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The Log cabin Democrat. [volume] (Conway, Ark.) 1901-1982, November 13, 1913, Image 4

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l og Cabin Democrat
PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY
CONWAY PRINTING CO.
• >ni E. Robins, Editor.
SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 PER YEAR.
/»variably in Advance.
FOR TAX ASSESSOR.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce JOHN H. POWERS of Stone town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of Faulk
ner county, subject to the action of the Dem
ocratic party.
We are authorized to nnnounce J. P. FIN
TON of Union Township as a candidate for
Tax Assessor of Faulkner County, subject to
the action of the Democratic primary.
The Lor Cabin Democrat Is authorized to
announce GEORGE T. FIDDLER of Cadron
Township as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner County, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce EBER L. DAWSON of Cadron
Township as a candidate for Tax Assessor
of Faulkner County, subject to the action of
the Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce J. W. RHEA of East Fork Town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner County, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce G. K. ELLIOTT of Ne—'ton Town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner County, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce HERBERT REA of Mt. Vernon
township as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce W. O. DURHAM of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce C. E. GENTRY of California town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce AUSTIN JOHNSON of Mathews
township as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce R. A. REYNOLDS of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Tax Assessor of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
FOR COUNTY AND PROBATE CLERK.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce JAS. A. LEA as a candidate for re
election as County ajid Probate Clerk of
Faulkner County, subject to the action of the
Democratic primary.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce T. J. BULLION of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for County and Probate
Clerk of Faulkner county, subject to the ac
tion of the Democratic party.
FOR CIRCUIT CLERK AND RECORDER.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce R. D. WHITE as a candidate for
Circuit Clerk and Recorder of Faulkner Coun
ty, subject to the action of the Democratic
primary.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce AMON M. LEDBETTER of Cadron
township as a candidate for Circuit Clerk and
Recorder of Faulkner county, subject to the
action of the Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce J. S. JOHNSON of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Circuit Clerk and Re
corder of Faulkner county, subject to the ac
tion of the Democratic party.
FOR COUNTY AND PROBATE JUDGE.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce J. W. HOLT as a candidate for re
election as County and Probate Judge of
Faulkner County, subject to the action of the
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce T. J. ROWLETT of California
township as a candidate for County and Pro
bate Judge of Faulkner county, subject to
the action of the Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat Is authorized to
announce E. L. SMITH of Walker township
as a candidate for County and Probate Judge
of Faulkner county, subject to the action of
the Democratic party.
FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce J. S. THOMAS of Monroe county
as a candidate for Judge of the Seventeenth
Judicial Circuit, subject to the actioon of the
Democratic party.
FOR SHERIFF.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce CHAS. 0. PAYNE of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Sheriff and Collector
of Faulkner county, subject to the action of
the Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat Is authorized to
announce OSCAR L. HONE A of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Sheriff and Collector
of Faulkner county, subject to the action of
the Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce WAVERLY W. BISHOP of Cadron
township as a candidate for Sheriff and Col
lector of Faulkner county, subject to the ac
tion of the Democratic party.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized t<
announce RUFUS HAYDON of Benedict
township as a candidate for Sheriff of Faulk
ner county, subject to the action of the Dem
ocratic party.
FOR CONSTABLE.
The Lor Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce BOB KING as a candidate for
Constable of Cadron Township, subject to the
action of the Democratic party.
FOR KBl’RESBNTATI VE.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce C. E. CONDRAY of Cadron town
ship as a candidate for Representative of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce GEORGE M. CONNELL of New
ton township as a candidate for a second
term as Representative of Faulkner county,
subject to the action of the Democratic party.
FOR TREASURER.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce E. V. JOHNSTON of Eagle town
ship as a candidate for Treasurer of Faulk
ner county, subject to the action of the Dem
ocratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce J. R. GIDDENS of Eagle township
as a candidate for Treasurer of Faulkner
county, subject to the action of the Demo
cratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce JOHN LINDSEY of East Fork
township as a candidate for Treasurer of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce R. G. CAMPBELL of Newton
township as a candidate for Treasurer of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
The Log Cabin Democrat is authorized to
announce CLEVELAND R. BERRY of Cad
ron township as a candidate for Treasurer of
Faulkner county, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
FOXVGpDPA
He Does the Handsome
Thing By Newly-weds.
