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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, October 10, 1890, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1890-10-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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> RE-ESTABLISHED FEB. 12,1878.
PORT GIBSON, MISS., FRIDAY MORNING, OCT, 10, 1890.
NEW SERI ES--VOL. XV., NO. 28
DU. K.G.W1IAKTON
OflVra Ids prnfreainnal services to the
people of l*oi t Gibson si.d vicinity. Of«
fire next tbwtr to his 1 caul cure.
Post Oimoa Fob. 16. IHkh.
fir
DR. X«. A. SMITH.
Resident Dentist,
Offers Ills nrofcseloiinl act vices to tin*
public. Office over Oocp« T«
l'ont Gihson. Jnn. 6 . |H88.
lb
I. sMdcmo*.
( UAH. U RAZOS
DRS. ANDERSON 4 le BARON.
I'll rcftttaX# AKU SURVKOffS
IVsprctfally «ffer Un ir professions! senrioes to
the ntirens of Port Oiheon and vicinity,
port Gibson, June 20, '90. |6m|
DR. E. B. ROBBINS, D. D. S.,
-OF
llnltimora* College.
DENTAL SURGEON.
- Mississippi.
Vicksburg. -
EVON M. HARRER,
Attorney'at Law,
Port gibbon.
MISHI'BIPPI
Will practice in the courte of Claltiornc arid
adjoining counties ; also in tlw Supreme and
l-Vdrra! Courte at Jackson,
to the collection of claims,
er Wsssem's tarte r shun.
Htwrial attention
Office up stairs wv
t II. 8T1 I.es.
Ç. A. FRENCH
Stiles & French,
A TTORS'K Y8-A F- LA H\
Office fc in the Person BuiiJin#
< >pi*o*ite IIvan's Shop.
W. H. SMITH,
Mulberry Street, Vick&burg. ,
COTTON FACTOH
coisnium souci , eb.
*'/' » * -
Liberal Advances.
BARBER SHOP,
Adjoining New York tftofe.
H. WASSK.M, Proprietor,
>ri tb.Hon
.Hint,
Ifsir Cutthiff and Shaving done with
tiestiiess Slid dUpMtell.
Windsor House,
Misses Helm. Koriil-*rlv of Port (iiltson
PBOPBlETOaS,
Ü04 COMMENCE IS'Hi E ET,
Natchez. Mias
Louisville. New Orleans 4 levas Railway
MUHtanm valley bou te.
N., J .lâc C. Division,
•Schalule in effect Aug. 17.
Mail
STATIONS
Mai
11 35 a in
1(1:05 a iu
9:&5 L iu
6:kSa m
Ar Natch«-* Ev
2:80 p m
3:45 p ni
4:10 p m
2 40 p m
Eipr tm
?:'J0 a m
9i05 a ui
I
Lv
Harriiitou
Lv Jackson Ar
I.v
Ar
F.ipn-as
8:15 p m
4 JO p m
Ar Natchez Ev
Lv Harriaton Ar
E. W. HOW,
Gen 'I I'aaVr Agt.
F. R. ROGERS,
Aas't Oeu'l Paaa'r Agt.
Bwcuniw or a m scsiscu
-AXI
PV -LIAI ILEEPII6 Cil Mil
srrwaxi
New Orleans an<LCincinnati
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY RDDTt,
in oonnserto* with th*
R.R. « M. ¥. Co. and tho 0. A M. R'y.
Wtu. IX AÜOt'ZATZ A
Pullman Buffet Sleeping Car Line
between New Orleans, Vicksburg
Memphis, Louie ville and Cin
cinnati without change.
N»w Orleans Ar.
BaUin Ronge
Fort GIInoB
Natchez
Vickzhnrg
Greenville
Memphis
paJacah
Loatevills
Cinciutiati
Round trip tickets are now on sale to the prin
cipal «u turner resorts of the United Hu tea and
Ganada.
For rate« and otfaer information, apply to all
agente or to
E. W. HOW,
Gen 'I l'aiu'r Agi.
)
5:00 pm Lv.
