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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, January 27, 1916, Image 6

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

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1
Far sick headache, bad breath,
Sour Stomach and
constipation.
Got & 10-eent box now.
No odds how bad your liver, stomach
or bowels; how much your head
aches, how miserable and uncomfort
able you are from constipation, indiges
tion, biliousness and sluggish bowels
—you always get the desired results
with Cascarets.
Don't let your stomach, liver and
bowels make you miserable. Take
Cascarets to-night; put an end to the
headache, biliousness, dizziness, nerv
ousness, sick, sour, gassy stomach,
backache and all other distress;
cleanse your inside organs of all the
bile, gases and constipated matter
which is producing the misery.
A 10-cent box means health, happi
ness and a clear head for months.
No more days of gloom and distress
If you will take a Cascaret now and
then. All stores sell Cascarets. Don't
forget the children—their little in
sides need a cleansing, too. Adv.
Irvin Cohb, looking over an Atlantic I
City paper when he was there for the |
trial performance of
Censors on the Seashore.
reminded of the fact that the sea- I
Back Home,
was
shore papers are as careful never to I
mention a drowning as a San Francisco
is to avoid mention of earth- |
paper
quakes, relates the Philadelphia Rec- I
ord, and he told of finding one day the
following sentence in a story evidently
doctored by the censors:
"Mr. So-and-So died of shock, in shal
His body was not recov
low water,
ered."
_ J C* I
Coüldn t Sleep FOUT ând rivi |
Nights at a Time, and
Couldn't Sit Up.
RUN DOWN
IN HEALTH
so terribly run-down in health that I
was worried about myself. I had great
weakness, back and headache, ... and
auffered terrible pains In my abdo-1
.. I could not sleep four and five
Asheville, N. C.—Mrs. Delia Buck*
of R. F. D. 5, this place, writes:
ner,
"Last winter I got so very bad off and
men.
nights at a time and I couldn't sit up.
1 was almost at death's door. Dr.
; «aid he didn't think I'd he strong again
1 unless I should have the operation.
One of my neighbors suggested my
taking Cardui, and after taking the
first bottle I was better. After the
«econd, I was able to do my washing,
though I had not been before, and was
getting along fine all winter, in better
health and felt better than I had for
six years, and had taken five or six
bottles and was a well woman...
<4
bottles and was a
"It's the best medicine that was ever
made for women. 1 tell my neighbors
about it and they try it, and when they
do, they all acknowledge that it does
them more good than anything.
If you suffer from any of the ail
ments so common to women, try
Cardui, the woman's tonic. For sale
by all druggists.
»9
Getting Her Right.
"I do wish you would quit dabbling
in politics," said Mr. Twobble, fret
fully.
ED
"My dear," answered Mr. Twobble
in his most dignified manner, "I would
have you understand that I don't dab
ble in politics.
"No?"
"When a man is up to his neck in
anything he may splash, but he never
dabbles." \
Is
»»
SAGE TEA AND SULPHUR
DARKENS YOUR GRAY HAIR
Look Years Younger! Try Grandma's
Recipe of Sage and Sulphur and
Nobody Will Know.
Almost everyone knows that Sage
Tea and Sulphur, properly compound
ed, brings hack the natjiral color and
lustre to the hair when faded, streaked
or gray; also ends dandruff, itching
Years
scalp and stops falling hair,
ago the only way to get this mixture
to make it at home, which Is
mussy and troublesome.
Nowadays we simply ask at any
drug store for "Wyeth's Sage and Sul
You will get a
was
phur Hair Remedy,
large bottle for about 50 cents. Every
body uses this old, famous recipe, be
one can possibly tell that
darkened your hair, as It does it
naturally and evenly. You dampen
soft brush with it and
cause no
you
so
a sponge or
draw this through your hair, taking
small strand at a time; by morn
one
ing the gray hair disappears, and
after another application or two, your
hair becomes beautifully dark, thick
and glossy and you look years younger
— Adv.
