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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, January 13, 1916, Image 5

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1916-01-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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FRANK CHANCE BACK IN BASEBALL GAME?
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Frank Chance.
Frank Chance may be back in baseball, though not in the major leagues,
ïf Barney Oldfield, the automobile race driver, can turn two tricks. One is to
Induce Chance to change his mind about retirement. The other is to induce
the holders of stock in the Los Angeles club of the Pacific Coast league to sell
the stock.
Oldfield is after the stock. He has the money to buy it His home now is
ln Los Angeles. He is a baseball fan. Chance and he are close friends. But
it still ip doubtful that the man who won four pennants with the Chicago Cubs
«ould be induced to come back to a sport that brought such bitter disappoint
ment when he tried to make a winner out of the New York Americans.
f
ment when he tried to make a winner out
BOXERS MUST DEFEND TITLE
American Boxing Association Has
•tartsd War on Flghtsrs—Tsd
Lswts Classed as Welter.
' The recently born American Boxing
association has started real war on
title holders who refuse to give the
rising generation a whack at the hon
Acting upon resolutions recently
adopted, it has sent notification to Wil
lie Ritchie that he must defend his
American lightweight championship
by fighting for it within a reasonable
time. If he refuses, or ignores the
edict, the association will pick the
best three or four men in the class
and stage a series of battles to give
the nation a real title holder.
It is the sense of the promoters that
Ritchie, Kid Graves, Mike O'Dowd,
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Ted Lewis.
Soldier Bartfield, Packey McFarland,
Jack Britton and Ted Lewis be classed
as welters. In the case of Ritchie,
Britton and Lewis, the promoters
voted that these men will have to back
op any daims they might make as to
their still being lightweights by meet
ing all comers at the accepted weight
In that class.
In the middleweight class the pro
moters selected Young Aheam, Mike
Gibbons, Jeff Smith, George Chip, Jim
my Clabby and Eddie McGoorty.
In the new flyweight division
Frankie Izzo. Artie Armstrong and
Jimmy Pappas were picked as the
three likeliest lads.
m
at
Last Raoe In England.
The last flat race of the year in
England, the Final Plate, of a mile
and a h*if, at Newmarket recently
resulted In a dead heat between M.
de 8t Alary's six-year-old gelding.
Khedive III, and Lord Derby's good
three-year-old filly, Hesta, with the
Duke of Portland's three-yearold By
third. Racing will be resumed
in the spring. '
Intercity Ten Pin League.
D. J. Sweeney, a veteran bowler of
fit. Louis, is hopeful of organising an
intercity ten pin league in which St
Louis, Omaha, Kansas City, Mo., Chi
cago and Peoria, Des Moines, 8L Jo
seph or Sioux City could compote in
'.weekly contests.
LITTLf PICK®
OT 5P0PT • •
Hockey is simply a new name for it
Just as many crocks are nicked as
when it was called "shinny on your
own side.
• • •
Hank Gowdy expects to do the bulk
of the backstopping for the Braves
next year now that Whaling has been
released.
• • »
The Kansas City Polo club has been
organized, with the idea of populariz
ing the pony polo sport among citi
zens in that city.
* • •
Lung, a full-blooded Chinaman at in
side left on the Columbia university
soccer football team, is one of the
squad's most expert players.
• • •
If there is anything in this "bigger
they come, the harder they fall" dope,
there'll be an awful crash when Fred
Fulton drops. He measures 6 feet 4.
• • •
A dispatch says the golf game in
England iB shot full of holes because
the players have gone to war.
same applies to some of the players.
* • *
Coach Houghton of Harvard says
he is not qualified to name an All
American eleven. He does not pick
them, he Just makes them.
• • *
The
The Courtney rowing No. 2 in the
present Cornell first boat is a
nephew of Coach Courtney. This
year's freshman candidates number
100.
