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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, October 21, 1915, Image 6

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1915-10-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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OUTLOOK FOR THE NAVY ELEVEN OF 1915
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Hardwick, Who Is Assisting Lieutenant Ingram In Getting the
Navy Football Squad Into Line.
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(By FRANK G. MENKE.)
The Navy eleven of 1915 isn't going
as was the
» »»
to be as "easy pickin
1914 outfit that suffered three regular
beatings and narrowly escaped two
more.
The outlook for Uncle Sam's saUor
boys this year is far brighter than it
was last year. With enough veterans
on hand to form an almost complete
'varsity eleven and some very promis
ing looking "rookies'' in reserve. Navy
promises to "come back'' with a team
this year that will give every foe a
mighty battle.
The main fault of last year—lack
of a powerful team of substitutes—has
been removed this year. Navy's sec
ondary machine ^omises to be just
about as good as its regular 'varsity,
and the navy rooters won't have to
tremble in Year—as they did in 1914—
when the substitutes relieve the regu
lars.
Just now it looks as If the first
Navy team will be made up largely of
the holdover regulars and substitutes
of last year. The coaches want to
start the season with a team of sea
soned players, and the youngsters, for
the most part, will be used only in
emergencies—unless some of them
Show football skill beyond that of the
older men.
Miles, captain of the team, is a fix
ture at quarterback. He got a lot of
experience in the pivot position last,
year and proved himself to be a cool
headed field general, a clever man at
handling punts and an exceptionally
fast man In running through broken
fields.
Failing, who shone at halfback and
fullback last year, probably will be as
signed to the fullbacking job. He's a
terrific line smasher and an excep
tionally fast man for one of his bulk.
Blodgett, whose great work last year
won him considerable mention, is a
fixture at one of the halfback posl
OUIMET IS QUITE A PITCHER
.
Star Young Golfer Proud of His Work
as Baseball Player—Recently
Won Long Game. „
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Francis Ouimet, the star young
golfer, is a baseball fan through and
through, and at times is a baseball
player.
Ouimet is about as proud of his
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Francis Ouimet.
work as a pitcher as he is of his great
feats on the golf links. - He recently
pitched and- won a 13-inning game.
HIS LIBERTY IS UNWELCOME
Baseball Player Given Unconditional
Release as Happy as Politician
Separated From Job.«
*i see where another welj-known
baseball player has been given his un
conditional release," remarked Mr.
Twobble, glancing up from his pa
per.
*Tve read that baseball players are
nothing more than slaves," said Mrs.
Twobble. "This one must be glad he's
free."
"Oh. yes,
sarcastic tones, "I dare say he's as
happy as a ne'er-do-well who's just
been divorced by his wife who earns
$1.000 a week or a practical politician
who been forcibly separated from
the public crib."—Birmingham Age
Herald.
replied Mr. Twobble. in
Pirates Sign a Texan.
Eugene Madden of the Galveston
(Tex.) team has been signed by Pitts
burgh. He is an outfielder and was
secured by Barney Dreyfuss in the
.eyi&at
tlons, while Craig, a fast, plucky youth,
may draw the other halfback assign
ment. He is rather light, but makes
up In speed and In gameness what he
lacks in heft.
Harrison and Jackson look like cer
tainties at the end positions. Har
rison played In practically all of
Navy's games last year and showed
up well. Jackson Is a fast, heady
player, - a daring tackier and a real
star in handling the forward pass.
Clarke, a tall, rangy chap, and Ward,
one of the most powerfull men in the
academy, are slated for the tackle
jobs, succeeding DeRoode and Mc
Goach, who were graduated.
There are three seasoned candidates
for the two guard positions—E. H.
Jones, H. S. Jones and Mills.
Jones and Mills were the regular Navy
tackles last year, but E. H. Jones in
his role as substitute showed up in
fine style throughout the 1914 season
and is doing fine work in the practice
scrimmages this year,
one or the other of his big rivals.
The only real task that confronts the
Navy coaches is the developing of a
center to take the place of Perry, who
graduated. Smith, who substitut
ed last year, is a good man—but is he
good enough? That's what the coaches
want to know.
If Smith doesn't show up to 'varsity
standard, the coaches may play one
of the three guard candidates In cen
ter, which seems like a good move, as
the trio of veteran guards all seem
good enough to hold down regular
Jobs.
