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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, June 02, 1893, Image 3

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FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE S. 18B.
A. 0. WHABT0I, Editor and Proprietor.
1. B. GB18LBR, Publisher aud Ktiaior
of Job Department.
Subscription Per Tear, $2.00
[Entered at the PoetofBce »t Pnr
Hibson, Mis»., a* second clans matter.
It has
The river is still falling,
declined about 17 inches from its
highest point at Vicksburg.
The price of middling ootton in
New Orleans has worked its way
down to 7| cents. Futures also
»how a downward tendency.
Mrs. F. A. Fall, whoee first hus
band was A. G. McNutt, governor of
Mi 88 issi
county last week at a groat age.
Prohibition is tightening its hold
on this state, no fewer than 48 coun
ties having voted down the sale of
liquor. But the trail of the tiger is
over them all.
The Durant Democrat, which was
established in 1887 by J. K. Almon,
expired last week from lack of sup
port. Capt. Almon is a wide-awake,
energetic newspapor man, and his
Democrat deserved a better fate.
i, died in Washington
* In Chicago last Sunday a son of
Dr. Milburn, the blind chaplain of
congress, took his life, to which deed
he was driven by poverty. HÎ 3 fath
er had just written that he could
send him no more money out of his
own pitiful salary.
On Wednesday the body ol Jef
ferson Davis was consigned to its
final place of rest in Hollywood
cemetery, Richmond, Va. Great
pomp marked the reinterment cere
monies, which were witnessed by
thousands of spectators.
Wednesday afternoon Kosedale,
Bolivar county, was swept by a cy
clone which wrccsed many houses.
The beautiful Methodist church was
completely demolished, and hardly
a tree was loft standing in the town.
A colored preacher and wife were
killed, two persons fatally hurt.and
a number of others badly bruised.
Tho report that Mr. Cleveland will
recommend the establishment of an
American protectorate over the Ha
waiian islands may safely be doubted.
It is much more likely that he will
advise that they be left to manage
their own affairs without interference
on the paît of the United States.
The fate of these islands does not in
tho least concern this country, nor
should our government assume any
obligations on their account.
John J. Ingalls has an important
and interesting letter in Sunday's
St. Louis G lobe-Democrat, on "the
Race Problem." He suggests that
separation, voluntary or compulsory,
at whatever cost, is the dictate of
wisdom, morality and national safety,
and that "if reconciliation upon the
basis of justice and equal rights is
impossible, then migration of the ne
groes to Africa should be the policy
of the future."—Vicksburg Post.
In Prussia the state owns the rail
road», and according to the last offi
cial report they pay the interest on
their cost, the interest on the state
debt and from $25,000,000 to $35,
000,000 of a surplus. They have in
addition since their construction paid
over $135,000,000 of their dobt. In
America where the roads are owned
by private corporations, they are con
trnually in the hands of receivers,
and yet we are told it would ruin the
nation to take them under control.— »*
Vicksburg Post.
♦ -
The district conference of the
M. E. church in session at Meridian
last week adopted strong resolutions
against Sabbath breaking, which in
part are as follows : "That we view 8
with alarm the growing disregard of
tbe Sabbath day throughout onr
country, as manifested in the naming
of Sunday trains by the railroad cor*
porations, and the use of such trains
by professed Christians and by some *
ministers of the Gospel ; and by the
recent flagrant disregard of the opin
ion of the better people of the
country, by the managers of the Co
lumbian Exposition."
The Farnham Post of Federal vet
erans, in New York city, was disband
ed last week and its charter with
drawn by the state department of the
Grand Army of the Ropublic. This
punishment was inflicted because the
Farnham I ost had had the manliness
to protest against the pensioning of
unworthy veterans, and to demand a
thorough purging of the pension
rolls, ror »hat exhibition of nonesty
the post vac disbanded as if it had
done something disgraceful,
incident shows iu a strong light the
mercenary motives that mspire the
organization of veterans known
the G. A. R., which lives, moves and
has its being in pensions.
on
in
it
our
This
ez
the
and
that
the
frail
stage.
one
this
after
tbe
that
Attempt at AMa»iin«tion.