• • •
Chicago's automobile race, set for
June 19 next, will be decreased from
500 miles to 300 miles. The purse for
the race will be $30,000, which will be
split into ten parts.
* * •
The St. Louis Nationals have signed
a one-eyed pitcher as a running mate
for Meadows, the four-eyed hurler.
That puts the club one eye to the
good.
• • *
New York Sun headline:
Eleven Will Be Heavy Loser by
Graduation.'
the Sun evidently did not pass with
Dana. -
Yale
««
The day of humor on
• * *
Umpire Quigley worked in 20 foot
ball games during the season just
closed and has now gone to his home
in St Mary's, Kan., for a rest during
the winter months.
• • •
Harvard university recently manned
20 eight-oared shells with rowing can
didates, while 50 or more oarsmen in
single and double shells also practiced
on the Charles river.
• • •
Cassignol, the best billiard player
in France, and Julius Adorjan, the
Hungarian expert, may visit this
country and participate in matches be
fore the year is over.
• • •
Gilmour Doble, Washington univer
sity coach, whose teams were never
beaten in eleven years, claims he nev
er will taste defeat as long as he
lives. He has quit coaching.
• • •
Coach A1 Sharpe of Cornell univer
sity has a four-year contract to in
struct the Ithaca institution athletes
In football, baseball and basketball. He
has turned out two champion basket
ball teams in three years.
• • •
r Coach Walter Christie, the veteran
Instructor in track athletics at the
University of California, has organ
ised classes for instruction in coach
ing and students' training, at which
there is a large attendance.
Coach Jim Rice of Columbia univer
sity oarsmen says the reoeat tri
umph of his varsity eight over the
Yale-oarew should do much to coun
teract the growing feeling that Eng
lish rowing methods are supérieur to
the American theories of rowing.
COACH SHOWS ABILITY
Doctor Sharpe Picked as Great
est All-Round Athlete.
Physical Director of Michigan Univer
sity Picks Cornell Man as Best
of Sprinters and Gymnasts
In Every Respect
From time to time athletes have
been put forward as the perfect speci
men of all-around athletic ability and
development. Now comes forward one
of the best athletic authorities in the
country. Dr. A. C. May, physical di
rector of the University of Michigan,
to pick a Philadelphian for this honor.
Doctor May, a former Yale man, who
has been rated as a real Mike Mur
phy by those who know athletics,
says that Dr. A1 Sharpe, who now is
the football, baseball and basketball
coach at Cornell university, is the
greatest living all-round athlete to
day. '
"Doctor Sharpe now is coaching
Cornell university it. three major
sports, baseball, boothall and basket
ball, and getting results in all three,
said Doctor May. "He played all of
these games with equal merit, and I
say that he was the greatest basket
ball player I ever saw. He was a
brilliant football player, especially in
the drop-kicking department, and in
baseball he was a wonder,
numerous offers from the Athletics to
play ball In past seasons. He could
pitch and play first base and was an
ambidextrous thrower.
"Look at him once and you will
see the reason for his success. He
is six feet one inch tall and weighs
195 pounds. He is evenly proportioned
and owes his build not to athletics, but
to gymnastics, and he owes his ath
letic success not to his build so much
I
He had
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Dr. AI 8harpe.
as to his ability to handle his body,
which he developed in the gymnasium.
He can handle himself on the bars
and rings and other apparatus with as
much skill as he can play football
and other sports. He can turn a
backward and forward flop and he
knows the other tricks of a gymnast.
"He is fast on his feet still. In
officiating in big college games 1
have seen him outrun some of the
fastest men on the football field, keep
ing with them on their long runs to
the touchdowns. Sharpe could row,
run a fine relay, jump, put the shot,
and, in fact, do about anything on
the athletic field."
Big league company naturally had
its lures for A1 Sharpe, the same as
other men who have made athletics
and the physical man a study. The
colleges of the east looked upon his
work with wistful eyes. Cornell finally
drew the prize. His success with
baseball and basketball made him the
logical candidate to fill Glenn War
ner's shoes with the football squad.