H. S.
He may beat
was
Lieut. H. H. Ingram, star of the
Navy's elevens in 1906 and 1907, is
chief coach, and
the brilliant star of the Harvard team
last year, Is his first assistant. Hard
wick has been tutoring the ends and
backfield men and If he's only half as
good a teacher as he was a player,
Navy will bear a lot of watching.
Tacks" Hardwick.
W:*
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COACHES STILL POPULAR
Former Yale football players
:•:» continue to hold their popular
ity as coaches notwithstanding
jijj that the Blue gridiron star has
i-j: failed to shine with its usual
brilliancy during the last few
seasons. A canvass of the lead
ing colleges and schools of the
country has demonstrated that
the New Haven university has
more former players acting in
coaching capacities than any
one other college or university
annals.
£
football
famous in
Among the other eastern insti
tutions Princeton, Dartmouth,
Pennsylvania, Lafayette and\ Sy
racuse are all well represented
in the coaching field. In sharp
contrast is the fact that Har
vard and Cornell players do not
apparently devote much lime to
coaching after graduation. In
the West Chicago and Michigan
lead in this respect, although
there is a fair sprinkling of Min
nesota, Wisconsin, Notre Dame * : ' :
and Illinois alumni on the UsL
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Tame Race at Hartford.
At the Grand Circuit meeting in
Hartford, Conn., the thirtieth renewal
of the Charter Oak stake, the feature
of the Grand Circuit meeting there
each year, this time for 2:08 trotters
and a purse of 35,000, half the amount
of previous years, was the tamest
race in the history of this classic of
the trotting turf. Peter Scott, Mur
phy's bay stallion, was an easy first in
straight heats, having no contenders
in the small field of four horses that
started the race. Time, 2:09, 2:07%,
2:07%.
Watch Dartmouth Punters.
Considerable attention Is being paid
to the punting of Gerrish, Thielscher
and Cotton in the Dartmouth squad
this year in an effort to find successors
to Whitney and Curtis. These men
have improved much since last year.
Cavanaugh has also shifted Barrows,
last year's strong substitute, to the
backfield.
pounds.
He weighs nearly 190
Dartmouth Wants QuisL
Coach Harry Williams of the Min
nesota eleven Is angry over the at
tempts of Dartmouth alumni to Induce
A1 Quist, an end, to enter Dartmouth.
It is said the Green have made al
luring offers to the Gopher star.
CORHAN 'COMES BACK'
Former White Sox Shortstop
Signed by St. Louis Browns.
Tigers Get Bobby Jones and Harry
Heilman, Infielders — Jack Ness,
Hard Hitting First Baseman,
Goes to Chicago.
The San Francisco baseball team
and most of the others in the Pacific
Coast league faced the opening of the
drafting season with an equanimity
born of the knowledge that nothing
much worse could befall them than
already has happened. San Francisco
thus far has sold four men and three
others are being dickered over.
Of the San Franciscans, Bobby
Jones and Harry Heilman, third and
first baseman, have been sold to the
Walter Schmidt, catcher.
Tigers.
goes to the Pirates, and Roy Corhan.
shortstop, goes back to big company
by way of the St. Louts Americans.
The Sox have bought Second Baseman
McMullen and Shortstop Terry, the
main factors of the Los Angeles
team's progress. Jack Ness, first base
man. who holds the world's record for
hitting In consecutive games, goes
from Oakland to the Sox, and the
same team loses Jimmy Johnston, cen
terflelder, and the league's champion
base stealer, to Cleveland's star third
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Shortstop Roy Corhan.
who also get Portland's star third
baseman, Bates, and Ritcher Coveles
kie of that team.
Salt Lake will lose its best hurler.
"Lefty" Williams, to the Sox, and Sec
ond Baseman Joe Gedeon to Wash
ington.
CONTROL IN GOLF DIFFICULT
Condition of Course Has Much to Dc
With Manner In Which Many
Skillful Players Play.
Greatness of play in golf in its last
analysis depends upon control of the
ball. What a master player can force
the ball to do marks the greatest feat
in golf.
With a club which measures around
three inches by 1% on Its face, and a
ball which runs around 2% inches in
diameter, the expert will do wonder
ful things, things which completely
baffle the player of ordinary ability.
On the drive skilled players will curve
ball, undercut It so as tp drop it dead
or hit it higher to cause it to drive low
and roll long after the drive has ceased
to carry. Pitching the ball on to the
ground dead to the hole Is a feature
of approach play which requires ex
traordinary skill to attain perfection
Putting Is a delicate task and
"holding" the ball so that it has no
spin that will cause it to jump over
the cup is one of the secrets of suc
cess in this.
