OCR Interpretation


The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, February 12, 1903, Image 8

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1903-02-12/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

CHAS. A. BARBER, M. D.,
Physiciarv St Surgeorv.
8PSOIKLIST,
TRRATS AU. DI8BASKS OF
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
Ofllce: 4th Floor, Century Building,
JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI.
I have a ward la the Jackaon Sanitarium to r
Important cates. _
E.S.&J.T.&H. W. M. DRAKE,
LKHwYeRS.
PORT 0IB80N, J MISSISSIPPI
Practice in all the Court« f Claiborne
and Jeffers« n Counties, and Federal and
Supreme C >urt* at Jackac»' . Real Estât
for sale.
J. N. BRASH EAR,
Attornev-at-Law,
Port Gibson, Miss.
Dr. L. A. Murdock,
physician and Surgeon,
Office in Bernbeimer Building.
Telephone—Office. 104 ; Residence, log.
DR. L. A. SniTM,
DE3STTIST,
Port Qibson, Miss.
Rooms S A 1«, Bernkeimer Building.
R. B. ANDERSON,
Attomey-at- LaW,
Careful attention given to business.
Office over Cahn's Dry Goods Store.
Chamberlain-Hunt Academy,
FORT GIBSON. MIBB.
Next Session will open Sept. 16, 190*
Next Session will close 7 um 9, *fos
f nitloa for the session, Sjj.oo. Payable, $15-°°
at the time of entrance, $10.00 by the ist Jan.,
and $10.00 by the ist March.
W. S. CRAIG,
Secretary,
V.
i
\ 1
f.
/
/
r
; tyi^r
TIE
And look for those band spots.
We wont fly over it but will tho
roughly examine each part. And
the Repairs will be repairs. Our
workmen are especially skillful
and very careful. They are sup
plied with the best material and
know how to use it to the best
advantage. We will appreciate
your orders and you will be well
satisfied with our work and
charges.
a«tj:r
Port Gibson, Miss
Phone 37 .
r
S OUIvB
COKMKICIAl
COLLKOX,
i v
Wi Jt Otlust, L«
«4 /ears rtn****4 as a leed
•T Bo fais« promis** made
Vo hnnbtiflu Bnotktd
Over MO ««Id Md Mod
als. Diplomas, «M, award«*'
« 1 by Amertoaa and Evoyou
i yosLiiooi. Coram avais 1
rS.
Crarso la slid as K apart
aoaatlng sad Asdliiag,
la o.araataad
( n p«rior la aay
aad
H l * h af
<*£« ta
Uaataattad faailtuaa. Vaasa* Dei FMaffif.
K OOffc
pUk* aoll*(*
UrtditWa Sold
raairy laslraaUoa all pan
B*n*S aamaroaa kulaaaiB
IsjII aalvaiaaily aad »■■■«■ My toava . wa
karat* parlor adraataeaa U *Mt*f aradaals la
sV3Kä"&
«•Ira a! any Um.
JOHN LANGFORD,
THILOR,
Port (Jlbaoa, Ml»«.
Carroll St.
Cleaning, Dyeing and general repairini
Any kind of dress goods, silks
Suits. All work promptly d«'.
ALTE 01 N A SPECIALTY.
Telephone No. 135.
, nuns, mem
ivered.
« »
It Pit
1 am prepared to furnish mate
rial and do contract work of all
kind», both brick and frame work.
Will do hpuae, fence and all kinds
ot repairs at reasonable prices and
guarantee satisfaction in work
manship.
Very respectfully,
E, C, JORDAN,
Cos tractor aatf Builder.
\
Up AU Night
jfoj
XX?
.V V É/
i<\ A
9 V o Hfl
A /
7
ff
This getting up every night
with the baby, or some of the
older children, is all wrong.
Not that the children are to
blame. If he's the baby, prob
ably his food Is wrong. Vlnol
will help his mother stand the
strain of nursing.
We have often seen whole
families of older children who
keep the parents awake o*
nights. First one, then the
other is ailing.
These children seem well
enough at times ; but they are
white, hollow-eyed, often list
less, with irregular appetites,
peevish and fretful, wakeful at
night and constantly taking cold.
The use of Vinol, In conjunc
tion with Vinlax to regulate the
bowels, will benefit these child
ren almost In a day.
There is nothing In Vinol that
can nurt them. It Is pleasant
to take. If it doesn't do the
work, we will give you the
money back.
POPE DRUG COMPANY,
DRUaOISTS.
Mail orders supplied. |i per Bottle, express paid
« _ For Drunkenness, Opium,
Keelev-"
I m W J the Tobacco Habit
^ and neurasthenia.
THE KEELEY
INSTITUTE,
Dwight, III.
ure
Strictly
!
u
/aa> x . w'
:v
Save your money by spending
it here for Sporting Goods,
mm tools-
;—AND
The standard makes at popular
prices.
$K\
J. N. Brashear,
Insurance
Hgent ^
I have tbe agency for ail tbe In
surance companies formerly rep
resented bv Capt. G. H. Fulker
son, to-wit :
Phoenix of Hartford
Amarioan Fira of PHiladalphla
Ætna of Hartford
Phenlx of Brooklyn
Georgia Home of Columbua, Ga.
Mississippi Home of Viekeburg
Southern of New Orleans
Prompt aud carefnl attention
will be given to all business placed
with me.
1
wa
la
J. N. BRA5HEAR.
Port Gibson, Miss., Oct. 7,1901
Improve
Your
Home!
There is no better way than