Natchez, Miss., M Ä y 30.—A cow
ardly attempt was made at Fayette
last night to assasninate Clyde Cul
ley, the 20-year-old son of Capt. F.
H. Culley, editor of the Chronicle.
1 he young man was passing along
the street when some one sprang
out of a dark crossing, «truck him
in the side with a knife and then
fled before being recognized. Young
Colley's clothing was cut through
to his skin, but a package of letter»
his pocket saved his body from
being pierced in the region of the
»ifart. Nu cause is known fur the
assault.
.»»»
IMPORTANT PENSION DECISION.
Secretary Hoke Smith, reversing
an order of commissioner Kaum, has
decided that Federal veterans, suffer
ing from physical disabilities not in
curred in actual service, are entitled
to pensions only when such disabil
ities are serious enough to incapaci
tate the sufferer from earning a living
by manual labor. This is a most im
portant decision, the enforcement of
which will, it is calculated, save the
country from $15,000,000 to $20,
000.000 annually.
Mr. Smith's ruling.be it noted,
is in strict conformity with the law,
whereas Gen. Raum's order (which
it supersedes) was without warrant of
law. Kaum held that disabilities not
of service origin, equally with those
incurred in service, were pensionable,
even though not attended by incapac
ity for manual labor. This was
quito in keeping with the profliga
policy which prevailed under the last
administration, and which president
Harrisou himself encouraged,as when
he exhorted pension commissioner
Tauner to "be generous with the
boys."
But fortunately for the country
government is now in the lnudi
men who believe that tax-payers
have some rights that even pen
sion-seekers must be taught to re
spect.
u
the
a of
An Inoome Tsx.
By the act of 1864, a tax of five
per cent was laid on all incomes
ranging from $600 to $5000, and ton
per cent on incomes above $5000. In
1866 this law yieldod $72,982,160, of
which $26,046,760 came from in
comes not exceeding $5000, and $34,
501,126 from incomes over $5000, the
rest being collected from banks,
railroads and other corporations.
At that time the United States had
a population of about 34,000,000, as
compared with 65,000,000 at the
preseut time. But the wealth of the
conntry has grown far more rapidly
than the population, and the law of
1864, if revived now, would easily
put from $200,000,000 to $250,000,
000 in the treasury.
No political party, however, would
dare to advocate in time of peace u
measureoi such merciless stringency,
which at the same time bore with
such severity upon the poor. Six
hundred dollars m 1866 went hardly
as far towards supporting a family as
four hundred dollars in 1893; yet
that little pittance was subject to a
tax of five percent. It is no wonder
that a law so oppressive was soon
swept from the statute books.
A properly framed incomo tax
should draw from the superfluity of
the rich, not from the necessities of
the poor. In accordance with this
principle,inoomes under $5000ought
At the request of some of our busi
neM men we publish elsewhere an ar
*»cle ou the subject of protecting
Americancottongrowersagainstfor
eign competition. The Reveille,
however, does not advocate this
scheme for the following reasons :
1 st. We are in favor of free trado,
believing, in the languago of tho
Democratic platform that protection
»* a "fraud," and that the "goveru
ment has no constitutional power to
imposo and collect tariff duties
^P 1 * or purpose of revenue only.
2d. ^ view of our enormous home
production,it is very doubtful wheth
or prices wonld, except possibly for a
8 h°rl time, bo raised by placing a du
ou foreign cotton,
3d; Whatever the effect of such
tax * " ^°l|y to dream that the uon
cotton-growing states would submit
f° •*» aQ d their will would be decis
* ve on »«count of their vastly greater
population
*
principle,incomes unuer Bowuougni
to be exempt entirely; above that
limit, the tax should increase gradu
ally with tho increase of income.
It is quite certain that in tho next
congress an effort will be made to
pass a law of this kind. It is no less
certain that if passed and enforced
with tolerable strictness, the imme
diate result will be a large increase
iu the revenues. A secondary and
even more important result will be a
reduction of national expenses. When
the rich find themselves so vitally in
terested in securing an economical
administration of government, their
influence will be sufficiently groat to
nee of
cy
in
in
as
to
has
tice
ever
check the appalling extravag«
. Let us have the i
oongrvfl
income
Lux.