"Some of the exhibitors at the poul- I
try show will get their decisions like
a baseball player."
' "How so?"
"They'll win on a fowl.
The Idea.
Dm BKartae after Rx»ee«e I» OaM.
Cutting Winds and Dust. It RMtores,
Refreshes and J >rom o* < " cira
Good for all Ryes that Need Cara.
Murine Eye Remedy Co., Chicago»
Sands Eye Book on request.
Russian petroleum producers are ex
periencing much inconvenience from l
scarcity of steel wire rope.
Dr. Pierce's Pellet* ere best for liver#
bowels and stomach. One little P*h®t
a laxative—three for a cathartic.—Adv.
Faint heart may win fair lady— with
a little assistance on her part.
TOMMY MURPHY, NEW KING OF REINSMEN
*
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New King of Relnamen and Peter Scott.
(By FRANK G. MENKE.)
Tommy Murphy has supplanted
"Pop" Geers as "The King of Reins
men'' by his wonderful achievements
during the 1915 trotting season.
Murphy, by winning $116,686 this
year eclipsed the $116,370 record es
tablished in 1902 by Geers, and inci
dentally he set a mark for single sea
8 on harness earnings that never may
be equaled,
of his winnings, Murphy secured
$107,336 in regular purse events and
only $9,250 in special match races,
Geers, in 1902, won $66,370 in regular
races. The other money came when
he piloted Lord Derby, 2:05%, to vic
tory over Boralma, 2:06, in a $50,000
match race in Hartford.
Murphy's phenomenal success on
the turf during the past season was
not surprising—nor was there the
slightest element of fluke about it. For
many years he has ranked among the
greatest reinsmen in the world, and
this year he jumped to the fore as
<he peer of them all.
Murphy's winnings in 1914 went
above the 1100,000 mark. His earn
i n g S for the seven-year period from
1909 to 1915 Inclusive, reach the amaz
ing total of $548,588, an average of
nearly $80,000 a year.
Murphy's greatest coup this season
was in San Francisco where he gath
ered in $26,2Q0 during the campaign
there. His next best winning was in
Lexington, Ky., where he won $14,470.
At Columbus he won $13,170, while in
gy^^e he took unto himself $9,027.
jjj 8 smallest winning was at Youngs
town, Ohio, where he earned $500 dur
j n g the "minor league" meet.
WORLD'S BEST ONE-MILE RECORDS
AT ALL THE WAYS OF GOING
Date.
Place.
Holder.
B. B. Kieraan.. Sydney, An«
,G. Camming:«... Manchester, Eng....Ang. 4, 1918
.Thame« Rlv., Eng. ..Apr. S3. 1891
Harlem Rlv.. N. Y....8ept. 2, 1901
Aug. 23, 1886
Krent.
Min. Sec.
28:16 4-5—Swimming:
6:22 —Walking ..
4:45 —Rowing (with tide)..Geo. Buber
4:30% —Malta 8-oar crew.
4:12% —Banning (prof.) . W. G. George.. .Lillie Bge., Eng
Norm. Faber.... Cambridge, Maes. ...July 16, 1915
Feb. 11. 1909
2:32 —Roller »k'g (b'k t'n«) .Henry Baker.... Rlvervlew P'k, Chi.Jan., 1908
—lee »k'g (with wind) .Noral Baptle... .Minnetonka, Minn...Dee. 29, 1898
.Oct. 8, 1912
Sept. 8. 1900
May 4, 1905
4:12 3-5—Running (ama.)
2:46 3-5—Roller «k'g (It fir)... Rod Peter«
Pittsburgh. Pa
2:06
Lexington, Ky
St. Paul, Minn
Lexington, Ky.Oct. 9, 1913
Chicago, HL
Los Angeles, Cal....Jane 27, 1909
—Trotting (to salky) ... Chian
—Pacing (to sulky).... Dan Patch
1:58
1:55
1:54% —Trotting, hitch, r. m.. Uhlan
1:35% —Running horse
—Bicycle (paced)
_Motor boat .Disturber IT.... Monm'th Pk., N. J. ..Aug. 27, 1915
..Feb. 7, 1910
.Dec. 30, 1912
Sept. 29, 1913
.Apr. 23, 1911
..Oct. 22, 1914
Ang. 28, 1890
Salvator
Ray Oner
1:06
0:56
0:41% —lee boat
—Motorcycle .....L. Hum 1st on.