He was given the place, and if per
sistence and the study of man will
win, Sharpe has a bright futur*
ahead.
Cavanaugh Not to Quit.
Frank Cavanaugh, head coach ol
Dartmouth, is now on the first year ol
his second three-year contract, so
that the suggestion made two days
ago that Tom Keady would be offered
the job has not the slightest founds
tion.
Wlllle Hoppe to Play In Hawaii.
William F. Hoppe, the balk line bil
liard champion, will visit the Hawaiian
islands next spring and spend the ear
ly summer months there and on the
Pacific coast. He will be accompanied
by Koji Yamada, the crack Japanese
player.
Danforth Should Halp Sox.
Danforth, the new pitcher secured
from the Louisville club of the Amer
lean association, should help Managet
Rowland to bolster up his slipping
pitching staff next year.
Frisco Tsa to Cross Ocean.
The Olympic club of San Francisco
will send a team of 14 baseball players
to Honolulu, P. L, next February for •
series of games with teams there.
Sorensen Elected Captain.
F. G. Sorensen of Norwood, Ohio,
has been elected captain of the Ohio
State university football team. During
the last season ha played at full back
and left half back.
LEARNED THE LORD'S PRAYER
"Old Charley" Telia How aa a Child
. He Didn't Want To, But Hfa Pappy
"Persuaded" Him.
"Yas, praise de Lord, Ah's a good
Christian," remarked old Charley to
an assemblage of negro children who
had gathered around him on the steps
of the little shingled country church.
"Ah kin say de Lord's Prayer, Ah kin,
clean through, an' Ah been able to
say It eber since Ah wan* no bigger'n
a grasshopper."
"Hones', Uncle Charley, was you
eber as li'l es a grasshopper?" queried
a fat little ypungster.
"Ah sho was, chile, an den's when
mah pappy l'arn me de Lord's Prayer.
Ah wuz a sho 'null hard-headed chile
an' Ah had a pos'tive dlstas'e fo' pray
in'. De preacher, he lay me out from
de pulpit one day, 'cause he done hear
dat Ah des natcherally wouldn' l'arn
de Lord's Prayer. Gosh ter mighty,
how mah pappy done lick me after dat
meetin'! He say he gwine l'arn me
dat prayer ef it took de hide off'n me.
"He might' near done 'at, too. He
go an' git an ol' piece ob trunk strap
an' he take me out on the kitchen
steps an' he say de first line er dat
holy prayer, 'Ouah Father who art in
heaben.' Den he say, 'Charley, say
dem words.' Ah ain't open mah mouf.
Ah tol' you Ah waz hard-headed.
Whack-whew, an' he lay on dat trunk
strap! 'Now say it,' he say, and Ah
say, right smart like, 'Ouah Father
who art in heaben."
"Den he try me on de nex' line, but
Ah ain' goin' say dat neider twell Ah
see de strap cornin' at me. Den Ah
says it real fas', 'Hallowed be thy
name.* We goes through de whole
jfetaway, he sa yin' a line, me
fjden he lickin' an' me sayln'
i Ebne tole me to.
''Ns** day Ah play possum an' hide
in de woods twell nigh on 'bout time
for supper. Den Ah get pow'ful hun
gry an* come home hopin' pappy dis
re member 'bout dat prayin'. But no,
siree—dere he sit on de kitchen steps
with dat strap. He done l'arn me dat
night an' de nex' an de nex* twell
fln'ly Ah could say dat prayer fom
start to finish. Den he l'arn me once
a week after dat, des to keep me recol
lectin' and his arm in practice.
"Now Ah ain* nerer start prayin'
without Ah feels dat strap on mah
back, but Ah sho is glad Ah's a Chris
tian wld de promise ob heaben."—
New York Evening Post
prayi
refi
wat
Woman Grocers.
