;
All wearing apparel.
Twenty head of sheep.
. One carriage or buggy. .
All farming implements.
Two horses and one wagon. '
One horse, bridle and saddle. "
The homestead of the family.
Five milk cows and their calves.
All current wagos for persona ser
vice. -. ' ,
-Ail household and kitchen furni
ture. Two yoke of oxen and tho neces
sary yokes and chains. .
The family library and all portraits
and pictures.
All provisions and forage on hand
for home consumption.
All saddles, bridles and harness
necessary for the use of the family.
All tools, apparatus and books be
longing to any trade or profession.
A mortgage, deed of trust, or sham
sale of homestead ia absolutely null
and void.
Exempt personal property can be
sold or mortgaged by the husband
without the intervention of the wife.
The homestead is liable to be sold
fgr the purchase money of the same
and for making improvements there
on when a written contract to erect
said improvements is made in accord
ance with the law.
The homestead cannot be sold to
ttay any taxes except the tax due on
the homestead itself.
Two hundred and fifty dollars
worth of household and kitchen fur
niture belonging Uo each family in
this State are exempt from taxation.
Two hundred acrew or less consti
tute a bomefteod, with improvements
thereon. A town or city homestead
eornprices a lot or lots not exceeding
1-S.OoO m y&loc at the time it is st
! apart far a boruetad, without refer
ence to in. proven. its.
I To make perfect tt!e to a botnav
atoad a wie mut join in tbe dtd.
j C S. Walters, mi!ng. Las trrrted
np, rcrA.T.g to tl Arartdo Ui'Jei-
Ua.

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