Protection for Cotton.
ex
v
a
he present teudency of American
politics being towards a removal of
tariff restrictions, southern peopl
delude themselves when they imagine
that the north aud west cau be in
duced to join them iu putting a dut?
on cotton.
In our opinion tbe only relief for
the poverty of the cotton growers lies
in a diversification of crops, aud
pecially in the raisiug of food crops.
This remedy has been preached ad
nauseam without avail; nevertheless
it is in this direction and not through
the help oi the government that
the southern farmer's only rational
hope of prosperity lies.
e
es
Outlets and Levees.
The failure of the levees in their
task of confining the Mississippi
river is again bringing the despised
outlet plan into notice. The Natch
ez Democrat advocates it ; so does
the New Orleans States. The Dem
ocrat does not hesitate to say that
Eads' theory that levees cause the
channel to scour out "is a delusion
and a snare. ' ' Both papers demand
that the levee system be supple
menled by opening more outlet« for
the discharge of the water.
At any rate it is evident that the
frail embankments along the river
cannot hold in the water at flood
stage. If they do not give way at
one point they do at another, and
this experience is repeated year
after year with such regularity that
people expect nothing else when)
tbe water is high. A levee system,
that will give satisfactory protection !
other
Ar*
Cm.: ,,>»
rebuild#
■■*•
"This «ction of the Grand Army
is the moat convincing proof yet of
fared that it is a mendicant organi*
zation, that its main purpose is not
the dissemination of patriotism, but
pensions ; that its large right hnnd
would lie lovingly forever in the
United States treasury; and that
its aim in life is the transformation
of beggary into an art. It resents
every attempt to kick the deserter
and the dead beat out of the treas
ury vaults, it draws no line of de
marcation between the man who
fights for his flag aud the man who
deserts it. It encourages depend
ence, idleness, gas und dishonesty.
It is in short a »elf convicted, mon
umental fraud.
to the contiguous lowlands is yet to
be devised.
of
of
A Mendicant Organization.
In commenting on the fate of the
Farnham Post which was expelled
from the Grand Army for protest
ing against the pension steal, the
Memphis Appeal-Avalanche re
marks :
u
» >
Land Trantfar* in May.
DISTRICT 1.
John H. Welborn, Sr., and wife
(col.) to J. H. Welborn, Jr.(co|.):
lot 100x60 feet near the Port Gib
son oil works, $ 100 .
A. K. Jones and wife to Mary John
son (col.) : building lot in outlot
DD., »ufcnrb St. Mary, Port Gib
son, $ 100 .
Stella A. Lovelace to Elizabeth B.
Barber, both ol Georgia : 403
acres (lees 73 acres heretofore sold
to Wm. Calm) being part of the
old McCormick place near Rus
eura, $ 1000 .
W. H. Burch to J. Girault Finlay
(col.): 60x200 feet on Chinquepin
street extension, in outlot C, east
ern suburb of Port Gibson, being
part ol the old Turner property,
$130.
Dan H. Smith to Stephen Schillig :
40x100 feet in outlot F. F., front -1
ing on Orange street, Port Gib
son, $85.
of
DISTRICT 3.
Reuben G. Siddon to R. A.IIarve
40 acres in the Scutchaloo Hil
$74.40.
L
DI8TRICT 4.
Ben Adler to W. A. Fife : o
claim to house and lot in H
manville, and 20 acres adjoining
said town, $193.50.
DJ8TRICT 5.
S. 8 . Starnes to M. Gilston : lot 11 ,
square 7, town of Martin, $305.
Mary E. Goza to T. L. Rush : her
interest in 160 acrea, originally
part of tbe Brady Mill place, $10
and assumption of a debt of $1790.
T. L. Rush to John W. Lord : 160
acres, $287.50, and assumption of
a debt of $1502.50.
J. T. Lewis to Mrs. Y. T. Barber :
lot 12, square 11, town of Martin,
$25.
nit
er
Rich and Poor.
There are idle poor and idle rich;
and thero are busy poor and busy
rich. Many a beggar is as lazy as
if he had $ 10,000 and many a man
of large fortune is busier than hie er
rand boy, and never would think of
»topping in the street to play mar
bles. So that, in a large view, the
distinction between workers and
idlers, and between knaves and
honest men, runs through the very
heart and innermost economies of
men of all ranks and position».