M. Prévost. ..
0:25 2-6—Automobile (st'way) Bob Burnham
0:24 4-5—Home trainer, rol'r.. Jesele Stalter... .Milwaukee, Wls.
The Dutchman.. Madison, Wls....
.Los Angeles, Cal
Reims, France...
Daytonna, Fla..
0:36
0:28 3-8—Aeroplane .
ED CORRIGAN SEEKING A JOB
Former Master of Hawthorne Is Ap
plicant for Position as Secretary
at Kentucky Track.
Ed Corrigan, the veteran horseman,
Is applicant for the position of secre
tary at one of the Kentucky tracks.
"His popularity," comments a Ken
M
pi;
m.
?
Ed Corrigan.
tucky writer, "will probably land him
the position."
In his heyday as "Master of Haw
thorne." Corrigan was fully as popu
lar as a diamond-back rattler at a
garden party.
However, the old war eagle's featb
I ers are moking now, and he may
paeem a robin red breast, instead of a
bird of prey.
"Cactus" Cravath Shy a Run.
"Cactus" Cravath, the Phillies' hard
hitting outfielder, fell one home run
shy of equaling the major league rec
ord of 25 circuit drives, established by
"Buck" Freeman, in 1899. when a mem
ber of the Washington club.
Plank Waa Best Fed Pitcher.
Eddie Plank, a former member of
the Philadelphia Athletics, won 21
games and lost 11 with the St. Louis
Federal league team last season,
which was the best record made by a
pitcher in that league
Murphy's great record this year was
made possible by the fact that he
piloted the racing sensation of the
year—Peter Scott, 2:05*4 —owned by
Henry Oliver of Pittsburgh.
During the 1915 season Peter Scott
the startling sum of $50,335 for
won
his driver and owner. In San Fran
cisco the great trotting stallion made
his best showing, winning $14,250. On
the Grand Circuit the best Peter Scott
winning was $6,000 at Columbus, Ohio.
The poorest record turned in by the
horse was from the North Randall.
Ohio, track, where he won only $1,285
during the meet.
The greatest winning ever made by
a harness horse in one season was by
Lord Derby in 1902 when his total
reached $57,625. However, only $7,625
was won in regular purse events, the
other $50,000 coming through the me
dium of that Boralma match race. I,
Peter Scott's record made this year is
the next best, and all of it was won
in regular events. Baden, 2:05%, won
$35,700 in 1912 and all of it was m
regular events.
Here is a table showing how Mur
phy made his record earnings this
year:
Youngstown, O.
North Randall, O....
Detroit, Mich.
Kalamazoo, Mich. ..
Grand Rapids, Mich.
North Randall, O....
Montreal, P Q.
New York City .
Hartford, Conn.
Syracuse, N. Y.
Columbus. O. ..
AUentovfti, Pa. .
Lexington, Ky.
San Francisco, Cal.
Total ...
$ 500
5.880
6,450
7,350
5,300
3,000
7,720
5 , 218 %
S.f.50
9 . 027 %
13,170
4,250
. 14.470
. 26,200
.$ 116,586
I
NOT DEFEATED IN YEARS
University of Washington Football
Team Makes Unique Record Un
der Coaching of Dohle.
Eastern critics will probably credit
the marvelous record of Gilmour Dobie
of the University of Washington, now |
that the far West ha3 proved conclu
sively that it classes with the East
in football.