7:31 pm
11; J3 pin
2:30 pm
12:2S am
« ,10 pm
7:45 am
• •
■xrj am
at
1:0*4 ft.ni
u
11:35 ant
HiM m
10^5 pm
4:45 pm
««
«I
7 40 am
Ar.
Lv.
2:15 pm
UWpm
H .20 ft.fl)
•4
•4
11^5 pm
7 ATI pm
44
MH tm
44
44
P. R. ROOERR,
Ass t Oeu'l Faaz'r Agt
Mrarma. Tzws.
NOTICE.
1 always koep in stock Hie latest styles
WATCHES, CLOCKS ARO JEWELRY,
Which I will aeli at lowest pœaible profit.
Repairing of Watches,Checks ami Jew
airy dune at reasonable prices. All work
guaranteed for one year.
Url
E. HOHER,
kU.u Sircet. Toil U.Uoq. Mi«».
— EMMEJTT'S
Colics Hot Cure for Horses SCows
the
Of«
fir
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC DRUGS,
Viidow blass.' White Lead. Oik and famishes, Mixed Paints and Strictly Pire
PARIS O-REEIT.
tin*
lb
FWL WON M*
WHOLESALE AND BETAIL DRUGOIST.
"^"ldss'bTjLxgr,
IvÆisslselppl -
to
J. H. GORDON, President
J. W. PERSON, Cashier.
PORT GIBSON BANK,
S.,
2?ort Q-lloson., IvdClss
$50,000.
Capital Stock,
DIRECTORS:
J. H. OOUDON,
E. 8. DRAKE,
1*. M. HARDING,
LF.E KICllAliDHON Jo., BYRON H. LEVY.
C. D. WHARTON,
CORRESPOROERTS:
VIOKHBURG:
Delta Trust and Hanking Company
W. P. RICHARDSON,
J. McC. MARTIN
N. K. WALKER
8. HCHILLIO,
O. W. WHEELED,
NEW YORK:
Hanover Natioual Bank.
NEW ORLfANd:
Union National Rank.
Will do a general banking business. Will pay interest on savings depos
its. Will negotiate loans on real estate for any amounts. Speci.il attention
given to collections, payment ofjtaxes.or any business entrusted to our care
wv
JNÆÎSS..,
V
'
A. M. PAXTON & CO,,
T7"iclcs'b'uj:e',
-HAVE FULL STOCK
Cane Mills and Evaporators.
-WRITE FOR PRICES.—
«rr^-nu
CHAS. D. WHARTON,
—i>kaij:i< ix—
Staple - and - Fancy - Groceries
And Générai Merchandise.
>1 IMMÎMS-lppi.
l*ort (»timon,
^gent fox tlxe "^7". I-,. IDoiigrlsis Sh.oe
1
?
i%8
&
I
VXii
O. S. -MLA-SOISJ*, DruLggist.
PORT GIBSON, MISS.
Opposite S. Bernheimer â Sons. Rotrt Door to Er ans Brot.
ZZEIV* OX HASH A KZKHH SC 1*1*1. Y OK
*
Dnp, Piteat Mem Toilet indes, Misery, tries Seeds, lie., Etc,
The Boat Braude of Cigar* and Tobacco Always on Hand.
IÉÉ
i
A
A I
-v
X
for Infants «nd Children.
C*uMr>r »
"Cutorit teso well adapted to chlklren that
IraoonamendltaeeupTtor to any pra s e t ipUtm
H. A. Aacnzn, M. D.,
Ill So. Oaford St-, Brooklyn, M. Y.
Sour Wotnach, Dtarrhona. Eractetioa.
vni« Worum, give« ateop. and prunote« «U
iwnoa
EsB H ns«
yean I have rwcoounrafted
jrour * Oaateria. * and «hall «Iway* coati oua to
do oo urn It haste variably prodnoed tentelcUI
reaulto."
-Th« tm» at ' Coatorfa' te eottteraraal and
. mérita oo wall taw. that I« Ojm. a wort
of «uporarogaUoo toendorM It Few aretba
l>>i«llir«it foraUlte who do aot keep Cateorte
within easy rea ch " „ _ _ _
Mxrrrs, D. D .
Itew York («y.
Late rootor Ukxxnl ngdo ta IteforaMd Church.