THEY COME TO CONWAY AND
FIT THEMSELVES OUT FOR
HOUSEKEEPING — GRANDPA
GIVES THEM THE BENEFIT
OF HIS EXPERIENCE AND
FOOTS THE BILLS.
“Miss Summers, Polly I—er—dare
I?” but the speaker took a header
over bashfulness only to hear a
sweet, “Yes, Charley.”
“Can I aspire to-—er to—that is—”
Again a lapse into silence followed
by an encouraging:
“Yes, Charley.”
“Oh, if I might only hope to—er—
to—”
Another failure of language. It
was seemingly a hopeless case, and it
might have been only for a demure:
“Charley I have said yes twice. If
you mean it I mean it, too, and—’
And to this day that young man in
sists that he popped the question.
All this happened away down east.
It wasn’t long before there was a
wedding, not much longer before there
came a letter from Polly’s Foxy
Grandpa out in Faulkner county, who
wrote effusively of what he called her
exhibition of grit and proposed if the
young couple would locate at Conway
he would start them in life as a wed
ding gift.
Of course they accepted and were
soon bidding their friends adieu. A
few weeks subsequent to the above a
travel-stained party arrived in Con
way. Our friend, Foxy Grandpa was
in charge and led them straightway
to the Hotel de Hines.
“After breakfast,” remarked Foxy
Grandpa, “we will go out and buy
your outfit and to expedite matters
we will order a rig of Gray & Gray’s
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable.
The carriage arrives, and as Polly
views the stylish turnout with fine
horses and a neatly dressed driver
at the reins she expressed her delight.
“This stable,” said he, is one of the
best outfitted in this vicinity, and its
three S’s, Speed, Safety, Style, are
its slogans, and they know the roads.
They do transferring and look after
Mr. Drummer to a T. If you ever
want to run to an of railroad town or
on pleasure bent be sure to go to
Gray & Gray for a rig.”
“The basis of a home,” continued
Foxy Grandpa, as they entered the
carriage, “is a bit of mother earth.
Therefore we will lose no time in
calling at Bahner & Co.’s Real Estate
office. They control city property
that is very desirable and always
have excellent bargains on hand. It
is worth your while to know them, for
if you ever want to buy, rent or sell
property, they are the men to call on,
as what they tell you can be set down
as solid facts.” The visit resulted in
interesting Charles in some very de
sirable city property and an engage
ment for a drive into the country to
view some farm lands in which they
offer some veritable bargains.
“Its better to be safe than sorry,
and you will be on the safe side if
you have Bahner & Co. make the ab
stract of title of your property and
when the home is complete we will
have them insure the whole in one of
their first class companies.”
“The next thing is the lumber nec
essary in building the new house on
the lot you bought,” said Grandpa,
“so come with me and I’ll introduce
you to J. J. Heigel, who is the prin
cipal dealer in that line here. He
carries the most complete line of
building material in this section.
Everything from the sills for the
foundation to the shingles for the
roof, including lime, brick, cement,
sash, doors, mill work, paints, oils,
etc. He can also supply you with all
kinds of interior decorations at most
reasonable figures.”
“The necessary material being pur
chased,” continued Foxy Grandpa,
“we must now figure with a reliable
contractor to build the home, and S.
J. Lea is the man to figure with.
Honest workmanship and material
are essential in building. You will
find him using both and employing
first-class workmen who know their
business and exercise it. He does con
tracting in its different branches, in
cluding interior work, shelving, etc.,
and will give you a turn-key job.
| When he takes a contract he pushes |
it through to completion without de
lay and you will be more than pleased
with you new home when turned over
to you from his hands.”
“Now you know that no home is
complete in this community without
a bath room,” said Grandpa, “there
fore we will lose no time in calling
on S. W. Loveland and make arrange
ments with him for installing one in
the new home with all appurtenances
and strictly sanitary plumbing.