The Oregon Aggies, who beat the
Michigan Aggies, conquerors of Michi
gan by a one-sided score, are rated as |
's second-class team on the Pacific
coast, having been beaten, 29 to 0,
by the Washington State college, I
which is coached by John Deitz, bet- |
ter known as Lonestar, the former
Carlisle Indian star.
Washington State is not considered I
the equal of the University of Wash-1
ington, which has not been beaten dur
ing the eight years Dohie has coached.
Dobie has made the marvelous rec-1
ord of never having '~st a game in |
the. ten years he has been coaching
football.
Dates for Indoor Events.
Georgetown university will hold its
annual indoor track and field sports
in Washington, D. C., on Saturday, |
February 19,1916. The annual events I
of the Boston Athletic association will |
be held in the Mechanics' hall in that
city February 5. The latter will be
handicap events.
Yanks and Giants to Play.
The New York National and Ameri
can league clubs announce that a se
ries of three games will be played at I
the Polo grounds April 7, 8 and 10
next. This is the first spring series
ever scheduled by the New York clubs.
a
Tax on Horse Racing.
New Zealand horse racing clubs
have decided to devpte their profits
to the war, while in order to obtain
extra revenue the government has
placed a tax of 2% per cent upon the
total receipts.
Jack Nw Ha * n ' t ** um P* d '
of Ness hasnt jumped to any
Feds that he knows of. He has ac
cepted the contract offered him by the
Chicago White Sox, the only conten
tion having been over a zaatter of
transportation. »
a
LOVES BILLIARD GAME
Noted Player Also Has Decided
Inclination to Painting.
Ora Mornlngstar Has Never Used His
Artistic Ability as a Source of '
Revenue—Has Originality In
His Methods.
Ora Mornlngstar, until recently
widely known as one of the foremost
billiard players of the world, was un
certain for many years as to the pro
fession he would choose,
toss-up between billiards and painting,
and his inclination was decidedly to
wards the artistic career. The result
has been somewhat of a compromise,
for while Mornlngstar is famous as a
billiard player he is al30 closely
wedded to painting. About a year ago
Mornlngstar was compelled to seek a
more congenial climate for his wife,
who was in very poor health and lo
cated in Arizona. This wonderful cue
artist is never happier than when at
his easel. His real genius lies in the
creation of landscapes in oil, and some
of his best works have received much
favorable comment at art exhibitions.
Mornlngstar has never used his artis
tic ability as a source of revenue. He
paints for the love of the work, and
his pictures adorn the walls of the
homes of many of his friends to whom
he has presented them. He may be
said to belong to the modern school.
There is originality in his methods.
During the summer of 1914 this ver
satile gentleman made a number of
beautiful sketches along with those
two celebrated artists, M. B. Leisser
and Richard Swartzwelder. Each suc
ceeded- in obtaining several excellent
It was a
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Ora Mornlngstar.
subjects, which will undoubtedly in
crease their fame ae artists.
It was by chance that Mornlngstar
became a billiard player. Early in life
he obtained employment in the bil
liard hall of Maurice Daly in New
York. Being thrown into such close
association with the game he devel
oped an unusual ability with the cue
and attracted wide attention in New
York.
He was soon recognized as cham
pionship caliber, and more than once
has held the 18.1 and 18.2 titles of the
balkline game.
His open table play made him
master of the pew style game of 14.1.
Billiards is more of a reality to him
than art, although he loves art the
I INTERESTING
SPODT •
PARAGRAPHS
| tling class. Surest thing you know,
| ried over peace.
I from a list of 59 players for next
| year,
I er in good trim and a fighter trimmed
good,
a tough start for the Senators next
| spring,
Penn State has a Nutt in its wres
*
President Comiskey says he doesn't
want Ed Konetchy.
Johnny Evers says he is not wor
Fielder Jones is to have his pick
»
»
There's a difference between a flght
• *
Clarke Griffith is looking forward
• • •
A1 Palzer no longer has any ex
cuse for living,
knocked him out in one round.
• • •
Andre Anderson
| ing in stage money.