EnWtX F. Paodz«, M. D.,
-Th« Winthrop," IJSth Street and 7th Awa,
New York City
Tn Czxratm CoarAWt, TT MvunAt Brnzav, Nzw T<
Re du» A Sowerfey
(SnorcMun to HAHTIN08' DRUG STORE.)
At tho Old Standm tho Parson Building, -
Dealers in
PORT BIBS OR, MISS
Pure Drugs, Medicines, Patent Medicines. Oils
1
l'anits, Window Glaas, Books and Stationery,
TOILET AM) FANCY AHTICLEM.
PHYSICIANS' PUESCTUITIONS CAKEFULLY COMPOOaVDED.
* - *
MEN WHO NEVEU SHEEP.
Thrilling Incidents In the Life of
an Amertoan Detootlvo.
■0» French, English and American Thief
Taker« Bust Their
Oisboueet < !-,«, -A For Quss
N Dlustratlug 1 he Methods.
One of the bostrlniown dotoctives In the
United States, after repeated solicitations
by a reporter for tho Denver (CoL) Times,
consented to tola about the basin cat.
'There ta all the difference in the world,"
he said, "between the methods used by the
secret service rgents of different countries.
People who road French novels have an nice
that thedisguisoa si> 0 ken of fax them as ba
le« worn by the Lsooqa of the differs at
stories as somethibg utterly untrue.
Strange os it may seem, however, it Is true.
"A French detective who can not so dis
guise himself that his superior can not
recognize him could not find employment
in any detective bureau. Tho disguises are
wonderful, too, and oven the strong light of
day shows no imperfection In them. ,
"There aro two sorts of detectives In
France—State detectives and the municipal
or city força Among tho former no one
knows who his fellow detectives are, aad
as they never work la pars, the neoeesfty
for knowing each other ia not so great. The
workings of the French bureau ia very
thorough and more like the American
method than the English.
"The latter never think of disguising
themselves, and go to work openly. If a
bank is robbed in France a new assistant
teller or clerk appears in the bank a day or
so afterward. He is a detective, of course,
sad where in England the detecttre would
be called In m front of all tho employee and
ask them all manner of questions, the French
would say nothing, and nothing more would
probably be heard of the robbery until the
thief was caught.
"The English have a great system of
stool-pigeons. Among the vicious of all
-
classes, mate and female, aro always those
to be found who, for the sake at being pro
tected in a certain war, carry all the news
of the crooked work done among the «well
mobsmen, as high class thieves are called,
to Scotland Yard, where is situated the
Criminal Investigation Bureau. If 'Harry,
the Swell,'is flashing a great deal of money
about the fact Is at once reported to the
police, and if any largo forgery or robbery
has recently occurred. 'Harry, the Bwoll,'
is liable to prove an alibi. Inside tho great
portico of 8ootlatxd Yard is a large cose
containing tho photographs of all the detect
ives employed .by tho bureau, and the
crooks or thieves can have free access at
any time to study the faces of those who
are liable to be after them at some future
"me. This stool-pigeon system is not used
much in America, as the police do not put«,
much faith in it.
lf th *, w ?P loyeo V
a »«lg banking house is suspected of irregu- I
larities his habits are watched and tho
facts ascertained, while in America a man
will be set on the truck of tho supposed
thief, make his acquaintance and ingratiate
himself into the suspected man 's confidence.
Ho will spend as much or more money than
tho suspect, and will go into any dissipation
with him. In the event of irregularities in
any large concern, the American detective
becomes an employe of the corporation—
whether as a porter or a director of a bank.
The clew and tbo working up of it is made
much more of by an American than by any
one else. He will jump at conclusions from
a faint something, and frequently hit tho
mark; where the stolid Britisher would
be stumbling in the dark
"To be a good detective a man must bo
possessed of courage, brains and coolness. !
There is no mystery, howevor impenetrable '
it may appear, but what con be solved if
the right methods see employed. There
was a case 1 remember in Chicago.
"A well-known business man was found
murdered ouo morning in his office The
crime had evidently been committed the
night before, for the body bad been cold a
long timo, and the man s family had waited
for him to come to his homo the evening
previous His valuables had been taken,
the safe had been rifled, and boyond the
ghastly bullet-hole in tho man's head, there
was nothing to ludicate with what tho crime
had been committed. No pistol was found.