There is a working class—strong
and happy—among both rich and
poor; there is an idle class—weak,
wicked and miserable—among both
rich and poor. And the worst of
the misunderstandings arising be
tween the two orders come of the
unlucky fact that the wise of one
class habitually ^contemplate the
foolish of the other. If the busy
rich people watched and rebuk
ed the idle rich people, all
would be right ; and if the busy
poor people watched and rebuked
the idle poor people, all would be
right. But each class has u tenden
cy to look for the faults of the oth
er. A hard working man of prop
erty is particularly offended by an
idle beggar; and an orderly but
poor workman is naturally intoler
ant of the licentious luxury of the
rich. And what is severe judgment
in the minds of the just men ol
either class becomes tierce enmity
in the unjust—but among the
just only. None but the dissolute
among the poor look upon the rich
as their natural enemies or desire
to pillage their houses or divide
their property. None but the dis
solute among the ricli speak in op
probrious terms of the vices and fol
lies of th e poor.— John Ruskin.
Dr. M. J. Davis is a prominent phy
sician of Lewis, Cass county, lowland
has been actively engaged in the prac
tice of medicine at that place for the
past thirtv-five years. On tbe 26lh
May, while in Des Moine» en ronte to
Chicago, he was suddeoly take with
attack of diarrhoea. Having sold
Chamberlain's Colic, Choiara and diar
rhoea Remedy for the past seventeen
years, and knowing its reliability, he
procnied a 25 cent bottle, two do» en of
which completely cured him. The
citement and change of water and diet
iucident to traveling often produce a
diarrhoea. Every one should procure e in
bottle of this Remedy before leaving
home. For sale by Dr. W. D. Redoe.
The greatest number of people
ever killed by an earthquake was
190,000, in the year 1703, at Yeddo,
Japan, and vicinity.
un
of
ÊU
»1
by
A wild boar wandered into the
streets of Wilbur, Washington, the
other day, and was shot for his te
merity.
isra
es
Msmy fersons
Ar* iwokca down rrotn orwrwork or bouMbcfcd
,,>»
rebuild# tb# iy*t«m, aid# d!g**uon rereov«* «j>
■■*• of bite, aad caret malaria. <Jot Uregaaolea *
Brown*» Iron Bitter»
JL ä
Mammoth Remains.
Part of a skeleton of a mammoth can
be »een in Dr. E. L McGehee's office.
This part is tbe first bone of the front
leg. extending from shoulder to knee;
it weighs 52 1*2 lbs, is 37 inches long.
This was obtained from the southwest
part of Wilkinson county. These
mammoth animals belong to the post
tertiary or pleistocene epoch of geolog* (
i*ts. This very heavy animal sank
of- down in pipe clay on the edge of the
water-course, where he came to drink,
not for the skeleton was found in an erect
but
the
de
>
to
the
the
re
P*
O
D
tl
d
a
c
I
i;
1
t
t
B.
:
-1
f
S
8
4
d
I
I
n
h
h
r
Herman ville, their future home.
Mr. Joe Powell, formerly ofMcCaleb,
led to tbe hvmenhd alter last week,
Mrs. Mary Reeves, of Pattons.
Recently, a chicken snake, as large
as a bloated bond-holder, was killed m
the hen house of a poultry raiser near
MaCaleb. It had dined on four chickens
porcelain nest egg, which proved
vy as to render him A ore du vom
The egg was recovered and will
be exhibited to the doubting ones.
Mrs. Percy S. Byrnes, of Martin, is
the owner of a three-legged duck of the
Pekin stock. The ornamental
ago is attached to the end of
side bone, and reminds one of a fifth
wheel to a wagon.
While on die poultry mention we ad
vise those interested to wash the walls,
nests, roosts and floors of poultry
houses well with strong brine during
this month and mites will not infest
your premises, nor prevent your hens
from getting during the summer. Be
sure to have the brine strong, and have
the work well done.