At the Hammersmith (England)
Trade School for Girls the education
committee has tried the experiment of
holding classes for the Instruction
and training of girls as grocery assist
ants. Up to the present the classes
have been well attended, and they will
be continued as long as not fewer than
25 students wish to take the course.
Practically every student who has
passed through the course has secured
a situation in the grocery trade at
very satisfactory wages. It is hoped
that six courses per yew- will be con
ducted, and in futurw-'STery
will be required to pay a registration
fee of Is. on joining the classes, which
have hitherto been free. It is reported
that among the girls who attend there
is, on the whole, a. low standard of gen
eral education, especially in spelling,
grammar and punctuation. A recom
mendation has, therefore, been made
to the council that a test in English
should be imposed in the case of girls
who do not possess certain qualifica
tions.
student
How Germany Gets Rid of Rats.
German system has been carried out
so far that in most cases it has ceased
to be a matter for remark. But how
many people know all its ramifications
—say, to the extermination of rats,
for Instance? Yet, thanks to this self
same system, there are practically no
rats in Germany, while here in the
United States they do $100,000,000
damage annually.
As soon as rats appear in a building
or other place, if ordinary methods fail
the police are notified of their exist
ence and at once an official is detailed
to exterminate the rodents. So closely
is the matter followed until the effort
is successful that rats are seldom seen.
No charge is made for the services of
the official rat catcher. As a conse
quence, there is little or no market for
rat exterminators or traps in Ger
many.
Gets Wife for Dollar.
Dollar day here drew many shoppers
from about the state, but probably the
shopper who received the most for his
money was Frank Wombacher of Wini
fred, forty years old, who bought a
marriage license for $1 to wed Miss
Jennie Nelson, twenty-six years old,
of Brooklyn, N. Y.
\ They were married by Rev. G. D.
Brown of the Methodist Episcopal
church, who had reduced his official
services to $1 for that day, and after
the ceremony started on a shopping
expedition to pick up dollar bargains
for their new home.—Madison (S. D.)
Dispatch St. Paul Press.
In Clutches of Giant Clam.
Bert Whaling, baseball star, is re
covering his equilibrium after one of
the most narrow escapes anybody
ever boasted. Whaling was picking
abalones, which «re abnormal animals
that stick to rocks. Bert didn't use a
crowbar, as customary, but tried to
pry his game off with a bare hand.
The prey shut down on him as a
turtle would do, and Whaling was
locked firmly to Immovable matter.
Friends arrived to release him just as
the rising tide had given him two or
three nerve-racking showers. — Los
Angeles Times.
Headgear in History.
If we «11 knew the history of head
which is far older than our own,
would doubtless say: "My friend,
this hat, whether radical or extreme,
represents one of the oldest things in
the world. In the palmy days of Rome
all free artisans wore a cone-shaped
hat, which was known as pUens. It
sign of freedom, and when a
slave was freed he hurried to get one.
The Romans generally, except the ar
tisans, who wore the soft hat already
mentioned, draped the fold of the toga
about th* head, which was deemed suf
gear,
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New Leather-Trimmed Suits
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When Paris determines to make use
of a good, common-sense idea in cre
ating the styles for womankind, we
may be sure the idea will be graceful
ly handled. Among the recent impor
tations are leather-trimmed tailored
suits and separate skirts which prom
ise to be entirely successful with
American women, who are keen to ap
preciate the union of utility and beau
ty in their appareL
Among the best examples of the
combination of fabric and leather are
separate skirts made of strong, soft,
woolen plaids, trimmed with a glace
leather, matching the predominating
oolor in the plaid. They are short,
fitted smoothly about the hips, cut
with a moderate flare, and faced up
about the bottom with leather. A belt
of leather and leather pockets, or
leather-trimmed pockets, usually ap
pear as finishing details.