"I was put on the case and reasoned that
as the robbery was evidently committed for
gain the murderer must be in poor circum
stances. I visited ail the pawn shops in the
city, and found that five revolvers hod been
pawned between six o'clock the previous
evening and the morning Three wore 45
caliber, the size evidently used to kill the
man. Two of the men were well-dressed
and the other wasn't The latter was
described to me, and I . took the
pawnbroker down to the different rail
way depots where trains were leaving. We
Went through three trains, and finally
located the man in a smoking cor. I ar
rested him, aad much of the dead man's
property was found in his possession. It's
not much of a story—if the man hadn't
pawned the pistol be would certainly have
rot off, but it shows bow much little things
Amount to, and will give you an idea of how
a detective will go to work.
"The life of a detective is startling
enough, but it gets tiresome and monoto
nous, and 1 expect soon to retire. I remem*
ber one cose that happened in New York.
A very swell reception was given by one of
the leaders of society. One of the guest«
had laid s valuable solitaire in the ladies'
dressing-room on tho Wash-stand, and for*
getting it, had left it. On her return to
find it, it hod, of course, disappeared. No
body know where it was. The trunks of all
the servants were searched, but no trace
could be found of the jewel, which was
worth $4,000. I Anally found It where It
hod been pawned for $000 in a pawnshop by
a French woman. I took the visiting list of
the hostess, and finally, after a week's
search, found that one of the guests, a rich
woman, had a French maid, and that she
had gone to Europe shortly after the re
ception.
"i had to wait for her re turd, mode the
acquaintance of the maid and took her td
the pawnbroker's, where be identified her.
She confessed and her mistress redeemed
the diamond and paid all the expenses. I
•ever told on her.
"You see also that pawnbrokers are im
portant factors in our business, and that
they are fre#uestly of service in detecting
crime. Still, pawnbrokers encourage rob
bers, for if there were no shops the tempta
tion to steal would not bo so g rent
' "It's a singular business in every way,
Concluded the thief-taker. "Fascinating In
many ways, but like every thing else, one
gets tired of it.
on
A II.« Worth h* printing.
* Puns oo names are geaeraiijr tabooed, but
here are two worth repeating. A noted
Waahington wag and beau of thirty year,
ago signed hia name "A. More.''Mrs. John 6
Washington hod Invited him to a forma!
dinner party at Mount Vernon. The com
pony oil arrived, except Mr. More, but in
knowing hi* queer Ways, mo hostess did not of
wail for him After she wa * «««tod some 1 p
£ 1 ri
amore tree. The interpretation was: j
"Sick.—-A. More ' !
»
*
I« A Tksatrei
ctrvA, 711.0.
[' Tbs man from Tbrare," afindr«] to ia the
first •tanta, waa Hpartacn», the gladiator, who
beaded the ate re-re Toll agalnat Uoaw-j t
We were friands and comrades loyal, though I
waa of alien race,
And be a free bora Hamnite that follbwed the
man from Thrace,
And there, in the mid- irrna, be and I stood,
face to face.
I waa a branded swordsman, and he was snppW
and strong.
They saved na alire from the battle, to do os this
ernrh at wrung.
Aim* sneli shontd slay tbs other there before the
«^taring throng.
PoTO»-- facos and faces ! how It made my brain
to spin !
Beantifnl faces of women, and tiger soots thsre
in '
And merry voices of girls that laughed, debating
of who should win.,}
Over ns, burning end cloud has, dazzled the bine
sky's dome ;
Far away to the eastward the white snow-peaks
' i mt his home ;
And in front the Prefect, purple-eled, in the
deadly might of Rome.
And so, in tbs mid-arena, we stood there face
to face,
And he looked me rigbtj in the eyas and said :
"I ask thee one last grace -
Slay me, fur (Are I cannot." Then 1 held his
hand a space.
Bat knew not what I answered ; tbs bine heav
ens round and whls
Barged up and down
sword was through his side,
And I was down npon my kncca, and held him
as he died.
flash of steel my
His Mood was warm on my fingers, his erss were
- sesroely still.