Tbe Sunday Timcs-Democrat of last
week, mentions a musical entertain
ment given for the benefit of Trinity
ChapeC in that city. Among the per
formers on the occasion was Miss Un
dine Byrnes, of this place.
Mr. Wm Hughes, of Bethel neigh
borhood, is the guest of his cousin, Dr.
W. P.fl
,
:
and a
so hea
bat.
in July,
.A.
.A.
.A.
Hughes, near St. Elmo,
good citixens of Hermanville, we
hear, are desirous that Rev. Mr. Bur
ry, of Port Gibson, will come out to that
villaee and preach for them occaaional
ly during the
Mrs. T. J. A
this vicinity and
sick in Natches with continue»! fever.
Mr. Joe Taussig, Jr., of Myles, has
gone to New York on a visit to friends.
Tbe
summer.
by, so well known in
Port Gibson, is now
Crystal Springs Notes.
Noab Cb total SraiNO«, May SO, 1888.
Truck farmers are now daily ship
pang car loads of fruit and vegetables,
the returns from which are fairly satis
factory so far. The vegetable business
is constantly extending in this section,
and the whole region is being turned in
to a vast garden. The development of
this industry has had the effect of djg
nifying labor to a wonderful degree.
Nobody here is ashamed of work.
Even young ladies, capable of sitting
down to the piano and rattling off
"Home, Sweet Home," or "Tbe Last
Rose of Summer, ' with hardly an effort,
think nothing of rolling up thieir sleeves
and going to work in the strawberry
fields or under the packing-sheds.
The people here are very intelligent
and enterprising, and at the same time
genuinely kind and sociable. In spite
of ray prqjudioe in favor of Port Gibson,
i think there is even a higher grade of
culture here than prevails at home.
My crop is progressing satisfactorily,
though the fact that my tomatoes will
soon be on the market seems to have
created no excitement either here or in
Chicago Before you
again, they will ail hav
and weal tli will be flowing in upon me.
I observe, however, like Prof. Nye,
that agriculture is beginning to get so
tight a grip on me that I will be com
pelled to tear myself away and try to
think of something else. Whec a truck
finds himself dreaming sev irai nights
8 accession that the Duke o r Veragua
and Princess Eulalia are banqueting
daily on cabbages of his growii." it is
high time to relieve the mental strain
by a change of occupation. You may
expect me home, therefore, some time
RG. H.
M
to
•bonld
É 8 ML
NEW
I2th
will
throngh
it* old
hear from me
re been harvested
stock
sale
paper.
also
express
ing.
corn
few
Capt.
John
M.
«.if«!?.
r red
<terwgt»«d
coooty.
rogu.area
falter*
too®
JIFF
may
in
Fifty cents ia a small doctor bill, bat
that is all it wilf cost yoa to cars any
ordinary case of rheamatism if yoa ase
Chamberlain's Pain Balm. Try it and
you will be surprised at tlieH
lief it affords. The
prompt ro
first application will
quiet the paiu. 60 cent bottles for sale
by Dr. W. D. Redos.
ap
sekMffl MJj CA,w *w w** n «w.,
A correspondent of the Advocate,
Franklin county, says: "Whitecap
isra has not yet ceased. Some hous
es were ha rood
some time since."
ou H van au'« place
•g*, I
Handsome is as handsome (Î2
applies to many beautiful dispy
made by both art and nature. M
needless for me to say to you tli]
the fiUPmeaning, bearing and facts are { \]
monstrated in the above couplet by my djj
play of Spring and Summer Stock of fash
ionable goods. See and believe; look and b,
onvinced, and then you will buy. . . . 1
(
u
>
»
o'
I feel gratified after so many years of business relations to you that my efforts to get the be* ^
you for the least money is meeting with genuine encouragement No pressure of hard times, no*
erstock of goods, no low price of cotton, nor high price of other necessities have induced me to o*
such bargains. It is of my own free will and accord, a reciprocity of the liberal patronage extend^]
me personally as well as of business interests. I feel that in the position I take I will be sustained^
a generous patronage, and that the extremely low figures in my line of Ladies' and Gents' W ear *
be duly recognized by an appreciative public. Thanking friends, patrons and the whole public for to
encouragement, I now most respectfully invite a call for inspection of the nicest stock ever offered hq
XX7~ m. C-A-X3I2>T,
!E>ort G-lloson.