When I say sanitary I mean it,” said
Grandpa, “and the jobs he has finish
ed speak for themselves. He is al
ways ready to give you estimates as
well as the benefit of his experience
in the selection of all classes of work
and his judgment can be relied upon.
You will want your new home heated
by steam and he is there with the
goods in this line also. He runs a
general fix-it shop—fixes things right
and don’t charge a fortune for it,
either.”
“The new home being complete,”
added Grandpa, “we must now look to
the furnishing for it. Hereupon
Polly declared she heard so much of
W. W. Westmoreland’s Furniture
Store that she desired to go there.
The result was they were ushered in
to such a fine display that the girl
was puzzled at first how to select, but
she soon yielded to the seductiveness
of a magnificent parlor suit, a bed
room suit in oak, golden finish. To
these she added brass, iron and fold
ing beds, pictures and wall ornaments,
rugs, mattings, linoleums, and art
squares. She purchased a swell
buffet, fancy rockers, kitchen cabinet,
not forgetting an ornamental writing
desk for hubby. Coming to the con
clusion that W. W. Westmoreland’s
prices were below the very whisper of
competition, especially the mail order
competition.
,/ . __J ” ooirl flvnnH
n pici-tj - -7 -
pa, “and now we will visit Frauenthal
& Schwarz’ big hardware and stove
department where Polly’s housewifely
instincts will have full sway in the
marvels of kitchen apparatus. There
is not a more comprehensive stock of
cooking machinery in this section,
said he. “Every possible piece of
kitchen furniture, from a tin dipper
to a cooking stove and range is here
in all styles and variety,’ and Polly
was not long in selecting a Wetter
stove, both cooking and heating. She
added a complete line of granite
enamelware, tinware and table cut
lery, and then all three inspected the
fine points in implements, parts, etc.,
and on leaving declared they had been
treated right at Frauenthal &
Schwarz, just as they treat every
body r+ the big store.
At the grocery Foxy Grandpa wax
ed philosophical. You cannot live on
love alone,” said he, “so never neglect
your larder. That important adjunct
of housekeeping controls the mascu
line temper, therefore you must pat
ronize a grocer on whom you can de
pend for honest goods. For some
time I have found L. M. Kinsey per
fectly reliable. You are sure to find
a careful dealer, always full-stocked
with everything in staple and fancy
groceries, fresh and first-class, in
cluding such well-known articles as
Ida Home flour, Johnson Lane Steel
Cut coffee, Heinz, Libby and Williams
pickles, catsups, etc., together with
fresh fruits and vegetables. You will
find no shelf-worn goods at this store,
in fact its the up-to-the-minute gro
cery, quick delivery. Phone 89, theie
Johnny on the spot and prices down
to brass tacks.”
“Next is the bakery goods, saia
Grandpa, “and when you want the
right kind you will do well to pat
ronize Caspar’s City Bakery, Caspar
Dum, proprietor. He makes the best
bread on the market, fresh and first
class daily, and his pies, cakes, pastry,
etc., are top notchers. He also fills
any special order promptly for wed
dings, birthday banquet or other
functions. He handles a fine line of
candies, chocolates, cigars, tobaccos,
etc., and I’d advise you to get the
City Bakery goods every time.’’
“While we are in this important
topic of gastronomies,” continued
Foxy Grandpa, “we must not forget
meat. It goes hand in hand with
bread, and the next thing to locate
is a good market where you can get
fresh, pure and wholesome meat,
home-rendered lard, sausage, etc., and
my friend E. Erbacher, is the man to
supply you. The reason for this is
because he buys and kills the best of
everything and keeps it fresh in cold
storage. You will find packing house
products here, such a= hams, bacon,
#tc., and will always treat you right.
So to keep your hubby in good humor,
Polly, trade at E. Erbacher’s meat,
market every time, good advice.”
“And say, Grandpa, exclaimed
Polly, “Where will I go for dry goods?