When they tors him from me.snd the blade that
else had laded a I ill.
And Ü i* one more day I am theirs, to work
their will.
Whereas it )>«< u-i™
wr,fr * M « P»«***« <MJr r at her
|in Ileavcu to remove from our midst
"«'"•her of this Solidity school in tho
1
C»ib«on Reveille til publish the above
No matter ! the «and, and the ran, and the faces
hstefnl to see.
They will be nothing—nothing î Dut I wonder
wbu
ly be
Tbs other tuan I bars to fight—the man that
•boll kill
?
—i. Werner.
Rssolutltas Of fiegrst.
person of our dear friend and school
mate, lHiillp T. I^cggett, who died on
the 16th day of .September, 1890, now
be it
Unsolved 1st. That while we bow in
humble submission to the will of iliiu
who rules over the universe, we still
mourn the l«»sa ot one who has ever
been dear to us iu all the walks of
this life.
Resolved 2nd, That wo extend to the
sorrowing parents, sister and brothers
our heart-fell sympathies.
Resolved 3rd. That we ask the Port
and a copy be sent to his family and
that these resolutions bfi spread upon
the minutes of our Sabbath school
record.
II. II. CÀMPftftfif*
K I. McVot,
A. U. ClIUNN,
Committee.
Uenaanvilk, Mwa., Oct fttb, 1890.
Pemberton's Poetical Plea.
James Pemberton of West lA*igh
was charged in the local police court
the other day with having been drunk
on licensed premises. Pemberton in
sisted upon defending himself, ami he
did so with a good humor and an in
genuity that excited the marvel of the
count, lie contended that he was not
drunk at the time ho was taken into
custody, whereupon the court asked
mm if be knew what constituted
drunkenness. He replied that uo man
was tlruuk so loug as he was not in
capable or disorderly ; that ns the lime
of his arrest he was quietly demanding
more liquor. "Your honor," continued
Pemberton, "1 have formulated my
theory in this wise, which I beg your
houor to hear ami to consider well :
H« is not drank who f
Can rise and drink sad ask for more;
But b« is drank who prostrate lies
Without tbs strength to drink or rise ?
This poetic«! presentation impressed
'he court so favorably that tho case was
dismissed, and it is bcliqyed that Pem
berton's muse has established some
what of a precedent .—Chicago Aernr
Lynoh on Ubalmars.
Chalmers is in favor ot the force bill,
aud ia advocating its passage in his
campaign for congress tn the second
district. The Impudence of this in
satiable office huuter is without par
allel. His melbods, mere than any
man living or dead, suggested the in
famous force bill. Chalmers is now a
full-fledged republican, lie will there
fore aot object to republican testimony
on this point. John K. Lyuch in a
«peevh in cougrem in support of hie
»ucccssfui claim to a soot iu that body
, , . ... . , , . . 1
occupied by Chalmers used this lan
guage :
. . .... „ , ,
1 " 8iert w,th feelings of deep mor
tiffrstion I ml profound iTgrct, that
the official person of fbc contestée
the cose (ChalmefsX the eoirotTV is
reM >nted with Ä living monument ot
r *>•»« •'<»<•«, *< ijw i»-««
a,,< * * prostlttlltMl suffrage. —\/aci'$on
Commonwealth.
is
to
the floor.
~
Oangersui bcfnsgbgilftf.
The constitutions! convention of
Mississippi, now in session it Jsckso ii,
serins iu dnugcr of being controlled
by the demagogues.
The one grcit tiling for thit con
vention to (in ia to restrict the elective
fraurhiae to re*|H>nsiblo votera. Kvcry
intelligent null in the slate knows Hint
to be the necessity of the liourj mid
yet the aiimll-tniiided, unprincipled
politicians, whose Only hopo Of promi
nence lie# in a deceitful pnniicriug to
the prejudices und selfishness of the
ignorant whites, seem determined to
defeat every measure tor thorough re
form.