Baseball peace will mean a big sav*
There won't be
I any Fed league magnates to raise mil
| lion-dollar war funds,
If we hadn't all of us been faked
death on baseball, an interesting con
troversy might be started over who
won the war.
I Vesuvius, Belasco, Shakespeare, Hops,
Courtney, Ty Cobb, the dictionary and
Lady Eglantine,
Great producers: Hoppe, Haughton
*
A golf course has been opened
Buenos Aires and the professional
allowed to charge $3 for playing
single round. Plumber prices.
• • •
Joe Tinker has his eye on Heine
Groh, the Red second-sacker, believ
ing the little German would be just
the man to round out his Cub
field.
s • •
O'Hara, former Giant outfielder,
in the British aviation corps. Several
pitchers we might« mention woulo
make good aviators. They are in
'
MILITARY AND CIVIC PARADE
FEATURES OF THE INAU
GURATION.
CAPITAL CITY IS THRONGED
Legislators and Citizens Join in the
Celebration—Chief Justice Smith
of Mississippi Supreme Court
Administers the Oath.
—Jackson.
It Id now Gov. Bilbo of Mississippi,
and as such the distinguished young
man from Pearl River county since
noon of Jan. 18 stands solemnly, con
stitutionally and formally proclaimed.
The inauguration ceremonies, as map
ped out weeks ago were carried out as
far as it was possible In view of the
inclement weather.
With a parade including civilians
and military, officials and aides to the
new governor, the actual formality
escorting the governor-elect to the
capitol was carried out. Fully 800 en
listed men were In line, added
which was the cadet corps from Mis
sissippi A. & M. College, two military
bands and additional musicians from
different towns, notably that from
loxi, with 30 pieces.
Owing to the raw weather, after the
parade had reached the capitol and
those in charge had consulted togeth
er, It was decided to abanon the open
air proceedings and adjourn indoors
the hall of representatives. The scene
was brilliant and impressive, with
floor and galleries swarming with
men and women.
Standing on the rostrum and before
a thousand pairs of eyes, Theodore
Gilmore Bilbo took the oath of office
administered by Chief Justice Sid
ney M. Smith after a fervent invoca
tion by Rev. H. M. King, pastor of the
Second Baptist Church of Jackson.
While this formality was in progress
hundred young men of Jackson were
engaged in hoisting the mammoth flag
from Canton, O., to the space selected,
draping it about the dome of the build
ing, where it was admired by thou
sands who stood and beheld.
The introductory address of Mayor
S. J. Taylor was impressive and was
interrupted by bursts of applause,
the greatest wave of enthusiasm was
manifested when Gov. Bilbo arose
from his seat beside his father,
pressive and venerable looking, with
his patriarchal snowy beard, and
his carefully prepared address.
as
gan
The retiring governor, Earl Brewer,
who about two years ago directed
prosecution of Mr. Bilbo .on charges
bribery, of which Bilbo was acquitted,
took no part in his successor's inau
took no part in
a
guratlon.
Official Changes.
There were a few changes on the
second floor in the auditor's and treat*
urer's offices, the new heads taking
charge and designating their assist
ants.
In the auditor's department Auditor
Wilson announced as his staff W. J.
Miller as deputy and Frank C. Nelson,
Yancey D. Lott, Wirt Johnson and R.
G. Wilson as clerks.
In the revenue agent's departmenl
Stokes V. Robertson succeeded J. C.
Johnstone in charge, and was busy get
ting his bearings. Robertson has de
clared that if the Legislature sees Ht
to put his office on a salary basis he
will offer no protest, but will discharge
the duties just the same as though a
big fee account showed behind every
action, or every old account recovered
to the state or any county of the state.
Miss Gertrude Butler, who for the
past four years has been confldinetial
clerk to the governor and a most com
petent and painstaking young lady,
left for Clarksdale, where she will re
sume her former position as stenogra
pher and clerk to Earl Brewer, attor
and counselor-atlaw, who will re
his practice and home in that
ney
sume
city.