by Papering and Painting
the house and Upholstering
the furniture.
It Would Surprise You
to know how cheaply this
work can be done.
PAINT YOUR BUGGY !
It needs it. It will look like
new, and the cost will not
be frest.
I carry a full line of Up
holsterer's Goods and Pret
ty Wall Paper Samples.
HARRY V. WOOD,
Our Schools.
Che Business of education.
An organism may be defined as a body
composed of members working together
for the accomplishment of a certain pur
pose or end. Prom the standpoint of
the Sociologist Society Is such an organ
ism, the members of which are men ;
and the purpose or end for which it was
organized is the development of sll the
elements of civilization, such as the en
oyment of life, liberty, and the pursuits
of hsppiness. Id ordtr tbst this pur
pose or end may be accomplished the
members must work together; and in
order that these members may work to
gether, they must be adjusted to the
functions of society. Prom this point
of view, as the Sociologist concerns, It
is the business of education to adjust
man to this social life. He is educated
when he is fitted to perform the func
tions of society efficiently.
I like to look at it from this staod
point. It givea to a teacher a definite
purpose in hls work. It gives to the
people interested in education an appre
ciation of the fact that it is something
tangible, practicable, and necessary.
It impresses me with a lamentable
condition that exists to a great extent
in our public schools to-day. . The text
book is used as an end in education and
Students are left with the
not s means,
impression that examples in Arithmetic
exist only iu Wentworth's or Robin
son's, or Ellwood & Colaw's Arithme
tics ; that Geography is found ouly in
tbe text book, and so on, making uo
connections between these text books
and the problems of life. A great defect
therefore in our instruction is abstrac
tlon.
Tbia instruction if it would serve its
purpose ^uiust be. rationalized aud co
ordinated with life activities. Teachers
must be impressed with the fact that the
public school is tbe means through
which the Stale furnishes education to
the pupil aud that she conceives educa
tion to mean the adjustment of the pu
pil to the functions of society.
Again, this conception of educatiou
can not fail to quicken tbe interest of
tbe masses of tbe people. It becomes a
thing of great concern to citizens and of
greater concern to pareuts. It becomes
of paramount value to you that tbe
school perform its mission successfully.
It is a fact that tbe success or failure
of your school will depend to a certain
extent upon every element in tbe com
inanity, pbyscal or social, whether it be
teacher, parent, pnpil, blackboard, desk,
road to school, or what not, everything
more or less conduces to its efficiency.
A little reflection will show this to be
true. Parents and Trustees then must
be actively interested in this enterprise.
Yon must awake to the fact that what
you contribute to education ia uot a sac
rifice but e paying investment and yonr
dividends will be proportionate to your
investment.
There is something more for you to do
than atari your boy or girl to school.
Yon need to invest a sympathetic, con
stant and enduriug interest in your
child and fa your school. You invest
in your farm or store. You give it your
time sud energy by dsy. It is tbe top
ic of your thought aud conversation at
night. An investment in tbeeducatiou
al welfare of your boy or girl should ap
peal to you iu a higher and nobler sense.
Do yon manifest the same interest in
your boy or girl at school ? Does be
attend regularly ? Is he comfortably
situated? Do you stimulate him in bis
lessons at home ?, How many times
have you visited the school aud how
much do you talk it up in tbe comtuuu
i.y?
Wbeu teachers and parents and all
co-operate in working ont thia concep
tion of education, then will tbe great
system of public schools accomplish its
mission efficiently in developing our
boya and girls into men and women ca
pacitated and euergized for filling tbetr
proper places in society with ease, grace
aud dignity.
Respectfully,
JNO. T. HOOD.
CURED CONSUMPTION.
Mrs B. W. Evans, Clearwater. Kan.,
My husband lay sick for three
months; the doctors stat-d he ,had quick
consumption. We procured s bottle of
Ballard's Horehound Syrup and it cured
him. That was six years ago, and since
then we always kept a bottle in the house.
For coughs and colds it has no equal."
25c., 50c. and $1.00 at Pope Drug Com
pany.
write* :