The remedy must be a heroic one ;
if effective, it is botlud tu offerid the
white iiicoiit|ictentH ns weil as tile
blacks.* We earnestly lio|»c that Hie
honest and patriotic members of the
Mississippi convention may tic able to
shame (lie obstructive elemeut into
silence, and construct a constitution
that shall contiuc the grave duty of
voting to citizens who have something
at stake, and who are under l»ouds,
moral afctf material, to vote judiciously.
Undoubtedly there arc liefe and
there impecunious aud illitcrat^mcii
who would make safe voters, hotkey
arc I he exception, taws must l>c
made for the general average, not lor
the exception. ExpcHetil-c has shown
that, as a rule, the possession of proj*
erty find intelligence, and several years*
residence in the locality, are necessary
to insure discretion in the voter. To
that wc must all come at Inst aud
the sooner the better.— AnfflO-Saxou
Churchman.
I
:
The Blondes Dissppearingi
Jllofldo arc «aid to be disappearing
both in Knglniid and America, says
thin Illuxtraled American. For cVcFy
rcd-liaircd persoii seen now', (dll could
have been mot with twenty years back.
In New England wo are told the
blohdc has well-nigh disajipLUfcd.
lu New Yôrk a reporter recently
In the course of |iffccn minutes' walk
on Itroadway counted two hundred
womeu, tolltig and old, with hair
ranging from brown to black, lie
passed only tlurtoert women of the
pronounced blonde liffc At the
theater the sarllö evening he scruti
nized fifty women.and only six had fair
skins, blue eyes and light hair. The
public schools yielded ssitiiiblr result.
One class of eighty girls had eight
blohde« among tlieiff, another of sixty
five bad sixteen, a third of flrty-seven
had onlt seven.
Another Observer hazards I he state
ment that not more than 10 per cent.
ot # Xew York women are blonde«. His
anywhere where pretty girls congre
gate. and you meet tall, striking-look
ing figures with dark hair ami big,
dark eyes. The blondes are disappear
ing. And why?*' Science steps in
tfith an explanation. Or. I led does of
I»ndon after examining the hair ot
nearly a thousand young w<rnicn ha«
arrived at the Comldsiou that in
matrimouy the brunette was preferred
over the bloitde iii the ratio of three
to two, aud so, gradually but surely,
through the selection of dark women
for wives and through tho transmission
of brunette traits, the blondes become
cxtiuct.
Stopping Short or Tapering Off.
The V f oice lias made a collection of
statements from prison officers iu all
parts of the country as to whether
prisoner« who are conflrincel aud
habitual users of alcoholic liquors are
cvrt off at once from the beverage, or
are sopplibd with liquor fur a time
and allowed to "taper of!" gradually,
tn only four out of forty-three
prisons reported is the "tajicring off"
practiced« In the rent the supply ofli
quor is cut off at uuco, though, iu a
few cases, doctors sometime» prescribe
stimulants. Iu some case« bromide,
chloral, ammonia aud auodyne» are
adminiutored, but no liquor. In one
Texas prison the drunkards arc "al
lowed to drink moderately at fill times,"
aud in a Keutucky jail they
"tapered off slowly.?- As to the effects
of suddenly depriving the habitual
irinkcr of his beverage, tho very gen
eral testimony hi that it is beneficial.
Some meu suffer for a time from a
nervous prostration, but the recovery
is more rapid under total deprivation
than under the taperiug off process.
One prison report« 20,000 cases ot
drunkenueM and delirium tremens
which have Improved from tho time of
deprivation. This may sene to quiet
tho fears of the confirmed inebriate
that it would nearly kill him to quit
drinking. He would suffer somewhat,
bbt abstinence would not endanger
his life. A wise physician would be
able to help him out if he bad the will
to stop short. If ho tried to «top by
tapering of!, the chances arc a thou
sand to otto that ho will ucver stop.—
(jpriiigflcid Union,
are
of
ii,
con
Hint
mid
to
the
to
re
;
the
tile
Hie
the
to
into
of
and
l>c
lor
To
The Largest House in the WoHd:
The Freihaus (free house), situated
iu a suburb of Vienna, Austria, is tlm
most spacious building On the globe, •
Within its walls a whole illy of human
beings live and work, sleep and eat.