Entire skirts of leather or entire
Jackets of leather followed in the
wake of these first models but are not
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Dressy Frocks for the Difficult Age
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To choose clothes for a girl of
or thereabout, is more of a task
confronts the mother of the very
girl, or presents Itself in clothing
nearly grown miss. « It happens
the child from six to fourteen is
likely to be too thin and, hence, angu
lar and awkward. Sometimes she
considerably too fat. In either
the mother must select styles that
tone down her defects of figure
keep her unconscious of them,
casionally a little girl grows up
out the usual experiences of "the
ward age," and the chances are
she owes much to a judicious'mother
who clothed her artfully.
Up to twelve years simple and
most straight lines are to be recom
mended in the garments of children.
The skirt reaches the knee or a
below it But in th« matter of length
there is very good authority for
tending the skirt several inches below
the knee* especially for the girl
eight. For a slender child a full
walsted blouse and very short skirt
re
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Beetles on Valle.
Writing « very sensible and
tical article entitled "The Comic
Dress," in the Woman's Home
panion, Grace Margaret Gould, fashion
editor of that publication, tells
some
ulous by taking the new styles
applying them to themselves too
ously. Veils worn by some of
women have beetles and bug woven
in .heir meshes and at a little
tance the effect is downright startling.
women make themselves
so well received. While every woman
will see the advantage of a leather
protection for the bottom of a cloth
skirt and the harmony of leather in
troduced in the details of finishing,
all-leather garments are too cumber*
some to be graceful, and there Is no
good reason for making them.
One of the leather-trimmed skirts is
shown in the picture given here. The
leather facing about the bottom is
joined to the cloth by a piping of
leather and the top of the facing is
shaped into very wide and very shal
low scallops. On one of the beet im
portations the leather facing was put
on in four sections and these were
laced together with a silk cord.
Narrow leather bindings finish the
pockets and belt. Skirts of this kind
are cut very short, not reaching below
the tops of high boots, which often
match the leather trim in color.
Never invest in an alligator hide
pocketbook. It's a skin game.
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good style, or the high-waisted
with full flaring skirt. Elbow sleeves
and square-necked patterns look
on her.
Two pretty frocks for the ten-year
old are shown here which will
successful on almost any figure.
is of sapphire-blue chiffon made
one piece with a small bolero of
and embroidery like the chiffon
color. It is finished with a
flounce and worn over a silk slip
the same shade of blue.
The dress of white net is made
the long-walsted style that is always
worn. The blouse is laid in plaits
the shoulder and the full, plain
is finished with a group of narrow
tucks. It does not quite reach
knee and is worn over a fine
petticoat edged with val lace
longer than the skirt by almost
width of the edging.
ten,
than
little
the
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with
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her article, Miss Gould comments
the funny part a veil plays in the
edy of dress:
What can be the idea of a woman
who ties over her face a veil with
huge crawling beetle woven into
What is she thinking of?
wouldn't she scream and shriek if
beetle came to life?"
prac
in
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fashion
how
and
rigor
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woven
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Preserving Them.
"Why don't you use your
Douglass?" "Because I want them
last"—London Punch.
*
"California Syrup of Figs" can't
harm tender stomach,
liver and bowels.
Every mother realizes, after giving
her children "California Syrup of
Figs" that this is their ideal laxative,
because they love its pleasant taste
and it thoroughly cleanses the tender
little ct?-?«ich, liver and bowels with
out griping.
When cross, irritable, feverish, or
breath is bad, stomach sour, look at
the tongue, mother! If coated, give a
teaspoonful of this harmless "fruit
laxative,'' and in a few hours all the
foul, constipated waste, sour bile and
undigested food passes out of the bow
els,,and you have a well, playful child
again. When its little system is full
of cold, throat sore, has stomach-ache,
diarrhoea, indigestion, colic—remem
ber, a good "inside cleaning" should
always be the first treatment given.