This dress of mine is hardly suitable,
I must admit.” “Well my girl, if you
want to select from one of the finest
stocks of first class dry goods in this
section, I will direct you to S. G.
Smith, who carries a line of dress
goods, nobby belts, trimmings, and
ready-to-wear that for variety and
real value are se dom seen outside of
large metropolitan cities. He carries
the latest weaves in fashionable dress
goods and a fine line of general dry
goods and you are sure to be guided
right in your select.ons. Goods guar
anteed or money refunded. You will
find this firm pleasant to deal with
and the employes polite and expert,
while as to prices—well, S. G. Smith
is never undersold.”
“Well, scat, my boy,” said Foxy
Grandpa with a David Harum accent,
as they reached the sti’eet. “I must
run across to the Farmers State
Bank and get another check-book.
Come along and get acquainted with
S. G. Smith, president, Wiley Mosley,
vice president, Frank Farris, cashier,
and Howard Johnston and Herbert
Maddox, assistant cashiers, for of
course you will do business with them
and it is always more pleasant to be
personally acquainted with the offi
cers with whom you come in touch.”
The fine fixtures and metropolitan air
of this institution, Grandpa remark
ing that this bank was managed on
safe, conservative lines and had a
strong working capital, you will find
them ever ready to extend any ac
commodations compatible with busi
ness principles and will sell you a
bank draft cheaper than any way of
sending money, more convenient, no
red tape and absolutely safe. “Guess
I'll open an account with the Farmers
State Bank at once,” said Charles
to Grandna”—and he did.
At this point somewhat to Charles’
confusion the old gentleman indulged
in a half serious criticism of his per
sonal appearance. “You are decided
ly off style for a townsman,” said he,
“and we’d better run down to V. G.
Craig’s, the home of good clothes,
where you’re suit is always ready.”
After Charles had fitted himself out
in a neat, late style business suit, the
good clothes kind, Grandpa declared
on donning same he would certainly
look like a newly married man and
that us Arkansawans can show you
how to tone up a bit. Having found
such a large assortment of furnish
ings here at such low prices, Charles
invested in a No Name Hat, a com
plete supply of Wilson Bros, swell*
furnishings, shirts, ties, collars, hos
iery, Cooper underwear, etc., and
added trunks and grips for both, not
forgetting the fine stock of men’s
shoes of leading lines. Goods are up
to-now and prices are always down at
V. G. Craig’s.
“Halt,” commanded Foxy Grandpa
as the party came in front of Gree
son Drug Co. Walk right in.” “Why,
Grandpa, we're not sick and—” “I
guess I know that,” laughed he, “but
I suspect it won’t be long before this
young man begins to take an inter
est in matters of paregoric and—”
“G-r-an-d-p-a.” “Well, go in any
way, as Polly may find some toilet
articles she wants.” Sure enough the
girl was soon loaded down with
combs, brushes, face powders and sev
eral bottles of fine perfumes. Re
member their soda fountain is a model
of neatness, always kept so, all the
latest drinks are properly served,
both hot and cold, and with pure fruit
juices, by Happy Donnell, the ladies’
man of this establishment. Don’t
forget to come here witn your pre
scriptions, as you will find none but
registered pharmacists at Greeson
Drug Co. using the purest of drugs.”
“Let's see, I promised you a gold
watch, didn’t I?” queried Grandpa of
Polly. “Well, the place of all places
is C. H. Robinette’s.” Entering the
popular jewelery Grandpa gallantly
acquitted himself of his promise by
presenting Polly with a handsome
timepiece and then directed her at
tention to the superior stock of jewel
ry, silverware, fancy china, novelties,
etc., and advised her to buy her fam
ily clock here. “Don’t forget another
fact, if you ever need optical goods
he carries a most complete stock,
everything necessary to improve af
flicted eyes and to determine their re
quired treatment. ou will also find
three expert doctors on sick watches
here. They can diagnose any old case
and make an old dyspeptic timepiece
look and act like new, and they are
right up-to-now on their work.”