XX7~ m. C-A-X3I2>T,
Rangum
Root
Liniment
Is the Best
On Earth
A Wonderful
Cure and
Pain Killer
For Mankind
In Rheumatism, Pains, Aches, .Swel
lings, Bruises, Sprains, Soreness,
Stiffness, Sore Throat, and Chest
Pain in Back and Joint», Cramps,
Numbness, Cuts, Wounds or Hurts,
Warts, Bunions, Corns, Insect Bites
and Stings, it is a most powerful and
therefore a great remedy.
For Beasts
In the treatment of Spavin. Splint,
Ringbone, WindgaUs, Puffs, Sweeny,
Stringhalt, Scratches, Cracked Heels,
Bruises, Swellings, Soreness, Stiff
ness. Sprains, Cuts, Wounds or Hurts,
Saddle or Harness Sores and Galls.
Price 50 cts. Per Bottle.
SPURLOCK, NEAL ft CO., Prop'rt.
NASHVILLE. TENN.
CoepelM Jeweler
Largest and handsom-
eet selection in this part
of the state. If you want
.A. Good 'W'a.toli,
.A. Good OlookL,
.A. GOOd Sewing Machine,
at the very lowest price,
go and see OoepeL He
does not allow city deal
era to undersell him,
and he guarantees all
goods to be as repre
sented. This is business
and these are facts. ...
GOE^EX-I,
PORT GIBSON, MISS.
YAZOO AND
M ISSISSIPPI ; "XT ALLEY
RAILROAD.
Patron* of tbe above ro*d parebaaiue ticket*
to Chieogo reading m tbe
ILLINOIS CENTRAL R. R.
a
ing
er.
fe
•bonld b*or in mind tboi 00 and after April 17,
É 8 ML lb*
NEW CENTRAL STATION
of tbe Central Route at
OHIO^GO
bean ti folly too*, ted between
I2th Street and Park Row,
ON TBE LAKE FRONT,
will be opened for the arrival and de par tore of
throngh train*,the running of *acb to and from
it* old station, foot of Lok« Street, to be aban
aprtl-3
1
log,
date
For Sale—-At a Bargain.
Carlisle, Vim., April ttnd. 18Ä
Having closed business here, my
stock of general merchandise is for
sale at a bargain, for cash or good
paper. In event of sale,store house
also for sale or rent. Telegraph,
express and po 3 t office in build
ing. A surplus of 500 bushels
corn for sale at plantation. J _
few weeks fresh hay also. Address
Capt. A. K. Jones, Port Gibson.
John A. Jones, Utica.
M. R. or J. R. Jones, Greenville.
M. R. Jones.
Administrator's Nohcs.
«.if«!?. ot î dœio, * tr * u<>D Ute ««tote of
red MU ton. dootaMd, ter» groated to tb* on
<terwgt»«d by tba Cbanfwry court of CUibora*
coooty. Mi**., 00 the 5TH DAY OF MAY. 1 m
0 0 h4r ® ««a probated and
rogu.area within me y*ar from abov* dku
falter* to do *o wilt bar th* claim.
too® ^ A ONER, Adioiai*tr*tor
JIFF TRULY, Solicitor. *'
may IS St.
A
for
ear
In a
ap 2 g -4
Cbaric*
t»#
E.
œay
to
i'r
is
LEVY BROS. & WELSCH,
DIKECTO
BEN R. LETT, Embalmer and Manager.
..- : : ~ ".... ...
Koep* oa bond a large aaoortiaent of burial eaakete new, plain, and plain mMtiln
Wooden coffin* matte and trimmed to order. Dana] robe* constantly on band. WdJ tooto
nd embalm bodies tor shipment to all coin ta.
PEOPLE MUST & WILL EAT
No matter bow dull the times are, and a wide awake
grocer encourages this weakness by koeping bis stock
as fresh and tempting in tbe summer as in tbe winter
THAT'S WHAT EVANS DQ
Bt
P I
Pure, fresh goods aud low prices can always be had
at Evans's, and special pains are taken to send every
customer away satiatled. We have ju>t repleut -lied
our stock with a lot choice canoed groceries, hsius,
breakfast bacon, Pure Lard, pickles, preserves,
crackers, etc. We want jour trade and we will treat
you right.