Lieutenant Governor Russell took
the office at the noon hour, succeed
ing Governor-elect Bilbo, who was a
private citizen for 24 hours.
Successor to S. A. Witherspoon.
Washington.—Judge W. W. Venable,
successor to the late Representative S.
A. Witherspoon of Mississippi, repre
senting the Fifth District of Missis
sippi. was sworn in as a member of
the House. Considerable national in
terest has been shown in Judge Vena
ble's election, ts it is shown to be the
result of a direct issue in the prepared
ness issue. He opposed the little navy
principles of his predecessor, while
Representative Witherspoon's secre
tary ran for the seat in Congress on
exactly the same ideas as those held
by his former chief.
Governor Brewer, whose term ended
at noon Jan. 18, sent in his final mes
sages. One message suggests the re
pair of the old capitol building, an
other gives account of contingent fund
expenditures, and the third asks re
imbursement of the $14,000 deficit in
the Panama-Pacific Exposition fund.
A flood of bills was introduced in
both branches of the Legislature, cov
ering a wide variety of topics.
Speaker Conner announced the ap
pointment of a number of standing
committees in the House, completing
the list of committee assignments for
that body. , __
All the minor State officials took
the oath and entered upon the dis
charge of their duties.
Leaders in thë""ëdücational work of
the state and of the Mississippi Teach
ers' Association will watch with atten
tive interest a bill which is pending
in the Legislature which proposes to
empower the state board of examiners
to recognise and accept as credentials
diplomas from the normal depart
ments of the higher educational insti
tutions in the State of Mississippi or
tc
ex
sav*
be
mil
to
con
who
and
in
is
a
just
in
la
the
WOULD REFORM TAX SYSTEM
New Governor Believes Taxation Not
Uniform—Characterizes Whole
System As Inconsistent.
In his Inaugural addreäB to the legis
lature and the people of his state Gov.
Bilbo, In plain, bold speech fairly take3
the cover off, in order to paint with
emphasis what he considers the most
defective point in the whole govern
mental system of the state, which is
its taxation and fiscal system gener
ally. He exposes or emphatically
states the inequalites of the whole
taxation and revenue, and declares
that, the constitutional mandate to
the contrary, taxation is "not uniform
and equal," and the whole system he
characterizes as altogether inconsist
ent and reprehensible.
He declared, with positiveness, that
so long as he remains governor he
will not sign an appropriation meas
ure which will carry the disburse
ments beyond the revenue. He as em
phatically inveighs against the policy
which has prevailed of "borrowing
money for current expenses of govern
ment, as has been the custom for the
past ten years," and insists that "nei
ther should the tax levy be increased."
He argued for a more modern, adapt
able and uniform system of levying of
assessments for taxation purposes, and
shows the absurdity of trying to go for
ward under the present system. He
comes out squarely for a constitutional
convention, as the best and most direct
means of remedying the present de
fects, pointing out that after'a quarter
of a century of service the constitu
tion of 1890 in this day and generation
has become obsolete.
The address of the new governor Is
a strong state paper, in which not only
are conditions stated, but methods of
improvement and remedy are stated
with emphasis and clarity of expres
sion, which will, at any rate, invite
thought and no doubt provoke discus
sion.
the
young
since
con
map
as
the
the
of
the
en
to
Mis
from
Bi
the
and
togeth
open
to
scene
with
with
«
before
office
Sid
invoca
the
a
were
flag
build
thou
Mayor
was
but
was
arose
im
with
be
CONTEST FOR TRUSTEE.
Montgomery and Hall Both Claim
Right to the Office.