Skillful players do not play the same
or even the same holes the
a
in.
course
same on different occasions. The con
dition of the course has much to do
with this. On a heavy links or where
the grass is cut short the high drive is
the thing. On a sunbaked course
where distance is wanted the long, low
drive with roll is the winner. Obstruc
tions on the course can be got around
by an expert by causing the ball to
All of this means hitting the
: ' :
curve.
ball a fraction low, high or to one side,
and it takes skill to do this.
»
Sharkey Had to Be Shown.
Somewhere in the long ago arose
one of the many stories that had to
do with the miserliness of Tom
Sharkey, the "war horse" of the ring
in the earlier days of pugilism. Here
is the yarn:
Sharkey and a friend were walking
along Fourteenth street in New York
one night when a human derelict
blocked their path.
' "Say, bo," he said to Sharkey, "I'm
down and out Will you give me ten
cents for a bed?"
Let's see the bed," asked the cau
tious Sharkey.
g
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American Association Struggle.
The 'American association had rnt
of the best races in the history of the
league this year, with SL Paul and
Minneapolis fighting it oat to the very
last day, bat the league did not make
much money. The Millers, led by Jo
Cantillon, won the flag.
Next Year's Pennant Fight.
New York fans think there will be
nothing to the American league race
next season except a battle for the
flag by Boston. Chicago and Detroit
teams, which have been strengthened
l>y other clubs of the circuit.
at
al
Donovan Tries Youngsters.
Bill Donovan, manager of the New
York Yankees, says he sees no chance
for his team to purchase stax bali play
er so he purposes trying out minor
leaguers.
V
A
\
Style of Dairy Building That Is
Especially Suitable for Hot
Sections.
KEEPS ANIMALS IN COMFORT
\
Manure and Feed Carriers a Feature
of the Design—Cheaper and Eas
ier to Care for Cattle When
They Face Each
Other.
By WILLIAM A. RADFORD.
Mr William A. Radford will answer
questions and give Advice FREE OF
COST on all subjects pertaining to tha
subject of building work on the farm, for
the readers of this paper. On account of
his wide experience as Editor, Author ana
Manufacturer, he is, Without doubt, the
highest authority on all these subjects.
Address all inquiries to William A. Rad
ford. No. 1827 Prairie avenue, Chicago,
II!., and only Inclose two-cefat stamp for
reply.
We read a great deal about the ne
cessity of keeping the dairy herd
warm and comfortable in winter, but
no one seems to pay much attention
to keeping the cows cool and comfor
table In summer.
The monitor roof style of dairy
building is well liked in some sections,
especially where the summer is long
and hot. A dairy barn of this type
ia shown in the accompanying illustra
tions, which give the perspective and
floor plans.
This stable is open to the roof, a de
sign that just naturally ventilates
itself when the windows are left open.
The bailding L 36 feet wide by 54
feet in length and it contains stalls
to hold 20 cows, besides two box stalls
to be used as hospital stalls, bull pen,
calf pen, or for any other useful pur
pose.
This plan is laid out for and is in
tended to use manure carriers sus
pended from overhead tracks in the
side alleyways behind the cows, also a

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feed carrier to run through the center
feed alley, to carry silage from the
silo, or mixed feed from the little feed
room built in between the end of the
stable and the silo. The same center
car track and carrier will bring for
age from a hayrack at thé other end
of the building. In using a stable in
this way dairymen often prefer to cut
certain crops In the field and haul the
fodder to the stable to feed.
This plan erf feeding is not- prac
ticed to any extent in the North, but
there are conditions of climate in some
of our best dairy sections where feed
crops grow late In the fall, and still
others are sown in the fall to mature
early in the spring, that may be fed to
advantage as soiling crops. All soil
ing crops are expensive to handle, be
cause they are fed green. It has al
ways been a puzzle to dairymen how
to handle such fodder without pulling
their arms out of the sockets. A cen
ter feed alley built on this plan, with
Litter- Carrier'Track
LrnrtR ALLtY
5ox Stall
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f& ED-C arr i er-Tra ck.
Feld-Alley
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Litter. C arrier Track .
Litter Alley_
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Floor Plan.
extra large feed carrier, comes
about as near solving the problem as
any
an
system that has ever been tried.
Thirty-six feet in width is recog
nized as being the most satisfactory
stable when machinery is used to
hand labor. It gives room for the
cow
save
different stable carriers, for milking
machines and for the necessary me
chanical appliances to operate the dif
ferent labor savers.
