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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, August 18, 1910, Image 1

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PORT GIBSON, CLAIBORNE CO„ MISS., THURSDAY, AUG. 18, 1910.
SIBfMIMMKS,. fiE-ESTlBUSBED FEB. 12. IÏT6
1» SERIES.— VOL. XXXV. NO, 17
ANSWERS CRITICISMS.
Hermanville Explains the Wood
men Picnic Admission Fee.
Hermanville, Aug. 15, 1910.
Editor Reveille:
In reply to the criticisms of our
board in your last two issues, we
have only to say that we rented
the pavilion and grounds to the
Woodmen of the World. Our un
derstanding was that it was to be
used free for all religious and edu
cational purposes. The Woodmen
of the World gave a political pic
nic and it was advertised as a
Woodmen political picnic,
charged them for the use of the
grounds and building because we
did not think they came under
either the edu cational or religious
head.
We
Since the pavilion was turned ov
er to the committee a debt of over
one hundred dollars has been paid
and the lot fenced. The roof was
damaged by the September storm
last year and must be repaired.
Seats are needed for it Will you
please tel! us how the building is
to be kept in repair? and is it your
understanding that any of the
white citizens of Claiborne county
is to have the use of the pavilion
and grounds free of charge, or are
they to be used only for religious
anti educational purposes?
You have been liberal in giving
to the erection of this pavilion, and
we think you will approve of our
renting the grounds to the Wood-;
man for the 4th. It is our desir*
and aim for the pavilion to he used
as those in authority intended, and
if we have failed, in renting it to
the Woodmen, we want to know
it
Trustees of Pavilion
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We are offering our Entire Stock of
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Glassware,
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Crockery,
Hardware,
Stoves,
And Wire
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at absolutely cost, for cash only.
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Hermanville, Aug. 12, 1910.
Editor Reveille :
It seems there is some misappre
hension amongst the people about
the Woodmen picnic given here on
the 4th.
The simple facts are these :
The school board of this county
has named five leading citizens, liv
ing near here, as custodians of the
county pavilion. It is a part of
their duties to say who shall use
the building and grounds, outside
of educational purposes. These
gentlemen have passed an order
that nobody shall use them except
upon payment of a certain sum for
their use. The Woodmen picnic
was no exception to this rule. They
paid for the use of the grounds out
of the small ten cents admittance
fee (children free.) Maybe our
good friends do not know the last
money due on a note signed by
citizens of this community for
money gotten from the bank to
complete the pavilion was paid
with the money from this very
Woodmen's picnic. There is no
fund provided for the pavilion main
tenance, though it needs lo he kept
in repair, its grounds and fences
in order, and we feel sure if the
people understood the needs of the
pavilion committee they would
heartily approve the order requir
ing a fixed fee for all gatherings
not strictly educational.
It may not he generally knowu
that the people of this community'
put up as much, or more, than the
county to liny ground* and erect
But we have no no
the pavilion,
tion that it is our individual prop
er ty. We take a pride in it as
county property, and me doing
our best to keep it in order, that
all may feel the same pride and
right of ownership.
To ''Yellow Jacket
we extend
1 >
our hand. Brandywine is not only
near but dear to us, and we prom
ise our friend never to charge any
body a fee to vote, unless it is a
Suffragite" and when ALL of
them want really to vote we'll not
even charge them.
I fear our good friend Regan
feels toward Hermanville like the
Jew of old did about Nazareth—
that no good can come out of it.
If he'll come over some time,
though, we'll give him such a good
time he will forget the way home.
HERMANVILLE.
i i
Hermanville, Aug. 15, 1910.
Editor Reveille:
It seems that the Uniform Rank,
Woodmen of the World, are com
ing in for some very severe criti
cism for their recent action in
charging a small gate tee to the
grounds of their picnic which was
held at Hermanville Aug. 4th, and
unjustly so. While I do not ap
prove of gate fees for public gath
erings, which have been held or
which may hereafter be held in our
midst, I claim that the boys had a
perfect right to charge a fee if
they saw it. Not being a member
of the Uniform Rank of the W. O.