There were no more fresh develop
ments in the situation caused by the
disqualification of W. A. Montgomery
as prison trustee from the First Dis
trict, by Gov. Brewer, and his eleventh
hour appointment in CoL Montgom
ery's stead of J. Peyton Hall of Jack
son to the position, which the governor
held was vacant. Both Col. Montgom
ery and Mr. Hall hold commissions,
the one signed by the incoming gov
ernor, literally and physically "in sight
of all the people," and the other by the
outgoing executive, within an hour of
the expiration of his own commission
Col. Montgomery claims the office tc
be his by right of election, and does
not take kindly to the intervention of
such a little obstacle as a constitution
al and statutory barrier, and does not
believe that he owes the state any
money, notwithstanding the court's
agreed judgment against him. He has
already entered upon his duties and at
the very time that the commission to
Mr. Hall was issued he was looking
Brewer,
the
of
inau
after
leagues.
Mr. Hall meanwhile is quietly pur
suing the even tenor of his ordinary
rounds of commercial activity, and
preparing to take the field, though it Is
apparent that it will be necessary to
invoke the civil court before the mixup
Is settled. So far as could he learned,
no steps ahd as yet been Initiated in the
courts, and just what shape this will
take, whether by injunction, mandamus
or quo warranto, is not stated.
a
Stribbling For Congress.
Senator W. P. Stribbling of Lowndes
county is being congratulated by his
legislative colleagues upon his report
ed determination to announce as a
candidate for congress from the First
Mississippi district. Senator Strib
bling is a native of Itawamba county,
but has lived and practiced his profes
sion in Lowndes for a number of years,
and is well known throughout every
county. He realizes that he will have
to pit himself against "Zeke" Candler,
one of the strongest and most popular
men in the First district.
It is expected that the campaign will
open up early this year.
a
Bilbo Goes To Work.
The Bilbo gubernatorial administra*
tion, after the pomp, formality and ob
servance of the amenities of inaugu
ration, got down to its first taste of
official life.
When Gov. Bilbo entered the execu
tive department on the morning of Jan.
19, It was to find Private Secretary
Buck keeping the crowd of first-hand
callers entertained, pending the ar
rival of the governor, and the counte
hance of the young governor was beam
ing with good nature, while his greet
ing was just as hearty and outspoken
when he was "just Bilbo," as on#
of his callers expresed it.
S.
of
in
on
re
re
in
in
ap
for
of
to
or
as
Before leaving the department for
the last time. Gov. Brewer, with the as.
sistance of his office 3taff, had cleared
the tables and desks, and the new gov
found everything in first rate
ernor
order, as had been the case when he
entered the executive mansion a few
days ago.
Gov. Bilbo realizes that the eyes of
the state are upon him, and has pledg
ed himself to "make Mississippi the
best governor she ever had," and he
has already Bhown that h,e is ready
and anxious to sidestep factional lines
and be the governor of all the people.
Woman Burns To Death.
Grenada.—With her body horribly
burned and the bed on which she had
been sleeping charred, Miss Settle Ai
ken, aged 70 years, was found dead in
her room by Mrs. W. S. Tomlinson of
this place, with whom she roomed.
When Mrs. Tomlinson opened the room
door late in the morning Miss Aiken's
body was found lying in the middle of
Just how the tragedy oc
curred and how Miss Aiken's clothing
came to catch fire is a mystery.
the floor.
Get the Habit of
Drinking Hot Water
Before Breakfast
Says we can't look or feel right
with the system full
of poisons.
Ily
Millions of folks bathe inte
now instead of loading their system
What's an inside bath?"
Well, it is guaranteed to per
with drugs,
you say.
form miracles if you could believe
these hot water enthusiasts.
There are vast numbers of men and
women who, immediately upon arising
in the morning, drink a glass of real
hot water with a teaspoonful of lime
stone phosphate in it. This is a very
excellent health measure. It is in
tended to flush the stomach, liver, kid
neys and the thirty feet of intestines
of the previous day's waste, sour bile
and indigestible material left over in
the body which, if not eliminated every
day, become food for the millions of
bacteria which infest the bowels, the
quick result is poisons and toxins
which are then absorbed into the
blood Causing headache, bilious at
tacks, foul breath, bad taste, colds,
stomach trouble, kidney misery, sleep
lessness, impure blood and all sorts
of ailments.