Headquarters Camp Claiborne No. 167,
United Confederate Veteran«,
Port Gibion, Feb., 1903.
The thirteenth annual reunion of the
Uuited Confederate Veteran« will be
held in New Orleam, La , Miy 19th,
20th, ant and 22nd, and it ia the hope
of the Cbmmanding General of the State
Division that Mississippi be fittingly
zepreseoted and urges all camps to be
gin preparation for this reonion, which
ail heretofore held.
promises to surpass
In compliance with the wishes of the
Commanding General, I most earnestly
beg all Confederate soldiers residing in
Claiborne county, whether members of
tbe Camp or not, to meet In Port Gib
son, Monday, March 2nd.
not members should come and put in
their applications for membership «0
they can be acted on at oar annual meet
ing in Aoril, when officer* for the ensu
ing year will be elected, and other bus!
of Importance brought before tbe
/ cannot order you as I once
Those who
are
ness
camp.
could. But let me again beg of you to
There will aoou be none of us
come.
left on this side of the river. Only a
corporal's guard now remain to meet
and alrew flowers over the graves of our
gallant dead. Come, come, come and
meet with us.
R. A. OWEN, Commander.
JAS. B. ALLEN, Adjutant.
Dr. Pope'« Antiseptic, dilated with
water, ta Infallible remedy for sore
thro«t, Qlve It 1 trial.
A Memorial Tribute to M. S. Hum
phreys.
L«»t Tuesday week s kindly gentle
man was laid to rest in our beautiful
"Wintergreen" Cemetery. ,
Among the mourning hearts gathered
around the grave of "Roe" Humphreys
were loyal friends who had full cause to
remember him for bis mauy inuate and
hereditary virtue« typical of the best
men of the old Southern regime.
Belonging to the fourth generation of
a family prominently identified with the
history of this county since its organisa
tion as part of territorial Mississippi, be
Inherited his full share of the culture
and courtesy of bis class and race. In
the English and American classics of
literal&re and in the political history of
his state and our national govern
ment he was one of the best read tueu of
of this section. A* a host he showed
the hospitality, attentive kindness and
all the affability proverbial among the
landed gentry of the South.
As a friend and companion, whether
it were in the gatherings of the winter
fireside, in the summer rides through
shaded roads or sunny crops, or in his
favorite sports of the hunting field, he
was ever genial, unselfish and disting
uished among all for his courtesy.
The gentlest and most tender side of
his nature was best shown in the love
borne him by little children, both by
the numerous members of his relatives'
families uud the many little guests of
bis old plantation home. These would
gather about him aud remain with him
while he tirelessly entertained them
with childreu's tale- or led aud joiued
actively in ibeii juvenile spoils avid
games. »
As oue who enjoyed his friendship fur
a'scoie of years, his pleasant couipau
ship on many a hunting field aud his
geneious hospitality at the old Ole isade
family home—as ene who well knew his
bright brain and bis big hesrt, the writ
er would lay this humble tribute on the
earth of his freshly covered grave among
the tender flowers placed thereon, and
among the sacred tears of his kindred
over the breast of a kindly aud courte
ous gentleman.
to
of
a
of
be
be
at
in
be
* *
Tendency of the Times.
The teudeucy of medical science is to
ward pieventive measures,
thought of the world is being given to
tbe subject. It is easier and better to
prevent than to enre. It has been fully
demonstrated that pneumonia, one of
the most dangerous diseases that medi
cal men have to contend with, can be
prevented by the nse of Chamberlalu's
Cough Remedy. Pneumonia always re
sults from a cold or from an attack of
influenza (grip), and it baa been ob
served that this remedy counteracts any
teudency of these diseases toward pneu
monia. This has been fully proven iu
many thousands of cases in which this
remedy has been used during the great
prevalence of colds and grip in recent
years, and can be relied upon with im
plicit confidence. Pneumonia often re
sults front a slight cold when 110 danger
is apprehended until it is suddenly dis
covered that there is fever aud difficulty
in breathing aud pains in tbe chest,
then it is announced that tbe patient
has pneumouia. Be 011 the safe side
aud lake Chamberlain's Cough Remedy
as soon as the cold is contracted. It al
Tbe best
For sale by Pope Drug Co.,
ways cures.
Pott Gibson, and B- D. Barron, Martiu,
Miss.
Postal Cards From California's China
town. -
In the Chinese mode of worship there
is a lack of reverence ai formerly. They
enter the temple as they would a lodg
ing bouse, chatting and smoking, with
covered heads. Without uncovering 01
ceasing their conversation or eveu re
moving from their lips the cigar or pipe,
they approach taeir favorite deity, go
through the "chin-cbiuning process,
bowing lew three times as rapidly as
possible, leave their offering if they
have auy to leave, and go Rbout their
business without fuitber ceremony.
The female worshippers are more de
vout, often prostrating themselves be
fore the deity and giving utterance to
their supplications with due reverence.
The prayers and offerings of either sex
are nearly all for some worldly good ;
success in business, and in gambling,
protection in journeys, freedom from ca
lamity, etc., etc. They have, however,
a dread of purgatory and their biggest
worship days are when they pray for
the souls of their friends, out of place of
punishment.
Tbe priests obtain their livelihood
from the sale of paper money, incense
tapers and other articles required by
worshippers. It is also customary for
white visitors to purchase from them
some trifle as a curiosity.
>>
of
TI MEK SI.
Social Life of the Army and Navy.
Tbe army and navy constitute a dis
tinctive element of American society,
and the wives sud daughters of officers,
whether from tbe homage due to arms
or on account of their personal attrac
tions, everywhere elicit attention and
admiration. Their lives, however, are
not altogether enviable; in tbe navy
separations are long and frequent, and
in both branches of the service there is
the ever present danger of death or in
jury to loved ones. Waldon Fawcett in
article in The Delineator for March
describes at length tbe social life of the
army and navy,' and the illustrations,
showing well-known officers and -their
wives, aod scenes aud events familiar to
the men of the army and navy are a de
lightful accompaniment to the paper.
an
a
I have used Chamberlain's Cough
Remedy for a number of years sud bave
hesitancy in saying that it is the best
remedy for coughs, colds and croup I
have ever used in my family. I have
not word* to express my confidence in
this remedy.—Mas. J. A. Moorb, North
Star, Mich. For sale by Pope Drug Co.,
Port Gibson, aud E. D. Barron, Martin,
Mi««.
no
I
* Aı A*ÄAÄÄ3fefcft*Äft!«^
J 6\*ry ni
B
Good to Sat
4,