It cotitnins between 1,200 And l,fluu
rooms, divided into upwards of 400
dwelling apartments of from four to
six rooms each. This immeuse hoiisn
has thirteen courtyards—live open and
eight covered—and a large gnrdcii
within its wallsi A visitor to the build
ing relates that lie once «pent two
hours in looking tor h hinn know n to
reside in the house.
Scarcely a trade, handiwork
profession can lie named which is not
represented in this enormous building
(•old nod silver workers, makers of
fancy articles, lodging-house keepers,
bookbinders, agents, turners, batters,
officers, locksmiths, joiners, tutor
scientific men. govern filch I clerks,
three bakers, eighteen tnilbi**, twenty
uiue shoemakers and many other
tradesmen live iu it.
The house lias thirty-one staircases,
and trouts on three streets and
square. Iu one day the postman's
delivery ^as amounted to as many
1(000 pieces to this single but titanic
liotiSC: To address a lot 1er to tho house
and to the person it is intended for
doe« not assure the sender that the
person to whom it is addressed will
cvci receive it.
In order to ''inflke'assuram'ti dotfhly
Au re," all letters addressed to the
"Krelhau«" must be provided w ith both
the given aud the surunmo of the
person for whom intended, the num
ber of tho court, the Uiimbcr of tho
apartment 5 otherwise it is npt to go
•stray, a« tiiough addressed to a city
unprovided with directions as to street
aud uumber.
At the present time '2,112 persons
live in this immenso building, and pay
an auhtmi rCfit*! of over iOCMHlfi florin«;
—Colorado Exchange Journal.
or
.
one

lie
of
How the Money Goes.
The public debt stntomout shows a
dolit-jt öf $4,600,000 for îscplelfibcr. It
is iinpoitant to uotc that the uHmbef
of pension claims already tiled under
the new dependent pension law*
nmouuls to 446,018, and that they are
increasing at the rate of alunit 16,000
per week. The etilire number of
claims, according to I lie New York
Sun, will not tall short of 600,000, and
they may go above three-quarters of a
million. As yet none of the ttfiw rases
have been litkcn up, nor will they lie
tint il the new force of 400 Clerks shall
he seed rod: All tlieso new people
have to be trained to the work. The
greatest delay in adjusting the claims
will be duo to the time taken to g< t
the reports ot the examinations by tho
local boards. The new law will put at
least $2,000,000 ill the |>ocbcta of those
doctors all over the count rt who are
lucky enough to be members ot tlie
local boards. About onc-tliird of these
doctors arc democrats, It being the
custom to ap|u>iiit t wo republicans and
one democrat 011 a board. The claim
agents will make about $4,000,000 out
of the new bill, the ten being $10, with
$2 for postage aud several odd silver
quarters for affidavits.
When Clcvelnud retired from thu
presidency there was a surplus of
more than $100,000,000 in the treasu
ry. Hut the leak sprung by the re
publicans Uircalciis soon to bring the
balance on the other side.— Mcmphi*
Ac a la nc he.
An AnOnynlous Correspondent,
A newspaper man who cvidcutly
know« what he I» taking about, »{teaks
thus of that nuisance, the Mnouymolls
eoffe»|H>ndeut i "If you allow such fel
lows to use your columns, you will
some day wish you had not done so.
Ile U cither a crauls, who wishes to
use you to work off hi« crazy iilens
tho public; or ho has some private
grudgo to wreak on an enemy. There
is nothing to gam foil such fellow«,
and much lo lose. All correspondence
should lie carefully read and liberally
blue pencilled. It pays to tear the
stuffing right out of matter seul you
by your correspondenta when the least
doubt exists aa to their meaning. The
best plNco for all matter not of great
public intercut I« in your wastebasket.
Better a thousand times have less
matter in your pa|>er, than to till the
coin mu« 'with what nobody read».
Short, sharp, tcliiug editorial comments
anti brief, breeky locals are the life ot
any paper, particularly a country
newspaper/*
on
•f
The best n nuuly for bleeding nt
the nosti^ fioeording to nn eminent
iniMlicnl authority, is a vigorous
motion of Be jaws, as if iu the act
•if mastication. It Ham never been
known to lait -not even in \cry
severe eases.
;
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.

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