In this stable the cows are headed
in for the same reason. It is cheaper
and easier to care for cattle when they
face each other. Also the many win
dows of the building admit light where
it is most needed. All of the window
openings are fitted with sash that may
be closed during cold or stormy weath
er. The monitor sash is hung with a
patent bracket, so that each aash
swings from the center in such a way
to easily open by means of con
necting rods that come down within
reach of the attendant One advan
tage of hanging the sash from the cen
ter is that kigh winds are not likely
to slam tl> i sash, either open or shut.
The foundation of this monitor-roof
dairy barn is of concrete, the walls
having footings wide enough to make
them solid and deep enough to reach
down to soli4 ground. These walls
feet above grade. A
profile of the/dairy floor conforms to
the most approved plan worked out by
practical d
The con
as
extend up t
men.
e standing floor has a
en the front and
fall of on© inch
cilitate drainage and for easy clean*
lng. The mangers ere two feet in
width, they are six Inches deep at the
back and 12 Inches deep at the front or
feed-alley side. The standing floor
measures four feet ten Inches from the
back of the manger to the gutter. The
gutter is 18 inches wide and drops six
inches below the standing floor. The
feed alley in the center is about seven
feet in width and the alleys behind
the cows are five feet six Inches wide.
The side alleys slope with a fall of
one inch,towards the gutter,
makes a stable floor that is perma
nent and satisfactory.
The roof may be supported in two
ways. It may be made self-supporting
so there will be no posts in the way.
This is done by running the rafters
from the eaves clear through to the
monitor plates. They are crossed and
bolted at the crossings, and the whole
roof structure is made into a trussed
roof by ties reaching across the build
ing from one side plate to the other
All monitor studding
reaches down and is bolted to these
ties and to the rafters, thus
This
side plate.
cross
forming a very strong truss.
The other plan supports the monitor
studding or posts long enough to reach
from the rear wall of the concrete
to the monitor plates. It is
mangera
customary to place these posts two
apart, and the monitor windows
are the same width as the cow stalls.
This arrangement provides one mon
itor window for each two cows.
The cow stalls may be two feet ten
inches between stall partitions, or
they may be three feet two inches, ac
cording to the size of the cows the
stable is intended for.
Generally there is no ceiling in a
monitor-roof cow stable, for the rea
son that with a ceiling it is necessary
to have ventilator flues, in which case
there is no excuse for the monitor.
cows
a
ONE OF THE SUREST SIGNS
Get Lover to Talk About Himself, and
You Have Him Hooked, Is Opin
ion of Expert.
And directly we feel a yearning to
talk about ourselves, our hopes, our
fears, we are weak and tractable. It
is a sifre sign. Brother, when you find
yourself expanding conversationally
to the young woman, and she shows a
disposition to listen amiably, it is e
dangerous symptom.
We notice it ourselves. As sure as
a young woman is Interested in us,
considers us with a certain amount of
admiration, she invariably starts in to
tell us the story of her life. We may
feel bored but we can also safely flat
ter ourselves that she has cast a favor
in
to
able eye upon us.
"But how do you know he is inter
ested in you?" asks mamma, when
daughter makes a tentative confi
dence.
"Oh. he talked about himself the
whole time," answers daughter art
lessly—and mamma nods understand
ingly and puts him through Bradstreet
—Exchange.
The Wolf and the 8hepherd.
A Wolf followed a flock of sheep for
a long time, and did not attempt to
injure one of them. The Shepherd at
first stood on his guard against him,
'
as against an enemy, and kept strict
watch over his movements. But when
the Wolf, day after day, kept in the
company of the sheep, and did not
make the slightest effort to seize
them, the Shepherd began to look
upon him as a guardian of his flock
rather than as a plotter of evil against
it; and when occasion called him one
day into the city, he left the sheep
entirely In his charge. The Wolf, now
that he had th^ opportunity, fell upon
the sheep, and destroyed the greater
part of the flock. The Shepherd on
his return, finding his flock destroyed,
exclaimed, "I have been rightly
served; why did I trust my sheep to t
Wolf?"—From Aesop's Fables.
a
A
to
by
Neglected Duty.
There is one duty that human be
ings conspicuously neglect It is a
tremendously important duty. And it
is also, for most human beings, the
most attractive duty in the world.
Nevertheless, in spite of Its attract
iveness and its importance, it is sel
dom spoken oE There are millions of
people who don't recognize it as a
duty. So they neglect to strive for it.