“If there is one thing above another
that you young folks are particular
about it is your footwear,” said
Grandpa, “and the place for particu
lar people to have their wants antici
pated is at S. G. Smith’s big Shoe
department. They have the shoes
here to fit your feet, your fancy and
your finances,” said he, “and as to
wear—well, your grandma andl have
tried 'em, and we will guarantee their
lasting qualities.” Polly was not
long in selecting a handsome walking
boot of American Lady, Charley a
footform last of American Gentle
man, and while Polly was casting shy
glances at the Security brand for the
little tot, Grandpa purchased a pair
of stout boots with rubbers for the
crowd. No one needing footwear or
almost anything else to wear can re
sist the styles and prices at S. G.
Smith’s.
“And where will I find the leading
ROBINETTE'S WATCHES
Are the Standard to which all others are compared
WHY?
A Watch pnuchased from Ccbinette has been thorough
ly timed and regulated before sale. The result is that
every watch is in perfect condition when it leaves iny
store, and the annoyance of regulating and adjnsting is
saved my customers.
Call in and see my line watches before you buy.
C. H. ROBINETTE
Jeweler and Optician
milliiner?” asked Polly. “Well, my
girl, if you want the real thing in this
line,” said Grandpa, “we will visit
Mrs. Nettie F. Hoss at 20G Watkins
street, corner of College, who, by the
way, has on hand the smartest dress,
pattern, street, picture pats, and Par
isian models in this community. The
latest styles and lowest prices being
her motto. She has that experience
which guarantees when you have once
purchased of her you have the proper
thing at lowest cost.” And a few
minutes later there wasn’t a happier
lady than Polly in the proud posses
sion of a tony effect of Mrs. Hoss’
own creation.
“There’s an old saying that the
clothes don t make the man, ’ said
Grandpa. “They may not, but they
help, and if you take your clothes to
Price’s Pressing Parlor for treatment
htey’ll help mightily. He does all
kinds of cleaning, pressing, altering,
repairing, dyeing, etc., and when he
turns out clothes they have that snap
to ’em which makes a man who wears
them feel that he is well dressed.
And then, too, he takes pride in his
work and his prices are consistent
with the very best work that can be
turned out.”
As the young folks were undecided
what to go into to make a living in
Conway they were prevailed upon by
Grandpa to go to farmii “Now,
naturally, in this community, you will
raise cotton,” said he, “and will want
it ginned and at all times I want you
to take it to my old friend R. B. Mc
Culloch at his four stand, well equip
ped gin here. He has the only cotton
cleaner in the county, gins your cot
ton right, with a fine sample and very
little waiting. He will also buy your
seed and pay top prices. You will
also want ice and he can supply you
with the purest of crystal ice, made
from distilled water, in any quantity,
from a five-cent piece up, delivered.
He runs a grist mill also and does
custom grinding. Take it all around
he runs a mighty handy institution
here and gives all a square deal.”
“As you are going to keep a horse
you will want a harness,” said Grand
pa, “and the boss horse milliners and
mule jewelers in this section are Bolls
Brothers. They are expert workmen
and give personal supervision to the
minutest detail of manufacture. There
isn’t a thing in this line that cannot
be had of them, heavy and light, single
and double, plain and fancy work and
buggy harness, they have them in
stock and make ’em to order. They
also carry a good stock of saddles,
whips, flynets, lap robes, in fact any
thing a farmer or a gentleman horse
owner could possibly desire and at
right prices. They do all kinds of
shoe repairing, run the bicycle shop
in connection and fix anything in
lines to a nicety.”
“I know you are particular about
that mare Kitty,” said Grandpa, “so
I’d advice you to take her to W. M.
Guy and have her shod. He under
stands perfectly the anatomy of a
horse’s foot, just what kind of a shoe
is needed and how to make and put it
on. In fact he is a horse-shoeing
specialist, treats all diseases of the
feet, cures corns, quarters, toe cracks,
will balance gait, cure faulty action
and avoid friction on most ocrintipic
and up-to-now principles.”
“While here I want you to get ac
quainted with Dr. H. P. Gannaway,
the veterinary surgeon who has his
office here. He is the man who will
give you expert advice on anything in
the veterinary line, and if your horse
needs a doctor in his line he w'ill tell
you, if not he will do the same, and
his 42 years’ experience enables him
to satisfy you. So remember Dr.