People who feel good one day and
badly the next, but who simply can
not get feeling right are urged to ob
tain a quarter pound of limestone
phosphate from any druggist or store
keeper. This will cost very little but
is sufficient to make anyone a real
crank on the subject of internal sani
tation.
Just as soap and hot water act on
the skin, cleansing, sweetening and
freshening, so limestone phosphate
and hot water act on the stomach,
liver, kidneys and bowels. It is vast
ly more important to bathe on the in
side than on the outside, because the
skin pores do not absorb impurities in
to the blood, while the bowel pores do.
—Adv.
No Laughing Matter.
"I suppose you read the newspapers
to keep informed of world events?"
"Yes, for the most part," answered
the thoughtful man.
I read them for the sake of a good
But occasionally
laugh. 1
"How Is that?"
"I find a great deal of unconscious
humor in those diplomatic notes."
THICK, GLOSSY ill
tc
does
of
not
any
has
at
to
col
pur
and
Is
to
the
will
Girls! Beautify Your Hair! Make It
Soft, Fiuffy and Luxuriant—Try
the Moist Cloth.
Try as you will, after an application
of Danderine, you cannot find a single
trace
your
please you moÿt. will be after a few
weeks' use, when you see new hair,
fine and downy at first—yes—but real
ly new hair—growing all over the
scalp.
A little Danderine immediately dou
bles the beauty of your hair. No differ
how dull, faded, brittle and
, just moisten a cloth with
Danderine and carefully draw it
through your hair, taking one small
strand at a time,
mediate and amazing—your hair will
be light, fluffy and wavy, and have an
appearance of abundance; an incom
parable luster, softness and luxuri
ance, the beauty and shimmer of true
hair health.
Get a 25 cent bottle of Kuowlton's
Danderine from any store and prove
that your hair is as pretty and soft
as any—that it has been neglected or
injured by careless treatment—that'«
all. Adv.
of dandruff or falling hair and
scalp will not itch, but what will
ence
scraggy,
The effect is im
his
a
First
Strib
years,
every
have
will
Foiled.
"Tompkins was around trying to
borrow • money today. I thought he
married a widow with three or four
millions."
"He did, and then discovered to his
sorrow that she intended to keep
them."
SWAMP-ROOT STOPS
SERIOUS BACKACHE
ob
of
execu
Jan.
ar
beam
greet
on#
When your back aches, and your blad
der and kidneys seem to be disordered,
member it is needless to suffer—go to your
nearest drug store and get a bottle of Dr.
Kilmer's Swamp-Root. It is a physician's
prescription for diseases of the kidneys
and bladder.
It has stood the test of years and has
a reputation for quickly and effectively
giving results in thousands of cases.
This prescription was used by Dr. Kil
mer in his private practice and was
-very effective that it has been placed
•ale everywhere. Get a bottle, 50c and
$1.00, at your nearest druggist.
However, if you wish first to test this
great preparation send ten cents to Dr.
Kilmer & Co., Binghamton, N. Y., for
sample bottle. When writing be sure and
mention this paper.—Adv.
for
as.
gov
rate
Preparedness.
"Well, Johnny, did you make any
good resolutions for the New Year?"
"Yes, mother. I resolved to take
boxing lessons so I can learn to lick
that boy next door."
he
few
of
pledg
the
he
ready
lines
people.
DEATH LURKS IN A WEAK HEART
ao on first symptoms use ''Renovine'
and be cured. Delay and pay the awful
penalty. "Renovlne" is the heart's
remedy. Price $1.00 and 50c.-—Adv.
Felly.
"The men didn't talk. They're just
as foolish about clothes as the women
are."
had
Ai
in
of
room
of
oc
More so. The poor simps pay
the clothes the women are wearing."
Ec-Zene Kills Eczema.
Let us prove it. Accept no substitute.
▼our Druggist does not have it, writs
Ec-Zene C o., St. Paul, Minn,—A dv.
Men in Switzerland are liable
the of

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