Then they wonder why they have not
achieved the duty. Sometimes they
complain, bitterly. Occasionally, by •
chance, they do achieve the duty with
out recognizing it as a duty. Then
they neglect it, and they suffer for the
rest of their lives. Surely you know
what the duty is. It is simply tho
a
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Afternoon Dress for the Little Girl
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A design in a dress and coatee for
a little girl, which may be successful
ly made up in any sort of material is
shown here. As pictured the dress
is of Irish poplin with a border of
ottoman silk In a wide bias band
about the bottom of. the skirt, and a
jacket of the same silk as the band.
But the model is just as well adapted
to many of the new cotton fabrics. It
might be developed in cotton gaber
dine for the dress, and cotton cordu
roy for the jacket, in any of the light,
staple colors that these new fabrics
are made in.
As shown in the picture the skirt
is set on to a belt of the poplin which
is also the belt of the plain bodice.
The bodice has a small yoke, opening
at the neck in a shallow "V" and fin
ished with little, buttonholed scallops.
The coat Is cut with long shoulders
[
Showing the Direction of the Millinery Wind
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Here are two pretty dress hats j
which show which way the millinery !
*wind blows. As to trimming it points
to simplicity, but as to shape it con
tinues to blow "every which way." In
materials hatters' plush, velours and
combinations of velvet with other ma* is
terials are In steady demand and such
combinations appear in these two hats,
At the top the picturesque shape is
of velvet and plush, the velvet appear
ing on the upper brim and in a wide
flange against the plush facing. The
top crown is of velvet. A wide, hand
faille ribbon is laid in folds
about the side crown and the ends are
Joined at the right of the front Here
odd feather ornament is posed at
equally odd angle. Sprays of fine
leathers, which look like frost-covered
twigs, spring from a big cabochon of
feathers and dance in every breeze
that blows. At the ffeft a ball and tas
sel of silk, fastened against the crown,
give this model more than the usual
allowance of ornament.
The brim in this shape is very ir
regular and the crown la eccentric in
shape but both are made on good and
some
an
an
FRIENDSHIP BRACELET A FAD
Pretty Idea Which at Once Met With
Recognition and Is Spreading
Among Young People.
There is a fad among young people
bracelets.
for so-called "friendship 1
Each of her friends, of either sex, fur
nishes the girl who is starting her
bracelet with one flat link, upon
which his or her initials are engraved.
and short sleeves and is lined with
the poplin. This is used also for the
turnback cuffs and collar and appears
In a piping about the edges of the lit
tle garment. Small pink frogs form '
the single fastening. A girdle is worn
with the dress.
Among other pretty models for the
little miss are full skirts of plaid ma
terial confined at the waist with sev
eral rows of shirring and set onto a
plain belt of the plaid. Wide suspen
ders made also of the plaid material
are set onto the belt. Such skirts are
finished with a plain, three-inch hem
and are only moderately wide. They
over thin blouses made of
are worn
batiste or organdie or other sheer ma
terial. Short top coats or jackets of
plain woolen goods, matching the dom
inant color in the plaid skirt, are worn
Together they make a
with them,
smart looking outfit for the little girl.
Such shapes are not
j becoming Mnes. J
! universally becoming, but when they
do suit the face, they seem made es
pecially for the wearers,
Below is a French sailor with the
brim widened at the left front, which
is an indication of the privilege ac
corded to brim by the mode. They
do all sorts of unexpected things. The
brim is of hattérs' plush faced with
velvet and has a narrow velvet bind
ing. The top crown is soft and of
velvet.
This hat, becoming-to almost every
face, has a band of the new, brilliant
flitter-Jét about the side crown. The
sequins are small and set very thick,
overlapping one another in a mass of
brilliant scales. Two long "feelers'*
spring from a small oblong body of
the flitter-Jet. the little sequins or
spangles extending a little way on
each one. Two of the odd, stiff orna
ments are set at the back—one on
each side of it. The hat would be pret
tier without these, and measured by
the season's standards would be araplj
trimmed,
JULIA BOTTOMLEY.
or have a clasp which the girl herself
has made, with her own initials en
graved upon it.
Many dealers furnish the links from
25 cents up. according to size, mate
rial and weight, engraving the initials
free of charge. If desired, one may
have the links fastened together by
little rings, doing away with the vel
vet band.
• It is believed by the superstitious
that a mole in the hollow of the cheek
^ Quarrelsome disposition

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