Ht tbe Right price.
Atmore's Mince Meat, Barley,
Force, Fancy Evaporated Fruits,
Extra Fanncy Prunes, Herring
Hecker's Self Raising Buckwheat,
Grape Nuts, for Brain and Nerve Centers,
Lima and White Beans,
' # * ,
Boston Beauty Mackerel,
Creamery Butter.
a
«
4
«
4 .

&
4 ,
9
a
»
«
b*
«
4-v
4,

4,
»
4 .
• b»
4,
4,
»
4,
»
4.
ALL JUST RECEIVED FRESH AT
»
>
N. n. SON & eo.'s Grocery.
w
»
FANCY DELICATESSEN A SPECIALTY.
WE ARE WELL FED, BUT
BUCKING FOR MORE TRADE.
WE ARE WELL FED, BUT
BUCKING FOR MORE TRADE.
THE SHOE
PROBLEM
{
*
y 'm*
Ll
sri
1
i
1
F
1
(
Star
With the savings you can make by buying shoes
from us. We have been so fortunate as to secure
one one of the prettiest lots of Manufacturers'
Sample Shoes at a ridiculously low price, on ac
count of the lot being so large and only two sizes
X
in the entire lot.
Men's Shoes Nos. 7 and 8 Only.
Ladies' Shoes Nos. 3 and 4 Only.
All of these sample shoes are of the finest grade
custom made, which usually retail for $2.50 and
$3.50 per pair.
$ 1.50
If you are lucky enough to wear number seven or number eight
Men's Shoes, ycu can have any pair for
If you are lucky enough to wear number three or number four
Ladies' Shoes, you can have any pair in the lot fo$r
$ 1.00
Never* in your life will you again have such an
opportunity to buy $3.50 Shoes for
$1.00 and $1.50!
Remember the sizes are only 7 and 8 for Men
and 3 and 4 for Ladies. Our show windows are
full of these sample shoes. Come and examine
them and get your first selection at
9
;
I

xml | txt