W., I had no voice in the matter
as to whether they should or should
not charge a gate fee; but since, in
their judgment, they saw fit to
charge a small admittance, I do
not see any just cause why I should
criticize them now. The first crit
icism I noticed came from your
paper under date of August 4th,
wherein you stated that this was
the first time a gate fee had been
charged to any public gathering
held at the pavilion, which state
ment I wish to correct, as you will
recall that the military company,
composed of boys from almost ev
ery district in the county, set the
precedent by charging a gate fee
of, I think,
their competitive drill and picnic
which was held at the pavilion only
a few months ago. I do not men
tion this to try to justify our boys
in their recent action, but to simply
show that they were not first in the
field of gate fees, for surely this
would not justify them in charging
a^fee if they had no legal right to'
do so.
After reading your article I at
first thought of passing it up un
noticed, considering it only a mat-')
ter of small moment. But it seems
others are craving some facts, and
before they make a "mountain of a
mole hill" deem it best to enlight
en them as to the position of the
W. O. W. boys. One would infer
from reading some of the charges
that they actually walked in with
out lief or license, and deliberately
took charge of things, held up the
people and relieved them of their
cash, and that the dear mothers on
arriving at the gate were forced to
pound their precious babes until
they could go to the bank in order
that they might make arrangements
for the enormous gate «fee, which,
by the way, was but a thin "dime"
for grown folks and nothing at all
for children under twelve (12)
years of age, and if anybody who
attended this picnic feel that they
have been grievously wronged or
taken undue advantage of, and
that they did not get value re
ceived, will send me the bill for
their gate fee, properly certified to,
I shall -certainly see to it that they
receive every cent of it back in
good U. S. coin.
15 and 10 cents to
Some have asked by what right
did the W. O. W. boys take pos
session of these grounds? As you
say this is public property, paid
for mainly by. tbf; county and from
the purses of some of the good, en
terprising people of Claiborne.
But nothing being donated to keep
up its expense. But there has
been a board of trustees appointed
according to law, who are made
custodians of the property and giv
en the sole right to ttausact any
and all business connected with
the same, and, by the way, this
board of trustees is composed of
business men of unquestioned abil
ity. One^ of the rulings of this
board is to the effect that all par
ties wno shall entertain on the
grounds shall pay a commission of
25 per cent of the net fevenue de
rived therefrom. And a very wise
decision, for it seems that this is
the only source .of revenue by
which the property -can be main
tained, and incidentally 1 want to
say right here, that their commis
sions from Woodmen Day enabled
them to cancel the small balance
on the pavilion debt which was
long past due.
Did the boys have any rights?
If they were paying a commission
on everything, did not they have a
right to forbid others coming on
the ground and offering for sale
any commodity whatever? God
knows, it there is a man on the
earth for whom I have the pro
foundbst respect and to whom I
would take off my hat, it is he who
tills the soil from early morn till
late at night and earns his bread
by the sweat of his brow.
But the fact that people were
not allowed to come on the inside
to sell their produce cannot be at
tributçd-to the gate fee, for if no
gate tee had been charged the re
sult would have been the same.
There is only one thing for which
the boys could be censured or crit
jcized, and that comes from the
(Concluded on Eighth Page)
YOU MM HARD
TOR YOUR MONEY
MAKE YOUR MONEY
for you
IT
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I*
Copyright 1909, by C. £. Zimmerman C 0 .--N 0 . t
f YA/^HEN you work hard for your
money, don't fool it away.
Make it work hard for you. It will, if you only
take care of it, and put it in the bank. They'll
make it work for you—that's their business.
(Mississippi Southern Sank
s port] [Gibson, (Misai
Capital and Surplus,
. . $100,000.0
THE SAFEST AND QUICKEST WAY Tt,
TRANSFER MONEY
IS BY
LONE DISTANCE TELEPHONE
«pc ? y r e*
i. ' •
»,

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