R. B. EVANS, lJ
Bolts tiflo A nolens
OAVEA
— iT *v
■TRIM MASKS. I
OCMGM WATINTS,
oowrwtosrrs.
tfß;».-.*?.".
v —tri m m » —
rrprnm* teim ami in *» (•
(•■ iMMtoaea—ateegtvvBnrMef otaf* a.
i rirntifif JVmmfan
tr.
Hotel Piazza!
CENTRALLY LOCATED
And ooBTOsteat to both
Railroads : and : Steamers.
-A. New- Hotel
WlLh M extern I no pro U.
VINCENT PIAZZA, Proprietor.
VICXBBUItG, t MI8WJ88IPPL
500 TOISTS
Old lion Wanted I
A. & A. TITCHE.
mrl7 Su
For Sale.
The undersigned offers for sale
a very desirable plantation contain
ing about 1,500 acres, situated in
Claiborne county a few miles from
Bruinsburg, on die Mississippi riv
er. Terms easy. Apply to
fe 2 4 -4 J. W. PERSON,
Sec'y C.-H. Academy.
Trespass Notice.
1 B«*by warned against hunt
log, fob Ing or otbenrtoe treepo—ing 00 tbe
Talbot plantation of J, H. Oordon, and tbe
BowWng Green plantation of tbe 8tower*
»votber* All pentona trespass ing after this
date wlü be prosecuted
J. If. GORDON.
L. M. STOWERS.
Port Gibson, April 14th—tf
For Sale
A good building lot with tenement
houses on same.
Fine investment
for a small sum of money,
terms apply to
_MRS. S. H. WHARTON.
For
Commissioner's Sale.
ISAAC FIFE.
:
ro.
Cbaric* Shradar, *t al. )
°* *h* Charererr eoorl
t»# OMft #1 ftâM âOttRftr Ht AihliA
jSteltaaLSSlE.IS? Ä 'T
HcmogUm lot, fafiy dreerib^d fa retrtd ^î l^ ! 2
E. I U T DRAKE, Solicitors
œay 13-Sr.
■n

■Æ
W.B. «Fiilker
1 X 8 UKASCE AG EM
OFFICt AT Wm. CAM
Phoenix Insurance, of Brooklyn,
Now Orleans Insurance Aa*oei»t»"*l
New Orleans,
Georgia Home Insurance, ofCdj
bus, Georgia,
Phoenix Insurance, of Hartford,
Mississippi Home Insurance,VidoM
Aetna Insurance, of Hartford,
8 oathern Insurance, of New (Msffii
American Fire Insurance, Philo,
THE ST
During 1893 THE SUN wil
of surpassing excellence and
print more news and more pure
erature than ever before in its
tory.
The Sunday Su
Is the greatest Sunday N<
paper in the world.
Price 5 c. a copy.
Daily, per year,
Daily and Sunday, per year,
Addr-e TU* BÜN, New Y rk
Per year,
WM. BOOZE
The Tinner,
Does all kinds of work iu Tin, G
and Sheet Iron.
ROOFING AND 6 UTTERIM
A Specially.
Aloo paints roofs and guttrrA 1
copper and sheet iron vert*
mended A made to order.
CALL AND SEE
His patent Bteain Feed Cook 1 *
oooking grain Ac. for 'lork
All work guaranteed OBd/i»i>e «» k>***vv
. WILLIAM BOOZV
aori&jSm
SEASON 1893.
CKLuaaTtn «tau-io*.
'•^loctox Knot»
By Hairy Wllk**,
W)>! mull* th® » 1 ring *re*>n i
plac*. "Mom Wood" (arm, , ' u *' '$
at Port OltwoB aod Hcrieanrillr
r 1 "
2 * rw 'P t, "*» b **
TU»
For ■.«■«on, which begin* al« n *
10 r*«h iu adv*ec* H***
Mare« writ cared for.
r**p»tabte for weideot»
iterft
rc
I D
Fresh cheese at Kiefer *
_ J

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