Gannaway every time if your horse is
in trouble.”
At this point Polly began to think
seriously of her household duties and
remarked, “Grandpa, I am not going
to kill myself over the washtub, so
tell me of a good laundry. Here was
a good chance to recommend Conway
Steam Laundry, Brown & Phillips,
proprietors. They pride themselves
on being able to satisfy the most par
ticular customer in ladies’ and gen
tlemen’s fine laundry and promptness
is their motto. They look after and
repair all laundry work, and do all
kinds of clothes cleaning, pressing
and repairing, etc. Prices are always
right at Conway Steam Laundry.”
“We will now visit an institution
that does as much to advertise Con
way as any establishment in it,” said
Grandpa, “and that’s the Conway
Bottling Works. You will find Con
way on every bottle and box sent out
and the goods contained therein are
a credit to any firm and popular with
a host of pleased customers. Their
special drink, ‘Gay-Ola’, is a winner
an dit, as well as their sodas and
phosphates are sold extensively
throughout this section. As only the
purest of water and syrups are used
they cannot help but please. Call for
and insist on getting Conway Bottling
Works products. You’ll get the best
every time.”
“A home without music is certainly
a barren estate,” said Grandpa, “and
as I promised you a piano as a wed
ding present we will lose no time in
calling upon S. E. Anderson, where I
will certainly make good by present
ing you with a Janssen make, one of
the best instruments on the market
today, and for tone, beauty and ac
curacy in construction cannot be beat,
and as to price, well, I don’t need to
mention it, but it’s certainly low for
such a fine instrument. You can get
all different kinds of musical instru
ments, sheet music, holiday novelties,
etc., here, and books that are classy
and of almost any strain. Now, noth
ing makes a home cozier or neater
than to have it neatly decorated,”
added Grandpa, “and if you want
your home artistically finished on the
inside don’t leave here until you have
Mr. Anderson show you his fine stock
of wall paper. I'll leave it to you
and him,” said he, “I know you’ll buy
as prices are always right at S. E.
Anderson’s.”
“Personal knowledge is the winning
factor in the culminating contests of
this competitive age,” said Grandpa,
“and when of ample character it
places its fortunate possessor in the
front ranks of the well informed. The
knowledge of wagons and buggies
possessed by S. G. Smith has enabled
him to select the leaders in both lines
in his big stock for your inspection.
They are the Luedinghaus wagon that
always gets there, and the Banner
buggy, that I know Polly will be
proud to come to town in. Don’t get
the habit of buying from transient
and outside parties. You get an in
ferior article and you pay in most
cases an exorbitant price. When you
buy of S. G. Smith you buy from a
reliable home dealer, who has your
interests at heart and gives you a
strict guarantee or your money back.”
“Now,” said the old gentleman,
“now for a picture of this crowd and
a view of the new home. In good old
country fashion we will visit Jack
Barnes’ studio. His pictures are won
derful in fidelity and finish. I want
a full sized photo for my study and
some smaller ones for my friends. He
makes crack-a-jack pictures and pose
and light are his long suits. He is
famous for successful enlarging and
I want to give you a life-sized repre
sentation of yours truly. He has the
soul of the true artist, does develop
inj?, kodak finishing and post card
work, and will not stop short of per
fection in any of his work.”
Enroute home the gentlemen stop
ped at the Log Cabin Democrat and
left the wherewithal for a years’ sub
scription. On rejoining Polly she be
gan to volubly express her thanks.
This is indeed a happy event and one
we never can forget. You have bought
us everything,” she exclaimed. “Ex
cept one thing,” said Grandpa, “but
I have remedied that by leaving the
order on the sly with my friend W.
W. Westmoreland. You can get it
whenever you want it. I’ll guaran
tee its the best in Arkansas”
“Why, what can it be?” exclaimed
Polly.
“A handsome, rubber-tired, collapsi
ble go-cart,” said Foxy Grandpa.
—But Polly had fainted.

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