Millions of mothers keep "California
Syrup of Figs" handy; they know a
teaspoonful toddy saves a sick child
tomorrow. Ask at the store for a 50
cent bottle of "California Syrup of
Figs," which has directions for babies,
children of all ages and grown-ups
printed on the bottle. Adv.
War 8pares the De Reszkes.
Jean de Reszke has written to a
friend in this city he has news from
his native Poland to the effect that
his properties have not suffered very
much from the war and in their pro
vince complete calm reigns. He says
that while his brother Edouard has
suffered from rheumatism he is now
beginning to mend. He also wishes
to thank his American friends for
their interest and sympathy, and adds
that he has resumed his teaching of
singing in Paris.
in
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COULDN'T DO
HER WORK
Says Condition Was So Serions
Little Daughter Had to Take
Charge of Work, But
Cardui Helped.
Burbank, Fla.—"About a year and a
half ago," writes Mrs. Florence Rog
ers of this place. "I had got in very bad
health. Everything was wrong. I
couldn't eat anything that didn't make
me suffer. . . . My limbs also gave
me great pain and the pains in the
limbs extending down to the knees. I
too had awful pains in the back and
was very thin and run-down in health r
also, I had pains in the chest and
stomach—was terribly nervous. Every
thing would startle me. . . .
An acquaintance told me of the
great benefit she had received from
Cardui. ... so I thought I would
try it Inasmuch as I was in so serious
a condition. I was so bad off I couldn't
do my work. The little daughter had
to take charge of the work, and I could
hardly walk. . . .
I began using Cardui, and in about a
week I felt much improved. ... I
got better right along, after taking the
Cardui, getting better every day. In
about two weeks after taking the
Cardui, I was able to do all my work
except the washing. ... In a month
more, I could do all my work, the
washing too. . . .
I have found it a great remedy and
boon for women."
Ladies! Take Cardui for your trou
bles. For sale by all druggists.
hide
]
Object Matrimony.
"So you don't believe in advertising,
eh?" scornfully remarked the up-to
date business man.
"No, I don't," Insisted his sad-eyed
neighbor. "I got my wife that way."—
Judge.
GIRLS! GIRLS! TRY IT,
BEAUTIFY YOUR HAIR
Make It Thiek, Glossy, Wavy, Luxur
iant and Remove Dandruff—Real
Surprise for You.
ft#
Your hair becomes light, wavy, fluf
fy, abundant and appears as soft, lus
trous and beautiful as a young girl's
after a "Danderine hair cleanse." Just
try this—moisten a cloth with a little
Danderine and carefully draw it
through your hair, taking one small
strand at a time This will clearifee
the hair of dust, dirt and excessive oil
and in just a few moments you have
doubled the beauty of your hair.
Besides beautifying the hair at once,
Danderine dissolves every particle of
dandruff; cleanses, purifies and invig
orates the scalp, forever stopping itch
ing and falling hair.
But what will please you most
be after a few weeks' use when you
will actually see new hair-line and
downy at first—yes—but really new
hair—growing all over the scalp. If
you care for pretty, soft hair and lots
of It, surely get a 25 cent bottle of
Knowlton's Danderine from any store
and just try it Adv.
well
One
in
net
in
in
in
on
skirt
the
lawn
and
the
A friend will always laugh at your
jokes, be they good or bad, but there
is a great deal in the way he does iL
Hot Gray Bain bat Ttrod *y«s
make us look older than we are. Keep
your Eye« young and you will look young.
After the Movies Murine Tour Bye«. Don't
tell your age. Murine Eye Remedy Co..
Chicago. Sends Bye Book on request.
on
com
a
it?
th*
We all admire a man who keeps
things to himself, until we want to
borrow something.
And
A HINT TO WISE WOMEN.
Don't «offer torture when all female
troubles will vanish in thin air after using
Femeoina." Price $oc and Ix.oe.—Adv.
to
• «
Indulgent mothers are those who
permit their children to annoy othom,

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